35 Burst results for "Business Analyst"

"business analyst" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

04:48 min | 11 months ago

"business analyst" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Business analyst Joe Appreciate your time. Good morning. Good morning. How are you, sir? I'm doing well. I'm noticing that Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, though. The United States of America had over 20,000 per day, Extra added to the rolls of people getting covid 19 does does that raise any flags there on Wall Street or order investors, you know? Yeah. Interestingly, Janet Yellen, who is the Treasury secretary, pointed out something that I think a lot of economists had. Maybe thought was not a big issue, but now it's becoming a big issue. And that is that if there is a spike in this disease again in this in this process, whether it's here in the United States or elsewhere in the globe, it could Slow down the recovery. We are not going back to where we were 15 months ago. I want to be clear about that. But if you have places in the U. S, and you have places around the world that are having problems just in terms of managing This crisis or seeing spikes. That is a problem for everyone. So what? One economist said To me a spike in cases somewhere else is a spike in cases for all of us. Alright, indeed. Let's keep with a little bit of how covid impacted the airline industry. The good news, Speaking on CBS Face the Nation, Scott Kirby Said. Leisure travel is more than 100% recovered, but business travel taking longer to catch up to pre pandemic levels. Will it ever catch up, given the fact that so many people can work from home? Zoom, etcetera. Do you think that we have a significant change or we're going to get back in the office space here hurt someone? Well, I'm going to give you a little like internal and then sort of the big picture. The internal is, for example, I have a very dear friend of mine who Traveled quite a bit for work. I would say that she was on a plane. Let's call it at least a week. Every month. You know, at least 12 times, maybe 15 times a year, she would travel and her boss told her at the end of June, just to make sure you understand this. We are not traveling in that way. You should plan for four business trips in 2022. Now that's a big difference, right? I mean from 12 or 15 down to four. Now that said, I think that things change kind of rapidly. I'm hearing from investment bankers on Wall Street who say you know what our bosses are telling us to get back on planes and go see our clients. The real question is, do the clients want to see them? You know, it's like a very interesting thing. You may say. I want face time with my client and the client says Hey, You know what? We're fine. Just hang out. That's what we don't know yet. We don't know how this is going to shake out. I think you bring up a really good point, though, that How leisure travel has recovered. You know, this is just part of an overall trend where the we are seeing spending figures rise pretty dramatically away from the good part of the economy. Right? I have plenty of bounty now. No problem. I'm all set. Plenty of life saw all set. Now I want to go do stuff and to the service side of the economy is seeing a surge in spending. And finally, a number of automobile, automobile dealerships. Power sports leadership, motorcycle levels. Dealerships still don't have enough product to really, you know, keep the wheels rolling here. What do you think these this chip issues going to be fixed for? Well, you know, Listen, the supply chain issues are going to be a little bit thornier than folks. Believed, you know, it's clearly much easier to freeze an economy than to defrost it and that we're seeing that with the supply chain. Here's a good idea. If you have a car that you can drive, keep driving it do not be. Don't look to sell it. I don't look traded in, although here's one other interesting point, I have friends who have a large RV. And for the for They've been driving these things forever for the my friend said. You know, for the first time in 25 years, we took a three year old RV and sold it for more than we bought it for. Right? And and, you know, automobile dealers are also you know, at least one that I worked for, and they were doing a great job of their offering over book value. Uh, and people exactly, And you could do bad idea. Don't need that extra car. Yeah, maybe. Maybe you're like, Hey, you know what? Actually, we're fine with, you know, Two cars are kid doesn't need the third car or we don't need the second card. Whatever you know, you never know, but this will settle in. It's just going to take some time. So if you're really at the end of their here Your choices. You don't You know what I mean? Like if your car is not working. This is not good. But if you have a chance to drive your car for an extra year, you should do so. Appreciate your time, as always, Jill happy Monday, and I.

Janet Yellen Scott Kirby United States Wednesday 2022 Monday Friday Joe 25 years 15 second card 15 months ago 12 Thursday Jill end of June U. S four third car CBS
Should I Take a Job Just for the Salary Increase?

Ramsey Call of the Day

02:30 min | 11 months ago

Should I Take a Job Just for the Salary Increase?

"How you doing first time caller. You got a question for you about Career okay so effectively and in I'm i'm gonna roll the business analyst. I'm trying to exit this career field and become a financial adviser. I just find that. That's what gives me the most Dopamine sages in life is helping people with their finances That be that being said. The baby step two We're down from about one hundred thousand to forty pounds in new meaning. Got it to go and we just recently had a baby so our income has been cut just nine income at about sixty thousand. But that being said i Had reached out to me with an opportunity. it's again of business analyst for about one hundred them I just wonder you know if i should take it. Even though i'm trying to exit this arena You know to get that increase in in pay be debt free in a year flat and then move on with my career aspirations or if i should not be pursuing something that is not in line with my one premium this So so if you move to a financial adviser what do you make you know I think it largely determined largely determined by the The commission that i'd be able to can i think starting out from what i've seen. It can range from sixty on through. I mean you're radically. Sky's the limit i mean. If you're just gonna be you know just just a total superstar and can quite a bit So i you know. I think starting out at maybe comparable to me now it comparible except that it has upside based on your performance. And it's and it's doing what you love idea. Yes go do that right so you would not take the. Don't do that in my hundred. Sixty sixty downside if you go do that and you make seventy or eighty versus taking one hundred and then you turn around and walk back out on those people who are you a year later. That's kinda why. I'm going to tell you that

SKY
A Conversation with Michigan State Representative Padma Kuppa

A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

02:46 min | 1 year ago

A Conversation with Michigan State Representative Padma Kuppa

"Pomme welcome to the show. Thank you so much for having me again. Sonya it is an honor to be here with you and your listeners. At the dc woman podcast. I'll we are so excited to have you here. And i wanted to start with a bit about your journey to this country. We have a large number of listeners from indiana in particular and i know you came to this country for graduate school. I know that you came here briefly as a child and then again for graduate school and so would really enjoy your end where you are from an indian a bit about your journey to this country becoming a mechanical engineer a business analyst experience executive in early the manufacturing finance and now elected official for second term and the first indian and hindu to be elected to the michigan state legislature and spiring journey. That began began in india. That'd be here for me about much. So i actually was born not in where my parents are from. My mom is from regimen dri. My father is from ten ali and then whatever reason you know mothers women go home to their parents or their family to deliver a child so my mom went to. Her eldest brother was working in a city called lie. It was in madhya pradesh. Today it is in check. These cut so is born in july and then my dad had come to the united states in the wave of immigrants that came to study here in the late sixties early seventies and my mother and i followed him. My mom also did postgraduate work here. She's a biologist. She did her phd at the state university of new york at stony brook. And so after living here for so many years in northeastern part of the united states my parents decided. My brother was one year old. I was fifteen and we moved back to india so that they could take the education that they had acquired here and then helped their country. Now i spent eleven years here growing up when i landed in india. I do feel at home. I had an american accent had an american attitude. And so i think that it wasn't just the best age to move to shift cultures in this was pre internet so really had no idea what i was getting into and i would be very outspoken. I come from a traditional seth indian family and you know as the girl amongst many boy cousins. I would always end up arguing with them and associated a lot of the patriarchy that i experienced and that i confronted with

Michigan State Legislature Sonya State University Of New York India Indiana Madhya Pradesh ALI United States Stony Brook
What Does AI-Enabled Work Look Like?

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

01:12 min | 1 year ago

What Does AI-Enabled Work Look Like?

"Sapir glad to have you back with us. And we're talking about serving approach to thinking about ai that actually a little bit different than we've covered on previous episodes which is to say. What is it day in. The life like of someone who's able to be a enabled in their job. This important people need to know what it's gonna feel like what changes in. Look like an understand that beginning to the specifics. I'd love to get a sense of what a business user is you. I know you think about two main types of business users may be particularly though. That's a good question. A good starting point as well. And we'll i there's a lot of discussion around. Wear the business analysts. The future is what they're going to look like right eating from an educational perspective but but really we think about someone who is a subject matter rex again. It could be someone who's in a marketing al's say it'd be someone who's in supply chain logistics business auction subject matter expert and then someone who works with data on a daily basis right. Maybe they used typically data already to make decisions at this kind of your your prototypical. Serve of that persona if you will raise us in our predictive capabilities.

Sapir AL
GameStop investor battle moves on to silver as prices surge

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:23 sec | 1 year ago

GameStop investor battle moves on to silver as prices surge

"The silver market is surging thanks to the same small investors who drove up game stops stock. CBS news business analyst Jill Schlessinger the red It's community had been talking about silver as a bet, meaning that they were trying to encourage people to pile into by silver and silver prices up 10 11%. Biggest gains in about 11 years, his family says. A long time singing

Jill Schlessinger Cbs News
"business analyst" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"business analyst" Discussed on WTOP

"Underway about a new covert relief bill in Congress. Ah, Group of lawmakers from both parties met with top White House aides over the weekend to discuss President Biden's $1.9 trillion proposal. At least a dozen senators or on a virtual call for about an hour and 15 minutes. Senator Angus King and independent from Maine called these talks a serious effort. But some lawmakers air still balking at the price tag of the current Cove in relief proposal. They want a more targeted bill. There is consensus on spending for Corona virus vaccine distribution as well as tracking and testing. Meantime, Democratic leaders are working on a variety of ideas to boost the economy again. One idea being floated by the president a $15,000 tax credit for first time Homebuyers. We spoke about the overall housing market with CBS Business analyst Chill Slesinger a little earlier, the biggest boost that the housing market would get. Unfortunately in prices. You know, As you said, Look, the real estate market. It was actually red Hot. Last year, there were maybe was a 45 day period where things looked a little Gramma march April, But you know what? It came back, very strong, a lot of different things contributing to that, but we came into the pandemic era. With a low level of inventory in the housing market. That's a little bit of AH, left over from the housing boom and bust of 8 2009 and as a result last year in the housing market was actually the best year for existing home sales since 2006 so the housing market is not suffering. From the any problem with demand. What it's really suffering from is a problem with supply, And that means that prices have been rising, almost 13% increase from the previous year. And, you know, frankly, I'm fearful that this housing credit I know a lot of you would like it, but I am fearful that it's just gonna push prices higher, and that's about it. Housing supplies. Certainly something that's out of the purview of the federal government has a local thing. So then what would you do with that? I guess the federal money that would be used for a first time Homebuyer credit. We're gonna be better spent. Well, I think that if you look at the data from the pandemic and what we know, we understand that people who have been negatively impacted by this virus on an economic basis are those who make less than $40,000 a year. They are primarily people of color. They are women, and they're also the newest entrance into the labor force who are having a hard time finding jobs. So if those of the people who are suffering the most I would think that we really need to be beefing up. Our unemployment insurance program on the federal level may be targeting stimulus to Pete to those people rather than people that already have jobs and to try to make sure we're protecting these people. Whether that means the moratorium on evictions. Maybe it means greater access to health care. Maybe some of those earned income tax credit can be beefed up, as the Biden proposal is is trying to do. I just think that the It always sounds great, like housing credit sounds good. And I know Realtors are going to send me hate mail. I'm willing. Come on, bring it on. But the reality is that these people who are looking for homes right now they're people who have jobs. You have good credit scores. And probably you're doing just fine in the pandemic on the financial level that I CBS business analyst Dill Schlessinger. Did you know that Cove in.

President Biden Senator Angus King Congress federal government Maine CBS Business White House Chill Slesinger business analyst president Dill Schlessinger analyst Pete
"business analyst" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:53 min | 1 year ago

"business analyst" Discussed on KQED Radio

"P. Morgan Chase, Goldman Sachs and Citigroup are pausing political contributions to both Republicans and Democrats in the wake of the right at the Capitol last week. Other companies including Marriott International and Blue Cross Blue Shield, the insurance group say they are stopping donations to Republican lawmakers who supported efforts to block the certification of President elect Joe Biden's win. It's bringing Jill Schlessinger, CBS news business analyst and host of Joe on Money. Hey there, Jill. Hello. So could you start by just helping us understand how business is generally go about raising money for political action committees. How does this process work? First? Let me also start with the disclosure that my life partner is involved in one of these big bank packs, so just want to make sure that's out there. I don't know anything about except what was reported the news, so she's very good at keeping appreciate that's good. S o. These political action committees allow companies to side step the federal laws that prohibit them from giving money directly to the candidates. So they all they do is they go out and they say to their employees? Hey, everyone. Would you like to voluntarily We're not shaking it down. But would you voluntarily give some money up to $5000 to a candidate per election? As well as $15,000 annually tow any national party now. Historically, these corporate packs a given to both Republican and Democratic candidates. They want to play both sides of the aisle so that they can promote policies and regulations that favor their companies and their industry. So that's the basic framework. But considering how many people these large companies we just ticked off employees, This is not an insignificant number of people. So what are the implications then? Of these businesses, pausing political fundraising, at least for the time being? Well, I think that money wise if it's a temporary halt, it's not that big a deal right? But it does say so much because money talks and if these companies are going to start To put policies and procedures in place where they hold some of the politicians accountable for their actions, then this could have a more long lasting impact. At least from the corporate giving standpoint, okay, so so money talks and if we listen to what the companies are talking about JP Morgan, for example, the largest bank in the country Says that it is stopping political donations for six months to focus on the nation's health and economic crises. But those crises air, not new Jill, so interpret the talking here for us. I mean, does this indicate that banks are treading lightly as so as to not alienate lawmakers in either party? No, I can't get in the head of Jamie Diamond, but I thought that was a pretty wimpy statement. That's my editorial part of this. I don't think it's about alienation so much, but I do think they want to create and they want to stick to a process. It's going to allow them to make consistent decisions across party lines because you don't want to be accused to say, Oh, you just are punishing Republicans because you don't like Republicans. You want to put something in place that will allow you to create good giving policies going forward. Now, look, some companies like you mentioned, Marry a blue cross blue shield. Commerce Bank, Morgan Stanley. You're putting the line in the sand right now. They're saying we're not giving money to anyone who opposed the electoral college certification of President elect Biden. Now others air just kind of give taking a time out on their pact giving and as you, said J. P. Morgan Chase Bank of America forward a TNT, But that may have more to do with just creating a policy that they can be held to for themselves and also Be able to say to shareholders and to the public. This is what our policy is. So there's a lot of different industries making moves here. We're hearing now that after banning President Trump from its platform, Facebook is also suspending its political contributions. Could we see other Social media companies follow suit? Jill Well, I wonder, you know Facebook, not exactly or Twitter for that matter of profiles in courage when it comes to these matters, but they are now kind of healing to the environment. Microsoft also said that they're going to pause their political giving until to assess the implications of last week's events. I think also, it's important with Lisa, the social media companies. They've gotta worry about their own legal problems arising from antitrust allegations from the government. We know But they all beefed up there. They're lobbying efforts, so it's going to be interesting to see how this plays out amid a new administration in light of the events of last week. So you'll help us put this in context that I mean, these recent decisions come in the midst of many corporations working to better disclose or in some cases, even limit political contributions. So how does the response now compared to what we saw just recently with black lives matter Protests over the summer. Well, I mean, this is very e think that the response from corporate America over the last decade has really changed dramatically. You know, even if I go back, you know when I first got into the business in the late eighties company with basically shut up and like, not get involved in anything that is there was no conscience at all. But over the last decade, and this probably started around the marriage, equality, fight state by state and then nationally. And it really did expand with a lot of companies signing onto an amicus brief protecting rights and after black lives matter, I think the corporate PR response was huge. Now, whether they follow through or not, is unclear, But here's a real positive aspect of this. There does seem to be real traction internally for companies to improve their hiring policies. And expand their pipelines to attract people of color and have better policies for their employees. And some of this is really kind of cool because there's a greater sense of accountability. Thank goodness for activists, employees and don't forget those ES D investors. They want better governance, so I think there could be this could be a sea change. Well, we know you'll be watching to see whether they follow through. That's Jill Schlessinger, CBS News business analyst and host of Jill on money. Thank you, Jill..

Jill Jill Schlessinger Blue Cross Blue Shield Joe Biden President business analyst Facebook P. Morgan Chase Jill Well Marriott International Goldman Sachs CBS JP Morgan J. P. Morgan Citigroup Bank of America partner Commerce Bank
"business analyst" Discussed on Technologist Talk

Technologist Talk

08:19 min | 1 year ago

"business analyst" Discussed on Technologist Talk

"Wits celebrates true technologists professionals who balanced. They're tech savvy with business. Acumen to thrive in technology careers. That's why we wanted to talk with. Caroline april senior director of industry analysis at competition a key member of the organization's research team. Caroline coauthors major studies such as competency as annual. It industry outlook she conducts webinars and leads panel discussions at company events to along with co hosting the popular volley podcast that explores trends and issues in tech business so i asked caroline when she started her career writing for newspapers. Did she ever dream. She'd be hosting a respected technology. Podcast no because when i started my journalism career there were no such things as podcast. They didn't exist when i started my journalism careers. Seth robinson. My colleague and i have been doing bali. Our podcast for amazingly on. We're going on five years. i'm congratulations. Yeah we do it. Every other or super consistent and now podcasts are all the rage you know you go running. You listen to podcasts. You're on an airplane when when we used to be on airplanes you you you listen to a podcast. It's completely transformed in terms of a medium and that makes me happy. I love it. And i'm so happy to be on on this one as guest. I'm a journalist by trade at one point during my journalism career as working at a newspaper. Big one outside of and friends of mine who also worked there. had been lured away by a company called idee g international data and they ran a whole bunch of technology. Magazines from info world. Computerworld and many of your listeners will know about those My friends who had gone and jumped ship over to those places. Like you gotta go. You gotta go. it's just great. This is like cutting edge. The internet is just happening. it's the nineties. Oh and by the way the pay is like double i was i was so poor it was like i don't know anything about technology so fine i'm gonna study. I'm gonna learn. Whatever there is to know and i can right so i'll go over there and that's exactly how i ended up where i am and i fell in love with it and i've been here ever since i love the people in the industry I i love the innovation. I love the the the generally just everything about it. That's how i got here. And i never left after that. So you can call me an opportunist for jumping for money. But it ended up being something that i really loved. So we consider a technologist to be different from technician. Technologist is someone who works with tech but understands that empathy and soft skills and critical thinking are just as important as being able to code. So do you feel you meet that definition of technologist. I do i do absolutely. I think that there is a rule for so many of us who are not a computer science majors in college or software developers to be considered technologists. I know al a lot about technology. i can speak a lot about it And when i feel like. I'm out of my element will be the first one to tell you that i am. I think that soft skills in our industry so underrated and they're incredibly important so the ability to communicate communicate effectively right effectively collaborate with your peers effectively. Those things are almost supersede. Some of the technical skills that people need in in the technology industry they can learn the tech skills but there are a lot of people who for whom soft skills are. Just you know woop. I can't go there. I don't know how to talk to people. And and and so. I think that's one of the things that has if i can bring it back to me personally. That has helped me along. The way is is being able to be a good communicator Be persuasive. When i want to be Ambi willing to listen when someone else is saying something smart. So what do you think has made you successful in your role. There are a lot of well known obstacles facing women in the tech field even in terms of reporting right. So how did you overcome some of those things. Do you think it's aptitude attitude both. I think it's both and i've i've done my best to to help mentor in an and work with younger women. I have two daughters. So it's very important to me to make sure that they don't feel disrespected in the workforce and they stand up for themselves etc but i honestly have navigated the gender thing pretty. Well personally i on the other hand know that it is a massive issue and i've written studies about it eroded diversity study a couple of years ago about The high tech industry in particular. And it's How it deals with not just gender issues but also Diversity issues of people of color and the findings are stark and scary. An awful and women leave careers in tech in droves because they get there and and it's just awful for them and they just don't feel comfortable did not respected they're not giving leadership positions and so that that's a huge problem and we've done other studies to come to your that about kids getting into technology and you find this massive enthusiasm on both sides of the aisle boys and girls and then around fourteen girls drop off and there's a variety of reasons for that but most of them are negative reasons. You know they're the they're told to go in a different direction. they're not encouraged. So i absolutely respect the gender issues. A real. I've reached a point. Now for i. I do feel with my young girls who are entering their own career. That's where i can have value is to help. People find their way young girls especially in how they can chart a pass. You mentioned you have two daughters. Who are embarking on their careers at this time and you mentioned being interested in sharing and pay it forward to the younger generation. So when people ask you for career advice what do you say my work with. The my podcasts volley has been a high point for me. I also think at com tia. I've been able to do some real good work around research for the channel. And i think that's very important in an and i think of elevated the game there and And with help from others. Obviously and so i would say you have to balance practicality with passion and that's my best advice and my other advice for young women is don't depend on anybody else be self sufficient want to learn about. Witt's the women in tech summit the conference series from creating. it futures that educates inspires and connects women working in technology visit women in tech summit dot net. That's women in tech summit as one word dot net wits is going virtual in twenty twenty one with a series of events exploring tech trends offering advice for thriving tech careers and cultivating connections between women working on the business and technical sides of the industry. Check out the summit schedule and registered today. Meantime plan to join us again for another chapter of technologists details from compass award-winning technologist. Talk podcast produced by creating it futures..

Caroline april Caroline coauthors Seth robinson idee g international Ambi caroline bali al Witt
"business analyst" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"business analyst" Discussed on WTOP

"It is that time of year again open enrollment for your health care coverage and retirement benefits. This can of course feel tedious, especially right now and overwhelming, but it is important to pay close attention, especially this year. CBS business analyst, Jealous Messenger on changes to health care and retirement brought on by the Rota virus pandemic there, definitely, or some changes on the way you start. If you're one of the 157 Million Americans who get your health insurance benefits through your workplace is to understand there's real money at risk here. And when I talk about this, I know your sort of rolling your eyes in the back your head. Oh, gosh, I don't want to deal with this except When we talk about thousands of dollars that it cost families every single year. There's real money to be saved. Potentially. So you want to start with what your existing coverage is what you spent in the past year and though as hard as it may be a mid a pandemic, try to project what next year will look like just for the normal stuff. Don't forget you want to look at your doctor's whether they're in the networks or not, whether your regular medications were covered and see what plans your employer is actually offering. The big change that I've seen over the last decade or so is a real increase in the number of folks who are using these high deductible health plans, so they are what they sound like. You have a higher deductible, But in exchange, you have much lower premiums every month. So the big change on these plans is that with the cares act, there's a lot more flexibility with them that if you're getting some sort of coverage for Telehealth, the remote care services or something that has happened as a result of the virus itself is that there's more flexibility you may not actually need to use.

business analyst Telehealth CBS
Data Alone Is Not Enough: The Evolution of Data Architectures

a16z

05:28 min | 1 year ago

Data Alone Is Not Enough: The Evolution of Data Architectures

"Hi and welcome to the a sixteen e podcast. I'm DOS, data, data data. It's long been a buzzword in the industry whether big data, streaming data, data, analytics, data science even ai and machine learning but data alone is not enough. It takes an entire system of tools and technology to extract value from data. A multibillion dollar industry has emerged around these data tools and technologies and was so much excitement and innovation in the space. It raises the question how exactly do all these tools together This podcast featuring Ali Goatee, the CEO and founder of data bricks explores the evolution of data architectures including some quick history where they're going and surprising use case for streaming data as well as always take on how he'd architect the picks and shovels that handle data and ten today. Joining Ali this hallway style jam is a sixteen see General Partner Martinez. Casado who with other a sixteen the enterprise partners just published a series of blueprints for the modern data stack. You can find that as well as other pieces on building a businesses the empty promise of data moats and more at a sixteen dot com backslash mfl economics. In this conversation, we start with holly answering the question. How did we arrive at the set of data tools we have today Starting eighties, business leaders were kind of flying blind, not knowing how the business were doing waiting for finance to close the books and data warehousing paradigm came about they said, look we have all this data in these operational data systems. Why don't we just all that data would take it out of all of these systems transform into some place. Let's call data house and. Then, we can get business intelligence on that data and it was just a major transformation because now you have dashboard, you could know how your product is selling by region by skew by geography and that itself has created at least twenty billion dollar market that has been around for quite a few decades. Now, what about ten years ago? This technology started seeing some challenges? One more and more data types like video and audio started coming out, and there's no way you can store any of that in did our houses second they were on prem big boxes that you have to buy and the couple of storage and compute. Kim really expensive to scale them up and down, and the third thing was people wanted to do more and more machine learning ai on his data sets. They saw that we can ask future looking questions, which are my customers charn which my. Products are going to sell which campaigns should it be offering to who? So then the data leak came about ten years ago and idea was here's really cheap storage, dump all your data here and you can get all those insights and it turns out just dumping all your data in a central location. It's hard to make sense out of that data that sitting there and as a result, what people are doing now is they're taking subsets of that data moving into classic data warehouses in the cloud. So we ended up with an architectural maths stats inferior to what we had ladies go. We have data in two places and they don't make ended that or house or the stale mass, and the recent sees not great in the last two three years. There's some really interesting technological breakthroughs. That actually now are enabling a new kind of design pattern. We referred to it as the Lake House and idea is what if you could actually be able to do bi that rightly on your knowledge and what if you could do your reporting directly on your radio and your data science and your machine learning straight up on the data link I would love to tease apart a few things that have led us here. You know this is very clearly a large existing data warehouse market behind. And you know it's typified by people using sequel on structured data. Like the Emily, a use case is a little bit different than the analytics use case right the case it's normally human beings that are looking pash boards in making decisions where the. Use Case, you're creating these models and those models are actually put into production and they're part of the product they're doing pricing. They're doing fraud detection to underwriting, etc.. The analytics market is an existing buying behavior and existing customer MLA is an emerging market and so. The core question is, are we actually seeing the emergence of multiple markets order this one market? Well, there are big similarities and there are big differences. and. Let's start with similarities roughly the same data. is needed for both there's no doubt when it comes to a and machine learning a lot of the secret sauce, you'll get those. Results predictions comes with augmenting your data with additional Meta data that you have. In some sense we have the same data and you're asking questions don't differences. One is backwards looking future looking but other than that a lot of it is the same and you want to do the same kind of things with the data you want to sort of repair it WanNa have it so that you can make sense of it. If you have structural problems with your data that actually causes also problems for machine learning, actually the difference today is that. It's line of business as typically doing a and they'll science or hardcore rnd whereas housing and be I oftentimes sits in it users of the data warehouse into Beatles, our data analysts, business analysts, and machine learning. We have the all scientists machine learning engineers. We have machine learning scientists. So the personas different and it sits in a different place in the organization and those people have different backgrounds and they have different requirements on the product using today.

Ali Goatee Lake House KIM Fraud Martinez General Partner Emily CEO Founder
Ever Hire The Right Person For The Wrong Job

voiceFirst careers

04:37 min | 1 year ago

Ever Hire The Right Person For The Wrong Job

"So this is a quick shout out. One things. Look I'm hired a lot of people. You've heard me mention that. I've hired some amazing people in my career. And some. Not. So amazing right. But The ones that stand out in your mind you know when you look back over it. Everybody's got a story right? You have a story, I have a story. I remember some great stories of being hired on some impossible tasks in pulling it off. I I don't recall if I mentioned. I was a consultant at Lexus Nexus. I was hired in as a business analyst. As working for actually software consulting firm. In they got me a role at Lexus Nexus near Dayton Ohio. In there was just an amazing adventure but. During the interviewing process. My immediate superior had another candidate. That he preferred or SOM- told. In the. His boss. was very pleased with the woman who was leaving the role and she was trying to we call backfill. She's trying to back fill her position with me because we worked at the same consulting for. Him The. The boss, the project. The highest level that I was interacting with he looked at my skill set and he said, well, you know, I don't see all the. The seashell Bourne Shell the. UNIX. now called devops, the UNIX system administration, the programming I you know I don't see that strength on. On his resume. In. The person who is trying to get me back filled was like ill, it's here. You know it's Kinda hidden under the covers you know because of this role he can do X. because a y you can do z. kind of thing and was making the argument for me. And, that's that's why you as talent trying to get hired is you have to have a conversation with the hiring manager. It's that simple if you're going through the HR department to get a job. It's it's like you going into fight with your hands tied behind your back as not a fair fight by any means. So. I said all that to say. What can you do if your talent to get hired as you can put your best foot forward? How do you do that? It's not with the resume. You send him a resume its going into an applicant tracking system. I'd say nine out of ten times. If not more, it's almost guarantee in the ATS is Ben Tuned to the point where It's told give me the top three or four candidates for this position. and. If there's any reason to eliminate you say a mommy gap. You. Raisin a kid or apparent gap taking care of a parental unit Keva lemonade yourself. You WanNa, send your linked profile your linked in profile. Your chance to say, Hey, here's what I can do. Here's what I've done. Here's why I'm the best person for that position. and. If you hiring manager look, you need somebody that can hit the ground running right? Hr was put all these lofty ideals into the job requisition. You know we'd like it. If you had a Nobel peace prize would like it. If he had six PhD's, we'd like it if Yada Yada. Yada. In the hiring managers like look I promise the company that might division, my department, my group would produce X. and we're nowhere near there because we're down a man or two or three. Me and being a species not sex. And so. Hiring managers you need to reach out so I can put you in touch with talent. That makes sense for what you're trying to accomplish says making some sense.

Lexus Nexus SOM Dayton Business Analyst HR Ohio Consultant
"business analyst" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

05:35 min | 1 year ago

"business analyst" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"The extra 300 week payment for Texans collecting unemployment submit this pandemic ends this week. That's what the Texas Workforce Commission announced just yesterday. The money, which was provided by FEMA. It was part of the they lost Wages Assistance program that temporary provisions after the expiration of the $600 Assistance program, part of the federal Cares Act. Faymann form the Texas Workforce Commission yesterday. The funds will finish with the benefit weekending September the fifth and the Twc said It cannot extend those payments beyond the date because the funds provided from FEMA while they're limited. So there you go get ready for that. Well, I don't know what I'm out about. It sure feels like things are starting to feel more like normal. When I'm in a restaurant, it seems like most people are kind of the staff are usually running around kind of Overwhelmed. It seems that's been my experience ah lot lately, So I have a feeling that that that more people are going to need to be hiring Mohr soon, so I'm quite encouraged. I'm starting to see the help wanted signs. I mean, they they begin with calling the people back at some of these rest, but by and large People already back man living with the mask and keeping distance and things like that. So what? In the world of business J. C. Penney's. They got a deal to get the company out of bankruptcy. We talked about it yesterday that could be letting a bunch of people go, but It appears they maybe they may have some investors business analyst David Johnson says the department store chain it set up some, You know, I set out to get some outside funding and it's coming. It looks like there's a deal to save the company is a hole to keep. Maybe 650 stores open baby save as many as 70,000 jobs. Wells Fargo spearheading. $2 billion in financing to go into the Jaycee penny bankruptcy exit. In essence, they have reached a tentative rescue deal with their landlords. Simon Property Group in Brookfield Property Partners. They've got a couple of billion dollars coming to him from Wells Fargo. And the name J. C. Penny, you know, may just be around for a while. There you go. David Johnson business and list here in Texas. I know they're still growing at Barton Creek Mall. I was out there a couple weekends and go and they they were open. I didn't go in, but they were open. Yeah. Show. I find it kind of odd that they would somehow endure. We're serious is long gone, but they had other issues. Well, this is a different scenario as well. I mean, I I don't think Simon Properties Made an effort to try to save Ceres in this in this case, Simon Properties is part of the deal with Wells Fargo to keep one of their major anchor tenants in the building. Well, that's true, and it is. It is in the best interest of Simon Properties to keep J. C. Penney's Or at least somebody else around. Yeah, I mean, nobody starting big department store chains right now. So if J C. Penney's goes out, then I have a feeling a lot of malls across this country would start whether already struggling And they're just trying to save what tenants? They gotta guess. Yeah, that's what it looks like. Yep. Yep. The you know, mall cycle like Barton Creek and like, like, line and all that. I don't know what I go, you know, compared to five minutes out of the domain or the Hill Country Galleria. If I met the older mall, itjust feels I don't know. It just didn't feel good. I don't look forward to the thought of having to go to the mall because it kind of feels like a bit of a time warp, but not not in a good way. You know, I mean, it's not good just feels dated. It just kind of feels like you know the mall itself or the stores around the mouth. The mall itself is just a concept of, you know, walking through the mall, and it's like, Wow, I just felt like I've gone back in time here and not necessarily in a good way. You know where you go to the art of the domain or Country Galleria, and it's kind of you know, I don't know There's some kind of invigorating about that kind of store is just a different kind of feel better vibe. You better Bob. You demanded better. Vivat, Your local mall. Gotta have my body. You miss the days of orange, Julius and parachute pants. I I spent many, many, many a night at the mall, playing music and bails Chelsea Street, Chelsea Street Pub, Lattice table gets free. Drink on and s. Oh, believe me. I mean, I'd be there five nights a week for like a month straight, then go to another. Show the mall was very good to me. But thing is now go back there and it still feels like 1982. And that doesn't necessarily feel good. Yeah. What would you say? You're gonna be all right, though, 7 21. Let's see. Let's see. Is it Susan Checking in from four points area patients this morning. Good morning, Susan. Hold my hat. I really appreciate what you said about your shepherd. WeII lived that same A situation in our house and get better and he's going to before they go to a thing. The terrible twos the first couple of really rough seriously for an Australian shepherd. Really, really, if you live in an apartment, and you're thinking about getting Australian Shepherd Be ready to chain the doors for at least a couple of years. Really? Oh, they gotta run. They've got to be cared for it. So you gotta you gotta break him in there like a wild stallion. Man. You've got to break him in. They are And I thought I wondered aloud, didn't host any kind of Trick or treat parade, The eating anything like you know all that's right. That was a long time ago. Susan, what's up? I don't know about that. We used to go on. Okay. I know what's going on. Now. That's the old neighborhood I used to live in the neighbors had on Halloween..

Simon Property Group J. C. Penney Barton Creek Mall Susan Checking Wells Fargo Texas Workforce Commission David Johnson FEMA Barton Creek Twc Hill Country Galleria Texas business analyst Mohr J. C. Penny Chelsea Street Pub Julius
Unemployment rate falls below 10% for first time since March

WTOP 24 Hour News

02:38 min | 1 year ago

Unemployment rate falls below 10% for first time since March

"Continues its slow crawl back, the Labor Department says. For the month of August, the employment rate fell to 8.4% from 10.2% and employers added 1.4 million jobs last month. Let's break it down and go deeper on this report. Joining us live now CBS news business analyst Dill Schlessinger. Jill it It sounds like good news. The market's, though, are skidding taken a dive here. Can you put this into some context for us? Let's not talk about the markets. Who knows why. Day to day things were moving around, But I think that the employment report was pretty much on target. The consensus estimate was for 1.4 million total jobs, although We have to just sort of put an asterisk here. 238,000 temporary census workers were hired. So you kind of have to back that out. Even with the monthly gains over the last four months, we still have 11.5 million fewer jobs that we had at the beginning of this pandemic, So it's still a pretty deep hole. I would say that we've filled up a bunch of it, but There's a ways to go and the unemployment rate improving. It improved. Not just that headline number, but you know, we look at the broader rate, the one that includes those part timers who wanted to have full time work, and that's down from over 20%. Now it's at 14% 14.2. Look these air still huge numbers but really vastly improved from where we were at the end of March beginning of April. So you know you talk about the number of jobs that were added last month. Is that number actually more or less than were added in the month before in July, because it sort of gives us the trajectory When we look at it for months, weren't you're speaking my language lady and we used to say this on the trading floor. The trend is your friend and what the trend is showing us Is that job? Additions are tapering off some and I think that that's sort of the concern, especially as we come into the next couple of months, because obviously we've seen some hiring occur in travel and hospitality. Summer months warmer months where people conserve meals in restaurants outside what happens in October, November, December that is unknown. And I think that the big gains that we saw, you know early in this process. They are slowing down some and that is of a concern, because clearly what the really concern is that individuals could be may be facing a second, lay off or furlough at a time where there's not a lot of support from the federal government member. We're waiting on Congress to come through with Yet another stimulus plan. Nothing so far.

Dill Schlessinger Labor Department CBS Federal Government Business Analyst Jill Congress
Financial Services Analytics, Before and After AI - with Dr. Derek Wang of Stratifyd

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

05:28 min | 1 year ago

Financial Services Analytics, Before and After AI - with Dr. Derek Wang of Stratifyd

"So Derek I want to get started with this kind of problem of operationalizing analytics. You guys work in financial services, a lot of our audiences, retail banks, big insurance firms at a lot of them have similar problems. How do you describe this core issue of how disjointed the analytics? What does it look like in there? Yeah. Let me give an example when I a professorship I was working hours Department of Homeland Security and Defense Strategy Deduction Agency, and really working on multimillion dollar kind of federal research to Human Jenner data to predict pandemic hall pathogens transmitted from different nations donation. It's a very timely skill right now derek a forty. Five years ago, six years ago. Got Big projects. They're Harvard. That's part of the. The motivation of starting stratified is because when we done not eighteen twenty, four months of product would deliver our software to folks on the other side, just start using it. They can operationalize that because as many Prada as we have been serving without customer, it's so centralized in a small group like the PhD's like the data scientists were looking at, it wanted pushed. A business is harder for them to use it. Right? That's where it triggers. The whole motivation of generating company like stratified is, let's let's bring future data analytic, which is really operational is the data analytics. Poaching that from the business lines, then live on business started using that in solving everyday problems they have. So we essentially become the operating system on their business analysts, their desktops day in day out there analyzing it in our station and my philosophy as in ever their laptops either they're collecting data. Or they're making decisions. So that's where we're going to operation is analytics for folks. Got It. So I'M GONNA assume a little bit up and kind of paint the problem a little bit more, and then we can start to go into some example. So the challenge that you're articulating is that analytics sits in this it universe where maybe I t tell me if I'm wrong here, they might build some dashboards they might build. Build some little interfaces maybe, but they're not day to day up next to the marketing people day to day up next to the compliance people day to day of next to the fraud people in financial services, for example. So those people in the business. So to speak in those operational wings, they don't really get their hands dirty with analytics, they just kind of get whatever they can request and whatever get built for. For them and what you're talking about is a dynamic where they actually can have their own interface and build and use the things they want. Am I hearing you. Correctly, you're absolutely right. One little thing to add to that is they're lacking the feedback channel, right? They're always as treated as consumers of what the other team has spilled. However, what other teams build because they are not business savvy, their lack of bag. Bag and updating what they're looking at to your point dashboard whatever the real time hurts the business. Yeah. Yeah. Because I guess nothing could be as customize. It really needs to be for the compliance people unless they're able to engage with it and build out the way they need or the marketing people build it out the way that they need. Now, of course, that's kind of a new skill set in a new. Set of things to learn for those teams and when I think about adopting a I, you guys, obviously, you have enough traction you for a fifty million dollars at this point. So clearly you have, you know some traction onto your belt for you folks, you've got to build I, guess, build something that simple enough that a person marketing or compliance will actually use. So I'm seeing that this problem is we've got to be. Consumers of what it builds analytics. That's not great. We WanNa see our own things about churn or about some regulatory issues or or whatever. But if if we want to put it in the hands of those users and let them really engage, how do we make it simple enough for them? What are the lessons you learned there because to me, that feels like a big challenge. It absolutely is, and you said are valued problem really while it's really democratizing Ai. Right. So think about this. What we have it, we will we have put a lot is simplify the model, right? You don't need to know what model is what you care as a marketing. You care about the results you care about attorney. Cariballo. Complies will we have done is spent a lot of time researching into how we can provide automatic machine learnings. Now, just one model. Model, not just two models is really led the model, the fit in whatever data for my to it. So that's simply put stratified were based on four simple part of one flywheel number. One will provide over one hundred, fifty data collections as individual. Do you don't need to worry about how can get hands on data? You are data market, you can get all the data connect to it. secondarily, that's where the preparatory auto, but she learnings county in our. It will go into based on what data get in automatically apply analytics and then visually showing you. Boys Costumer as Customer, experience folks to see what are the head and signals that really locks into that data set, and then you can start connecting those signals interactivity real time to tell a story. So that's how you made a simple straightforward and it becomes a skill sets that people can start leveraging without

Derek BAG Department Of Homeland Securit Prada Human Jenner Harvard Fraud Attorney
U.S. continuing unemployment-benefits claims drop to nearly 17 million as of July 4

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:27 sec | 2 years ago

U.S. continuing unemployment-benefits claims drop to nearly 17 million as of July 4

"1.3 million people signed up for unemployment benefits. Last week, CBS News Business analyst Jill Schlessinger economists were expecting to see better progress on the weekly claims. But there was some good news in the report continuing claims, meaning the number of people currently collecting unemployment insurance dropped 2 17,338,000 That's down by 300,000 from the previous week.

Jill Schlessinger Cbs News Business Analyst
"business analyst" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

05:19 min | 2 years ago

"business analyst" Discussed on WTOP

"Johnson believes the plan name change reflects a greater change in this country. It is long past time for a new name for the NFL football team in this town in 1991 W T. O P actually stopped using Redskins. That banded last decades of court cases of protests against Redskins as a team's name did not force a name change. But this summer did against a backdrop of heightened awareness of social justice. And, finally, financial pressure from sponsors. A new name is on the way the NFL allowed the Redskins name to live on the NFL could have, said the team owner, Dan Snyder. No name change. No television money that would have been game over for Redskins as a name. Instead, we've reached this point because enough people collectively said enough for change toe happen. Those voices had to make sure blue chip team sponsors like FedEx, Nike and Pepsi heard their outcry. The message was received and our NFL team has a new name on the way because it is truly a new day. Unlike back in 1991 there is a willingness to listen a willingness to be better. That's my take. Dave Johnson. W T OBY News as many states sea surges in Corona virus cases, colleges are getting ready to reopen across the country, many conducting a hybrid of in person and remote learning. But paying thousands of dollars for a very different experience during the pandemic has many parents wondering if it's worth it? I asked CBS news business analyst Dill Schlessinger if families to try toe negotiated deal given the drastic changes Well, I don't know if it's going to help if you have not had your financial life impacted by the virus, but Let's just presume that you have, like half the country has essentially financially been hurt by this virus, and you were awarded a financial aid package that wasn't maybe was fine based on last year's tax return, But this year's a whole different picture. Then you go back, and you actually tried to negotiate. However, if you're just sort of Angry, which I understand, you know? Hey, I don't want to pay the exact same amount of money for tuition. If it's all online, versus being in a classroom, I think that that's going to be a tougher road for you. I do think it's a really good time to assess what exactly you're paying for. Because of course, we know college is worth it. You know, certainly people who have college degrees Make more over their lifetimes than those who don't have college degrees. But there's a caveat. If you're making more money, and all that money is going to paying down debt because you've accumulated that to get your college degree. The equation doesn't work out quite so well. That CBS News business analyst you'll Schlessinger. Meantime, more than 200 universities here in the U. S have now joined a lawsuit trying to block a Trump administration ruled that barring foreign students from remaining in the country if those schools don't hold in person classes this fall. The lawsuit was originally filed last week by Harvard and MIT T. More than a 1,000,000 foreign students attend higher education institutions here in the US, they make up more than 5% of higher ed enrollment in this country. The Texas Supreme Court has dismissed on appeal by the state Republican Party that was seeking to hold on in person convention this week in Houston. The event was expected to draw about 6000 attendees. The State Party says it will hold the event virtually instead. Houston's Democratic mayor said last week that he had directed city lawyers to terminate the contract because he believed the event Could not have been held safely. Let's get a check on Wall Street. Once again, Jeff Kleber. Good start of the week. The Thou is up 408 points. Money news in 10 minutes on the GOP sports at 15 and 45. Brought to you by your local Honda dealer. Don't settle for less than Honda, 12 45. What do you say George Wallace? Well, Debbie pretty big day as Faras. The NFL is concerned in this town. The Redskins established July 9th, 1932 and moving forward. The Redskins name and logo will be retired. It will be no more, according to a statement this morning from the team and Dan Snyder saying the upon the completion of the review, which was Set out on July 3rd that they will be retiring the name and logo, the release, says Dance center and head coach Ron Rivera, working closely to develop a new name and design that will quote enhanced the standing of our proud tradition rich franchise and inspire our sponsors, fans and community for the next 100 years end quote. Now as Faras. The timeline is for a new name. That still to be determined report are that one of the Names that has preferred is being held up now because of trademark. We know it takes quite some time to officially change a name, so we'll see how quickly that does, in fact, become reality. But the one thing we do know is that the name and logo being retired in D C and donned. Warren, who played 14 years and won three Super Bowls in town will be coming back to join Ron Rivera staff is the assistant director of pro personnel after two members of his staff were fired over the weekend capitals entering the training camp phase. Of their reboot. Games begin August 1st, Everybody on the ice and Kettler getting ready for that reboot in DC United first match of the tournament in Orlando. Pretty good comeback down by two goals and down to 10 men. They scored two goals in the last 10 minutes to tie Toronto. FC George Wallace, deputy will be sports. All right, Georgie coming up here.

Redskins NFL Dave Johnson Dan Snyder Honda George Wallace business analyst Faras Ron Rivera Houston CBS News CBS Texas Supreme Court FedEx Dill Schlessinger Toronto W T. O US Kettler
Amazon to Face EU Antitrust Charges Over Treatment of Third-Party Sellers

Daily Tech Headlines

00:28 sec | 2 years ago

Amazon to Face EU Antitrust Charges Over Treatment of Third-Party Sellers

"Wall! Street Journal reports that according to sources the European Commission plans to file formal antitrust charges against Amazon based on Amazon, allegedly using dead from third party sellers to compete against them. The use case reported that looks at similar conduct to an April Wall Street Journal investigation that found Amazon. Business analysts created reports using restricted data from third parties derived almost entirely from one seller to develop competing products under EU law. The European Commission could find Amazon as much as ten percent of its annual revenue.

Amazon Wall Street Journal European Commission Street Journal EU
Jobless claims total 2.4 million, still elevated levels but a declining pace from previous weeks

The Gee and Ursula Show

00:33 sec | 2 years ago

Jobless claims total 2.4 million, still elevated levels but a declining pace from previous weeks

"Nearly two and a half a million Americans are now out of work that's according to the latest unemployment report the labor departments I should say two and a half million new claims the Congressional Budget Office now project the unemployment rates will be at nine percent so by the end of twenty twenty one that is just one percentage point below where it was at the worst of the Great Recession CBS's business analyst Jill Slazenger the labor department says Washington added more than a hundred and forty five thousand jobless claims a thirty percent increase from the

Congressional Budget Office CBS Jill Slazenger Labor Department Washington Business Analyst
The future of travel after the coronavirus pandemic

WTOP 24 Hour News

02:10 min | 2 years ago

The future of travel after the coronavirus pandemic

"As more states open for business treasury secretary Steve Mnuchin is predicting the American economy will rebound in the second half of this year from unemployment rates that rival the Great Depression I asked CBS business analyst Jill Slazenger about that and her predictions for the economic outlook for the second half of the year I think that they have to likely get better and you know we just had such a severe and sudden downturn that really shut the entire economy down is starting in March but the think about it you know March April may June let's say those four months will we likely see things improve after that sure I don't think that that's in dispute I think there are two real critical questions one is if they do improve by how much and if they do improve how many more people are going to come off the unemployment rolls and be re employed and that is completely unknowable right now so the future sort of depends on how many of these furloughed and lay off employees how many of those jobs are actually permanent right and and you know if you think about it of course we understand that the sharp tip of this is the airline industry travel and hospitality and of course retail but I think that there are well what economists will call at second order effects knock on effects that their industries that serve those industries and certainly if you were say writing big insurance policies for restaurants you're not going to actually see that business continue and certainly if you are a mall operator on and you have a period of time where this many companies just kind of not just disappear but stopped paying rent and then ultimately there's a bit of a culling of the ranks then that's going to impact it impacted your business so we have millions of people out of work some of whom will be temporarily out of work but many of whom could see these turn into permanent layoffs that CBS business analyst Jill Slazenger

Steve Mnuchin Jill Slazenger CBS Business Analyst
"business analyst" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"business analyst" Discussed on WTOP

"On this is CBS news business analyst Jill Slazenger Jo thank you so much for joining us it is hard to think that such a staggering sum in the trillions may not be enough but could that be the case it absolutely could be the case economists say this is a start I interviewed a Nobel Prize winning economist who thought that we were gonna have to be spending somewhere closer to three to four trillion dollars and maybe we will win this is all said and done at the very least this is a much needed lifeline to people who are feeling the impact of this virus and their financial lives and as you said you know a lot of this is predicated on you know what we know today I think things could change pretty dramatically we just don't know how long this is going to last and frankly if you got twelve hundred dollars or twenty four hundred Bucks if you were a married couple that may be fine if this were a ninety day event but if this were to be six months I think people are going to need more money it's a very good point it's not just a temporary solution that people need they might need something well a little longer than that are there any lessons that we've learned from the Great Recession that this bill is putting into play well absolutely I think the a part of the the the oversight of the corporate aspect of this this is a half a trillion dollars going to companies now most of that four hundred twenty five billion will come in the form of loans from the federal reserve it at zero or low interest we don't have the terms yet the fifty billion dollars that goes to say the airline industry the original draft of this show that there was pretty much no string attached to that now we have an inspector general and a five person panel that will oversee these funds this is a very good lesson a new Brodsky who is the former the the special investor and inspector general for the tarp the sig tart he was very clear that in his role it was really critical that he got the information he felt like the banks were pretty cagey I've interviewed him a few times and I found that the lesson to be learned is make sure that there is accountability and be clear what the money can and cannot be used for this these funds cannot be used for paying big amounts of money out to the the C. suite they cannot be used to buy back shares of the company that's something that we definitely learned in the financial crisis that we could not allow these companies to go unfettered chill one ask you about our money there is that expression on Wall Street don't try to catch a falling knife does this look like a falling knife situation to you right now and what should people who are thinking about buying it and do it well I think that if you are lucky enough to have money that has been set aside or that you've G. yet you know you happen to sell your house six forty five days ago and you're renting now when you don't need your money if you don't need your money anytime soon and you want to start purchasing shares or purchasing index funds that's fine but be very clear we don't know where the S. goes next I remember at the end of two thousand eight there were many people who thought that was it the market was down by thirty percent or so and it continued to lose another twenty five percent by the bottom in March of two thousand nine so what I would say is if you are someone who is long term in nature and you have money to put to work that's great but be very careful and certainly do not put any money at risk that you think you're going to need within the next twelve months that's a real big no no I know a lot of people are freaking out right now I've actually I have a podcast we went to daily podcast because we got so much information overload and if people do have questions they can send me emails that ask Jill and Jill on money dot com and you can subscribe to the Jill on money podcast it's daily it may be more Jill that you want but if you don't want it then you don't don't listen to it no such thing because we have a lot of questions right now we really do and we thank you for coming on with us that.

CBS business analyst Jill Slazenger
"business analyst" Discussed on BA BLOCKS for Business Analysts

BA BLOCKS for Business Analysts

05:43 min | 2 years ago

"business analyst" Discussed on BA BLOCKS for Business Analysts

"The best thing that you could be doing for yourself your family your friends and everybody around you right now is to try to isolate yourself from everyone so that the situation that we're dealing with right now doesn't get worse than it actually is and so to help you do that. I've decided to make our be fundamentals. Course completely free of charge until further notice. And so if you are looking for something productive to do in the time that you're going to be spending by yourself. This is something that you should consider taking. This isn't a watered down version of the course or it's not samples from the course it's the actual full course That we were planning on launching at the end of this month and it was planned to be It was planned to be a paid course but to try to help. Do my part to help people kinda behave in a way. That's not gonNa make the situation worse. I WanNa make this available to you as an option for something to do so that you have some incentive to stay indoors when the little bit more time online and still feel like you're doing something productive your time if you're anything like me Stay indoors for an extended period. Time isn't GonNa make you feel cooped up and isolated just generally not very good. I'm hoping that among the other things that you're doing for yourself to try to keep yourself on a little bit saying that taking a course like this is going to give you the feeling that you're still being productive you still contributing towards something that's GonNa help you in your future and soul the thing that I'd ask you to do to help us is to share this with anybody and everybody who you think would benefit from having something to do something productive to do in the time that they are locked up as many people as possible that you can encourage to kind of self isolate the better. The situation becomes for everybody. That's that's dealing with this crisis so if you don't know what the fundamentals courses Essentially what this is is our very first course in the program that gives you an entry way into the profession of business analysis. And so you don't have to have any kind of knowledge about the profession to take this course because we start at the very very basics we start at square one basically and walks you through everything that you need to know to really understand the profession of a business analyst. What a business analyst does inside out and so even if you are somebody who's not really ever considered becoming a business analyst want something productive to do just pay the course. You have nothing to lose. It'll keep you occupied for the next couple of days or a couple of weeks at a very minimum and give you something to do while you're still waiting for the situation to blow over case. Oh this is our very first course and essentially what it does. Is it leads you into the rest of our curriculum handsaw as part of our curriculum right. Now we're developing the courses the remainder of the courses that we have as part of our curriculum. And this is the very first one that kind of gives you an overview of all of the different subjects that are included as part of our curriculum. The fundamentals course kind of gives you an introduction into all of the different areas that we're going to be releasing courses for in the future and so it's a really good overview for you to get an understanding of exactly what it is that a business analyst does wear in the organization the business analyst fits in What kind of things that? The business analyst is typically expected to produce by their employers. The course itself has a number of different modules and again like I said well we do. Is We start at the very very beginning with really kind of providing a definition for what business analysis is so it's a very plain simple definition. That is again. Doesn't really need any kind of specialized knowledge about the profession to understand we start there. We moved through all of the different stages that in analysts help the company through and then we dive into a little bit more deeper into the company itself and we look into basically how are structured. What kind of stakeholders stakeholder groups exist within the organization so there are a number of lessons that are going to help you understand that aspect of it. We talk about projects and so here you'll basically learned about what a business analyst doesn't waterfall project versus an agile project and then we dive into solutions themselves. And so this is the place where I kind of explained to the difference between the process and a product in exactly what different layers of solution of business analysts typically expected to describe so in the enterprise solution section. Basically you'll learn about all the different layers that you're expected to describe as part of your requirements earlier specifications. So I won't go through the whole curriculum but this is the full course that you're getting access to like. I said it's not just going to be samples. Of course it's everything that you're seeing here and so again if you can help us spread this message as far and wide as humanly possible. It's going to help us to get the message out about the course. It's going to help people who don't have anything to do to have something that's GonNa be productive that's GONNA hopefully encourage them to stay in and as soon as all of this blows over. I think we're all going to be in a much better position at that time. Discourses GONNA turn back into a paid course So it's not going to remain free forever until that time. It is free so please help us share it as far as wide as as we possibly can so take care of yourself on the inside. Hopefully and if you.

business analyst
Investor fears rise over recession, bear market as coronavirus spreads in U.S.

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:26 sec | 2 years ago

Investor fears rise over recession, bear market as coronavirus spreads in U.S.

"Markets have been on a roller coaster for weeks as investors try to guess what the economic damage from the coronavirus will be CBS news business analyst Jill Slazenger we don't know how pervasive it will be and as a result the odds of a recession in the United States are now higher than they were just six weeks ago so you put that all together and what you kind of figure out is that that uncertainty is breeding all of the selling pressure in the

Jill Slazenger United States CBS Business Analyst
"business analyst" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"business analyst" Discussed on WTOP

"President trump downplayed the scale of the outbreak most of those people are going to be fine the vast majority can provide after signing the rotavirus funding package the president suggested the outbreak was unexpected even though his administration was issuing quarantines and travel restrictions in late January there are twenty seven states with cases south by southwest was just canceled over the corona virus the annual tech film and music conference in Austin Texas brought in more than three hundred fifty million dollars last year for the economy markets have been on a roller coaster for weeks as investors try to guess what the economic damage from the coronavirus will be CBS news business analyst Jill Slazenger we don't know how pervasive it will be and as a result the odds of a recession in the United States are now higher than they were just six weeks ago so you put that all together and what you kind of figure out is that that uncertainty is breeding all of the selling pressure in the stock market the Dow lost to fifty six nasdaq losing one sixty two the price of oil plunged ten percent its worst drop in more than five years president hope was also in Tennessee to survey disaster areas after tornadoes tore through the state earlier this week WTVF TV is Chris conte president trump walks through a devastated neighborhood in Cookeville Tennessee it was during the early morning hours on Tuesday when a fast moving storm spawned at least two deadly tornadoes one with winds up to one hundred and seventy five miles an hour god be with them and we're going to be with them we're going to be with them all the way the president also toward a donation site and met with survivors he promised federal disaster funds would start flowing soon and the state could have as much as it needs all the twenty twenty campaign trail Missouri is taking its turn in the presidential race spotlight ahead of the state's primary visits are expected from Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders over the next few days Idaho Michigan Mississippi North Dakota and Washington are also holding primary elections or caucuses next Tuesday Biden still leads to the delegate count you're listening to the CBS world news roundup on that paper money news at twenty five and fifty five on WTOP Friday losses were for the week the Dow still gained one point eight percent U. S. companies were hiring last month adding two hundred seventy three thousand jobs the labor department says the unemployment rate fell to three and a half percent JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon is expected to make a full recovery after emergency heart surgery Lufthansa is cutting its flight capacity.

labor department CEO JPMorgan North Dakota Michigan Idaho Chris conte business analyst CBS Lufthansa Jamie Dimon trump Washington Mississippi Bernie Sanders Joe Biden Missouri
Coronavirus hit to airlines could top $100 billion

Mark Larson

00:21 sec | 2 years ago

Coronavirus hit to airlines could top $100 billion

"An industry group in the U. S. as airlines could suffer a one hundred billion dollar hit because of travel issues business analyst Jill Slazenger if there is continued impact throughout the economy most economists believe that there will need to be government action that in other words the government would have to step in and start spending money we are companies and consumers are pulling back

Jill Slazenger Business Analyst
Jack Welch, GE''s legendary CEO, has died at 84

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:39 sec | 2 years ago

Jack Welch, GE''s legendary CEO, has died at 84

"And Jack Welch has died he was the chairman and chief executive of General Electric from nineteen eighty one to two thousand one and transform the company into one of the world's most valuable public conglomerates CBS news business analyst Jill Slazenger says while she had many fans his accomplishments are legendary but not everyone liked his methods when Jack Welch took a hatchet to the staffing levels at G. E. firing people he was known as Megatron Jack the C. E. O. who would be willing to cut jobs and sacrifice people to the overall mission of the company Jack Welch was

Jack Welch Chief Executive General Electric Jill Slazenger E. O. CBS Business Analyst
Reported virus cases spike as Europe sees its first major outbreak

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:57 sec | 2 years ago

Reported virus cases spike as Europe sees its first major outbreak

"Stocks swooned on Wall Street today investors are concerned about the global economic impact of the corona virus which is spreading in Italy and South Korea economist Diane Swonk the reality and the world over about the fact that we're not going to see some real economic effects of the coronavirus CBS is Diane king hall has more investors were rattled by a rise in corona virus cases outside China Italy now has the largest outbreak in Europe the epicenter is just miles from Milan Italy's financial capital CBS news business analyst Jill Slazenger doesn't expect the virus to have a dire economic out when I talked to economists they're not framing this particular virus outbreak as tragic as it is on the human side as an economic docket that would throw the world into a recession CBS news update I'm

Italy South Korea Diane Swonk CBS Diane King Hall China Italy Europe Milan Italy Jill Slazenger Business Analyst
Druid Analytics with Jad Nauous

Software Engineering Daily

12:19 min | 2 years ago

Druid Analytics with Jad Nauous

"Lied are in D.. At imply which is an analytic system built on the DRUID database the end user of implies often an analyst business analysts have some kind take me inside the job of a typical analyst. I well actually. The typical user of imply is not an analyst generally analysts usually interact with tools or are traditionally. Bi tools like tableau looker power. Bi imply as is not really focused on that set of people will yet mainly what we are focused on delivering as analytics capabilities for operational level. People let's say you're an engineer and you need to look at the performance of your cluster and identify which machines seem to be exhibiting behavior. Yeah that's problematic. What versions of the software like what combination of software versions and configurations are causing a particular problem? And things like that or if you're a marketing say you're like a growth hacker or you're looking at your doing advertising you're doing ab testing and you won't understand what what segments of the population of the audience are actually interacting with a particular ad versus others and trying to optimize the performance of those ads in these kinds of situations. You have very complex. Data sets each kind of event or each click may have hundreds of fields. Potentially and what you're trying to do as a looking at some aggregate metrics for certain number of events over a period of time and then trying to find what are the common dimensions or the common fields within those events that seem to exhibit similar behaviors viewers. and which ones aren't we have a whole bunch of customers like one of the one of our biggest customers is twitter and their main use cases around is around. Ads Tell me some of the typical queries that might be issued to this database for the most part these types of queries are less about dashboard inquiries on more like slice and dice. Donald IX so the example would be altech an engineering one because those are always the easiest for me. Give me the request. Latency the ninety nine th percentile. UNTILE request latency over my entire cluster over the past. Let's say two months and then drill down to the past two days compare. The past. Two days is against the PAT like the two days a month ago and then zoom in to a particular spike. Let's say that you're seeing and the past today's Day's breaking down by let's say ws regions and then break it down by Java version and then compare those versions each other and figure out which which of the job version seem to be having problems versus. Not so those kinds of queries like pay a very simple workflow for the things that you're trying to do but imagine like you're trying to do this over. You know. Hundreds of these dimensions trying to figure out what group of dimensions or kind of key value pairs are the ones that are problematic. There's been tooling. Thanks for issuing these kinds of queries for a long time. And you're in a business where you're competing with some of these products like data warehousing products. What are the traditional responsibilities of a data warehouse? How does that compare to the responsibilities of Druid Greg question if you look at what time series database is? Do they really focused on providing these fast type real time super real time analytics. Where you know you? You put an event and it's supposed to the actual metric should be impacted almost immediately. You should be able to get alerts on those metrics pretty quickly and you should be able to store tons of these metrics billions of metrics. So that's kind of like one point in the design space for kind of data stores where you want Super real-time super fast but the complexity of the queries that you can do and the complexity of the data that you can get very limited on the other hand you have these. He's very capable very powerful analytical databases data warehouses like big query or snowflake or red shift where you can execute cutie super complex joins on vast amounts of data but they take a really long time to execute. DRUID is kind of open source Ola Real time data where I call it a real time. Data warehouse that we are that we are responsible for the main company behind it today. It's somewhere in between a time. Series database where the number of dimensions is small and a full data warehouse. Where you can do these super complex queries and and so we are drew it as real time and high performance in the sense that you can get results at interactive speeds so you can actually execute these kinds kinds of slice and dice analytics inquiries pretty quickly and human can sit in front of a Ui and then start clicking on things drag and drop and execute these search yes kind of drill downs and aggregations and and so on and do these kind of root cause analysis explorations but at the same time. It's it's powerful enough to get good subset of the use cases that people use data warehouses for mainly all these use cases are like really really operational use cases like people clore performance related use cases like people are trying to get kind of like the perform the performance of certain in store over time the performance of a certain item within a store like these kinds of things. How credit card transactions are working? WHO's executing them? What what are they? What are people buying for these transactions and so on so those are the use cases that we see in the scope? So you've got data warehouses on one side you've got time series data bases aces on the other and in terms of technology. Druid this kind of in between these two and what we're seeing happening is that more and more use cases that people actually care about are moving towards real time and more and more of the people who want to actually use data to make decisions today. Are these operational type. People like marketing customer success people or support or engineers. We're finding what what they're finding is that data warehouses can't fulfil this really interactive of need. And so they start to find they start to move and look for something that is more capable of interactive type queries. That are fast enough and they find droid and so today. A druid is very much focused on this hot data or you look and find the data that is most used by people. People want to query it all the time time they care about it being fresh they care about it being available all the time they move that data and they put it android at the same time. People are starting to push us towards words. The data warehouse use case the traditional data warehouse use cases. Because they see how fast they can execute queries android and and they say well. Why can't you do this? One More Query and this one more query and like this additional capable at the end like add additional function and so bit by bit we actually actually getting. We're actually moving more and more into the traditional data warehouse space the vision that we think we're building out imply as this idea of this operational real time data warehouse. And that's not something that currently exists. Today you have either time-series databases cases which are really operational. While I mean do it has been here for a while. But like Pe- when people think about high level concepts and the things that that currently exists they have like well. Okay it's either. There are a time series database. Or it's a data warehouse but there's actually something in the middle which is this operational real time data warehouse which is and overtime. We're adding like in in our next release we're going to add to do star Schema joints and so that's kind of pushing us bit by bit towards the things that data warehouses traditionally they have been doing architecturally. Speaking as I understand snowflake and big query you can treat them as an correct tong lick a unified data lake data warehouse. You can dump all your data in them and they take care of figuring out what should be on disk or what you pulled into memory in law. That's that's based on. When you're querying it the druid you fit it into your data infrastructure in a way where you're doing routine gene? ETL Jobs into into druid and you also have strong data streaming into it from another angle like streaming from Kafka or something. Can you tell me me how how it fits in to your architecture. How're you dumping data into drew it? In winter you dumping data entered. So there's two ways of putting data data into druid either you do it through streaming ingestion like you had mentioned with Kafka or can he says so you just pipe the data straight from Kafka into droid or or you do it through batch ingestion and what that means is you have your data sitting somewhere. It's usually in parque files or or see files inside Reid Data Lake or in S. three buckets or HDFS or whatever and it used to be that you would get dupe drawn. Certain Duke jobs that are controlled owned by Druid to read those files and suck them into the DRUID format in sucking goes files actually either through. a stream ingestion or batch ingestion. What we're doing as we are reading all the data and adding a whole bunch of indexes and optimizing it for the types of queries that we want to do and then we dump it into what we call deep storage so deep storage is usually another? HDFS or S. three bucket. But that's basically where the main store kind of highly available reliable store for all this data is the way drew it works. Is You have a bunch of historical. Also we call them historical and these are the really the worker nodes so they each of them will be responsible for subset of the data. This data is stored a segment. We call each packet of data. That's as a segment. Each historical is responsible for a number of those segments. It's they load them and then they served on any queries that come in so it used to be that. You used to need a dupe for doing a lot of this ingestion what we've done in this release that's coming out tomorrow as really focus on double down on building batch ingestion within I do sorry within droid such that. You don't need this external Hukou System to actually do this batch ingestion. Everybody knows loop is just really hard to run. So does that mean that. A user that already has a duke cluster are they typically copying keeping all their data from HDFS into druid they would usually select the data that they care about and they would copy it into druid. What we see is is people often timing out the data that's android so it kind of over time ages out and so people would store in Druid? You can actually surely have tearing of your historical nodes so you can have very expensive historical. 's that have a ton of memory. Such that the entire data that they load fits memory so you can actually execute queries really fast and then you can have a lower performance. Snowed which may be serves data data from SSD files from SSD's and that could be for things that are maybe like a month or three months old or something like that and then something that has magnetic discs and that would be four things that are maybe a year old and then generally people don't like in these operational use cases. People rarely care about data for for multiple years or things like that so they they usually wouldn't load that that amount of data

Reid Data Lake Analyst Twitter Engineer Kafka Donald Ix
Dow industrials end down over 450 points as coronavirus fears rise

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:39 sec | 2 years ago

Dow industrials end down over 450 points as coronavirus fears rise

"In stocks have tumbled this morning after China announced a sharp rise in the number of cases of coronavirus threatening to cramp global economic growth right now the Dow down almost four hundred and sixty four points the S. and P. down over fifty points but CBS news business analyst Jill Schlesinger says she doesn't think the current adviser corona virus cases here will have a significant impact on the US economy I don't think that five or ten or even fifty cases that's not what's going to impact the United States economy what's going to impact the U. S. economy is at if everyone is freaked out and they're scared to go out shopping they're scared to do things that's what starts to impact the real

China Jill Schlesinger CBS Business Analyst United States
"business analyst" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"business analyst" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Have it just like your CBS news senior business analyst joining us especially when the job creation which really really strong you want what's so the story here we have well first of all I want to applaud you as the only station in the United States of America that is requested me for this record ever so you are super smart pants at right our bread is buttered I mean come on so this is a report that comes out every month it's called you're ready for this jolts job opening in labor turnover survey I am that I couldn't even find unlike so excited because no one ever asks about this and it's a great report now why is this because when the labor department goes out and says to employers like Hey how many jobs you have that are outstanding you know it it's really a very good clue about a portion of the labor market so right now this is for add it's a little bit of a lag okay so it's it's the October and it report it it's just job openings rose to seven point two seven million dollars okay now which weird of course is that there are some hick ups in this because we had a drop and we didn't know why we had to drop but here's what I want to know is the big huge trend vacancies have been trending lower this year so that means we're feeling more jobs and of course you could imagine for an October report we got a lot of retail jobs right to say it is outside of the of that report the Christmas to jobs but yeah it is but look the other thing that I think is really interesting is what is the best way to gauge how strong the labor market is it's you know it's partially what jobs are out there and what are being filled but how about the number of people who are willingly saying I'm out of this job I'm doing something else and that is called the quit rate in the quit rate is really important because this is a new extremely interesting number gives you an idea like Hey if you're willing to quit you think could either get another job you're going back to school so this is the quick rate is at two point three percent huge number but it's pretty good I think that what's important here to know about the job market in total is that we are creating jobs there are still a bunch of vacancies out there but they may not be the greatest jobs in the world those people who have jobs and they feel confident about their skills are willing to quit even if they don't have another job because they have a lot of confidence that they can get a job so well these are good things yeah indeed what about wages how how's that going well I'm glad you asked that it's still a very difficult number because we what I would like to tell you is that wages are rising and that's good overall but it really is depending where you fall in the income stream so in the beginning of the recovery we so we just go up for people in the middle and high end now leading the recovery we're finally getting people at the lower end that maybe because of some of the minimum wage rules that went into effect in certain municipalities I gotta say I think the job market is certainly certainly a a strong indicator that the economy is growing it's just not growing so fast it's it's solid it's just not fantastic and we just probably would be the missing component I would say for the whole report Hey you know what that the silver lining is low inflation yeah so even if your wages go up too much hopefully if you look at your overall prices I know we we say no gas and and you know Jill like just one bought a Turkey for the holidays and it was expensive overall prices are not up by that much all right just Lester CBS to senior business analyst thanks for your time again this morning put it in a chapter seven I'm Tony Christie tech as were used the latest a part of your morning hours let's talk a little.

senior business analyst CBS
"business analyst" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"business analyst" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"News business analyst Jill Schlesinger says the first step is creating a holiday budget by reviewing your bills from last holiday season then make a list for this year of everyone you need to include many retailers are kicking off their promotions early hoping to lure shoppers who are starting to browse the web for those holiday deals evacuations are staying in place in southeast Texas because of that massive chemical plant fire Jefferson County judge Jeff Branik says his first priority is to keep all citizens safe at all times will not do it back to where you can order until such time as I'm conveyances say for our citizens to return firefighters are making some progress battling flames a TPC group support nature site but he didn't doesn't want to risk any lives people aid at port Neches need Orland groves and also part of Port Arthur were told to get out on Wednesday afternoon no word yet on what caused the fire officials don't also yet know when people will be able to return to their homes the blast happened on Wednesday thirteen hours apart they blew out windows and doors of nearby homes also prompted a mandatory evacuation of a four mile radius from the plant important H. as in southeast Texas by the way that's about eighty miles east of Houston all power has been restored in Methuen after an outage on thanksgiving day here's more from WBZ TV is Tiffany chance it was a frustrating thanksgiving for about thirty two hundred families in Methuen not because of all the cooking but a power outage at the worst possible time only tell you didn't everything but power I powerful winds knocked down three telephone poles along Pleasant Valley street at around four forty five one was leaning across the road tangled up with live wire we definitely like to hold on BM thanksgiving day where was road wasn't being heavily traveled right now lucky for drivers but not for families who had to dine in the dark again all power now restored and with the wind but pleasant street Pleasant Valley street from Jackson street market basket was initially close both directions after multiple power poles were spotted leaning into the roadway a high school football game leads to chaos the nation's oldest public high school football rivalry ends with a bench clearing brawl on thanksgiving Wellesley and Needham players one after one another with just two minutes left to go in the game the home team Wellesley was up twenty seven to nothing officials call the game once punches were thrown it was a one hundred and thirty second game between the two teams meanwhile across town rivalry in the high school football is renewed in a city on the south shore in its eighty seventh annual Turkey bowl WBZ's Kevin Coleman explains from Quincy as the clock ran down to the final seconds of the Turkey bowl the Quincy high presidents football player shower and their head coach with the ice cold cooler to celebrate beating the rival north.

Jill Schlesinger business analyst thirteen hours thirty second two minutes
"business analyst" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"business analyst" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Newsroom by Bill. Stephen the clouds have parted, and we're seeing lots of sunshine in the spring housing market says one expert calling what group chairman and former Fannie Mae executive Tim roots said on FOX business man, what a difference thirty days makes right? I mean thirty days ago before writing the epitaph on the housing market flashbacks to the housing crisis. What's of course, was all fraud and speculation and this housing market. It's really based on fundamentals. I like what I'm saying mean now coming into the spring buying season. I think everything's really working out quite nicely. Route says he's excited because home values are stabilizing interest rates remain low. Incomes are rising home buyers. This spring should have a lot easier time finding something to buy says another expert CBS news business analyst, Jill Schlesinger says. It looks like inventory, the number of homes for sale is finally starting to improve. That's really good news for the buyers. And so I would think that this is a good time to be looking low mortgage rates and also we've seen some good gains in wages over the last year and a half or so so more people can potentially enter the market. Schlesinger says the improving inventory pictures, helping slow the pace of home price growth, many baby boomer homeowners are discovering a hard truth. Millennials don't want to buy their mcmansions. The Wall Street Journal reports that large high maintenance homes popular with boomer's a few years ago just aren't selling to a new generation of buyers with different needs. And. Tastes. And the journal reports that the problem will likely get worse in the coming decade as more boomers decide to downsize, you'll have a hard time unloading their big houses, there's a truce in the bidding wars. Redfin. Reports that in the first three weeks of March only sixteen percent of offers written by Redfin. Agents faced a bidding war just a year ago in that same time period. Sixty one percent of buyers were forced into a bidding war, but keep an eye on this. Redfin. Says if the rate of bidding wars begins to increase it'll be an early indication that the market is heating backup coming up in half an hour. One state may.

Jill Schlesinger Redfin The Wall Street Journal Fannie Mae Bill Stephen Tim roots group chairman FOX business fraud boomer CBS executive business analyst thirty days Sixty one percent sixteen percent three weeks
"business analyst" Discussed on The Product Podcast

The Product Podcast

03:16 min | 3 years ago

"business analyst" Discussed on The Product Podcast

"And how would it taught me a lot about myself, and how to be effective communicator on if I take a day in my life when I was working. Mcdonald's. I have myself product owner on a business analyst, we're based in London Dan had the rest of the scrum team where based in Spain I had business analyst working closely with my US colleagues stakeholders and customers in the US. And then of course, I had a girlfriend who needed my time in the by. And. It forces you to really value your own time. But also, the time of of your colleagues and other people in your life that really pushes you to find more efficient ways to build relationships and communicate with people. So when I think about my team for me as a product manager, and I think any product manager it needs to be more than just a taskmaster. And when you have someone in the US who may be getting say five or six hours behind you. You don't want relation to just be a series of tasks in emails that you're sending up person and never really get into rock to you never really get to understand. What's happening? So for me, one of the most interesting challenges was headway inspire. My team when I don't have to privilege of being with them face to face. How do I remind them of what our vision is? And make sure that they understand it and everything that they do. And when you start them to think about it. Of course, what comes to mind is will continue -nology helped me. So really a started to learn that needed to work smarter, not harder, and because of the different times, and I looked to things like Asana or any task management tool to be away for us as a team across Spain the US to really communicate an update each other on what we are working on. So we would have to products we had a talent management application we worked on his world verticals. So really it was using to like this to be able to date on task management where we were currently going on each project. Maybe how particular stakeholders and key markets were feeling and the important part about using this tool, though, was dot when I did get out of bed or before it went to bed depending on who is speaking with obey all to have a conversation with them and remind them what our goals were what our vision is. While the strategy is what we're. Trying to do. So it didn't just become a relationship where I'll just chasing them on what I needed to do. And what we're supposed to be working on? What was coming up in the next sprint because I left a lot of that work in our task management tools. And I think that's a really valuable lesson product manager. It's yes, of course, it's shipping the product. But it is also being a leader about inspiring people that work for you. I'm this is one of the ways I was able to do it. The point really is technology should be an enabler. I've seen a lot of great tools out. There have a lot of people contact fee. Trying to sell me tools..

US product manager Spain business analyst Mcdonald London six hours
"business analyst" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

04:13 min | 3 years ago

"business analyst" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"And what gets you to that sort of single source of truth rather than one hundred different sources of truth that live in a hundred different workbooks. There is sometimes a distinction between the role of a business analyst and data scientist, and maybe a data analyst more and more companies have these kinds of roles maybe you could say data scientists to write more code business. Analysts spend more time in front of business intelligence tools, there some work around machine learning algorithms that maybe data. Scientists are doing more often told me about this range of data roles as you've seen them. And how do these different people use business intelligence tools? Also is business intelligence useful for doing machine learning. Yeah. So I mean, I think on the title side. I would say don't wanna step into them. Pass because it is a an ongoing and sort of hilarious at this point. It's like an ironic fight. It's such an old fight that it's it's become a joke. Oh, what a data. Scientist is this statistician. This mathematician, is this data analyst is this business analyst. But I think the core idea is yeah, people bring different skill sets the table. But the reality is an any data. Scientist worth their salt will tell you this most of data. Scientists time is spent cleaning data right sort of shaping it and extracting features and getting it ready for machine learning running the actual machine learning. Algorithm is not very difficult tuning it can be more interesting, but but actually running it is not super hard and certainly not time consuming. The thing that's time consuming is like cleaning up the data and getting it ready. And the only way to do that affectively is to have subject matter expertise in what the data is supposed to mean. Right. The that is something that that. Any machine learning algorithm that you're you're bringing to the table needs. You can't just feed in sort of a jumble of raw data and hope to get magic out the other side, you need data that that makes sense that the answer something for the business. Otherwise, what you're gonna get back from the machine learning. Our is seems like there's some correlation between month and temperature like, yeah. Well, thanks awesome. Not very helpful. Right. So you need to give it something that that makes sense. And so data scientists lot of the time what they have to do is they have to go to the business owners and say tell me what this means or tell me how this data is supposed to be shaped. Or what the features that? I should feed in our because they can't possibly be subject matter experts in every possible part of the data that their business cares about. So what a data model gives you is it gives you data where somebody has already gone in gives you sort of meta data where somebody has already gone in and given the data meaning said, this is what this means to our business don't feed in, you know. Raw number of purchases feed in lifetime customer value. Instead. And so whether you're a data scientist, or, you know, data analyst or a business analyst or a statistician or a business user, you're still going to care about that core concept of taking the data from its raw form and turning into something meaningful to the business. And so if you're a data scientist, that's really going exceleron your process because you don't have to start with the raw data and cleaning it and pulling out all the failed transactions because they've already been pulled out by the business analyst. And so I think sort of collaborative approach to to getting that data from its raw form to something meaningful makes everybody's job better and easier because those business analysts and those those data analysts are often the ones who do have the subject matter experts. Right. The marketing analyst knows what the marketing data's supposed to mean data. Scientists might look at the marketing data Ango. Yeah. That looks fine and business analyst would look at it and say, no, no, no, no something's really wrong with that data because we know. Ever spent ten trillion dollars that year on advertising and the data. Scientists will would say, well, it's just a number. I don't I don't know if it's right or wrong. I'm just working with the data as it was given to me. And so you need that subject matter experts because those are the people who spot the problems and the things, you know, both the sort of.

business analyst scientist analyst marketing analyst ten trillion dollars
"business analyst" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:56 min | 3 years ago

"business analyst" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Djebel bit deeper into that example. So the example of somebody from the sales team coming over to the business analyst and saying, hey business analyst, I need sales by region for the last six months, and then the business analysts benzel time writing that query. And then the salesperson comes back and says actually I need sales by country for the last nine months. Your query was was not sufficient for me. And then the business has to rewrite the query and sequel, you're saying that looker has some features that help save time in that interaction give a little bit more detail there, what's how is that time being saved shore. So it's being saved because the analyst was involved once in defining the data model and in saying, let's say, you know, here's where the country field lives in the database because that's a physical field in the database. But then I will assign countries to regions which is not something that lives in. The database, but lemme say, you know, if it's this country this country it's in this region. And if it's this other country the country, and it's in this region. Maybe I'm writing a case statement, and I write that once into look Mel into into looker and now anytime that anyone clicks the region button on the sort of looker interface. That's presented to business users. Not the back end. But the front end looker automatically knows how to write that sequel that puts the right country in the region. And if I need to update that region field because you know, we we reclassify one country into a different region. I can do that in one place in code. And then every dashboard that uses that concept of region every time that somebody writes, a query every time somebody asks a question that has that concept of region looker is going to update that and right? The the appropriate sequel that's been the most updated version, it's it's just a very it's a very dry model. Right. It's very don't repeat yourself model, which again is like a great engineering concept that for whatever reason. Just hasn't made its way into data analytics and so- looker is bringing that concept of data to analytics and saying, that's really brilliant. We don't wanna have to define something six different times or one hundred different times one hundred different places because then changing it is is really painful, and that is exactly what leads to data chaos. Right. It's it's everybody having their own little workbook where they're doing their own data analysis and trying to remember what was the latest definition for region. What was the latest definition for lifetime customer value? When they don't remember that or when they remember it wrong or when they do it, and it's right now. But then six months later, it's wrong. And there's no automatic way. To update it. That's what leads to data chaos. And so having all of that live in one data model that is central. That's governed. That's version controlled that's, you know, everybody has their own sandbox on Dev version of it. So they can try new stuff out without affecting production. Having all that stuff. In software is what allows everybody stay on the same..

business analyst Mel six months nine months
"business analyst" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:55 min | 3 years ago

"business analyst" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"The long term storage medium is you have core BI analyst business intelligence analysts who are trying to give that data some structure that used to be really huge job to sort of structure, really nicely. So that it could go into the data warehouse because those data warehouses couldn't deal with anything that wasn't, you know, perfect star schema, it's a lot easier now because the data warehouses are much more capable of dealing with messy data real world data, but you've got those analysts than you've got business analyst. Who live across the organization and effort department, and then I think you can't forget about all the people in business roles who want information from that data right there fundamentally that consumers they're the ones who are making the demands in terms of trying to get value from that data, and they even more than everybody else. Don't wanna have to worry about where that data lives, you know, whether that data was collected correctly. If it's clean, if it's structured properly, if it's put into terms that the business understands that makes sense to the business, right? They don't want that data raw they want as sort of business metrics. And so that data pipeline involves a lot of people, and then it can go even beyond that. Because maybe you're earning that data around and giving it to your customers. And so you have developers who were then building out portal's embedded analytics for your customers. So there's just a lot of touch points and keeping everybody in sync is a big challenge before we get into looker, which is where you currently work. I'd like to give. People who are listening some context on data analytics as it's practice today through a case study and before you join looker you worked at upward thirty which is a media site. And you've written about your time there in terms of the data pipeline and the data challenges that you had there. So I think this is a good case study because media sites they have to make data driven decisions around the advertising and the content. It's actually it can be a very data intensive job. Because you have all these users that go on the site, and you have all these events that happen, and you have to correlate events and content and what advertising is making you money taking his side the life of a modern data analyst as you experienced it at upwardly. Yeah. I do think that publishers media is an interesting case study because they they have an enormous amount of data much more than an ecommerce site for. Sample would have. But a lot of that data is, you know, not very well correlated. You don't really necessarily know who the user that, you know, read the article was and so trying to figure out those patterns at a very high level is tricky, you know, I mean, I think so my my life as data analyst at upward. The a lot of the time was spent architect the data system to be able to do data capture at the scale that we needed it to and to make that available that turn that data around and make it available to all the folks as you said in in, you know, the customer facing positions the advertiser facing positions and also the aditorial staff, and you know, I think for data analysts and data engineers, it's easy to focus on the technical requirements because those are intellectually demanding and challenging and and fun and a lot of ways and the technology. That's available. These days is pretty amazing. So getting to play with that stuff is great. But I found that some of the biggest challenges were less on the technical side less. How do we? Picture this this table. So that joins officially and more. How do we present this data to a writer or an editor or revenue operations manager in a way that will make sense to them that will actually be useful in their job that can be a much bigger challenge? Trying to put yourself in their shoes. And think about what they need to do their jobs and often as an analyst you'll say, well, I'm sure this dashboard will work and you put it in front of them, and they go. Yeah, that's nice..

analyst business analyst writer operations manager editor