27 Burst results for "Bush Institute"

Hector Barreto - Entrepreneurship and Immigrants

The Strategerist

05:45 min | 3 months ago

Hector Barreto - Entrepreneurship and Immigrants

"Welcomed or guest today, Hector Baretto Hector form headed up the United States. Small Business Administration today. He's the chairman of the Latino Coalition. Thanks for waking up early with us. Do this actor thank you in our Co host Laura Collins, once again. Welcome back, Laura. She's the director in the Bush. Institute smu Economic Growth Initiative thank you. Thank Santa I. Only wake up early for this I know we. To Peel back the curtain we're here at about seven thirty in the morning in Dallas and Lauren I were comparing notes and turns out that one of us are morning. People so hector. We're looking. We're looking at you. Demand on. West Coast time. It's like five thirty in your body clock Oh. That's rough. Hector's here for our SME Economic Growth Advisory Council where he is one of them. Is that help guide the policy work that we do at the Bush Institute, because both of his expertise is the forty first administrator, the small business, and because his work with the Latino Coalition. Let's start with the former when you were with the small business administration. What was the goal of that department? What were you? You, all working on the small business. Administration was actually started in one, thousand, nine, hundred, fifty, three by President Eisenhower and there were some small business programs before that, but they unified those all into one agency, and it's really the agency that supports and advocates for America's small businesses, and that role has become even more important over the years when they formed the SBA. There probably weren't thinking that was going to be over thirty million small businesses in the united. United States and I like to say nothing small about small business. They really are the engine of America, the engine that fuels the economy of America not only are there a lot of them, but they represent over fifty two percent of the gross output of the economy. It's the place that two-thirds the net new jobs of our economy comes from, and it's also the place that a lot of our innovation comes from. That makes us the envy of the world. World in terms of our economy so very very important agency. A lot of people have heard of it, but they oftentimes don't know everything it does. Where does your passion for Small Business? Come from a well? That's easy. I was fortunate to be born into an entrepreneurial family, so the first business owners I ever met where my mother and father and my father was especially a serial entrepreneur. He loved business. He loves starting businesses. I'm not saying he loved running. My mother ran the business ideas, man yeah, but I learned a lot about a small business I used to joke that everything I learned about business. I learned in a Mexican restaurant because that's why I worked when I was a little kid. What jobs is you? Hold with your parents Oh, a lot of them, you know we were an immigrant family and. There was five children. My mother had five children six years. I have four younger sisters, and so we were all recruited to my father's executive training program very early on, so we all had to work I remember waiting tables when I was nine years old. So And then I. as I got older, I got more responsibility and help run some of those businesses and start some of those businesses, and my father had a number of different businesses. We started off with the restaurant business, because that's an easy business to access, but then later on at a little import export business, a little construction business, none of those businesses wherever really large, but they were very important to our family helps support us. They helped educate, and we learned a lot about being in business and working with the community and customers, and so your father came to America start these businesses. He actually didn't. My father was an immigrant to the United States in the late nineteen fifties. I don't think he was planning on staying that long. But he met my mother. My mother is also from immigrant parents from Mexico they've shown love, and and of all places they started their journey in Kansas City Missouri that's where I was born. I grew up in Kansas City Missouri and my father. He had a lot of different jobs as a lot of immigrants do when they first get here. His first jobs were picking. Picking potatoes for fifty cents an hour in rural Missouri and later on, he worked at a railroad, a literally pounding the spikes into the ground, but in the winter it got too cold, so he moved into He started working in the livestock business, and it was very difficult. dirty work. He was cleaning out stalls, but at least it was warmer than being outside. When he was working at the railroad later on he, he was a janitor at the school that I would eventually go to, but my father used to always say that he was a business owner, and I would say dad. You have these jobs. You're not a business owners. They know what I have to do right now, but eventually alone my own business, so he was very passionate about that. He always wanted to work for himself, so he starts so then he starts these businesses and his career trajectory starts trending too so far up that start happening. Yeah, my father was a very visionary leader very. Very charismatic you know he when he's grown up used to say know. I came here with nothing I didn't know anybody. I didn't speak the language. I had no money I had no power, but I believed in myself I was willing to work hard, and this is such a great country that affords us the opportunity to go as far as we WANNA go. We're only limited by our own imagination our own commitment, so he he's. We started these businesses, but later on my father was kind of an organizer as well, and he wanted to belong to the Chamber of Commerce. This is in Kansas City. Number of others spanning businesses. There were there at the time, and my father started asking. Where's the Hispanic Chamber? And they said well. There isn't an Hispanic Chamber. My Dad said well there should be, and if nobody else is going to start it, I will so my father was one of the founders of the Kansas City Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, that was in the mid seventies,

Small Business Small Business Administration Hector Baretto Hector United States America Business Owner Latino Coalition Kansas City Kansas City Hispanic Chamber O Missouri Hispanic Chamber Laura Collins Smu Economic Growth Initiative Kansas City Missouri Chamber Of Commerce Chairman Director Bush Institute President Eisenhower Dallas
Anne Chow On  Keeping People Connected

The Strategerist

05:51 min | 6 months ago

Anne Chow On Keeping People Connected

"We've been talking recently with several nonprofit leaders about how their organizations are pivoting adjusting to all the changes in the world because of in nineteen today. Though we're talking to a business sector leader to hear about their side of the world and Chow has been at. At and T. Business for thirty years and in Twenty nineteen was named CEO. The first woman and the first woman of color to hold the position of the company and welcome to the strategic. Thank you for doing this. Thanks so much. Appreciate you having me so next week. We're launching our latest issue. The catalyst that Bush Institute's Journal of Ideas and we're focusing on America at its best and the things that are making us optimistic. So and what are you seeing right now? That's giving you hope. Yeah interesting question and I think that there's you know there's nothing like a crisis of epic proportion to US. Great clarity about what's important in our lives. And that is both are professionalize in our personal lives holistically and I would say that the thing that really I find so inspiring is how important the power of connection is you know what this pandemic has shown us is that You know the world works whether it's You know in our communities whether it's across any business of any size the world works on connection and that connection is You know is manifested both in the sense of technology and kind of networks and the business that. At and T. You know eighteen business are responsible for but also the power of connection between people and the fact that we We as humanity have rallied together in a way That we never have on a scale that we never have in common enemy and that is the virus. So that that I find incredibly inspiring is how we have come together as a business community as they philanthropic community as humanity and society at large and how were rallying together In a common mission. Yeah it really is amazing to see everybody has a little bit different set of resources available to them and everyone is using their resources to the best of their abilities to try and bite this thing and I know just in terms of tying a little bit eighteen is trying to imagine what this last what these last few months would have been like without Internet access. This had happened even fifteen years earlier where we didn't have video conferencing and we didn't have high speed internet or thirty years ago when very few people had what would have looked like. Is that something you've thought at all about is how incredible the timing of this? Yeah for sure. Yeah I I have fought long and hard about that. I've actually spoken about it as well. You know when You know as really kind of leading teams and serving clients. It's it's always easier to do. So when you see a very clear purpose right when you see a very clear mission about what has to get done and there's no question that our communication and our our reliance on communication which is enabled by Mobile Technologies. Internet technologies. There's just no way that we could have even survived right whether that's You know in any of these aspects of the fights on the front line You know whether whether you think about some of the pivots From a small business perspective about how you know restaurants have now had the ability to go online right and focus on delivery. I mean there's there's no aspect of our lives or the economy or society. We can envision what this would have been like us the golf right whether it's ten years ago twenty years ago thirty years ago Of what that could have been like. And so now for sure this pandemic and in nineteen has really brought to life the power and the importance of communication. You know even beyond Internet our access to data but even just voice right and how true acted we are and how important it is to have that connection whether it's through video through voice right because we cannot for the time being largely have that physical connection in that physical proximity that That we all thrive on you mentioned small businesses which are just critical to our country. What are y'all doing to make sure that That those needs are supported. Yeah Yeah thanks for that question. You know an and eighteen business. We are so fortunate to have an opportunity to serve businesses and organizations and sectors of the economy You know across the world and businesses of all sizes whether it ranges from healthcare providers to first responders to education and otherwise specifically is really small business. I have great passion for small businesses. I I have Been inspired by the fact that you know if you're a small business owner or if you're an entrepreneur you are in business because you have passion for Your Business I And so for us. Small Business represents a key clients for all over the country support of them have ranged from a providing them with a with unique offers to support them. You know whether it's You know call forwarding services Mobile Hotspot Services but importantly we've also joined You're very consistent with FCC Chairman Pies. Keep Americans connected pledge? We continue to support them through June thirtieth for both residential and small business customers. Who Tell us that. They're having issues with paying their bills or having issues Asteroids to the pandemic We have a commitment to them to not disrupt their service and we're waiting all late. Payments Fees You know we're we're also joined up with American Express in their Stanford Small Coalition Where we're supporting small businesses through various programs services offers tools we have encouraged our employees to donate and actively contribute to small businesses as well. And you know we've got the unique offers around the different president services that enable small businesses to operate whether it's in a remote work environment or otherwise and so we've really worked hard to run the gamut of what is it that are small business customers. Need you to navigate through this crisis and move onto the next as which I like to characterize as kind of return and recovery

Small Business T. Business Business Owner Chow United States Bush Institute CEO American Express Journal Of Ideas Mobile Technologies Mobile Hotspot Services President Trump America Stanford FCC Chairman
Leadership During Difficult Times

The Strategerist

08:09 min | 7 months ago

Leadership During Difficult Times

"Guest on this episode of the strategic is Keith Hennessy. These days he teaches at the Stanford Graduate School of Business Stanford Law School and his leadership fellow at the Bush Institute where he's teaching our leadership program sessions during the Bush administration. Though Keith was the assistant to the president for economic policy was the director of the National Economic Council during the financial crisis in two thousand seven and two thousand eight so those days Keith was working around the clock to blunt the impact of that financial crisis on on our economy. So we thought it'd be interesting today to hear about that experience while we're reacting to the cove in nineteen pandemic. That's happening right now. Keith thank you so much for taking time while your social distancing to call in happy to help hello from Palo Alto California. Well first off. Can you paint a picture of what it's like to be a decision maker in government during a time like this because I know right now? I'm watching the news. And there's just a constant stream of information things are changing by the minute and some of it is is fact some of it is conjecture. Some of it is somewhere in between. What's that stream of information like inside the White House and in our government? Yeah well an advantage. You have when you're working in the White House is that you get you. Get the best information that's out there. I always joke that one of the wonderful privileges. You can pick up the phone call pretty much anyone in the world and say. I need to help the president understand about your area of expertise. Can you spend some time with me? The person will always say yes. And then you have. You have a tremendous Roster of experts working in the government and then also outside of government Who can help feed you information? So the information tends to find you and if it doesn't you've you've got a team of talented people who can go find out The best available answer to any question. That's out there but there definitely is sort of a fog of war we're You think you know what's going on and you probably have a better picture than almost anyone else But there are a lot of unknowns. There are a lot of things that You know that you're just making educated guesses at so that's tough in hindsight This is one of the big mistakes. In terms of historic analysis is in hindsight. It is very easy to forget the things that now seem obvious. But we're not obvious time You know the biggest mistake about hindsight announces at the time. You didn't know what was going to happen next. And while you thought you knew what your actions and decisions might Might produce you're not always certain And then the other thing is is stressful And so you learn how individuals react to stressful environments and then you learn how teams React to stressful environments and you know I think it also depends on how long the crisis Lassen how long the pressure is applied. It's one thing to be in a stressful situation for days and weeks. It's a whole another thing to be in it for weeks and months and wears on people and In overtime that takes a toll because the people who are making these decisions are after all humans right. That's actually kind of interesting. And and so how? How do you keep team functioning under these kind of in under this kind of situation? And where might we might be doing this for a long time? Yeah I'm not sure I have many tricks. We were in in one respect. We were fortunate in that the the financial crisis in two thousand eight hit in year eight. So of the Bush team We knew how to operate as a team. We knew how the mechanisms of governments worked on a lot of US had four or five or six or seven years under our belts working for this president working with each other So we had those advantages of experience and know each other and frankly had a really good team In that last year With with Hank Paulson sort of as the the field. General for the president with Ben Bernanke over at the Fed and Kevin Warsh And with a lot of amazing people internally and so that teen Kinda you know it means that you don't have to worry about those aspects of it. You can just focus on the crisis of hand. So we had a bunch of pros. We had a bunch of pros. Who knew how to work together. And then you know you just you kind of say look. There will be time to sleep and time to rest on the back end of this. We're just going to keep pushing basically because we have to. I think the other thing is the morale is really important and and Bush thing. We were really fortunate because the morale comes in large part from the president You know the morale and the tone I always say that the tone in the White House is eighty percent set by the president and twenty percent by the White House Chief of staff and we had a president and a chief of staff who were creating a tone and environment where the rest of us didn't have to worry about the politics We could basically just focus on. What was the? What was the best policy? And how do we try to make it happen? So then you mentioned the that you knew how the government works and the government with all of its departments and with experts who sometimes have competing priorities. So in general strokes. Can you talk about how to how these departments all work together and coordinate during a crisis like this? Well that's what the White House policy councils are for. At the time we had four of them there are now three In the White House of the National Security Council is the granddaddy of them all And the National Economic Council in the Domestic Policy Councils And I worked in a on the National Economic Council staff so these are people who work in the White House for the president and Their job is to coordinate policy making in their in their area for the All the information that comes in for the president goes through the Policy Council to sort of structure. It make sure the presence president knows what's going on and what that best information is and in particular because the president has got a lot of advisers each of whom is responsible for looking at a part of the problem and the Policy Council Stash. Job is to make sure that the president has the information that they need to look at the whole problem. And so when you run one of these Policy cancels you get very good at running meetings and conference calls to pull all the advisers together To to compare information to figure out what decisions the president to make and then to make sure that the president hears from all of you know his advisors that he needs to we. We would joke that. Our job was to set up clean fights cleaner where you'd have conflicting advice. The you know one team advisors would set a precedent you do X. And other advisers would say the president should do why you. WanNa make sure the president gets the information. He needs so that he can make that decision and then when he makes the decision that everybody throughout the executive branch actually executes. Does what the president wants to do right so you would actually present. Exxon wide both team ex ante y presented the president. Let him make that decision. Yeah and I shouldn't describe as really two teams that a mismatch speak mistaken. Are My these are. These are different advisors who were all part of the president skiing. But right right right just disagree on a particular question and You know these. These decisions are hard. None of the options are particularly good. Because you're always over constrained But there are just different. Trade offs different choices that the advisers would make. And what you WANNA do. Is You want to hear the president. Have the president here. Those arguments be able to push the advisers. And then say okay. Here's what we're going to do You know the privilege of working for the president. Is You get to be in the room to make the argument or the option that you think you should make. And then when he hasn't sides it you've got to go out there and execute even if he went with The other option one that you didn't recommend be interesting thing about the financial crisis is that there were a lot fewer disagreements about what to do among

President Trump White House Assistant To The President Keith Hennessy National Economic Council Bush Bush Institute Stanford Graduate School Of Bu Palo Alto California Policy Council United States Exxon National Security Council Director Hank Paulson Ben Bernanke Kevin Warsh
"bush institute" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

01:32 min | 8 months ago

"bush institute" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"For the invisible when and we we should also acknowledge that in a while we're focused on veterans today no quality mental health care across the United States it's challenging to navigate towards but my hope is through the way your wellness plan veterans are actually going to leave some of the transformative needs that we have an oral health care in the country we know that when veteran recover from the challenges that they face but they want to go on and lead and their communities around the country and when we have strong veteran communities and our country we have strong communities overall and that the percentages we we believe and helping veterans successfully transition from their military life so that they can go on to continue to lead and serve their country after they take off the uniform and with that I couldn't agree more Casey Kelly just a pleasure talking to you about this and you're so right yeah the invisible wounds of war I mean trauma and drama are not unique to the warfighter everybody nobody makes out of this world without some dents and dings and I can't thank you enough for the work you're doing down there with the bush institute always appreciate talking to you thank you so very much now when we return we'll look at resources available for veterans that want to start their own business that's next on CBS eye on veterans let's say you just bought a house bad news is your one step closer to becoming your parents you'll probably mow the lawn ask if anybody.

United States Casey Kelly bush institute CBS
The Leadership of Congressman Dan Crenshaw

The Strategerist

08:11 min | 1 year ago

The Leadership of Congressman Dan Crenshaw

"Congressman Dan Crenshaw life has taken in from Houston to Venice Waylon as a kid to the Middle East and Afghanistan is a navy seal and Saturday and I live in Washington. DC as a congressman representing the Texas Second Congressional district. There's a lot more friendly relationship in Congress and I thank people realize Probably should do a better job of letting the American people know that we talk about the importance of Central America in US policy and his transition from military to civilian life. I Imagine Kaufman and this is the strategic presented by the George W Bush Institute. What happens when he crossed the forty third president late night? Sketch comedy and compelling conversation the strategic podcast born from the word strategically which was coined by ASK SNL and embraced. By the George W Bush administration we highlight the American spirit of leadership and compassion through thought provoking conversations. And we're reminded that the most affective leaders are the ones who laugh. Well thanks so much to congressman Dan Crenshaw for joining us today on the strategic just congressman. And we appreciate you taking a few minutes here. Absolutely great to be with you. In our CO host. Today is the Great Lower Collins. WHO's the director at the Bush Institute? SMU Economic Growth Initiative Initiative. Laura thanks for hanging out again thanks for calling in great must be all the cookies I brought it. I'm easily bribed. Yes so congressman you represent the Great State of Texas. Were you grew up but your your background isn't strictly restricted Texas year. Pretty uniquely global. Can you tell us a bit about the path that you took to where you are today. Wow well quite a quite a few years so I'm from Houston My Dad was Petroleum engineer he He jumped around a lot of a lot or some companies over's career and You know as a result we moved around a lot so my life was going between Houston and overseas and back the east and back overseas and You know somewhere on the lines of I wanted to join the military Specifically the seal team's James Next you didn't WanNa do in the military wanted to be a seal specifically right. Yeah that's what I did. And did a few deployments a little mixed up on third deployment and that kind of sent me on the path in Amman now because eventually resulted in me. Happy military fought that pretty hard for years. And and Did a couple more deployments and operations role but eventually had to leave. Some of that time in the military too was was some overseas living with. You said Your father father worked in the oil industry in west end lived overseas at time. He spent some time in Central America. Correct Yeah South America. Yeah so Lived in Ecuador a little bit Middle School and then actually all my entire high school spent in both hot Columbia de. Do you think that your childhood influences your public policy in any way because you were exposed to so so many different cultures as you as a as a young kid and and a lot of a lot of different experiences than your typical politician. I think it does. I mean it's So as a as a younger kid what I'm exposed to is kind of a need to defend the United States Like a new. Defend your patriots them you know. America is sort of punching bag around the world. Because it's it's the big the big guy in the room right there you know it's it's it's always been that way and it was just commonplace for everybody to to to take swipes out there you know. Sometimes you know well and say well intentioned but not not in a malevolent ways. It's just is what it is and that's just not something you're used to at a young age usually unless you grew up overseas like I did so that's the first thing I did start thinking about patriotism early on in Mike It wasn't default. You know and so and And other than that though it just gives you perspective Perspective on how good we have it in a lot of ways and What we should be grateful for and In Perspective on other countries you know deeper understanding and and and You know appreciation for for other cultures as well You know my my My parents actually. After I live in Columbia my parents moved to Venezuela. I was earning college by this point. So I know some pretty well I knew it was prospering. And then as it devolved into terrible socialist policies. I don't pretty well like what we be grateful for. Yeah totally do you think you know. We're in kind of a time where there is a bit of an isolationist streak but so far in your short political career. You haven't had a that perspective you've been a little bit more More of a proponent of being involved abroad particularly in Central America. You have co sponsored some legislation About the northern triangle. You've visited with our Central America Prosperity Project participants which We really appreciate. And you've talked to us a little bit about the digital strategy that we proposed for Central America. How do you Game just a a little bit about what that means you why you think it's important. Yeah well we have to empower our neighbors and we have to give them the same lessons that America has learned over the last few hundred years. Unfortunately we're I think we're forgetting many ways but but we'll here's what we learned. We learned that when you empower the individual to to live free and protect their personal property rights and their freedoms. Then you have the best chance for human prosperity and it's a really simple lesson that America has learned that America has been the leader of for very long time. We're questioning that ourselves lately You know as we're flirting with socialism and things like that But as we question it we we should also Empower our others and I thought it was cool to meet with you guys with your team on this and and hear about the digital infrastructure ideas. Because what I got from that was exactly the right American lesson which is you empower people to to live and thriving economy and In the best way to help people come out of poverty is to empower empower them and I just really cool conversation that we have you know talking about. What would they presented which was like listen? The these people want to work right but they can't. I can't set up an Uber Account. They can't set up online banking. They can't sit up you know. They can't rent their house out there. BNB just some basic stuff You know want we help with that digital infrastructure and allow them to thrive you know again. These are neighbors where we do have to do it. To look at ways to and smart ways to help development oatman these countries. And it's it's not just throwing money away. Corrupt governments no. It's actually look some more creative ways to do that. Deeper than that. You mentioned the corrupt governments and there are some some things that we completely take for granted here because we do have transparent government not perfect but transparent. We do have A situation where we have the rule of law and we have protection of property rights. These are things that I don't think a lot of Americans understand. Fundamentally don't exist particularly in the northern triangle countries in way that makes every bit of existence difficult. There's lack of economic opportunity If you want to set up a business pay your taxes you might get shook down by a a government official in addition to street gangs You your tax rates on it being higher than they need to be because there are so few people actually paying them and there's just a lot of things are the adept to make it an untenable situation. It's very hard as an ordinary person to to make it in any sort of way and have they lacked fundamental freedom that we have. Yeah exactly. Yeah 'cause back to we should really be more grateful for the United States of America And I think we used to be as a country and we're slowly forgetting that and It's a it's a parent as we all commemorating nine eleven. And you know there's been a lot of talk. We remember how we all came together as Americans back then it would just loved our country and everybody through American food who American flags everywhere and You know we definitely don't want another nine eleven back there but I want why we shouldn't need one right. It should just be the default you know we have our differences is but there are certain things that we appreciate about about our country

Congressman America Central America United States Texas Houston Congressman Dan Crenshaw Central America Prosperity Pro George W Bush Administration DC George W Bush Institute Middle East Bit Middle School SNL Dan Crenshaw Afghanistan President Trump Kaufman
Ambassador Deborah Birx on Creating an AIDS-Free World

The Strategerist

12:02 min | 1 year ago

Ambassador Deborah Birx on Creating an AIDS-Free World

"Guest. Today's Ambassador Large Deborah burks who serves as the global AIDS coordinator in the US Special Representative for global health diplomacy diplomacy and in this role she heads up far the US president's emergency plan for AIDS Relief Dr Burks. Thank you so much for spending the time with us today happy to be here and our expert co host is the esteemed colleague who's Mitch the Executive Director at the Bush Institute Holly. Thank you for spending this so Dr Burks we. We we really WanNa talk to you about the incredible work that pep far is doing and has done but we've been extremely lucky to have so many great guests with leadership journeys that are just incredible on the on the strategic since we want to talk about your leadership journey a little bit to start and so early on I understand you're you you actually started off as a physician in the US military in the US army. Yes I was yes. How did that start off your career well. That's a great question so so I actually paid for my own medical school. It's why I went to Penn State Hershey on my parents and I paid but I ended up meeting someone in College Canary them my first year of medical school and I didn't realize he had taken the army scholarship and so he was actually active duty Army when he finished so in order under for me to be with him because it's not like they let you just come in and be a co resident so his residency was at Walter Reed so I joined the military military so I could be in an internal medicine residency with him otherwise I would have never seen him and what kind of what kind of did you learn from your from your standing. The military freising up to colonel. I believe you have to read was really an amazing place to trade it was at that time every complicated case from all all over the world came to Walter Reed. It didn't matter if you were retired in Europe or you were active duty and Thailand if anything befell someone or there was a very very complicated illnesses they came to Walter Reed and so we would have araks medical Arabic's coming in three and four times a week and as residents so you would bring all those patients in an exam in them so it was a we saw the most complicated infectious diseases is to the most complicated cancers do it was just it was amazing experience and we had really terrific professors we call them. Attending who were over at the research institute who would come over to Walter Reed Hospital to attend and so it was very easy for me. Pass my internal medicine boards 'cause I had actually seen everything that was on the board because it was really an amazing training experience so given that you initially really only joined the military because of your husband and you were when you went to medical school did that change your path in terms of. Do you think you would have been the head of PEP far today. If you hadn't gone the military route I definitely nervous angle angle because the military I think they spent so much time on leadership training so it didn't matter that I was a physician from the military standpoint you were just a captain didn't or you're just a major or lieutenant colonel and you were just a colonel and you had to be able to lead troops and so we had the same trainings and the same leadership trainings things as all the line officers at the time you could imagine you're busy with medicine and you're taking care of patients and then you're having to do all of this command and General Israel Staff School and Leadership Training and at the time I was like I'm never going to use this because when you're in their twenties as you think all of this stuff is really natural very or you think it's intuitive but it leadership is not intuitive and I think that trainings at the military the discipline that the military brings to sequential leadership training. I think is quite unique. I think it's why many businesses have tried to copy it the end it's really comprehensive so I had to learn acquisition and budgets and so all of the terminology that used in government. It's all normal to me because all that acronyms we had to train on. Even though I was in medicine I really had to learn all the other pieces different there you went to from your from the military you went to the Department of Defense on the civilian side now dow. You skipped a little bit of a step so it was very very interesting. I was in. I was actually in pep far. At the time I soon as President Bush announced pep far are at the state of the Union. I had already been working in Africa for about five or six years. I was doing research and it really bothered me that I was doing very significant. HIV Vaccine Research but the community around me was dying so when President Bush announced this I flew back from from Kenya and waited outside of Joe O'Neill's house for almost a week in February to get a meeting with him and of course everybody knows is my powerpoint this time I went in like one hundred eighty slides and tell he agreed to let people are to let the army awesome be part of have far. I was not leaving his office and so I think I war him down by my powerpoint and I came into pep far as the critical community compassionate program that surrounded our research in both Uganda Kenya and Tanzania and then later Cameroon and Nigeria and it was that unbelievable ability to bring your high tech laboratory Ori Piece to serving the public that it was so intriguing so I got into pep far as on the side and then people ask me to apply for the CDC we see position in two thousand and five and so I went through the regular civilian application process got selected which I was very much shocked by uh-huh and my commanding general at that time my surgeon general general scumacher said I really we want them to understand the military and CDC doesn't really have a lot of experience with military members. Would you go down there on active duty for two years so they could see uh that the military is just like them and you know we can work together seamlessly so I did and then the war started and so I ended up being an active duty longer than I had anticipated but eventually I became the civilian down at CDC and so it was a it it was a very crooked pathway into my office visit you tell the story there. We have one hundred eighty point powerpoint deck where did good where did that passion for. HIV and AIDS really start to form for you. So I had just finished my fellowship. I had finished internal medicine. I was doing immunology. I wanted immunology really do research on how the immune system works. I was working on primary and secondary condemn. You note efficiencies similar to like the boy in the bubble who didn't have T. cells. I worked with B. Cell immunodeficiencies. Tesol immunodeficiencies and I got called old in one thousand nine hundred eighty two about individuals. I'm dying at Walter Reed soldiers young soldiers dying from a mysterious serious immune immune dysfunction and so came into HIV not knowing it was HIV. We didn't know that it was. HIV until nineteen eighteen eighty five so from eighty to eighty five. I worked side by side with the Infectious Disease Team while we tried to save these soldiers and we couldn't and I think it was so profoundly I think what you're trained in medicine and the eighties and you've got all this high tech stuff and ability to diagnose everything when you naughtily could make a diagnosis didn't know what the problem was and you didn't know how to treat it. It was devastating. It was incredibly humbling and I they really and the shocking thing to me was all of my patients who were dying. We're worried about me because I was so upset that I couldn't can do anything to help. They died with such courage and such willingness to try different things realizing that may not help them but it helped the person person behind them. I just never saw that level of altruism in the midst of just death and despair from the patients themselves and so so I think like for the last I guess thirty seven years. I've just really thirty plus even more than that. We're not it really been focused on doing everything we can to not only save lives but change the course of the epidemic so that the future feature for the world could be imagined as age as AIDS free so. Let's talk a little bit about pet far and the progress we've made. It's been then going since two thousand and three for sixteen years so what's happened in the six juniors. It's been really I would say. It's probably everything that that I've ever done. It's been an enormous privilege. I think because of two reasons one it was like a moonshot. I mean when President Bush Bush announced this there weren't sophisticated labs in sub Saharan Africa which was bearing the brunt of the disease where one a- and in four adults were already infected. Children hundreds of thousands millions of children's didn't have parents anymore. It was really this unbelievable translation translation of what you believe America stands for as we will take our best and our brightest and everything that we know and use that to change the future for others and I think being able to translate. US Taxpayer dollars through this initiative has been the most extraordinary piece of work take anyone could be involved in and I think that is such a big responsibility but it's also an amazing really representation of what we stay on for it and it's not just I think what's been always exciting to me. It was never just about the money it was ensuring that that money continue new to us the best science and the best evidence to do what you could do remarkably for people and making sure that you're bringing that best signs. It's the same science that we have here in the United States and Europe to the people who need it the most around the globe. There's not very many programs as a lot of programs. That will say oh well. You can't really do that there. Because of these ten reasons this program said Oh nope. We're GONNA do everything that we're doing here. There and we're just GonNa make it happen and I think ah boldness that the president brought to this. I think people don't realize it wasn't just the boldness and the money it was the fact that he decided to create an entirely different structure for foreign assistance. I think people still have trouble understanding how brilliant that was the way it was positioned at the State Department the way it brought all the agencies together the way it made the State Department as the coordinator but but not actually Benny parts of implementation so that you could maintain accountability separate from any of these single agencies understanding that anyone agency would be conflicted. Ah trying to oversee another agency if they were actually doing the work

President Bush Bush Walter Reed United States HIV Aids Deborah Burks President Trump Walter Reed Hospital CDC Us Army Europe Coordinator Bush Institute Holly State Department Penn State Hershey Mitch Army Africa Executive Director
Dana Perino on Developing Her Own Voice

The Strategerist

12:48 min | 1 year ago

Dana Perino on Developing Her Own Voice

"After spending seven years in the Bush administration rising to press secretary Dana Perino had become comfortable speaking speaking on behalf of others including the forty third president but she transitioned into roles on Fox News after the White House Dana develop her own voice who cared what I thought I could tell you what President Bush thought and why he thought that are how we got to that decision and I was very comfortable in that role on the first episode of Season Season Two of the strategic wrist Dana Talks about how she always remembers to focus on the good news how she deals with social media trolls and how her career in country music is progressing. I'm Andrew Kaufman and this strategic presented by the George Bush Institute what happens when you cross the forty third president late night sketch comedy and compelling conversation. The strategic has a podcast born from the word strategically which was coined by the now and embraced by the George Bush administration station we highlight the Americans feared of leadership and compassion through thought provoking conversations and we're reminded that the most effective leaders are the ones who laughed. We're joined for today's episode by Dana Perino former White House press secretary and now Fox News Co host the five host of the daily briefing Dana Perino podcast co host of I'll tell you what she's a bestselling author so you're pretty busy. Thank you for taking the the time to do this. This honored to be here. I I love coming here to the Bush Center. It's whenever you step in that front door. It's like wow this place is beautiful. Thank you for saying that and doing such great work thank Q. and our co host is Hannah Avni your friend and VP of external affairs. She's back again Hannah. Thank you for doing it again. Thank you for having me again Andrew so Dana you so you recently you're now we're recording artist as well. Gaza May dierks dirks a Dirks Bentley superfan right. I yeah superfan Fan. Also I get to call him a friend now to happens if you stock long enough so. Do you think he's going to invite you to be on a song the backup side when you have a number one song in the world. It's kind of like you. I don't need to really do it again. I don't think but it's pretty funny when I worked at the White House. Well let me go way back when I I was in college and I thought I wanted to go into media back then if you wanted to get into TV you had to start in radio and I didn't want to have to do my radio experience after right graduated so I got a job part time job as a country music. Dj working overnight and Pueblo Colorado and I ah I didn't really I had grown up in the West but I had really listen to country music when I was a teenager I didn't really do that so I was completely out of it I I I introduced the first night a song by Tracy Lawrence and I said and here she is with their new Song Tracy Lawrence and then of course raises Lawrence's a man uh-huh tricky. I we have to do so fast forward and during the years at the White House. I don't think I listen to any music back at all. I didn't even have an IPOD when we left. That was the technology at the time I had nothing I listen to. NPR or whatever else was happening rush limbaugh or something so Kakitumba on the news and so when I left the White House or when we all left the White House I got an ipod I guess it was and I used to travel back and forth to to New York a lot and I just started downloading country music and Dirk Bentley Song Come. A little closer was out at the time China so that's how we became a fan. Would you like to sing a little bit of but I do have the worst voice but the other thing you're talking about is I don't I'm blessed with having lots of ideas and not a lot of time to execute however so in two thousand sixteen the five went on a bus trip to go conventions. RNC Indian say and at one point in the back of the bus Greg Gut failed and I were sitting there and he was making me laugh so hard because he was just making up nonsense country songs about the five about Fox News about everything and he just had me giggling so much and I said we should should go to Nashville and record a song about the five and record it with a real recording artists and then release it for charity so three years later it came true. We have a wonderful executive producer of the five called Megan Albano. She figured it out we teamed up John Rich from big and rich who is a wonderful person big fan of forty three's as well and we went to Nashville and in one take he's saying the song that we sang the backup part. It's called Oh shut up about politics and it's not about shutting any particular person up. It was just about how politics has entered into everything sports music music theater technology. Everything's just too much and so we have a song called shut up about politics. We released it and within two hours it was number one on the country charts and then and that whole weekend it was number one in the world bigger than Lady Gaga Justin Bieber it was astounding. It's amazing it was amazing and all the proceeds go to folds of honor so we're pretty proud of it. Ninety nine cents you can download it on full. Honor does great work. We've done incredible work. We're familiar with there were pretty well and they're just such great such a great organization. That was pretty fun fun. I have a question for you off of that. Though I mean you're right politics is in absolutely everything you cannot get away from it and we talk about that a lot too. I mean even when you're going through Instagram instagram stories. It's just permeates every bit of it. It's in your life obviously multiple times a day. How do you get away from politics and focus on the thing? I feel a little a lot better than I did even from a few years ago because I've really embodied this idea that politics is what I do. It is not who I am and I have carved off my weekends and my evenings when I'm not working but but I don't go to dinner to talk about politics with people unless I agree with them now. That's GonNa sound like Oh that's not very fair and balanced view but I argue all day long and so in my personal life I pretty much. Don't I have a rule that I wrote about in the in the Jasper book which is no politics at the dog park. You're that's a safe place for me and if and even people that WanNa talk to me about politics at the Dog Park Mike Sorry I don't talk politics at the dog park. I have a policy and then laugh about it and they move on and I also carry a lot less about social media than I did. In Two thousand sixteen. I was really attacked by the Russians. Even though I didn't know as Russians at the time I remember actually coming here to the Bush Center right before the two thousand sixteen election. I can't remember what I was doing and AH chance to see President Bush and he's how you doing and I told him I had the worst professional summer of my life you know being attack and I was really kind of in the fetal position under my desk and even like my husband would say how can I help you. There's there's nothing you can do and it gave me a big appreciation for what parents are going through when their children are consumed assumed with their phone because you don't know what's being said and it's so demoralizing I was a grown woman. I've been the White House press secretary. How could this affect me so much and and I remember President Bush saying? Why didn't you call me like a really imagine if I had called President Bush and said Sir people are being really mean to me on twitter he would have said get off twitter on it solved this one's easy and actually it is easy so once you step away from from it or somebody gave me a tip to only have mentioned from people that you follow and Eric Schmidt of Google actually pulled me aside at one point in two thousand seventeen as I was explaining what it was like to be one of the people that was targeted by these Russian boots but I didn't know they were rushing at the time I just said it's overwhelming and he pulled me aside Dana? These are not real people and you explain to me how the whole system worked in Saint Petersburg and I don't know that just gave me an ability to say it doesn't matter. It just doesn't matter no so I it's weird to say that as much as politics permeating everything for me. It's probably less a part of my life than in the previous elections that I've covered for Fox. Was it similar to how you regrouped. After you left the White House taking a breath stepping away from it no not really I mean I remember the day that we'd left Andrews Air Force Base and Peter and I left to go on the trip to Africa. I leaned my head back against is the seat and I said nothing I do for the rest of my life will ever be that important or that hard and it's really true when I make a comment now. I'm not gotTA START A war. I also have a great appreciation for what public servants go through and I want to support deport them. No matter what party they're from if you're willing to put your self out there and run for office and try to do the right thing I try to be supportive. Okay talk to us about mercyships touch. You talked about a little bit when you left the West so interesting about mercy ships. There's actually a Bush connection there too okay so obviously President Bush and Mrs Bush were amazing leaders. When it came to Africa I I got to go to Africa with them? In February of two thousand eight and in typical forty-three fashion we did five countries in seven days. I got my first migraine. I couldn't even go to the Kigali event because I had to stay on the plane and two liters of fluid into my arm and so I didn't get to go to the and and I've been sad about not making it to Rwanda ever since given the statistics about pep far so many times at the podium that I thought I understood Africa and then I was just totally blown away when I went there and I came back and I said Peter we need to go for six months after the White House and he said how about six weeks so we did six weeks compromise and yeah so we did a pet farsight that's on in Fishhook South Africa and Peter and I just had this confusing time and that did help us reset our priorities and our hearts and to reconnect as a couple as well because we're so blessed here in America and you can get caught up in what about me. What am I gonNa do to the White House and just being able to have a bigger world view? After I left was great great fast forward mercy ships asked me through my speakers bureau if I would come to Dallas and moderate a conversation between the president and Mrs Bush in front of their dinner group so I said well sure that sounds great so peter and I were coming down here now prior to that I had join the one campaigns women advisory board and I had gone to several countries with them. I had also been on the Broadcasting Board of Governors under President Obama and I'd gone to Africa on behalf of of that organization as well trying to increase the amount of content of for women in particular and Africa because we found that men will definitely listen to the radio for news in sports but women will listen if it's about health and their kids so anyway it's just little bit of an effort to do that so at the dinner right before the Q. One eight with the president and Mrs Bush. I'm sitting there and somebody says well. Why did you get interested in Africa so I'm telling him than soul story that I'm telling you and then I I said just a few months ago I got to go to Sierra Leone and I went to this place called the Aberdeen Clinic and it was started by Scottish heiress us and it's so amazing they were doing fistula surgeries there and the day I was there? They were teaching the women there how to count to ten and the lady next to me said Oh she's not a Scottish heiress. Her name is Ann Gloag and she's sitting right behind you. This is a self made businesswoman in Scotland who was a burn unit nurse for twenty years but then she and her brothers started a bussing service in the UK when Margaret Thatcher deregulated the transportation sector and they became very successful and as the company expanded she took Africa and and when she got there she said this will never do so she started doing all of this philanthropy there and that's how I ended up talking to her and I said to Peter we have to go see mercy mercy ships for ourselves so that's how we got involved and it's a surgical hospital ship they do the West Coast of Africa that night they were kicking off a capital campaign for a brand new ship because they I usually retrofit and old ship and

President Bush White House Dana Perino President Trump Bush Center Africa White House Dana Fox News Peter Press Secretary Andrew Kaufman George Bush Institute West Tracy Lawrence Hannah Avni Migraine
Infinite Dial Canada 2019 Released in Full

podnews

03:15 min | 1 year ago

Infinite Dial Canada 2019 Released in Full

"The latest from pod news dot net. The infinite dial Canada, two one thousand nine hundred study which we previewed earlier this month is now available to download in full the study from Edison research says that thirty six percent of Canadians aged over eighteen listens to a podcast in the last month. Spotify has published a good look at the podcasting industry on their Spotify for brands website with lots of statistics and detail. It's almost a month since luminary launched. And in an E mail seen by pod news today since to a subscriber they say as one of our first premium subscribers we want to say, thank you. Bye extending your free trial periods to three months. It's unclear whether this is a targeted offer or something for everyone. Poltrak is changing their measurement algorithm. Our blog post appears to indicate that they're undergoing official AB compliance, on warns you should expect to see your download numbers decrease to be consistent with the new guy. Lines a contract claimed last July that their figures were always have been consistent with the podcast, metric guidelines, but say this change is due to quote, more coalescing around specific interpretations of the guidelines in the industry at the end of last year we highlighted the pod tracks figures were about twenty seven percent higher than blueberries who were awarded IB certification in early December. The new still Paik methodology from pod track has been applied to their opt in self selecting April two thousand nineteen statistics the effect appears to be a drop of around twenty percent for streams and downloads for the top three publishes, which remain number one. This is NPR number two. And number three iheartradio, only studio has rolled out full support for web sub so podcasters using the platform. We'll see new episodes appearing instantly in podcast apps that support it like Google. Casts or swooped podcast, host, megaphone. Oh, also supports the web sub-standard apple have removed. The words listen on issues from their podcast pages preferring now to use. Listen on apple podcasts. This is the surest indicator, yet, that they plan to build an apple podcasts desktop app for the next iteration of MAC OS. You probably don't want new podcast newsletter. But if you did fiction podcast weekly might be for you. If you're involved in the world of audio fiction, audio drama and sound storytelling, it's free to sign up. There's a link from our episode notes, or from our newsletter today, and in podcasts, we highlight a number of them, including photo business. Help new podcast from Natalie Jennings promising to teach affective strategies to tackle productivity organization, and content creation and this strategy arrest. A podcast from the George W Bush institute and they. They have snatched, a well-known guest for their first ever appearance on a podcast, George W Bush himself, as he says, it's hard to be up. Well, he might as well say it's hard to be after mystic. If you're not able to smile and isn't that true?

Apple George W Bush Spotify George W Bush Institute Canada Edison Research Google Paik Official Natalie Jennings NPR Twenty Seven Percent Thirty Six Percent Twenty Percent Three Months
Boeing Slow To 'Own' Recent Air Disasters, Analysts Say

NPR's Business Story of the Day

05:16 min | 1 year ago

Boeing Slow To 'Own' Recent Air Disasters, Analysts Say

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from American pest as the leading provider of safe sustainable pest control solutions across the DMV. Let American past help you to take back your home or business. From menacing pests. Visit them today at American pest dot net. Two crashes of Boeing seven thirty sevens. Leave behind a follow up question. What took the airplane maker so long to acknowledge a problem? The aviation system depends on self reporting regulators encourage companies to acknowledge problems working to ensure they have incentive to keep their own business, exceedingly safe and gross. Danielle Chesler reports on some incentives that seemed to encourage bowing to keep quiet when an Indonesian lion air jet plunged into the Java sea and Tober twenty-ninth Boeing issued a statement extending our heartfelt sympathies to the families of the one hundred eighty nine victims. It said initial investigation showed the downed plane had faulty data from sensor, but Boeing also said this. Same plane flew with the same faulty sensor day before and a different crew managed to keep control. Jeffrey Sonnenfeld, a professor at the Yale school of management says Boeing's response bordered on pointing a finger at pilots overseas. There's a question as to whether or not the pilots followed the right routines initially, and if they were properly trained Boeing put out a bulletin on what to do in case of a faulty sensor. It did not mention that the sensor feeds automated flight control software called m s that was suspected of forcing the plane into a nosedive the FAA certified the seven thirty seven max to fly without requiring pilots to train on or even to know about M S. And then it was business as usual orders. Kept pouring in for the 737 max, the fastest selling jet in Boeing's history until March tenth when a seven thirty seven max flown by Ethiopian Airlines crashed with one hundred fifty seven casualties over the next two days. Authorities from China too. A Europe grounded the plane, but in the US Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg announced that it was developing an update to its m software and that the FAA did not require any further action and Moen Berg even called the White House to say there was no data to support. Grounding the planes Eric Bernstein, vice president of California based Bernstein crisis management. You don't want to say something that is then translated in a court of law as an admission of guilt Bernstein says he thinks Boeing maintain this stance for financial reasons. I would assume that they were selling those planes up to the day, they got grounded or at least attempting to their keeping business partners and investors from being spooked. Boeing says it was not avoiding responsibility. But rather waiting for the facts to emerge? Richard Levick CEO of the Levick communications firm in DC says its response did not go over. Well, they weren't personal. They weren't empathetic. They were speaking like engineers, and they weren't very visible. On March thirteenth three days. After the second crash. The US did ground the planes saying it had new information and shortly after muhlenberg recorded his first video message about the crash. We're taking action to fully reassure airlines and their passengers of the safety of the seven thirty seven max, but he's still tiptoed around what caused the crashes the turning point was when he THEO paean authorities released a preliminary report on April, fourth transportation Minister, Doug, Maui. Mogas said the pilots had followed Boeing's directions that cruel perform age on the procedures. Piddly provided by the manufacturer, but was not able to control than crops. This is where Mullen Burg's public posture shifted in a carefully worded message. He knowledged that M S had added extra risk to the cockpit. It's our responsibility to eliminate this risk we own it. And we know how to do it we own it has since become a catchphrase for Boeing muhlenberg repeated it last week when he spoke at the George W Bush presidential center in Dallas. Frankly, these last few weeks have been the most heart-wrenching of my career. It was a safe audience Boeing has donated millions to the George W Bush institute and Monberg didn't take questions Bernstein says owning the problem was a first step toward connecting with the public. And I think that opens them up to really get a lot more compassionate with their communication. There is a downside. Houston attorney. No me Hassan is suing Boeing for negligence on behalf of a victim. Family. He says Mullen Burg's comments give his case ammunition this admission I think helps us clear the hurdle of negligence. Boeing must get it software fix and extra pilot training approved to get its planes back in the air. Once that's done. The new transparency will help convince passengers that the seven thirty seven max is safe to fly Daniele Chaz low NPR news support for NPR comes from investor dot gov. Presenting this message when it comes to investing. We all have questions and investor dot gov has answers, it's your free resource for tools. Tips and information about investing before you. Invest investor dot gov.

Boeing Eric Bernstein Mullen Burg FAA United States CEO DMV DOT Ethiopian Airlines Jeffrey Sonnenfeld Danielle Chesler Richard Levick Europe George W Bush Presidential Cen Yale School Of Management California Levick Communications Daniele Chaz Moen Berg China
George W. Bush welcomes new U.S. citizens at immigration ceremony

The Frankie Boyer Show

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

George W. Bush welcomes new U.S. citizens at immigration ceremony

"In Dallas, Texas. Former President George W Bush welcoming immigrants to America at an excellent ceremony at the Bush institute fifty people from twenty two countries sworn in USA radio's Timberg with details. Fifty-one immigrants became US citizens during a naturalization ceremony at the George W Bush institute in Dallas, Texas. Former President Bush has a reminder regarding immigration amid all the complications policy. May we've never forget that immigration is a blessing and a strength. Bush. Also tells the Dallas audience at the debate on immigration can get pretty sharp, and you also encouraged everyone to vote as well

President George W Bush George W Bush Institute Bush Institute Dallas Bush Texas President Trump Timberg America USA
"bush institute" Discussed on The Strategerist

The Strategerist

03:33 min | 1 year ago

"bush institute" Discussed on The Strategerist

"Who find themselves in these kinds of scenarios, and how did you handle that? Well, in short, I would say I've learned over the years that in some ways if you're in that experience a lot it's more uncomfortable from the for the other people than sometimes it is few. I remember when I was running for the presidency and standing on a debate stage, and I used to get the question all the time from remorse. What does it feel like to be the only woman on the debate stage? And I said, I feels like the rest of my life. I actually think the guys are more nervous about how to deal with me than I am about how to deal with them. And that turned out to be true more seriously. However, what I would say is the advice. I give all the time is don't get a chip on your shoulder. And don't hide your light under a bushel. And what I mean by that is when you're the different one, whether it's because you're a person of a different color or your different gender. Whatever the case may be when you're the different one. There are people who will. Will tear you down and those kinds of people can give you a chip on your shoulder, which in the end hurts you not them. But there are also as many if not more people in my experience who will lift you up. And so go to the people who lift you up. Don't get a chip on your shoulder about the people who tear you down by the same token. Don't hide your light under a bushel. And by that what I mean is don't be different than you are to try and accommodate the fact that you're different from everybody else in the room be as good as you are as brave as you are as strong as you are let them figure out how to deal with you. Don't change yourself to deal with them, as you know, the Bush institute were committed to investing in women and girls and most recently we've brought nineteen women from Afghanistan. Egypt. Jordan, Lebanon, Tunisia to the Bush institute to empower and equip them to become more effective leaders into advance economic opportunity and their communities and countries you spoke to these leaders tell us why. It's important that we empower women globally. Well, I want an amazing group of women. I was so uplifted by each of them in their stories. So let's talk about it at a macro level. And we'll talk about it at a micro level at a macro level. The data is unmistakable when you get women and girls more engaged everything gets better. So it's true. I mean, the data's inescapable illiteracy poverty conflict all those issues. Get better when women are engaged, and the reason is because women girls have half the brain power in the world. So we got a lot of problems. And the only way you solve problems is by applying human potential and brain power to those problems. If you have half of the brain power and the potential in the world sitting on the sidelines. You're not going to get as far as if you have one hundred percent of it engaged at a micro level. I'll tell you a story at the human. Level personal level. I was engaged with an organization called opportunity or national which is a microfinance lender. And you know, that microfinance is lending a very small amounts of money. The founder of microfinance a man named Mohammed Yunus began microfinance in Bangladesh. He wanted it to be sustainable, and he started by lending to men because that was the culture in Bangladesh, you lent to men, but what he figured out over time. As the men weren't always the best investors are the best credit risks. And over time..

Mohammed Yunus Bush institute Bangladesh founder Egypt Afghanistan Jordan Tunisia Lebanon one hundred percent
"bush institute" Discussed on The Strategerist

The Strategerist

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"bush institute" Discussed on The Strategerist

"Never thought about being pilot. But always thought about being a bird because I was so tired of this world, this walence this war like all women under Taliban rule, she was forbidden from attending school working or showing her face in public. But her story is one of courage is she became the first female fighter pilot in the Afghan military after the fall of the Taliban in two thousand one. She tells us that story next. I'm your host to Andrew Kaufman. And this is the strategic presented by the George W Bush institute. What happens when you crossed the forty third president late night, sketch, comedy and compelling conversation. This strategic wrist a podcast born from the word strategically which was coined by SNL and embraced by the George W Bush administration. We highlight the American spirit of leadership and compassion through thought provoking conversations. And we're reminded that the most effective leaders are the ones who laugh captain money. It's an honor to have you joining us on the strategic wrist. Thank you so much for having me, and we're also joined by fought up Popol manager of the women's initiative at the Bush institute far hot thank you for joining us. Thank you so much Andrew as an Afghan-American. I am honored to be sitting in front of captain dot money today, cutting money, I wanted to start a little bit by I know, I don't know that I have an accurate picture of what life in Afghanistan is like, thank you. So the life is not as we see it as we see it as a big picture. The life is very difficult. Especially for women in Afghanistan because woman's enough ghanistan or struggling with so many laws so many regulation that bid they are always told that they are not allowed to do. And as a foreign countries outside the United States be always see it as a different picture just by saying empowering women in Afghanistan. But as a society that I came from. That's not really how it works because it still you see a woman's on. They're struggling with so many things they have no rights. They have no choice. They can make a decision for their own life. And there's so much while still in for women in Afghanistan. How's that changed over time? Do you feel like unfortunately, Afghanistan came from way up to way down because Afghanistan before war woman had so much freedom women's could be doctors women could be teachers women's could be whatever they want to be in. There was nothing. To stop them by being who they wanna be and even the freedom of how they want to dress themselves how they wanna call themselves..

Afghanistan Taliban Andrew Kaufman George W Bush institute George W Bush administration president SNL United States
"bush institute" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

04:41 min | 2 years ago

"bush institute" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"Class of the George W Bush institute's stand to veteran leadership program bar STAN to veteran leadership program is the newest leadership program here at the Bush center, and it's really an exciting opportunity to combine two things are ongoing values based Bush center leadership programs, which started with our presidential leadership programs included our liberty and leadership programs developing leadership for our Burmese dissidents in our international women's fellow ship program, we lead fostering leadership and women from the Middle East North Africa in Afghanistan. And of course, you know, that, you know, one of the missions that we have here at the Bush center is the foster a successful transition and reintegration for military service to civilian life for our nation's veterans in their family members. And so for five years, we've had some really important programs in work here that helps with employment and with education and with addressing the invisible wounds of war traumatic brain injury and post traumatic stress. But this stand to veteran leadership program is a really neat and exciting opportunity to bring together leaders from across the country across all sectors. So, you know, I just left a room adjacent pock who runs Boeing's veteran and veteran employment program, we have nonprofit leaders like Anna Marie, Greg. Who runs the commit foundation? That helps with veteran transition. We have folks who are working in the federal government. You know? At the department of education. And so, you know, it's a real neat opportunity to bring together leaders at the local state and national leader all sectors, business nonprofit and government. Who are working to advance veteran outcomes? What's the basic message that all of them were talking about? But whether it's the Easter seals weather, it's next stop veterans. Whether it's the Ohio department of veteran services, which was part of this deal. What are you hearing from them? That at the end of the day all of the men and women who have ever put on the uniform and their family members. Whether they were wounded injured or became ill during their service for not that all of them with the right supporting transition, whether it's education issues employment issues, whether it's navigating a new life in the civilian world or whether it's a dressing things like the visible or invisible wounds of war all of them with great support from businesses education community, nonprofit and government partners can thrive and just as they did in the military. They can continue to lead in our families and our businesses in our communities for decades to come. So you know, I would say Mitch that's the real message and story overall. But it's it's incredibly important work. It's worked it's really going to advance or country leveraging this cadre of leaders, but it is work and it requires a great national team to get it done to welcome. These men and women home and then to get them into the business of leadership across our country. I mean, you had all kinds of folks at Boeing, and you have the prudential folks there for prudential financial the next class can people apply for that. I mean is it open for application? Mitch thanks for asking that question. This is an all call in. So applications are open right now. For the next class in the next class actually starts in June of two thousand nineteen and we'll run through November of two thousand nineteen and so one of the neat things about this leadership program. I just kind of executive MBA style. The scholars come together once a month for two and a half to four and a half days, depending on the session. And so occasions are open right now. So anybody everybody organizations individuals who are interested in this really neat program have until January fifteenth. So that's actually the deadline to get your application and said, go to Bush, center dot org today and submitted an application. There are great leaders out there. We have met leaders through this program that we never would have if.

Bush center Mitch Boeing George W Bush institute Bush Middle East department of education prudential financial Ohio Afghanistan North Africa Anna Marie executive Greg five years
George W. and Laura Bush awarded 2018 Liberty Medal

The Ray Lucia Show

00:41 sec | 2 years ago

George W. and Laura Bush awarded 2018 Liberty Medal

"Former President George W Bush and former First Lady Laura Bush are this year's recipients of the national constitution centers liberty medal USA's. Chris Barnes reports. Former vice president Joe Biden, presenting it to the couple had the Philadelphia history museum on Veterans Day, Biden says the commitment veterans and their families. Give to America is why initiatives like the Bush. Institute are quote critically important any commended their efforts to honor and assist. The brave men and women of the US military. It's the second year that Biden has taken part in that liberty medal ceremony last year presenting the award too late US Senator John McCain

Joe Biden Lady Laura Bush President George W Bush Senator John Mccain Vice President United States Chris Barnes Philadelphia History Museum USA America
"bush institute" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

05:10 min | 2 years ago

"bush institute" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Charles krauthammer who died of cancer last week at the bush institute in two thousand thirteen i kinda liked that one too i'm not even sure it's true it could be apocryphal but i don't care as we say in the column writing business that story is too good to check remains unchecked but it's in the book probably the only item checked now so i tried to write about obama in that vein china understand him as social democrat and the essence of the political half of the book is that obama represents this kind of i would say aggressive american liberalism and that in some way the debate that we've had over the last five years between left and right since obama came into office is essentially a debate over the classic the fundamental issue of our democracy and all the debates obamacare cap and trade the stimulus energy break all of these things are subsidiary to the central question that has been at the heart of our politics ever since he was sworn in and that is what is the proper size and scope and reach an province of government or to put it slightly more grandly what's the name trivia american experiment and to put it in its grandest terms we would arguing about the relationship between citizen and state and the one column that sort of address is that the most directly is a column called the state make you great and remember that came right after obama made the famous statement if you have a business and you've had success you didn't build that somebody else made it happen i mean that's crystallization of the great argument in left and right and i tried to point out in the column obama said what was almost a platitude you know you you didn't you don't operate alone there are other people around there's roads and bridges the mistake that liberalism makes and here's the core and it came out exactly in his explanation of this is that he identified the society what's outside of the individual as government rather than recognizing that would really shapes the individual is what we call civil society the independent autonomous elements of society outside of government that have the most influence in shaping you that is the fabric that's the church that's the community that's the pta that's all the things that tocqueville talked about as the glory of america the little platoons that is talked about and that is the essence in the glory and the protection of american liberty because these institutions civil society are what stand between the citizen and the state totalitarian society is one where they deliberately tried to destroy all they get immediate institution so that the individual is naked before the state and can be utterly control them indicated the stories in stalinist russia have the child would tell on the parents tournament because he loved stalin and he became a child of the state well liberalism doesn't attempt to do that deliberately its intentions i believe are honorable and good and various humane but it does not understand by increasing the scope and the reach and the power and the authority of the central state inevitably squeezes and compresses and marginalize all those elements in civil society particularly the family and then the church you look at the side effects that obama's having other relations of people with their churches you look at the effect that welfare had on the family one of the reasons i moved from left to right and i write about this in the introduction is that i had been a great society liberal i believe that the intentions of the war on poverty and then one day in the beginning of the night in the middle of nineteen eighty the empirical evidence started to come in real fact and as a physician scientists train i'm opening empirical evidence if i give a patient a drug and it kills the patient i stopped giving the drug and it turned out from charles very james q wilson and sir researchers with very hard science by that's a war on poverty not only did not help people who was intending to help but it undermine them and destroyed the communities and that ironically of course the abolition awale fire in one thousand nine hundred ninety six led to the quickest drop in child poverty in in in modern in modern history so that was sort of the event that that had its greatest effect on me moving left or right but the.

Charles krauthammer bush institute five years one day
"bush institute" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"bush institute" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"We don't always have to go to war to win somebody should tell that to the bush institute iran this is so great iran is warning north korea and this actually has helped is helping us i think iran is warning north korea that trump could cancel the deal before all before they even arrive home from singapore i love that i love that iran says watch out trump back out and you good you should say that because you make him look unstable and trude or worse than shrewd and you are making them be concerned by what you're saying mr one third of the axis of evil iran good so as i watched the stephanopoulos interviewed for twenty two minutes this afternoon i really got the i walk away feeling of trump is meant for this he is absolutely meant for this this is exactly what he's meant for how calm comfortable how real he is just sitting there talking to george stephanopoulos saying i've been up for twenty five hours and all of a sudden he's over the top bravado an ego but he is avs i watched this man and he's absolutely meant for this i love the way he talked about canada and the trade war within prime minister justin trudeau from canada i love i love the quote he said quote i i liked justin but he shouldn't have said those thing so those things that's gonna cost them a lot of money love it i love it i liked justin but he shouldn't have done that that's going to cost him a lot of money that's what rich rich powerful man says yeah i love the guy but that's gonna cost a lot of money behind the scenes he is our guy let them leap and the people in the press and the people on the left won't let let him have either way they won't let them lead they won't let them do any so it keeps sandwich you want we're enjoying winning the even the.

iran north korea canada prime minister justin trudeau bush institute george stephanopoulos twenty two minutes twenty five hours
"bush institute" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"bush institute" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Work designed to support school districts in their ability to recruit support and retain those highly effective school principals in every school in their district the do all those things that enable students success so like school leadership we also believe in strong accountability you hear that a lot in education here's what we define it pretty simply with three elements i you set high standards for what students should know and understand second you measure their progress to those standards and third you use that data to meaningfully design and implement interventions that are going to support students success we think this matters so intensely because it reflects the belief that all kids regardless of race ethnicity socioeconomic status geography deserve to learn and succeed deserves access to a great school but sadly that's not the case in many places around the community again daniel was telling you about this it you and i went to visit some struggling schools this afternoon you'd likely here see implicitly or explicitly things like well some kids are just never going to do that well and gosh it's really hard to catch some of these kids at so president bush very memorably described this phenomenon of assigning different expectations to certain kids as the soft bigotry of low expectations it was a powerfully said phrase then it's powerful now and it guides much of our work at the bush institute we seek to support city and state leaders to understand and embrace accountability and their education practice and policy so that all kids.

daniel bush bush institute president
"bush institute" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:36 min | 2 years ago

"bush institute" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Early in my career i taught eighth grade social studies it was equal parts ultimately i'm not really sure if my kids got what they needed for me and my classroom and we're prepared and they took their next step i think i saw my principal maybe once in my classroom that first year and i ended up taking an opportunity outside the classroom over the summer even though there was a lot i really loved about teaching that still makes me a little sad twenty some years later when i look back on it because i think what could have been different for me but most importantly for my students had i had the mentorship of a strong instructional leader as a principle that's why the bush institute our work is designed to support school districts in their ability to recruit support and retain those highly effective school principals in every school in their district that do all those things that enable students success so like school leadership we also believe in strong accountability you hear that a lot in education here's what we define it pretty simply with three elements i you set high standards for what students should know and understand second you measure their progress to those standards and third you use that data to meaningfully design and implement interventions that are going to support students success we think this matters so intensely because it reflects the belief that all kids regardless of race ethnicity socioeconomic status geography deserve to learn and succeed deserves access to a great school but sadly that's not the case in many places around the community again daniel was telling you about this if you and i went to visit some struggling schools this afternoon you'd likely here see implicitly or explicitly things like well some kids are just never going to do that well and gosh it's really hard to catch some of these kids up so president bush very memorably described this phenomenon of assigning different expectations to certain kids as the soft bigotry of low expectations it was the powerfully said phrase then it's power now and it guides much of our work at the bush institute we seek to support city and state leaders to understand and embrace accountability and their education practice and policy so that all kids in their communities and.

bush institute daniel bush principal president
"bush institute" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"bush institute" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"This discussion took place in october of this year at the george w bush institute in new york city will hear more from that event coming up in just a moment but some programming notes at this hour seven minutes past the hour president trump is still in washington but he will be departing this afternoon for his vacation for thanksgiving in mara lago but before he does he will appear in the white house rose garden with first lady milania for the annual turkey pardon wishbone and drumstick or staying at a local luxury hotel and they will be appearing in the rose garden one pm eastern time you can watch the pardon on cspan television or listen to the presidential pardon here on cspan radio we're wc s p fm washington this week unsee spans the sidebar we discussed the lbj tapes president lyndon johnson ended the audio recordings from his presidency with historian and author michael beschloss jump on got him a habit of wanting to be in court records holed up some some guy one against him he could go back and say well that's wall you promised me yesterday and i quote you can find the sidebar in every cspan podcast on the free cspan radio app for apple and android devices as well as google play music tune in stitcher and apple podcast.

george w bush institute trump washington mara lago white house president apple new york thanksgiving cspan lyndon johnson michael beschloss android google seven minutes
"bush institute" Discussed on The Fifth Column

The Fifth Column

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"bush institute" Discussed on The Fifth Column

"The speech today in new york city for the sensitive conference at the george bush institute george w bush instituted and you know for the most part bush has pretty much stayed out of politics since he left the presidency and you know actually said publicly that he didn't think it was it was cricket as the bridge british would say to attack obama and things like that and he you know i think that there is obviously difference in two thousand eight when a man who presided over a catastrophic foreign policy decision and was widely hated a well i been one big one elephant in the room and was widely hayden and had very low approval ratings and wanted a retreat to crawford and in paint dogs and paint himself in the bathtub in what i really also did but so i i get that there's after a while you maybe want to get a little bit more into the fray i mean that's kind of in the blood of the bush family right so he hasn't said very much so it's rather interesting that he comes out now and and a full attack against the trump administration without ever mentioning the trump administration is essentially what this amounts called a sneak this now there's people are saying oh my god w bush the taxi this headlines i'll replace on stuff on twitter and people you know tweeting clips of this speech here's the interesting thing is that what i finished but it is it is a bog standard.

bush obama twitter new york george bush institute george w bush foreign policy hayden crawford one elephant
"bush institute" Discussed on KPRC 950 AM

KPRC 950 AM

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"bush institute" Discussed on KPRC 950 AM

"A show i mean the government does do evil stuff the government does do stuff that they it was about but a dozen evolve faking the death of a budget a little kids of elementary the machine and i don't think the shooting in vegas was fake either and we're not even going to entertain that roma were among other things that the government moves more than they're telling us but i still think it was a lunatic the did admits the big difference both cases like in the road cases i think that's true in anything we'd go beyond that were just using our imaginations engaged in some socializing and i'm not going to do that i don't think george w bush's behind nine eleven they maybe could have done more to our to punish the saudis after that happen most certainly could of but they didn't ends but and that doesn't mean the george w bush is by nine eleven are george w bush took a shot at alex's body donald trump russians alex's butler and took a big show remember george w bush appeared to slam donald trump without mentioning his name he was giving he chastise russia for alleged cyberattacks he's giving a speech at the what is it the bush the george w bush institute which is basically like attorneys i'm just kidding it's a life is life his charity rose charity or i say foley's hill if it was a daily though plug them back section of core the golfer in every great regret we're gonna be great said george w bush has given a speech and he made some remarks you sabac cyberattacks is harmon north korea in russia and the things he said about russia i seemed like he was leaning towards comments about trump which is weird if you consider the news this week what we now know about obama and hillary and the russians and.

vegas george w bush alex donald trump butler russia george w bush institute foley north korea obama hillary
"bush institute" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"bush institute" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Dot com because he ought to serve the true george w bush in a stunning attack bush accuses trump of promoting falsehoods and prejudice and quote that's the head line the headline from the la times yesterday about president bush's speech at the george bush institute in new york headline is what we might classify as i don't know spin george bush never flat out accused trump of anything in his speech but he did call for the awareness of a disturbing trend of nationalism that has become popular with trump and the right we've seen nationalism distorted in the native ism forgotten the dynamism that immigration is always brought to america we see a fading confidence in the value of free markets in international trade forgetting that conflict instability in poverty follow in the wake of protectionism we've seen the return of isolationist sentiments forgetting that american security is directly threat by the chaos in despair of distant places where threats such as terrorism infectious disease criminal gangs and drug trafficking tend to emerge hey so everything that he said rings true i don't think they were directed at trump but anyone who participates in the isolationist mindset protectionism nationalism they have never ever been a part of american success never we've never needed them to be proud citizens of the home of the free in the brave our pride the in america emanates outward naughty in word we want to share everyone we want to share our values our principles and our prosperity that's what makes us great come over here participate share in this but because they just wanted to kill trump his words fell on deaf ears.

bush trump la times george bush institute america drug trafficking george w bush president new york
"bush institute" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"bush institute" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"When president george w bush today in new york city had a bush institute forum the headline at the new york times without saying trump george w bush delivers an implicit rebuke in part of the story notes at the bush family has never been fond of president trump who beat former governor jeb bush in florida for the republican presidential nomination last year the former president nor his father for president george bush george hw bush voted for mr trump bless november but advisors said the younger mr bush has been deeply troubled by the state the national debate under president routinely demonize is his adversaries on twitter the story also notes at this conference also featured a panel with two former secretaries of state companies to reis of madeleine albright joining nikki haley mr trump's ambassador to the united nations eastern radio wcs be at them washington sunday night on cuba a day executive director of paralyze rhetoric of america and retired us marine corps officer sherman gillon's junior talks about his own paralysis and his work to help paralysed vets i'm i'm trying to tell them but this was the problem this is what i see from a patient's perspective from a policy perspective from in advocacy perspective you have to improvise that's what will be get the ideal provider for veterans who have gone to combat is sacrificed sunday night at eight eastern on cspan secure day saturday at ten am eastern since then reviews view from the state's wisconsinbased three billion dollars in tax burdens berlin products maker box on twin in the champion by president donald trump this is a great day for american workers and manufacture and for everyone who believes in the constitution and the label made in the usa and republican governors not long frears all of the matter what offers rerun four we talk about why the have good big fan was supported jobs that's really what today's all belle but wisconsin senate democratic leader jennifer schilling has reservations twenty thirty forty fifty years the wrong scratcher listen to the debate from wisconsin on the.

president george w bush senate wisconsin cspan officer america cuba washington nikki haley madeleine albright twitter george hw bush bush institute new york new york times jennifer schilling donald trump sherman gillon us executive director united nations mr trump president presidential nomination florida jeb bush bush family twenty thirty forty fifty year three billion dollars
"bush institute" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:39 min | 3 years ago

"bush institute" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Dam's or all also radio free europe and radio liberty reporting the president vladimir putin is threatening us media operating in russia saying that russia would retaliate if us officials put restrictions on russian media in the united states officials with the russian statefunded media including party tv channel formerly known as rush today and the news site of news websites sputnik say those organisations americans units have been ordered to register under a decade old law analyst the foreign agents registration act the us department not confirming that it issued any order to rt war sputnik what next former president george w bush the new york times reporting that he never mentioned his name but delivered what sounded like a sustained rebuke to president trump on thursday decrying nationalism protectionism and of course ning of public debate or conqueror bust response to russian interference in our democracy for president spoke at a farm hosted by the george w bush institute in this runs just or fifteen minutes right thank you but garages so i paid ramon i wish your stress adding here it's a face only a mother could love go as a fabulous i love your remark thank you very much for being here and grace joe thank you for your testimony in big jim i got to know tamas result of presidential leadership scholars of program at the bush cetera along with the clintons center at uh uh with a with help from forty one and it'll be judged lab peres a i want to uh i'm thrilled the friends of ours from afghanistan china north korea and venezuela are here as well these are people who've experience the absence of freedom i hope what is like and they know there is a better alternative than tyranny lord i r a thrilled bush are supporter here verde i want to thank you and your committee a calling bernie it's amazing to have uh secretary albright share the stage with condie and ambassador haley uh for those of you who can't take things for granted that's a big deal.

bush albright venezuela afghanistan peres clintons george w bush us secretary bernie europe north korea tamas ramon george w bush institute president new york times analyst russia vladimir putin fifteen minutes
"bush institute" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"bush institute" Discussed on WTVN

"Now ladies generally have you heard he for staff kelly retired fourstar marine general i want us to listen not in comparison it's a different matter but still a speech in part not going to play the whole thing by george w bush now george w bush doesn't give a lot of political speeches he was very very quiet if not completely silent when it came to the obama administration and it always bothered me at always bothered me that he never came out and defended his foreign policy considering all the men and women who fought to advance his foreign policy really never came out in challenged obama on those issues obama repeatedly violated the constitution or skirted the constitution he never gave a speech about that that i'm familiar with if he did it certainly didn't get a lot of attention and that bothered me bothered me a lot but he was the ah president george w bush at the george w bush institute in new york city today and in all fairness is just some clips of what he said during the course of his speech cut eleven go too often we judge other groups rather worst examples while judging ourselves by our best intentions getting the image of god we should see in each other we see nationalism distorted into native is god the dynamism that immigration is always brought to america stop stop stop stop nationalism verses nativist them now he's not talking about nationalism per se or or much more generally talking about nationalism as it applies to immigration.

obama administration foreign policy obama george w bush institute new york city george w bush president america
"bush institute" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"bush institute" Discussed on WTVN

"Now ladies generally have you heard he for staff kelly retired fourstar marine general i want us to listen not in comparison it's a different matter but still a speech in part not going to play the whole thing by george w bush now george w bush doesn't give a lot of political speeches he was very very quiet if not completely silent when it came to the obama administration and it always bothered me at always bothered me that he never came out and defended his foreign policy considering all the men and women who fought to advance his foreign policy really never came out in challenged obama on those issues obama repeatedly violated the constitution or skirted the constitution he never gave a speech about that that i'm familiar with if he did it certainly didn't get a lot of attention and that bothered me bothered me a lot but he was the ah president george w bush at the george w bush institute in new york city today and in all fairness is just some clips of what he said during the course of his speech cut eleven go too often we judge other groups rather worst examples while judging ourselves by our best intentions getting the image of god we should see in each other we see nationalism distorted into native is god the dynamism that immigration is always brought to america stop stop stop stop nationalism verses nativist them now he's not talking about nationalism per se or or much more generally talking about nationalism as it applies to immigration.

obama administration foreign policy obama george w bush institute new york city george w bush president america
"bush institute" Discussed on NPR Politics Podcast

NPR Politics Podcast

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"bush institute" Discussed on NPR Politics Podcast

"All right so it's not every day that we start the podcast with a speech by a former president but the fact that former president george w bush has on the public stage and talking about the current president is news in itself but what he said and how he said it is also notable you might say that george w bush wants to make america great again someone wrote that dominica you know it's really remarkable you had a president george w bush take two of the lectern at uh the the george w bush institute and they had a forum that they're holding in new york this week the thing is with president bush he somebody who left office uh very unpopular he pretty much stayed out of the spotlight he didn't really criticise or go after president obama even though president obama won largely as the antibush you didn't see george w bush out there now you see him taking a different kind of tak he went after kind of the world view of president trump without naming trump let's here it's kind of a long clip but with just worthless nato bigotry seems emboldened a politics seems more vulnerable to conspiracy theories an outright fabrication there are some signs that the intensity of support for democracy itself is wayne especially among the young who never experience the galvanizing moral clarity of the cold war or never focused on the ruin of entire nations by socialist central planning.

president george w bush institute new york bush obama cold war george w bush america