20 Episode results for "Bush Center"

Mark Cuban and Daymond John - Inspiring A New Generation of Entrepreneurs

The Strategerist

26:53 min | Last month

Mark Cuban and Daymond John - Inspiring A New Generation of Entrepreneurs

"We are here with the debut season. We're back into Bush Center in person for sitting sixty depart we've got masks on we D- we sanitize the microphones and we are kicking it off with a doozy. We've got mark and John to sharks the gentleman themselves mark. Damon, thank you so much for being here. Thanks for having us an honor and our co as Brittany. Bane the director of communications at the Bush Center and she's editor. The catalysts are online digital magazine. Britney thank you for helping us out. Thanks for letting me join. All right. So I WANNA start a story about mark from two thousand and two or so I wanna you remember this. Okay. Don't be nervous it's going to be. I am. We used to play basketball together all your by here and there was Saturday's about two thousand and two. You were just your manager of dairy queen at the time. And We get done playing go to my nine, thousand, nine, hundred and Nissan Pathfinder to leave and a will not start. So I call a tow truck and they send the biggest coach they have. It looks like it could tell an eighteen wheeler there's no way it's going to fit in the parking garage of this gym. So of course, I'm parked up on the fourth floor. The tow truck driver pushing my car out and I'm tired and scrawny, and he's kind of older and it's slow going and all these cars are passing us and it's awkward. Everybody's clearly annoyed except this one little x sports car zero up stops parked right next to us and this big dude than mfl shirt jumps out and push three floors out of that parking garage. Never forget that tow truck driver who kept repeating. That's Mark Cuban. Mark. Cuban's helped me pushing my wife is never going to believe this. So. Let me ask this. How much would you pay me? How much did you pay me my car? My car was in trouble. Are. You the same guys you were in two thousand, two I hope. So I think so I try to be. A lot of people that's probably not a positive, but you know. Yeah I think I am. I gotta be honest and I'm not being funny when I say this, I think he still drives that Lexus. In La, that he is Alexis that looks like that this is a sports car I know because I. Kept. It kept it. It was supposed to go to my daughter because my daughter was born right after that and I was going to save it for a sixteenth birthday and I kept it and when we got to her sixteenth birthday, she laughed at me. Robert. Pulling up and Ferrari I got the goals and he got chicken. In Two Thousand Two's release it twenty years they're. Close to it. So. Damon, what about you? Are you the same guy that you were in in two thousand and two? Much more calmer. A much smarter two thousand two was about. Six years me having access to money and I was. Very. excited. But. Since then I guess screwed over by enough people and I realized that I had a bigger responsibility and that I was growing ass man and that I should do more on my cell. So hopefully, I'm a little bit better mark bought a jet online. What did you do? I bought a lexus. I didn't hit the same kind of oil will. What the and had the eighty CD whole, the our our used to pull them out of everywhere, and just keep my trunk with the show piglet. Eighty CDs, I can flip through. And David definitely has not changed. So we're shooting shark tank in a bubble, right? What I call you. David. Radio. Roddy. Who? Who Radio Raheem is likely do the right thing. And so he was he was a character in the movies I carried around this big boombox. So every morning Damon would have this huge huge enormous plume blocks said would roll up with and it's what seven thirty, a good portion of the cast, the portion of the cast that are musically challenged because. I have to play some music Oh, my God. It was great I mean you would just hear the whole place to start sharing. Painful was. On the set ready. Are. Awesome bringing mark's trying trendy listen to Abba is air. PODS. They were listening to. His songs are so ECLECTIC. Not what you think but. Yeah it was fun. So Damon still that guy blast in the music. That's awesome. Okay. So you guys could both retire tomorrow tonight if you wanted to take a nice long vacation. So what keeps you motivated what's getting up in the morning? While I retired for about six months. When I was. I think I was thirty I think it was thirty four and my wife at the time not the same way after six months telling me hey, bozo empty the garbage I realize that I need to go to work because obviously there was a bigger calling for me. and. Then I got me back up because who was a great success then no matter what level you get to your privacy of Eagle you have a healthy paranoia it was. Oh, well, he. He just hit a lot of once or he just got struck by lightning he can't do that again. And then I did it again with another brand Kukudji but after that I realized, why am I trying to start these things myself? Why don't I go after people that are smarter than me younger than me that can that or not younger than me and I can invest in them and I started doing that shark tank picked me up. And at I I got into shark thought I'll get really good deals I wouldn't get pitched only clothing. I'd get the divers for my portfolio. But when I started realizing that it was a, it was a former inspiration for a lot of people around the world and that me being somebody who was in. Of, color who was music related or sports related that people can see and there's many many people like unfortunately we don't know a lot of them. But if I can show the world that I can do then whoever you are Lgbtq veteran African American female. If you feel the odds against and you could see that me who got left-back who never went to college I mean I. I was pretty good in school because I love seventh grade. So much I did it twice only Want people to see me do that and I felt that they could see anyway and then you know I, I said. Came on the show and I wondered at that time when he came on the show. All the very notable. Celebrity business people that you know they all said I'm not going onto that show with I. Don't know who a barber is a Kevin. They didn't go on the show because they felt like the show be just for them. And that they were the star and Mark said. Because he was doing the data on the show and he was like I'm looking at WHO's watching them looking and he said if this is GonNa help American entrepreneurship I'm going to go on the show and then reinforced to me wait a minute I got bigger story to tell to, and that's why I stayed on the show and that's what drives us because basically now, we have all these great partners who believe in us and so many other things to do share mark what drives you. I'm competitive I mean I retired when I was thirty like Damon and then we started went back to work. When we started broadcast, audio net would started the whole streaming industry sold that. And I was retired again then about the Mavs and I was just going to do the mavs. But like Dame said, you're competitive spirit takes over you know you WANNA show people not only that you can do it again but you know businesses the ultimate sport and I would tell Dirk I would tell Luka tell kp guys on the team. You play a game eighty, two games plus playoffs for forty eight minutes and you have an off season and business. There is no off-season and you don't know who your competition is and you know there could be a twelve year old kid at Smu Daymond John Somebody. Coming after you and you've got to be ready, you've got to be willing to compete and that's what I love about business and so that keeps me going. So. Right now, it's hard time for a lot of business owners that are that are there they're struggling to get up and get going in the morning because their businesses are in the tank. What do you guys say to these to those type of business owners who are who are really struggling right now I mean. There's changed was opportunity and there's some businesses that are really. In difficult circumstances, sporting events, live events, movie theaters. You know weddings, wedding planners. Event planners that have real issues right now, and you know you've just got to hope that they're resilient or can pivot in some manner to do something that leverages the changes that are taking place because you know as as difficult at times is the there these are You, know there are trends that are happening that create a lot of opportunity more people are buying online where people are buying different things. We saw a shark tank deals where. People using zoom pivoted well, I'll tell you one of my companies from last season analysis table Alison table, helps Stay at home parents start businesses, and in particular, how to do floral arrangements. Will teach you how to do a flow arrangement. Then you'll teach other people how to do floral arrangements that helped them with their business and earned income from that, and they couldn't do it. They used to have all their events in hotels and that stopped, and so they pivoted to doing them online and what they found out was they charge the same amount of money even though it was online but instead of being limited to the number of people in this ballroom like this, there was no limit and then we partnered them with if td with one eight, hundred flowers and on mother's Day instead of having twenty people in a ballroom, they had over fourteen hundred people. Yeah they found new ways to succeed in. That's really what we try to do. Work with our entrepreneurs work with my investment companies and just say, let's find new ways to succeed. Doesn't always work but it's shocking how often it does work. Damon, we know that your mom had to fight pay inequality when you were growing up to support you put food on the table that still initiative for women today and women are being hit even harder in this covert economy. So how do we solve for that? How do we fix that and make sure that women? Get the pay they deserve and stay employed. As a tough question because. And I agree with you. Right because we've looked at the women have been hit the hardest because if they don't get paid the same and they are in a house and they have a family and a husband, they also many of them have now taken on another job of being a teacher to right and so if you both your husband, the white, both have a job and this person is making eighty and this person making sixty eight. May make more sense right also, you look at women who you and you're losing way more talent in the world, and you also look at women who at first a hiring practices has been well, you may have maternity leave whatever I say that the the the hiring practice needs to also be the same for men too. So you so uterus doesn't become a liability right at a at a auto fathers take paternally mothers what other cases. This is going and I'm not gonNA talk too much on in the same area of the racial inequality and. And LGBTQ and various other things and none of these all going to be solved overnight. But like all entrepreneurs and I've gotten a lot of calls by. Colleagues of mine, who run businesses. Go. I want to do something, but I don't WanNa put lipstick on a pig. I don't want to do anything else. I want to do them long and meaningful but I don't want to just do it for African Americans and then LGBTQ is ignored and then females ignore. So any entrepreneur you know what they do they see there's a problem that is not being salt and they do their homework on the first affordable steps. They can do internally to address it for the long haul and it has to stop from start from the top down, and if you don't have females, let me have some who's GonNa make something for black black females that they need white men black men no right scoring to be black female. So you need to have on WHO's working for you when board and everything else that people that reflect the people you serve it's. Fascinating too is is we've seen the covert is not doesn't people equally like let's be honest like the people were we're sitting here Brunei like we sit at a desk and think all day and we've we've been affected lot less than everybody. Then a lot of folks don't have jobs like then. Essential workers of bearing the brunt because they don't have a choice you know the people that we deem essential workers are the ones getting paid by the hour. They're the ones that aren't earning a living wage in many many cases if not most cases and as a result, they have no choice but to go to work and when you have no choice, I, mean you take risks that you otherwise would not. Take, and you can't really get help from just you know the best of right you're just trying to make Damon was saying you're just trying to make all the pieces fit and just trying to survive which makes you more susceptible and you probably don't have healthcare. So at the time when you need healthcare the most and here we are in the middle of the healthcare crisis, you probably aren't getting insurance and if. You are probably not a great plan and if you aren't, you're just praying that you're not gonna get sick because if you do all falls apart and you can't go to work and then you're stuck in that position while do I go to work I'm not feeling well, I have a headache right or have a sore throat what does that mean and we don't know who to trust with our lives effectively to. Understand you know are we are we not sick and so you get some people say it's probably not right and then all of a sudden you're infecting people all around you in that just cascades and make makes it worse and so people people who are in those essential jobs getting paid by the hour are most at risk and it's it's showing right? You're you're seeing with people of color in and disadvantaged groups. Sandra another tricky topic we you know we're talking about the economy and a big part of the economy is is our relationship with China, there's one point, four, billion potential customers over there. So you guys are big business people. How do you navigate a such a challenging situation where there's human rights abuses and there's there's problems there. Now I'll take since I've been in the middle that firestorm. But. I didn't. I didn't hear anything. Well I, when it comes to human rights violations in China that's just wrong. Right, specifically with the warriors and what's happening there it's just wrong but human violations across the globe are as wrong. They happen everywhere. But still doing business with China, you've got to be cognizant of what kind of business you're doing and where. The people you're whether it's manufacturing service, whatever it is where they're located and how they're creating your service and manufacturing. You know you have to be very cognizant and you know not only is it good from an influence perspective to try to stop what's happening there but if you don't do it and people find out that your, you know your whatever it is you're you're Chomsky's are being created by. Working mark for our listeners that don't know who are the we We are the the Muslim community in. China. That is really. Even know the best way to describe that very oppressed and so many have been driven from their homes. They're in camps it's brutal. Well in India has the same same thing. They have bonded they of Labor indentured servants and things that nature. Around the world right Nigeria just you know you can't fight every battle, but you can be cognizant of the things that you can control and it really makes a difference when you make sure that what it is you're buying is not made by forced labour. When we will manufacturing over there, heavily put an all out contracts that you were not allowed to use any slave or child labor in there And we would reinforce it if we could. But you gotta remember, I'll give you example if I make a jacket, you know they're those. Pieces coming from thirty different factories to assemble on that jacket I, can't, and in some of these places are cottage industries in various industries. So what you do is you go to an agent and say I will pay seventy dollars for this jacket and they go out and you still will end up finding out down the road. I didn't know and that's that's the problem right now with the legislation proposing right because the legislation that's being proposed saying that you can't do business with anybody with forced labor on particularly the week. They only deal with the first ordinance, right they only deal with the first level of impact to your point. If. Someone then contracts that the somebody else who contracts is something else even the legislation that's being proposed here doesn't address that and you know there's so many things that we can do I mean when it comes to immigration I mean you can go on for days dealing you know how do you respond you know because the reality is if they can escape through Turkey Europe wherever it is and they don't get extradited. We don't let them in. You know we have a chance to prevent someone from dying potentially and we don't won't let them in this country so. It's not a simple issue is very, it is very complex because in a lot of the places like the Child Labor or women, would they say well, the factory getting get the business in some of those families have died of starvation so it's It is very conflict, but you gotTa do the best. You can to protect that you're putting out the right message and trying to work with the right people to help further and enforce that message right when you're talking about the manufacturing, is it even possible to get any of that back in America? Oh Yeah. Technology. Right. I mean look if if we were to become if we had. A. A Country Plan for the United States to dominate in AI like China. Does like Russia does. And by extension dominating robotics There's no reason why if we were the best in the world at robotics, we couldn't bring back most of that manufacturing why do you think China's pushing? So heavily into robotics because they know that's even cheaper than therefore than the Labor you know the inexpensive Labor that they have, and so if we're able to dominate in robotics and right now we're not we're behind Germany were behind Japan where behind Korea, and we're probably equal to China. And we really don't even make robots here in this country. But if we're able to take that on and become the best in the world like we typically are for for technology by investing in it, I mean to me that's the ultimate infrastructure play. You know it's important to fix roads. It's important to have great airports but the real investment we need is to invest in AI in robotics and precision medicine because that's what's going allow America Inc to be dominant in the global economy. I totally agree mark I have other thoughts about that. He also tax incentives for people who are going to take on the building of buildings in creating a workforce. If I'M NOT GONNA get incentivized to do that. Then why am I taking on that responsibility of hiring a thousand people working you WanNa make money at it I, do but I can make it right now at different places I'm talking about now me building butch built the factory bill he he he spent eight million into it. He barely got any of it back in tax incentives now and we're talking about certain things to right because Dacia bells funny but he's also telling the chew. Americans. Also got the road is an American trying to put a GI JOE head on some on a bunch of two dollars an hour. You Ain't trying to do that, and then some of the stuff in China I don't want over here. It is the dirtiest dirtiest place you ever been and I don't want them dumping that crap in our wall, the reason pollution. So we're doing ro- robots and stuff like that. Absolutely, and we are the best of the best. Well okay. We've talked some serious subjects. Let's have some fun. Now it's was fun. Enjoyed myself. You guys have a much deeper knowledge than I do about the stuff it was like I'm getting out of the way and letting these guys go at it because they y'all y'all clearly spent a lot of time talking about this. On the set which I think that's all we talk about robotics. Mr One MR wonderful hairstylists. Yeah. Right royalties. So talking about shark tank new season just debuted. Do we say it's on every Friday night on ABC at eight PM EASTERN Central do we say that I don't know What. Time. It's right. It's right after Thursday before Saturday on Friday at eight o'clock. Eastern, what about central on on what time of the central seven pm but it's on ABC right every Friday night he. Got It, can I watch it on a smart devices if you're GonNa? Watch that time and then look at it again, I wind Dr Yes got. Your family, and then you go and really understand what happened on your smart device again. To Watch with your entire family last time, you got the kids or your friends I mean come on I. Know You pre-game have a drink put on shark? Every Friday night, what's better than that Friday and Saturday actually but that is the appeal is one of the I was watching the episode one of the season there was an watch them Friday night on ABC Seven PM here actually I watched it on Friday at nine pm I saved. It was only now late. So go hard and you know you had to put it off till nine well, and I watched it again on Saturday 'cause I went a little too hard. But so these there was this genie's if a kid who's WHO's out there pitching in and two kids like that inspire you. Oh Yeah. They scare us to. Your mother smarter than US sometimes, it was amazing stuff. Brilliant. Okay and this is the twelfth season, right. So what do you guys think as the recipe for success here? What's made it such a popular show. Damon. You're on before mark, right? Yeah he's the. First of all when and as we were talking about the nicest. The this is the best time I. See it Friday night seven PM Central. Why? Because a lot of people watch it on CNBC and that's great and sometimes they think the show is a CNBC show airs for Your Sixty Times there. But if you're going to watch it this year, what you're going to see is you know listen they couldn't come up on stage and go I was really doing bad prior to Colbert, and now I'm really screwed helped me out that you're not probably not going to get a deal right so what you're going to see people that are so. Inspiring and the pivoted so much that you can learn because it was hard for us to not by all the company. There are some gripe and why do I think the show is success because when when would you have ever been in a room and seen what millionaires and billionaires going to ask you? When will when will you ever going to be? In, a room and see that a person who's just like you one who is living, you know who is just chilling on the couch eight months ago. Now has eight hundred, thousand dollars worth of orders. When were you able to learn the words like you know margins and third party logistics three pl and be able to walk in the room and least know Versus. We had we had a discussion and I screwed what was happening, but it was about markups. Margins are markup and the market is right I. Think they want me on air about this and we took it. Wayne. This is My that's my thing. Listen market happens to have a couple more dollars than me don't worry about it. He's not smart enough better looking at me. Any caught me on this. So. Let's have some fun. You're both competitors we WANNA do rapid fire. You've done this before you do rapid-fire we're no different. We want to fires. Britney's Brittany's the master this K-, we've seen the tick tock mark and we know your background. Thing. That's right. So who's a better dancer? WHO's GonNa win in a dance off? In his talks I haven't exactly. I'll outdoor when. I'm a sprinkle y'all. Tag At. The Bush? Center We'll never embarrassed President Bush that. I'm GonNa tag something else. WHO's Funnier? Who could moonlight as a stand up comedian by telling jokes, empire me all right you up the pirate jokes. So that means we have to hear one. I. Don't have a fiery joke right now. Joke one of your stupid. Jokes Oh What did they say when he was late? beat me. No. Ch, we need to get a sound effect machine. What's what's Armlet Armlet? Most. What's the most cronk bathroom? John. Doom check I'm here all night. He is he's going to be here for engaged the Bush Center presented by this, and there was a toy store that burned down on the second factory. You'll be happy to the slinky's all got out. Okay. So now you know what? How many? All literally all day hours. Okay. So that's a clear winner. WHO's the better grill master grow master real master illness me you can't tell. Definitely, Damon. If both woke up tomorrow morning, you've got one Jackson left in your pocket lost everything else somehow to know you bet sports bent who knows who becomes a millionaire again i. Mark. I work at. Because he knows. He. Things I can do. All right. So we're running out of time. We always ask our guest kind of just one last question you to have been on microphones twenty, four seven for whoever knows how long everybody's ass you a million questions what has no one asked you that you wish they would Damon. dumped. Him stumped. I know. I know market you can from here we can see the winner of who who answered. This question best could be could be mark. way. What's your favorite song? What is your favorite song? I have a favorite song. Well this favorite artists I go all over the map just depends but now like that. Whole. Lot Of. Myself. Talk. Well this fell apart here at the end but. Incredible half hour. We can't thank you guys close. So generous time. There's a lot of fun. Thanks for being here for the main event will hope to get to talk to you guys. Actually, you know I. Did get a fixed after that incident. We had a good run man I miss that. Anyway Suit Against Gentlemen. Thanks guys. The American spirit of entrepreneurship is still alive watch mark and Damon on sharp right as on ABC and watch their engaged at the Bush center presented by highland capital, management conversation at www dot, Bush center, dot org slash to sharks. Enjoyed this episode of the strategic. Tele friend and be sure to subscribe on Apple podcasts, spotify Google play and everywhere else find podcasts are found. Thank you for listening.

Damon mark China John Somebody Bush Center Mark Mark Cuban Bush Center basketball United States Britney ABC Lexus ABC Nissan Pathfinder Brittany Bane
President George W. Bush

The Strategerist

21:01 min | 1 year ago

President George W. Bush

"What happens when you cross the forty third president late night, sketch comedy and compelling conversation, this strategic a podcast born from the word strategically, which was coined by the now in braced by the George Bush administration. We highlight the Americans feared of leadership and compassion through thought, provoking conversations and we're reminded that the most effective leaders are the ones who laughed. We've got a pretty special episode today. First off our co host is Hannah Abney who heads up our external affairs department Hannah. Thanks for waking up early this morning. You're welcome. And if you're at the Bush institute, and you have a podcast called the strategic I, you really have to get on the man himself, the forty third president of the United States. President George W Bush Andrew. Thank you Hannah. Good to see you smiling. I'm honored to be on the strategic list. Well, and so the name the strategic is derived from strategically, which is supposedly a famous bushes them. But I think there's a little bit of a story that whether is a story, so. For seventeen years, see for seventeen years. I thought I said the worst strategically. Cage Nally I would get my words mixed up. Call malapropism and then get that one mixed up. No nailed. I'd been researching it. And so Lord took Lorne Michaels ahead of Saturday Night, Live, or the producer creator to dinner. And at one point the dinner, he said we created the words strategically. And as no. You didn't I said it any said, no one of our great speechwriters came up with the word, and we basically stuck it on you, and I said, you gotta be kidding me. Learn it for all these years. I thought I said strategically and you're telling me I didn't he said, that's right? I said, well, let me ask you to come up with misunder estimate. So anyway, that's I'm honored that the mala prop that evidently, I didn't come up with is a part of the Bush center that you've been saddled with all these year have have. Well, we're glad you're on our pack cost. You listen to podcasts. No. Okay. Well, I mean, of course, we're listen to this one. So we wanted a podcast that would allow us to interview some of the really cool people that come through the Bush center, we're really lucky to have some awesomely honor to be insured. Cool. And what we wanted to be authentic. So we think around the Bush center that we take our work more seriously than we take ourselves. And we think that, that might come a little bit from your leadership. Do you think it's important to take your work more important than yourself? Yes. But I think it's very important to take yourself too seriously. Yes. So. I think if anytime you're parliament organization where one attempts to advance their own interests. It undermines the culture of an organization. So, for example, during the presidency. I worked hard to surround myself with people who were there, not to serve me or a political party, but were there to serve the country and so cultures very important. We've got a fabulous culture here at the Bush center because we're all aimed at making this place relevant and important and lasting. And the leadership provide there is on spot that we are so empowered to, to do great things. And we're good we're lucky to be here. Well take, for example, traduced. It's feels like it's a great thing emerging. Well, thank you. We hope so we're, we're having to overcome some shortcomings at the host, but other than that, I think we're moving right along the way. So during our engagement with Lorne Michaels that you're so you went to dinner with him after our engage of it couple years ago. And during that vent, you said that a part of the past of the presidency include humor because our nation needs to laugh. Yeah. So what's it feel like to be the guy that's providing them at aerial part of the his just part of the job? I think it is very important for society and individuals to either collectively or individually laugh because laughter such a part of a light spirit and heaviness on a society or a heaviness, clouds and individuals vision is can be very weighing and it's hard to be optimistic. If you're not able to smile one of the jobs of president is to create an optimistic vision for the country, and I don't say you can be optimistic if you're like worried that somebody's. Making fun of you. Right. Good point. By the way. I did watch him make fun of my dad, and, you know, his way handle, it was very instructive to me one. He just accepted as part of the job as a son. I didn't particularly accept it. The, the, the humor on my dad if it was particularly as binding. But which made it easier for me when I became president to accept humor is part of the job. The other thing though is he befriended. Dana, carvey. And as a matter of fact, at the end of his presidency. When he was saying had a farewell party for the White House staff. He surprise everybody with Dana, Carvey as the guest and I thought it was a great example of humility and. Of humor. And so besides see learned a lot from your father, and your mother about humor, and we saw that their humor on display at our recent engage event just was remembering your father who else. Did you learn humor from though, we we've seen we know about them? Well, that's all you needed to know because they had such a huge influence on my life. I mean my mother was very quick. Very funny and was capable of dealing with hypocrisy in a humorous way. My dad was a little more subtle, but he loved a good joke, and he loved to laugh and. And it was pretty famous for grading others jokes. So post-presidency a lot of his buddies around the country, would send in jokes. And he was the judge of the jokes. And, you know, I can't remember the grading scale but, like if you got a four on your joke, as opposed to three. It was considered a wonderful day for the jokester to your member has favorite joke. No. So we were doing our research this interview, and I did a quick Google search. When you search George W Bush and humor. Yeah. There are a lottery salts that come up about four hundred of the search results are you dancing different in different places interesting way to analyze my dancing, but one moment that come up comes up a lot, and I remember it was from Livingstone Zambia Lear. There you were there is Bush was they're renovating a clinic. And I remember, so we were there as part of our cervical cancer screening and treatment program. And I recall the women were so nervous as they filed up to be tested for the first time to see if they had HP or cervical cancer. And then the did they began to sing, and there was some dancing involved, and there's a lot of laughter and a lot of joy, do you, do you remember that do clearly? And here's what struck me was amidst. All the deprivation and poverty. There was a joy and I got caught up in the spirit joyful spirit, and they started singing clapping and a couple of star dancing, and it was really fun. Really fun. And, you know, part of my way of telling them that I was trying to relate to them. But also that I knew they were nervous. They were nervous being around president. They were frankly, a little nervous because finally, somebody had paid attention to what may be a major health issue, and they were uncertain as to whether or not they needed treatment. And so the dancing and the joy was away of, of for me to help them. Enjoy the moment, and they really helped me more than I help them for sure. But it was fun. It really fun. The moment, must've really stuck with you. Because the, the women that you met on that day you painted the painting and the Bush institute now. I did I painted the faces of I think it was eight women. And of five of them where the older woman women who were very joyful, three of the women were the younger women who were very nervous. Oh, interesting. Yeah. There was a great apprehension among some of the young women because, you know, as I say, this seem like the first time that any organization or entity had paid attention to their health. And so these young young girls were, you know they were justifiably nervous. I mean there was a lot of thirty there. I think the first lady is amby came by some point. And, and I don't recall these were the dancers either. I think they were kind of sitting on sitting in their seats, you know, in, in nervously awaiting their turn, and they were healthy. They were healthy. Yeah, it was great. I thought you know, I did a lot of public dancing. I thought you. Google. George W Bush's great dance moves, and that, you know, the critics were say, well, this guy can shake when they were one of do dear daughters ever, send you the me on your phone, when they're when they're texting with you to the one of you dancing. That's just a two second clip of dancing. No. I haven't seen that one yet, but I do know that when I was dancing. I can't remember where it was during the presidency might have been in the rose garden, it might have been in Liberia at, at, at an event. That it made you know. Knows days. Like there were no podcast and the internet was just taking hold and things going viral is a new phenomena. And I think one of my daughter said you went viral and I said, no, I'm healthy. So you were talking about laughter and being optimistic. Yes. And I think if you if all you did these days was watched twenty four hour news, maybe you would feel like a lot of people feel like maybe that the world is ending. But of course, it's not. And we know that don't watch twenty four hour shift point. But what keeps you up domestic? You know that first of all, my understanding of history of this country we have been through some very difficult periods in the past this one for some people seemed like the most difficult. It's not democracy has got institutional safeguards that enabled the ship estate to sail on that elections. Enabled democracies to heal and that the soul of America is good and generous. And so I'm very optimistic anything. Nothing shows that souls much as programs like pep far which starred under deer four was a big deal sad thing is most Americans have no clue of anybody's listening to this podcast. They're probably scratching their head going, what is pet far and the answer is it was your tax payers money, going to save lives on the continent of Africa. There was a pandemic destroying an entire generation of Africa and thanks to the generosity of the American taxpayer may, is now live. We would have died and I, you know, if one were to go to Africa and say, you know, I'm American they'd say, thank you. Most Africans, say thanks. That's a an incredible compliment from the US tax payer. It really is. It really is. It's a. In the fundamental question is do the American people? See that. It's international interest to save a continent from a pandemic oftentimes, feel say, well, we've got our own problems, and my answer's yes, we certainly do, but nothing compared to a pandemic and its destructive effects on a continent. And so in here at the Bush center, we learned that a woman with the as virus was likely to get cervical cancer. Cervical cancer was a leading is a leading cause of death of women and the on the African continent decided you something about it. We want we continued the spirit of pet for last week was the warrior open, which is a great. It's a great way to honor veterans as a great celebration this at this year's warrior open. Did you see anything different between this year? Any of the previous years we've done, this is our eighth year to do it. You know, it struck me that we had to double amputees play. And that Audi air no showed with only one arm. And yet, I was and has such a great spirit. The idea of having a spousal of was a smart idea. And which we had done in the past, but the wives were very appreciative of the fact that the Bush center cares about them as much as they cared about the golfers. Well during the program Ryan Palmer got a hole in one on the same hall. You gotta, you know I it was nice. They need to make the whole harder. Do you think? No, I think he's plenty hard. Yeah. He dunked the ball actually did not bounce on the green, but, like basketball shot. It went straight into the into the hole, and it was a dunk. It was good. I'm glad he did it because he and I were talking about my whole in one prior to him teeing off. He's just to show off that he had he was trying to show you Amarillo boy and very nice of the pros to be there. We're very thankful that people took time to come. And, and you know, hang out with the vets and one thing is no that they're impressed. So one of the things I don't know if you know this story, but during the pro-am David Dorothy, one of the warriors who played this year was getting ready to t- off his group and Jason pock, who was a member of our, I stand to veteran leadership program works at Boeing was playing in the same group. And as they were coming up to the thi box. They David was kind of looking at him like I know this guy I know him and then he Jason turned around. And they made the connection that they had been together during the war, and that the last time they'd seen each other with wind Jason was being airlifted out. And so they had this really incredible moment where they were seeing each other for the first time, which was pretty divine intervention. Yeah. But there are a lot of tears and a lot of emotion. And that's the kind of thing I think about the were open in the w and hundred you think stories like that happen, once in a while, but it feels like they happen every year and the thing that's really important. Is that? The participants past and present in are golf, and biking, experience form a peer to peer counselling network where they cancel each other. So we can sit and be very empathetic. And it's almost like he will worship in a way you know, to some vet has been to him believable, seven we're kind of wow, you mean. You're unbelievable. But then help deal with some of the invisible wounds awar-, what helps is for a fellow vet to say, look, I know what you're going through man. And here's a way I dealt with it, and you ought to try it. And so the these networks. Not only help each other that are that have participated, but they reach out to other vents as well. And so we're a part of we do a lot of things for vets here, but we're a part of a larger group of peer to peer counseling networks around the country cavalry, wellness alliances is doing is one of the many things or military service, initiatives, Daffy working. It's good work. Yeah, it really is important. And so we have parlayed our strength, which is the capacity to assemble smart, people incapable capable people to rally, a group of disparate organizations, toward a common cause I have one more question about programming, which is in about a month. President Clinton will be here for the graduation of our presidential leaders dollars program are, are what is this? Our fifth class five years. And I know you've gotten to meet them, they're actually going to be here this week tomorrow night. That's right. And so I wondered about what you think about that program. I think first of all. A lot of people say to me, can't we figure out at work across the political divide? And I said, well, look at what we're doing at the Bush center, we've got a leadership program that Bill Clinton and I are very much involved in as LBJ and, and Bush, forty one that'd be my dad and. It is a way for us to bring a group of people that are talented and optimistic and want to continue to learn bring them together, regardless of political party race at you, you know, whatever and help them learn the skills necessary to become better leaders. And so this is a this is an genius program that will stand the test of time, and we'll have a very positive contribution to our country and Dame printing crediple, thanks. Yeah. I'm looking forward to seeing Bill as I mentioned. At my dad's funeral that he we call him a brother with a different mother. One of the things that we love to do here on on our podcast. And for the record that we believe this is probably the first podcast you've been on. We're gonna do some fact checking and make sure on that, but pretty confident it is, well, we're gonna we're gonna make sure we'll make sure do some fact checking at seventy to my mind is beginning to slip a little bit. I don't believe that for a second, but at age seventy two, you've probably been asked just about every question under the songs you've done countless interviews. What is a question that no one asked you that you wish they would? Why do you use only reds blues and yellows and white in your paint mix? Why do you. So I can learn to mix colors. So we've had to behind the scenes with artists today. We've had the learning about the juxtaposition of joy fear, and the painting with the African ladies and now about your use of colors. Yeah. And so one of my I'm one is never too old to take instruction. I still have as a matter of fact this afternoon. I'll be painting with an instruct one of my two instructors Jim Woodson, he came into my students. What do you wanna learn? I said color. He said, we'll get rid of all the paint. You bought. I had bought every color. There was look looking a painting cataloging. Oh, that looks like a nice color. And so I only use Salo blue CAD yell alike head yellow, medium CAD. Red light Elizabeth, and a white, and I've learned to mix every, every color possible, and it's changed my painting and it changed my appreciation of the use of color in my paintings there, it is less than from the artists themselves. Yeah. President Bush we can't. Thank you enough for spending the time Andrew morning. Thank you for having me on my first podcast. Enjoy today's episode. Like to help us spread the word about the strategic to please give us a five star review until your funds to subscribe for available on apple podcasts, Spotify, and all the major listening apps. If you're tuning in on a smartphone tapper swipe over the cover art, you'll find so notes with helpful information, and details, he may have missed the strategic was produced. But you Anna Pappas at the George Bush institute in Dallas, Texas. Thank you for listening.

George W Bush president Bush center President George W Bush Andrew Bush institute Bush center Lorne Michaels George Bush United States Google Hannah Abney Dana Carvey cervical cancer President Clinton Africa Jason pock Zambia George Bush institute HP
After the Fact: A Forgotten, But Essential Aspect of the Doctrine of Creation

Knowing Faith

06:37 min | 2 months ago

After the Fact: A Forgotten, But Essential Aspect of the Doctrine of Creation

"Welcome to after the fact and knowing fake mini episode where we look to take a big question and address it in just a few minutes. Typically, the questions we consider will line up with our larger topic for the season and that certainly true for our time today this season knowing faith, we are discussing Genesis one eleven and I get the privilege today to. Chat with Dr Ken Keithly Dr Keith Lease the senior Professor of theology and director of the L. Russ Bush Center for Faith and culture at the southeastern Baptist theological seminary. He is the author of salvation and sovereignty. A modernist approach is the CO author of forty questions about creation and evolution. Dr Keithly welcomed after the fact thanks for joining us. Glad to be here. So here is the question for today, what is a crucial but often forgotten essential about the Christian doctrine of creation what's something? That's absolutely essential to a meaningful coherent Christian doctrine of creation but that we often overlook forget. Well the doctrine of creation can be summed up in one sentence in that is that the triune God without opposition or equal and without the use of pre existing materials created the world by his will and for his good pleasure. And so. There's a lot each each one of those phrases is loaded one of the things that. Most people pay attention to is the idea that he did us. No pre existing materials a Krio Hilo. That is the reason for that is is to because God is truly sovereign over that which he created. It is not that he is one of many deities that who he happens to be the one that created the world, and that the world is made out of some kind of pre existing material are divine stuff in which he had to battle it and defeated and subdue it, which would would really impune on the docket of God's sovereignty. We don't find any of that in genesis chapter one. The thing that I would say many people forget is that last expression that he created a according to his good will and pleasure that is God has freedom he is a free gone nick would have been just as glorious if he had never created at all. It would have taken away none of His Excellency's. Throughout all eternity he had remained. The sum total reality it isn't that he got lonely in created because he was a perfect society of fellowship of Father, son and Holy Spirit that love one another with a perfect love that all of the glories and Excellencies were already experienced in a maximum way. No He created as an act of of pure grace. It is a gratuitous action. Created A world different than they one that he did if he had so chosen and if it had been according to his goodwill and good pleasure. So we want to preserve the freedom of God in creating. Because I. think that is just as essential because you do have some who thinks that God some somehow needed to create in it some creation fulfill some lack that he had and the Bible makes it very clear that neither of those things are true. That God is. Complete. Insufficient enough himself and we add nothing to his caloric. Now, we have been graciously given the privilege of glorifying him. In, but that is a gracious privilege and so I think that is something that is forgotten. The freedom of God in. Create. That's So I think that's a really good point. I might maybe a little follow up question here if we lose God's freedom and creating what do we lose about God like how how does that compromise a not only a coherent view of God but are persuasive you have got well. You for example, this means that everything God did he did by necessity being not have done? That for some reason whether it's internal or external, he was somehow compelled that he could not have done otherwise. A I think we all recognize intuitively that this puts a constraint on the character of our the the nature God in a way that doesn't sound very godlike, right? Though so It is no infringement are no restriction on. God to say that God always operates within the constraints of this nature. Words. God. Is a good. God. God is a Holy God God is a righteous God. So therefore, he always operates righteously lovingly. In a way that is pure. But within within that framework of his nature, there are an infinite number. Of others and infinite number of options available to him. He could have not saved Ken keithly. I still would have been just as glorious as he is. But he he ordained a world in which I would be six. This, this was a free act on his part. and. So regardless launch where one. COMES OUT ON. The calvinists. Debate. In everywhere non kind of in between the point is is that I think all of us want to preserve the freedom of God in this way yeah. Absolutely. Well, Dr Keithly that I think a really good answer to the question what is crucial but often forgotten essential about the doctrine of creation that God is free in his act of creation. Thank you for joining us today I appreciate it. After the fact is brought to you by Southeastern Baptist theological seminary. You want to study with incredible professors like Dr Keith LEAP HEAD OVER TO S E T. S. dot edu slash knowing faith and discovered just how accessible it is the study God's word so that you may go into the world with the Good News of the Gospel.

southeastern Baptist theologic Dr Keithly Dr Ken Keithly Dr Keith LEAP Dr Keith Lease Krio Hilo Ken keithly L. Russ Bush Center senior Professor of theology director
Democracy in America, 2019 edition

Democracy Works

35:40 min | 1 year ago

Democracy in America, 2019 edition

"From the mckearney institute for democracy on the campus of Penn State, university, a Michael Berkman, and I'm Chris beam. And this is democracy works. Chris today, we're gonna talk about an important survey that probes Americans young and old about their support for concerns about American democracy. Right. It's, it's actually the results are interesting. And also just the, the, the fact of the survey itself. It's an interesting partnership, right? Yeah. So we're going to be talking to Lindsay Loyd, who is director of the human freedom initiative at the George W Bush presidential center. And what's interesting about he did the survey called the democracy project survey. Elaborate and extensive. They included focus groups, but what's interesting about it is that it's distinctively bipartisan effort. Right. They worked in collaboration with the pen, Biden center at the university of Penn and also with Freedom House, who you know, universally worldwide regarded as a important arbiter of the condition of human rights around the world. And so they, you know, they did this this poll together, and they got. Polling firms representing both Republican and democratic sides of the of the aisle and together this this survey. Yeah. Bipartisanship from bygone era, I think, older establishment Republican, right? Abba, democrat back in the days when we could talk about an establishment that had bipartisan support, right? And it's interesting to ask whether and how that. Perspective, maybe gone for by perspective reflects is reflected in the results, or in the way that, that was also presented. So you and I both talked about this, the survey very famous now by Yasha Mont coup at the time was a, an electoral harbored. He's now at Johns Hopkins, and the survey asks people is it essential to you to live in a democracy. Right. And it's finding it decline in support for democracy. Among your co younger cohorts in multiple countries out the western we're right. And so this, this survey is just about the United States, but it's deeper because it's also using focus groups. Correct. And goes into some more detailed questions, including about promoting democracy abroad, which was not a topic and the chamo-, right. And which is obviously of serious concern to Freedom House. The, the pen Biden. Center and the, the George W Bush center, so. Right. So all that's true. But you're right. It's the objective is to find out not just what people are, are, how committed they are to democracy how they feel about democracy and what they see what they identify some of the biggest problem. Well, it's true. Right. It's trying to do that. But it's also tried. It's, it's, it's also trying to assess the extent to which American still support the idea of promoting democracy abroad. Right. But this other two things one is how to Americans of different generations, because they do through their focus groups and some other methods focus in on younger Americans. So how do Americans of different cohorts feel about the state of American democracy. And then how do they feel about the role of the United States, and promoting democracy abroad? Right. That's, that's right. I just want to. Just say that it's that it that one of the cohorts that split out is among aids. But also, they identified differences, in terms of partisanship and also differences in terms of, you know, racing necessary. And all of those are I think, pretty interesting. They also see America, they see younger Americans feeling a lower sense of efficacy. Meaning that they're what they have to say matters, having less confidence in politics, way to get things done. Unless confidence in American political institutions, right? Answer disturbing findings over the lottery. Yeah. I mean, if they if they stay this way, but there's no reason to believe they're going to grow out of it. So anyway, I think we've. Let's go to our guest. Yeah. Hear what he has say about who survey and then we'll be back. We'll be back. This is Dennis Bonelli here today with Lindsay Loyd Lindsay, thanks for joining us Jaylen. Pleasure to be with you. So we are going to talk today about the democracy project and some work that was done regarding feelings of Americans about the condition of democracy, and some of the factors that affected that, but before we get to that, I think it would be good to start with some background. Can you tell us what the democracy project is and how it relates to the Bush center's mission? Sure. So we Bush center opened in stores in two thousand nine and one of the, the areas that, that we work on is what we call human freedom democracy and human rights, programming, and historically that work had all been focused outside of the United States. We have inactive project on North Korea. We do work in Burma. We work with leaders from the Middle East North Africa and things like that. But several years. Ago we like everyone else sort of noticed what was happening in American democracy. And the fact that our politics are becoming increasingly angry, that there was just a lot of contention, a lot of partisanship. A lot of nastiness, frankly and wanted to see what we might be able to do about it. We joined forces with two other institutions, one being Freedom House, which is the oldest and best known human rights watchdog group in the country and a new organization, new startup called the pen, Biden center founded by the former vice president in housed at the university of Pennsylvania, and the three of us jointly decided to launch a public opinion research project to sort of find out, what is troubling our society. What's troubling our democracy? So over the course the first part of the of last year of twenty eighteen we did a series of focus groups in four different cities around the country with different constituencies. Like small business owners or military veterans or teachers to get that sort of qualitative data. To hear from people in their own words about what they were thinking about our democracy, and then later in the spring, we did a national public opinion poll where we surveyed people around the country on, on some of these issues both both domestically and internationally. We looked at the health far democracy, but then also about how markets feel about the US supporting democracy and human rights outside our borders. Briley speaking. How are people feeling about the condition of, of democracy in the US? So I think the first thing in the end, it's important thing there were, there was a flurry of articles and conversation in the first part of twenty seventeen that Americans were looking for something else, or the generally people living in democratic societies were thinking about alternatives Yasha monk at Harvard University's probably the, the best proponent of this, and he put out a an article and spoke quite a bit about this. This phenomenon saying that, you know, that there was an openness to something different that a technocratic government or even an authoritarian government, or, or something like that. We did not find that in our survey, the, the folks that we talked to overwhelmingly felt it was important to them or very important to them to live in a democracy. So large large numbers, really. No, no significant opening whatsoever to. Let's try something else. Now, having said that, you know, the theoretical, you know, eighty eighty five percent or saying it's important to them to live in a democracy. The, the flip side of that is that our respondents felt that America's democracy was weak, and that it's getting weaker. So, you know, not wanting to, to, to throw out the baby with the bathwater, but just sort of feeling that America's democracy, isn't delivering in the way that it's supposed to that. Traditionally had we ask people is, is America's democracy, getting weaker getting stronger nearly seventy. Percent. Sixty eight percent came back and said, it's getting weaker. So, you know, it's great to have that sort of theoretical conceptual support for democracy. But clearly there's something wrong when you have, you know, over two thirds of, of respondents in the country, saying that our system is getting weaker. What role do you see the democracy project and the, the Bush center playing in, in trying to address some of the issues that you found in in your surveyed in the focus groups? So it's kind of, twofold the other thing, which I didn't really touch on. But we the, the survey also looks at the support for US engagement onto microscope, human rights overseas. It was sort of the, the second half of the survey, and our plans, there are a little bit more crystallized, this point, we are starting a process to, to put out a policy paper, along with some discussion groups working groups things like that on a bipartisan basis to look at. Democracy and human human rights support overseas. It has frankly taken a hit under this administration. It has not been a priority for this administration, and we believe our partners, believe that it's extremely important that the US speak out on behalf of human rights around the world when when abuses her happening, and that the US support democracy around the world through through rhetoric through financial support through many other ways our adversaries, if I can put it that way. If you look at China you look at Russia are, are advocating for a different model for Thawra -tarian, ISM for, for more centralised system. And, you know, just as back in the height of the Cold War, when the National Endowment for democracy was founded, and President Reagan made a famous speech at Westminster in London, talking about the need for western democracies for democracies generally to advocate for their system for their point of view. And that has. Is that has largely fallen by the wayside, the, the funding is still there is still in place, but that's only because congress has put it in place over the last couple of years. The administration just hasn't made it priority. We believe it should be. We believe it's affected. We believe it's essential and what we found in the survey was that respondents when we started talking about these issues agreed that, when, you know, when you make arguments that having more democracies having more democratic world makes America safer, makes us more prosperous that it's the right thing to do we found strong support across really all demographics. So as I say, we are working on a policy paper that will make recommendations to, to congress to the administration. The new president, whoever he or she may be about this issue, why we believe it's important. Who do you see as your allies to, to move some of these issues forward? And as you said, continue that that support. For the US, you know, helping to, to build and sustain democracy abroad. So I think one of the one of the good news pieces is that on Capitol Hill, you still have very strong support across across party lines for this members of congress. I think Republicans and Democrats are generally supportive of the US continuing this kind of work, you know, as I said, you'd ministration had proposed cutting the budgets, pretty dramatically of some of the key programs that, that fund these these, these projects groups like the National Endowment for democracy and funding within the State Department and congress as each year put it back in. And in some cases, it at increased levels over the year before. So I think that's the sign of optimism. The other thing I would point to which is which I think, is a really interesting phenomenon is that newer democracies are interested in this work. Countries that were under to tell -tarian rule in central eastern Europe. For example, have started their own projects to, to support MARCY and human rights overseas. So it's not just that the US is going out and, and saying, do this. You have a host of countries, you know, all over Europe Scandinavia has been very active in this area. Australia canada. Taiwan other other democracies out there are also undertaking efforts to do this, and it it's, it's good that that's happening. But it's also I think imperative that the US show leadership on these on these issues, there seemed to be broad support for both the, the US supporting democracy abroad. But also, there was if I'm recalling correctly, a sentiment of while we should just let other countries do what they wanna do. And I'm just wondering how both of those things can simultaneously. Be true. True. And I think that they both rated pretty highly if I'm recalling in this came out, I think, also in the in the focus groups that we did. There's a strong sentiment among many people to fix our problems, I deal with deal. With the concerns, we have here at home before we do any sort of foreign aid for natives, never popular, and has never really been popular going back to, you know efforts like the Marshall plan after after World War Two hugely hugely controversial in barely barely got through. And I suppose, that's, that's very natural. But I think there's a couple of things at work. One is that we've done a really lousy job of explaining this, when our surveyed it nests question. But other surveys, ask people to estimate what percentage of the federal government goes to foreign aid, and they're wildly off the Mark? You know, people think it's ten percent of the budget or twenty percent of the budget. When, in fact, it's, it's, it's less than a percent of the total. Federal budget is going to foreign aid. So there's a little bit of education that that was really helpful on that front. But, you know, people's concerns are legitimate is perfectly legitimate, to say we need to deal with our healthcare crisis. You know, why can't they fix the road that I drive on every day to get to work? But our belief is that we can, we can do both in that there's a lot of historical precedent for for doing this. You know, when you look back at what the founders wrote they didn't say, you know, we the American people, they said we the people and there's a universality that. That's inherent in, in the declaration in the constitution, so forth. You know, these, these rights belong to everyone, so to the extent that we can be supportive of that. I think people will come along. When you when you talk to people about foreign assistance like a program like pep far which has saved countless lives in, in Africa. People start to understand that, you know, a relatively small amount of money has, has done some enormous good and they're, they're supportive of it. When you explain to people that, in fact, democracy promotion human rights from can work. It's not foolproof. But it you know, there are success stories that you can point to from from around the around the globe. You know, you look at a country like South Africa, which has, has transformed itself beyond recognition in twenty thirty years, but on every continent, you can find examples of, of countries that have chosen the democratic path, where the United States and other democracies have insisted, and there have been good outcomes, and you talk to people about how those countries are now trading with us. They don't pose a security threat to us and, and so forth and people, then I think are going to be much more receptive to this kind of work. President Trump was was not mentioned at all in the report, and you certainly there's much more to democracy than what happens at. Sixteen hundred Pennsylvania Avenue, but I'm wondering if the administration came up at all in the survey, or perhaps more likely in focus groups in what, what some of those conversations were like we intentionally did not ask about the approval of the president or any other political figure in impart because this isn't a political poll. It wasn't the type that would appear on the evening news and say, so and so's up by two percent kind of thing, and it was hopefully a little bit more timeless than that. It certainly came up in the in the focus groups that we did those included one group of people that, that supported the president in, in two thousand sixteen. We had another group of people who were supportive of Senator Sanders in the democratic primary twenty sixteen. So we, we, we certainly got some different perspectives and inevitably you know, his his name came up early and often in the in the focus group conversations totally. Naturally, and I nothing I think particularly surprising, you know, clearly, the president has some, some very strong supporters in some equally strong detractors out there, and that colors, a lot of people's views on politics, more broadly. But as you said, it's democracy is much bigger. They on who is sitting in the White House at any at any one time, it, it really gets to. I think the local level politics in the importance of that, again, the sense that democracy delivers it did my garbage get picked up this week, they fix that pothole. Have they fixed the crossing lights in front of the school? I drive by everyday those kind of things touch people where they are. And you know if if they're being neglected confidence in the system overall, I think suffers. You know, and I know that, that democracy is more than what happens in the White House that you get the sense at the people in your focus groups felt that way as well. I think so one another the focus groups, we did was with local officials again, in Indianapolis so people who are serving on town councils or elected, judges, or tax collectors, that kind of thing. They clearly they had an interesting perspective in that they regret regretted the lack of engagement that they saw from citizens that how rare it was to have citizens come to a council meeting, the reluctance of people to serve on juries, things like that were mentioned. And, you know, many of these these small town and suburban officials, I think, would be delighted to see, you know, a big turnout at the city council meeting her have somebody call them about that pothole that crosswalk that needs fixing and said that people weren't, you know, we're, we're engaging on. That level. So, you know, I think it's you know there are a lot of, of rights that come with living in a democracy, but they're all are also responsibilities, including being informed engaged and speaking out when something concerns you. So Linda, the other thing that we hear a lot about a in polling in the media's kinda the increasing partisan ization or or polarization of, of our country and people not being able to, to agree or just kind of talking past each other. Did you see any evidence of either of those scenarios in in your focus groups, either this extreme polarization, or perhaps people being able to, to find a middle ground on, on some issues? Your we certainly did. I mean, it you hear this from everybody, regardless of where they are on the spectrum. I think one of the complications is that if I'm if I'm a diehard pro-trump remedy. Hard anti-trump person. I think getting rid of partisanship means everybody needs to agree with me. And we heard that it kind of both both poles. But most people aren't there. Most people are somewhere in the middle. They may lean one way or lean the other. And I think it, it, it it's of grave concern at the local level. This is less of an issue, obviously, you know, in many states, local elected officials are nonpartisan, but you see this, I think, really across the board that people are frustrated that congress that Washington in particular, can't solve problems. And I think it's pretty clear to most people that this, this era of hyper partisanship that we're in is one of the key, contributing factors to that. Because the ideas aren't examined based on the merits, they're, they're examined on the basis of who's proposing them and. I think that just really frustrates people. You know, you look at an issue like like healthcare, which is typically, the top concern of most Americans, and they don't really care who's behind the proposal. They just wanna see it get better. They just wanna see it get done, and we've seen now this ongoing struggle for for, you know, however, many years that, that if it comes from the other side of the aisle, I'm not gonna touch it and rather than dealing with some of the real issues that are out there, even on things that are much less controversial on the surface on, how do we deal with the opioids damage around the country, and that becomes a partisan issue? So I think that, you know that the voters frustration is, is very understandable on this issue. Unfortunately, both of the parties have seen a hollowing out where they've both been sort of dragged further to the extremes that, you know, the, the old days where you had a Rockefeller Republicans, or blue dog Democrats are largely gone in congress. You know, so it's, it's, it's a real challenge. And the guess the, you know, the only answer I got to that is that people need to think a little bit differently about how they vote in primary elections where, you know, if if you view yourself as being somebody more centrist than maybe you need to cast your ballot. In that way in the primary elections and, and reward politicians who are seeking compromise and seeking to work together. But it's it's, it's tough. It's very, very tough environment out there report does does make a couple of recommendations mostly, I would say around messaging, and I'm wondering kind of given that there are. So many of these big issues that show identified like racism and like money, and politics, did you consider at all trying to, to make recommendations that might speak more to the substance of those issues as opposed to help people talk about them or things like highlighting success stories, or, or things like that. So the, the messaging that you talked about, we did that, primarily are really exclusively on the on the international dimension of this survey about how do you how do you talk about? How do you talk about democracy? How do you talk about human rights support on the domestic side? We didn't. We didn't really do that for issues. We didn't say how should you message healthcare? How should you message campaign finance reform? But we did we did talk about kind of how you talk about politics in a sense to an extent to really sort of maybe, give people a little a little pause about how do you, how do you how do you think about these issues, so that you're getting people engaged not disengage? You know, we, we've chatted informally about the potential of doing doing some follow up research on this. We haven't made any decisions on that, but I think given this kind of coalition of, you know, organization headed by former Republican president former democratic vice president and Freedom House. It, it was less about finding the solutions to these problems in more about kind of, how do we talk about them? How do we how to Americans perceive? What what these issues are out there. I, I don't have a good answer on campaign finance reform. I don't know that anybody does really in terms of an easy fix. And how do we get back to that or something much bigger and more important racism discrimination, in society? But the other thing I would just noted what I something I mentioned before about meeting people, where they are talking to them listening to them in new ways different ways, as well as traditional ways, I think is hugely important, so that people. Start to feel that now in fact, you know, I might my vote my voice can make a difference. I think that might be about, as hopeful of note that we're going to get at this coversation says, seems seems like a good place to, to dry things to close. We're going to end as we always do with our four mood of the nation poll questions, so thinking about politics and kind of the state of affairs today. What makes you angry to me? I think one of the things that I, I find particularly troubling is the rise of intolerance, and the acceptance of intolerance countries had a very long journey, and it's an incomplete journey in terms of finding ways that, that all Americans can participate, I some of the things we've seen in the news over the last couple of years, you look at the, you know, the, the, the incident in Pittsburgh, or in Charleston or right here in, in, in Texas. At churches and schools and so forth. The rise and the acceptance of, of rhetoric that would have been utterly unacceptable just a few years ago that, that makes me angry and I think all Americans have responsibility to, to push back against that. And at what makes you proud. I think one of the things that I it makes me proud about our democracy, is, it's ability to adapt gets to something. I just said that, you know, we didn't start off as a country where everyone enjoyed the same rights, but over time gradually. And sometimes very painfully, we have adapted the system to ensure that women, and people who are not white male property owners in general are able to to play a role in the system. And I think for all our flaws that something that we as Americans can still take great pride in. And what makes you worry? I'm worried about partisanship in its a different sort of partisanship than, than we've seen in recent days. I worked Capitol Hill for many years, back in during the Reagan presidency, and I push presidency, there was a lot of anger, an partisanship then. But I think it's taken on a really different character these days to basically, you know, the mission of the opposition is to block everything that the majority wants to do and vice versa. And seeing that, that level of partisanship, not just the federal level. But at the at the state level in, in most of our states, as well as something that gives me concern. And then finally, what gives you hope of the I would point to, again, these university conversations, I had last last fall talking with these young people who were exceptionally well, informed and eager to be engaged in had been engaged in different ways. You know, the, the uptick, small, though it may have been in youth turnout, the growth that we've seen in African American participation in Hispanic participation in. In in elections. I think is something that is a very hopeful sign as we as this country transitions. Demographically? I think it's just vital that, that these voices are heard, and it appears to me that, that many of them really are eager to be heard Wendy. Thanks again for joining us today, terrific. Thank you. All right. Well, so very interesting and reflects what Michael, you were talking about about this kind of? It was expressing a point of view about bipartisanship, and about American foreign policy. That is not doing very well in the current political climate. I think it's a challenge for, you know, Republicans coming out of say the tradition of the bushes to be able to talk about the things. He's days because their party has not moved in a direction that one could argue is pro democracy. You could say a lot of things about it that might be positive for people of, but doesn't often talk about promoting democracy either here are broad. It's difficult for someone representing the Bush center to engage these issues as you say, because they represent a conception of the Republican party that is at best, a minority view. But let's commend how important it is that they are trying to symbolically and in practice, actually. Push back against polarization by working with the Biden said. Right. And that there is a responsible metal and they're trying to they're trying to say that's a bipartisan conversation that is necessary. That is essential to moving politics, government and foreign policy forward, the counter argument and this is one that Jenna has made, and I think she she's making it. I think Lloyd made this point. Right. Yeah. Which is that, you know, to the degree that we focus solely on Donald Trump, where missing a large part of this American democratic conversation and an argument. Right. And so, I think that's probably true. I also you know, the counter-argument is one that I've made Jenny is that, you know, when the barn is on fire, you worry about getting the, the fire out, and then you were. About the rest of he also did talk about how the survey found declining support for American institutions among the young less trust in American. This is a real problem that we're seeing more and more. And the constant attacks on American institutions by the Trump administration contributes to the, the attack on institutions like the media, the attack on institutions like the independent judiciary. The way that the president often talks about courts sorta his courts or the other courts, all of this contributes to what we this poll showing us is out there and it's a problem. And that is a young people are likely to be less trusting unless supportive of institutions, where does this go over the long term? How do you restore that kind of confidence actually have no idea how you restore that confidence? The I don't I don't think he does either. I don't think. I don't think anybody. Here's where our poll does show something really interesting. We did this about this about this topic. We saw this couple months ago, we ask people about their confidence in the FBI. We asked us in a variety of ways, and what we would have expected to see. Is that Republicans in particular are supportive of law enforcement in that decades? But that is not what we see. Right. What we see is at the pre, and there is no other way to attribute accepted the president's attacks on the FBI that Republicans at least have lost confidence. Well, the point the argument is we are seeing the partisan zehr of every everything of American life. So this is basically yet another manifestation of this argument that we were having before, which is, is this, a what's the right way to understand this into respond to it. Right. Is this is there more to democracy, American democracy than just Donald Trump and his impacts in his decisions? Or is this? The only thing that matters for the future democracy is the is the future continued so of, of the Trumpian, and so, you know, this survey raises these issues and it's important that Americans talking about them, so good for them for doing that. But it is also true that because of these actions, there are more people more engaged in politics now than there happened for generations, and then include young people, and it doesn't just mean reading the New York Times, or watching MSNBC, or Fox News. It means people are understanding a sense of responsibility about the condition of their democracy, and they're acting appropriate. Yeah. Absolutely. And I mean he made that point, it's, it's important to emphasize that. The fact is people voted and voted in record numbers, and then when protests and they're seeing gasping all politics and riding ladders. It's hard to imagine. If Hillary Clinton had one yes that we would be seen. We see the same gridlock in congress. Nothing would be getting done. It would be the same commitment that there was towards when Obama was president, which is at nothing's gonna get done. But because of this, you have seen a renewed engagement in a renewed sense, among Americans that politics is important of that democracy is important, so, you know, I think this is the flip side of or the good side of understanding our democracy, as weak and getting weaker. There's no sense among Americans, any longer that this train runs it self, and that we don't have to concern ourselves with. We can go into our do our own thing. We now understand that democracy is eve. Even two hundred years plus in has a certain precariousness to it, and that it requires a commitment on part of all of us to, to make it run. Well, and if that is the message that comes out of the survey out of where we are politically right now. Well, that's not necessarily a bad thing. Exactly. So thank you very much to Lizzie, Lloyd for, for his work and for the survey and for coming on the show. Thanks, Jennifer, the interview, I'm crispy. Michael berkman. Thanks for listening. Democracy works is produced by them, Courtney institute for democracy at Penn State, and w PSU Penn State, our hosts are Michael Berkman, Krispy, Kreme, and me, Jenna, Spinelli, Andy grant is our engineer, and Mark sitters, our editor additional support comes from Emily ready. Sharon Stanford, Craig Johnson, and the rest of the team at WPN issue for detailed show notes and discussion questions for each episode. Visit our website at democracy works podcasts dot com. And if you like what you heard today. Please consider rating or reviewing us wherever you listen to podcasts. Thanks for listening.

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Tom Luce - Education, Opportunity, and Civil Rights

The Strategerist

49:43 min | 5 months ago

Tom Luce - Education, Opportunity, and Civil Rights

"Tom Loses. Long career has had quite a few twists and turns from the private sector as a lawyer working with Ross Perot too key roles in Texas government to a fervent education policymaker in the George, W Bush Administration, and the nonprofit sector as founder of organizations like the National Math and science initiative, and now Texas twenty thirty six, both each turn. He has stayed committed to a core belief that all Americans deserve opportunities brought through education. Unfortunately, it's still too often the. That our kids don't get sick head. Start than I got and that's not right. That's not fair competition I just became convinced that. Not, only was it. Elements have injustice. But it wasn't good for our state. One good friend, country and our economic system which I'm great Belabor. It was not gonNa work if we did not have equal opportunity for everybody. We'll talk about education and opportunity in today's turbulent world and Tom takes us down memory lane, sharing stories like when he carried one of the original copies of the Magna Carta across the Atlantic, as part of his carry on luggage and the Social Faux Pas. He committed the first time he met George H W. Bush I'm Andrew Kaufman and this. Is this your teacher? It's presented by the George Bush Presidential Center Our conversation today is broken up into two parts first. We talked with Tom in person at the Bush Center. Not long before we shut down to slow the spread of covid nineteen. We then recently gave him a call to get an update on our conversation. which you'll hear is the second part of this episode. First off welcome to Kevin Sullivan. Senior adviser at the Bush Center and former White House communications director who is making his co hosting. On the strategic today, so it's about time we may time for us. Hey, thanks for having me looking forward to it and our guest today is Tom Loose. Give me my the introduction is GonNa take a second. He's a difficult mant to introduce if in that. If you don't listen enough of the roles and awards, you don't really get a sense for the impact. He's made, but if we listened to molly, be here all day, so a few started out as an attorney and founding managing partner in Houston. Loose the Dallas Morning News called him a quote education visionary who worked in the Bush administration as Assistant Secretary. Secretary of Education and in multiple five actually believe every five. That's correct Texas. Governor Administration's five governors. He's found in major philanthropic initiatives like just for kids. The National Center for Educational Accountability National Math and Science Initiative Meadows Health Policy Institute and most recently Texas Twenty thirty six, which is hiding nonpartisan ideas and solutions to make our great state better. He's a professor having tied a little school called Harvard also right here on Smu campus, and he won the Lens Award Recognizing Enduring Civic or humanitarian efforts benefiting. Dallas we're just skimming the surface, so Tom, thank you for joining us. He must have some amazing stories to tell. Well I. Don't know about that, but I've been blessed to be morning raised in Texas and. At a great time in the history of our state, I've just been very blessed time. We'll get to Texas twenty thirty six and a few minutes, which is at your most recent big big challenge you've taken on, but first I'd like to talk about your journey both professionally and personally you had really just quite a ride with what's interesting about it. Is that a multiple occasions you stepped away from your law practice, or for whatever you're doing to take on a new public service initiative, and so let's start with that. I mean why. Well filled in enormous sense of family, a an understanding of how blessed I had been to have been raised. At the time I was in the way I was. And how many people were factors in my life that change the trajectory of my life, and it was just really important to me to pay that back in the number of people intervened in my life were just it was amazing. I was raised about single mother. My follow was an alcoholic didn't really live at home that was back when there wasn't even a phrase single parent mothers. And most of the households were husband and wife, and but yet at various points in time, various men appeared in my life whether basketball coaches are guy. Medic College Neider. This wonderful story I went to college line in my in my high school. My aspiration was to go to Alpine State College on a scholarship and played baseball, and I met a young dashing Gabon, the name of Dick Bass who was a graduate from Yale. I was only only appeared that line at the Yale booth and he said you ought to go to jail. I didn't know Yale from Secombe and. He said. No you're a Yale Man. And he said I'M GONNA. Get you in jail and you need. And he started sending me books, and of course you didn't get me yeah I, didn't have grace. Go Yale but all of a sudden my horizons were were Played for basketball coach, who said distort on my team? You gotta be average loves the C.. Student I said. Why do we have to do that at our district opponent and he said well. If you're not smart enough to make a baby, you'll have turnovers on what is rationale was, but I made a be you know so so I could play basketball, and so just throughout my life, various people intervened in my life, and when I got ready to go to college, I didn't have the funds to go to college at Gerber. Businessmen got together and ranch me get a scholarship to them. I on a play. Basketball, so I went to College Dick. Bass reappeared in my life and enabled meet a work through I went to Smu Undergrad and law school, but I had to work. Forty hours a week to pay for my education PAM remarried when I was nineteen so I'd worked my way through college and Law. School go night, law school, and just at all stages of life, people were intervening and giving me a leg up and now I was. Profoundly struck by later in the eighties. thanks to my client Ross Perot. I was given the opportunity to travel the state. Learn about public school education for the majority of kids and I saw it. Millions of kids had not gotten same opportunity that I'd gotten and not just convicted me that I've been extraordinarily blast. How did those modest beginnings? You know you've talked publicly in the past that your mom had some mental health issues today she was hard. Can raising you and your sister right? Law School at night. This didn't come easily for you. How did that? I mentioned the people who intervene to to lend a helping hand. But how did those beginnings that you had play into your pursuit of public service? Well, I think it really did in a sense that are head to I. Guess Out of necessity. Develop it worth it work ethic. And I just became A. Understood how many people were helping me and second of all? I don't know where it came from, but I've always had a great interest, history and political scientist. Tell the summer. It sound like such a Geek but when I was in middle school, I read Winston Churchill's World War Two memoirs, and I was just blown away by you know his writing skilled and the stories he was telling, and I always had a sense of you know what was happening in the world, and that made a big impact on me and then I. I, think a- through that I began to understand. You know I think when you're young. You kind of think well. Gee, all this happened because I was young and smart, and all that stuff, but I was really riding a notion that other people created from a I've tried to kill my grandsons. The day I was born. The German troops marched into Paris and I. I wish to to ask my mother. What in the world was she thinking? My future would be like and I wouldn't know enough to know that you know. Maine's people lost their lives preserving freedom and democracy for me and you know so. What. What could I do to at least try to approach paying that back for canal, so you had an interest in history had an interest in politics and he'd hoped the people who need today they look at you as a policy trapped in the in the career, the body of an of an attorney, but how did your interest in politics and in this kind of leads to your first meeting with future President George H W Bush as? As very when you were very young man. Tell us how that happened I. Always had an interest in politics, but I I decided very early on. I guess because of my bringing. In fact, I was married when I was nineteen and had two children by the time I was twenty one that I had to make a career before it could go into politics or public service felt that was important to provide for my family and so. I went to law school began legal career, but I was always interested in politics, and in the sixties again as part of working my way through school was hired to work on what was called the draft goldwater committee that was instrumental in winning the nomination for Barry Goldwater to be the GOP nominee in nineteen, sixty four and part of my job was. Was To be in San Francisco at the convention and my goal in being there to make this young dashing upcoming political star that everybody was talking about named George Herbert Walker Bush was first time he'd run for office. Heat announced the United States Senate and I really wanted to work on his campaign. And so my goal and San Francisco was to meet. who we now later call forty one, and I went to a Texas reception with the goal of meeting him, and I'm in this room. He comes in the door. I got there early, so I wouldn't miss him, and he comes in the door, and you save making eye contact with me and I thought my goodness sees heard about me. And he walks all the way over to me making our contact with me and I said here's my big break, and he put his arm around me, said young man ear flies. I wanted to crawl out of the Cow Palace I. Literally what I've never been so mortified in my life. I got to later telling that story and the White House would he was president. I said Mr President on no, but for that one incident and have been in your cabinet. Now's the tiebreaker because it was. Just can't trust these scout and public. I'm sure what he said not the start you're looking for for your. For. Your, career in politics. For Office for quite a while. Took a while to get that in the rear view mirror so so you a Houston Louis Ross Perot becomes your your client, and that just brought about head to bring about all kinds of adventures in in great stories. The that was a wonderful break for a young lawyer When he gave us our first piece of business I just started my law firm. Firm a year before. We had five lawyers and all of a sudden. We're representing Ross Perot eds and it was just a you know like a rocket ride. I mean People have forgotten, but I mean Ross. Perot was kind of the equivalent of Michael. Dell Steve Jobs and Bill Gates all rolled into one, and he was kind of the first tech big figure. You know there was IBM and then there was Ross Perot, and so it was just an enormous break, and in my life and my career, and led me a lot of wonderful challenges opportunities. I got to sue the government of Iran. I got purchase this. Lamin, Republic of Iran and security judgment recover. The money got to buy the car on behalf Ross. Okay, hold on. Just drop that in nothing. Ebay didn't exist. No, it did not. Ross got a call one day from Stanley. Marcus is daughter and she said Ross. I've got a friend in England. Who wants to sell a magnet Carter and I think you ought to buy it. And he says. Well okay, he said. He said how much they want for it, and she said I don't know well. It's worth a million five hundred thousand dollars to me tell and what year was this nineteen eighty five? Maybe four, eighty, five, million five goes pretty far pretty far, yeah? And She called by, said well the they'll take that. And he said well said I must say my lawyer over there. He said I WANNA. Make sure it's real and. If, he said if he can assure me. Carter, then we gotta deal. So Ross calls me at the office. Tom Despite the magnet Carter. Go over there and verify that it's the real thing now. Sit Ross. This may surprise. You don't have anything in my forum files about how to verify magnet Carter's. He said. Just follow your nose. Go over there, and figure it out and so I. Did and we verified it in? But it was a Collie. It was a wonderful experience for me because I was a student of history and first thing I did was read Churchill's history, the speaking people and understand the importance of the magnet, Carter and this great story after a completed, the purchase verified it, and all that I had to get an export license and call Ross. Okay, it's. We've bought it. Cheers out, said you want them. They bring it back. He said no, he said just bring it back. You said the best security snow security. Bring it back with you on there. So I. Get it on American. Airlines and I put it in the coat closet and sit across from the coat closet. Afraid to go to sleep I. Don't what I thought somebody do that, you know. I, guess jump out of an airplane, but anyway I get to DFW. Airport on going through customs lists eighty heavy thing to declare. The MAGNA Carta. JOKESTER here right? Step over here? a good thing. It wasn't happening today. I'd probably get arrested. It was kind of interesting is as he tell these stories you've said the year writing the ridden. This wave of goodwill kind of glossed over in this story with President. H W Bush. That you've kind of you've got all these people helping you log, but there's something about you. That's probably making them want to help you. Eat you kind of gloss over. You went to this convention to do this. Like had some gumption. Is that a conscious thing that you've developed over the years or is? This is who you are well. That's a good question. You know I've always. My grandkids get tired of me saying this, but say over and over I, always say you'll never exceed your own expectations. I like that and when you think about it, that's true if you tell the kid then broad jump a certain amount of fate. That's how much abroad. If you set the bar on the Haja, that's how far they'll jump and. I don't know, just think having. Expectations of yourself is important I don't mean that in a cocky way. It's just ally. Toy is the worst that can happen and I've I've found of this and hiring. I always think you ought to go after the best talent and the worst thing you'd have to hear somebody say no, thank you well, so what? You've made a friend. You've made a connection. You learn something and I just think it's important in terms of setting expectations for yourself for the organization. Somehow you know. I always thought I'd be starting quarterback for the home. Football Team I wouldn't. But always thought I'd be and I always thought I'd be a great college basketball player I wouldn't. but I always aspired to to do those things that kind of ties also to education where I think President Bush's famous lines, the soft bigotry law expectation totally. I mean I was always so symbolic. Oh, he wasn't learn it for me, but I was simpatico with him about education I could always tell that came from his gut. He believed those same as it was in the core of his being, and he always talked about standards and expectations, and it's. It's really true if we set our barlow for our kids. That's what they'll achieve if we set them higher, the though achievement higher. Sports. Fan You. Are you know what happened? When Roger Bannister broke the four minute mile, everybody else started making everybody else broke it and it was A. Believed to be unfathomable and only fathomable, and then you know now we got high school kids breaking the four men in my so this is such an hour. You know keeping on the education theme in Nineteen. eighty-three. Governor white sets up a select committee and public. Education Reform Ross Perot's involved to to funded as I recall. He was chairing. The commission made up of various people, but he made the decision. A great decision he said I don't want this staffed by the Education Agency how willing to pay for it myself and so Tom I, won't you hiring recruited staff because I want us to have the best research possible the best experts from all over the country. I don't want to rely upon the existing system to tell me how we're doing so so you leave Hewson loose for eighteen months. Step away yes. Because Ross Perot called me and said Tom I've just told the governor of the state that you volunteered to take a leave of absence from the law firm. To run this commission for me and I did a quick calculation of the percentage of revenue. He was law firm and I told him I thought that was a great idea. I was drafted in other words, so you were drafted. You went down there and you had an interesting first round draft choice with this elite staff that you were going to build. Yes, her name was Margaret Spellings. I've met her. Yeah, and who subsequently now the way she likes to tell the story. Everything works out in the right way because I eventually worked for her instead of she working for me. And she says that meritocracy. Is the proof that she ended up being the secretary of Education, and not me well all three of us around the table here it worked for her. That is true and when you stop working for her. She tells you on your way out. Don't forget you still work for me. So! What was that experience like? This is where you really get into data, which has kind of fueled. You're working all the public service that you do. What did you learn about Texas at that time? And maybe a no pass, no play happen. Then we'll I learned a lot. I mentioned earlier first of all. It opened my eyes to how many kids had not gotten the same opportunities that I had and it was heartbreaking. I mean I saw I. Mean I'm a firm believer, philosophically equal opportunity on necessarily equal outcomes, equal opportunity, but I learned. Learned very quickly that not all kids have equal opportunity, and they don't line up at the starting line the same way in the same place that I did, and that was really true on our state in the eighty S. unfortunately, it's still too often. The case that our kids don't get same headstart. Then I got and that's not right. That's not fair. Competition. Odd Gist became convinced that. Not only was it. Elements have injustice, but it wasn't good for our state. One good for our country and our economic system, which I'm a great believer in does not gonNa work if we did not have equal opportunity for everybody and Thomas Jefferson I don't remember the exact quote, said you know the future of our democracy depends upon the success of our public education system, and that's true for a lot of reason now we'll talk a little bit more about that when we when we talk about twenty thirty six, and where things stand today, but sort of the next thing that happened is you decided to run for governor? Yourself. In nine hundred ninety right, The Way I put it on temporary I had a temporary bout of insanity and I ran for governor and. lost. And but it was a it was A. Shock people say it was a great experience I wouldn't trade it for anything I learned so much about the state. It was a great family experience. I met people that are still my friends today from all over the state. I'll learn a lot about the state. I just had a wonderful experience. And that's where you met really get to know George. W voices idea it was real interesting, really known his. Known his father and I think I'd probably met. President. forty-three previously, but we certainly were not friends any. Call me out of the blue one day about. Month after I'd announced for governor. And he said Tom and he said. We know each other well enough for me to make this call I'm won't do it anyway. He said understand. You're a little nervous about Kinney. He already had a nickname. He is nicknamed. My son's name was Ken. He said I understand. You're a little nervous about Kenny. working on your campaign and I said well. I am Sir I, said frankly said main reason is he's in his twenties, and he's married, and he quit his job without talking to me about it, and said he was going to work fulltime on my campaign without pay. I said I'm not sure exactly how that's GonNa Work George and he said well, he let me share something. Would he said? It's the best lane ever happened for my experience with my father was to work on his campaign and for a change. Be Able to help him as opposed to him. Help in the any, said you let Kenny help you and it'll be a wonderful thing for you and I did. And he was right so then sort of the next big inflection point is is now. George H W Bush run for president and then out of the blue. This lightning bolt happens where the other really important relationship in your life. He decides he's going to throw in in Nineteen ninety-two for president and you leave to go run that campaign. Tell us about how you navigated that experience very carefully. Well first of all. Ross called and said Tom I'm never ask you for a favor. And I'm asking you a favor to come. Help me run. Not Presidential Campaign I've made this Larry King appearance I'm being flooded with telephone calls inquiries and. On SMA help, and which come help me. Sit Down with him and said you know raw some really indebted to you and treasure, our friendship and our relationship, but I said you need to know going in that I will not I will do my best to run your campaign, but I will not speak ill are. In any way negative about. Bush I will do my best to help you win. But I'm not gonNA just I can't do it I. Don't you know I don't believe a? Shouldn't be very good at it because I don't. I don't feel that way he said. I understand and that's not your job. On each run the make sure. The railroad runs and run the campaign. How does Vice President Bush? Take this news that you're thrown in with the? Opponent that's clearly going to hurt his chances. Well, I guess the proof is in the pudding. When Ross dropped out of the race in the summer of ninety two, my assistant came in my office. In the White House is on phone, and the President Bush wants to speak to you and I thought well. It was probably somebody like cell. They pulled and prank combat really wasn't in the White House, but she said No. It really is the White House and the president wants speak to you. Follow me. And he comes on the phone. He said Tom. She's George Bush and he said I just heard Ross dropped out of the race and I just want you to know that I more than most people value loyalty under why you did what you did and welcome back it feels. Yeah I said Vice President. He was obviously president. Rutherford, election? Year history I do now. But then there's another wrinkle in the story. In that Ross, Perot reenters the campaign for for president. Then what happens well I hit already decided that I would not go back and help and Russell understood that about already you know. Made a commitment to help the reelection campaign of President Bush so I stuck to that if we fast forward a little bit, then you find yourself in the Bush, forty three administration as Assistant Secretary of Education. How did that relationship work? How did you feel at that point in your career? Is as it a pretty pretty high post in the administration first of all, I felt very humble gratified at work. Twenty five thirty years on education. Margaret had been named secretary of Education a new head and education president and Margaret's called, and said I got the perfect job for you I want to work on budget and policy and I had a conversation with her and and. She said. You know. Funny I remember. I told her I said Margaret. I'll do, but I said I don't want to give any speeches. I don't want to travel workum Budgie policies and she. She honored that and. I'll tell you funny story. When I was getting ready to be sworn in I, had all my grandchildren come up my children and and. On down the education building, celine remember that building, and at the time it was known as federal building number six number at least glamorous place in. Washington DC correct with the name to match. Yes, right and Um. My grandsons are walking up the sidewalk, all dressed and blazers and ties, which was really unusual experience, but I told them dress up and I'm down at the security and. The security guard their woman Awesome you see those seven? Boys that's said those from our grandsons are coming to see me today's. She said Oh. Is, today your retirement date. I said No. It's my start date. Skew the average age of the Department of Education so they come in when I. Did you made an incredible impact in that in the year plus that you were there? Let's let's talk a little bit about Texas twenty thirty six. Now we could listen to these stories all day, but let's talk about what you're doing today. Texas, twenty, thirty six. Like what's what's the mission? What are you up to well? The big vision is we're really up to trying to make sure that my grandchildren and their children had the same opportunities I had. That's a simple way of state, and I really believe that that's at risk. If we don't pay attention to some major issues that have to be addressed, and therefore I wanted a forward-looking organization. Long term view of what we needed to do to keep the state the place we love tug live and do business and my experience in public policy is. You can't change public policy overnight I. don't care who you are. How persuasive you are the problems you're dealing with or massive. They're huge. I mean you know the public education system alone? Try Stage cared about five point. Six million children has about four hundred fifty thousand employees about six thousand eight hundred campuses. System that big, and then you had to that healthcare, higher education and water and roads. And the different distinction of state government. As opposed to federal government, thank, goodness is the state. Government can't print. Money has to balance the budget, and so how they spend a limited amount of resources is really a strategic decision that needs to be based upon term thinking in return on investment, and in today's political world long-term may be this afternoon's. Or if you're real lucky next, November, right and I thought we need an organization. That would say no. Let's talk about what we want. The State to beat I can twenty thirty six. How do we afford it? How do we get there? How do we turn the Queen Mary overnight hours the hard experience? You can't turn the Queen Mary overnight. You have to turn it very slowly and that's what takes twenty. Thirty six is about is ensuring the future. Future of our children and a grandchild, I would encourage our listeners to to go to the website that twenty Texas twenty, thirty six dot Org correct, and and look at the data, and it's pretty ominous about what what is coming down the road. The growth of the state is is incredibly impressive, but with that growth comes challenges with every policy area that you're undertaking well. One example we project population growth from twenty eight million people today forty million. Twelve million people, so it also shows we'll be out of water. Be Hard to get to work will run out educated workforce. You can't. Bill. Water reservoirs overnight education pipeline sixteen years long or fourteen or twelve, so we better get started. And one of the challenges and President Bush has talked about this that the elected officials are not prone. You know politicians are not used to looking over the horizon. They're worried about the next election. They look at a two year or four year a six year window. How do you overcome that well I think we have to do it by building public demand. that. We think longer term. You know the way I look at it. Public officials respond public demand, and we need to mobile us a significant portion of our population. That is disaffected by the political process. Or doesn't think the political process speaks to them today in the way I phrased it to him. Is You need a foraging the F. O. R. that you can say to public official this is. The example I use I'm never heard political candidate yet. WHO Says I'm against education? I haven't found anyone who is against Mogi. But I want you in the future to hand them this. Strategic Plan and say Young Woman I. Think what you mean by telling me your for education is your four this specific plan and these specific changes, and then hold them accountable. You really is interesting that so much of our news and our media consumption is focused on national policy when it's our state and local policies that often impact day to day life as much if not more totally, and because of what's happening in Washington. That's even more so today. I mean you look at the. The impact California has by passing laws about data, privacy or automobile emissions all of a sudden. General Motors GonNa make cars in a different way because it's a big market policy is going to be made in state, a state and local governments and s Texas goes I. Really believe this as Texas goes, so goes the nation because we we are a reflection of the Texas of the United States economy we've got the diversity forgot rural urban suburban. We've got it all technology technology. I mean if you can do it in Texas, you can do it anywhere last thing for a time in in out of personal, I wanNA. Thank you for being the ocean wave in my life. From the time that we met on May First Nineteen ninety-six when Ross Perot junior purchased the mavericks where I had worked for a long time, and that day was a tectonic plates, shouted in my life that day through you and I'm one of those people who have benefited from your generosity and kindness and wisdom, and that went from the Mavericks to Dallas Twenty, twelve. Our effort to came up just a little bit short. Olympics ended up in London twenty twelve dollars. It was in the universe. And they held the Olympics in two thousand. And it was still our time to shine. The US Department of Education which led to Migrate Adventures and with President Bush in Washington here and just you know personally I'm grateful to you for all that you've done for me in for. My family is one of the just one of the one of the great people that I've had the privilege to get to get to know and I kind of know the answer to this question, but I want to ask you if we went down the list just for the kids which advocated for kids in Austin. Austin the national. Math and science initiative, which is now in forty something states and incredibly successful, the Meadows Mental Health Policy Institute you started all of these big things now, Texas twenty thirty six, so you go around town, and you ask people to join in whether it's to donate financially or to do something to help advance all of these efforts. Why do they keep saying? Yes, when you show up with your newest big bold idea, Golly, I'm I'm really I'm really humbled by a really much. Sincerely I I. Don't know exactly why I do think. Relationships are important. trust is important. Try to set tell my grandchildren. that. Every day is important in terms of building your own credibility and integrity and relationships, and it doesn't matter who you deal with. You have to deal with every person in the same way and I really do I. Really do believe comes from. Faith and my wife's a better example of it than I am I really believe that that we ought to act in a way. That really reflects that we believe that every person will encounters child got. Kind of a great message for someone for everybody in whether your career starting out. Does he treat everybody that way? It's just absolutely essential and I. Don't think you can treat Ross Perot or the grocery store checkout person any differently and I just think that's. That's essential Tom One last question. You've answered a million questions over the years. Probably what is an you that you wish someone? Would ever over your time well think? Interesting question on like this, Kevin. Margaret is they both abandoned? Grab onto more done to make. Chris Medic figure in forty three in less me in the shade. And it was just so obvious what was happening. This left me on the curb, and this bright shiny face came back, but I've gotten over it I've gotten over, it really have. TYPICAL TIMELESS FASHION! He doesn't make it about himself. How. We ended except on that Tom, this has been wonderful. Thank you so much for taking the time to do it. I know you're busy and best of luck with Texas twenty thirty six. Like you so much light for heaven. On the phone now, with Tom Loose to update our earlier conversation and boy. Do we have a lot to talk about? Since then so we spent some time talking about US dallasite and a Texan and you've seen a lot so I'd like to start just by letting you reflect and provide some of your perspective on what's been going on with everything from Cova to the Racial Justice Movement. Just go ahead and opine ferment. All my goodness you know I was. Thinking about them having a conversation with my grandson's to mind. told him I want to talk about the perfect, storm, twenty, twenty. In my mind that's talk seeks to were based within our country rotten now which is. The pandemic. Social Justice Racial Divide. Economic Circumstances. We found ourselves in the dramatic sudden unemployment across. The country the worldwide nature of this pandemic. The social media phenomena we're seeing. Cultural van underlain by presidential politics. It's Only time I can recur. Recall. And that is even halfway similar, and it's only halfway is nineteen sixty eight. I'll let through that I'm pump, the country was. In many ways coming apart in nineteen, sixty eight, but this is a toxic stew and we. We need to get our act together. And we need to deal with and proactively shape the new normal because we're GonNa, have the normal. And the question is. Is it GonNa? Happen? The right way. So were there lessons out of the nineteen sixties that apply now? What can we take from that era and have we made any real progress since then? Well it is depressing. My Age. I think a lot of what we didn't get right in What is yes, we've made an enormous amount of progress in. Addressing the. Issues of race in our country since nineteen sixty eight, but my generation failed. To adequately address it. And just that one aspect alone stands out to me. Is You know I feel like my mom's generation? you know we do talk about with with good reason Progress with May, but obviously we didn't overcome the issues. We all hoped we would. And I would say. In nineteen, sixty eight economic conditions were knowledge bad as they are I mean we basically. We've never had job losses of this magnitude in this abrupt amount of time. I mean it was crashed Bam. Thank you Ma'am we went from. You know home three percents on employment to twenty percent unemployment in the short period of time that same buried. That's. I don't think that's ever. We called in our country even in the great. Depression, it occurred over multiple years. Cheered you up and? You know no, no, you have quite yet, but you know. Sometimes you gotta fight through the tough conversations, and then we can be cheered up once we have some. Lasting significant change now. Surely, and that's what I mean. What what is important is A An earthquake occurred. The landscape has been altered. And the question is. What's that Landscape GonNa? Look like and what are we going to make this? Can Happen to us, so we can make it happen the way you wanted to. And I think that it's it's possible there's going to be transformational change. I think you've already seen some indications of. But. Any transformational change it's GonNa be some ups and downs, and it's GonNa take real leadership. And It's so it's important that everybody you know. My favorite saying is in the marks that you get what you deserve at N-. It's going to be up to us from this point forward to make the best what we came. Well, we talked a lot about education in our first conversation and President Bush has called education and urgent civil rights issue as an Education Guy. What do you see the role of education being as we move forward? With got a big huge and unfortunately is. His message of the bigotry low expectations and He was so profound and in really. Announcing pronouncing repeating that education. Was the new civil rights movement and he's staying, but we lost that momentum and we gotta. Pick it back up. So Instance Bob Moses he was a prominent African American. leader Minister Civil Rights Movement. He said many many many years ago. Algebra is the new. Fundamental Civil Rights of African American, and he was saying Algebra you know he was. He was saying those words, even the whole President Bush and was speaking to this very issue of bigotry and low expectations, so. We have to address these fundamental issues. So I think I something. A lot of people are trying to figure out is what can we do differently? And how can we have more productive conversations and I think a lot of that starts at the individual level so it ask you tom what you're going to be doing differently. Yes but I WANNA. Challenge the. This is We have to do more than talk about this and listen. In that we have to move to POW seat solutions. And you know maybe because of my policy background, but for instance if you talk about. Protest now about police brutality. What changes do we want to make? In policy that govern. enforcement, loss or something we would all say we need order in our society. You also need long otherwise I. mean. I've heard conversation lately about the you know. We have to have ordered well. That phrase is law and order, and what should the law the that governs? The way we enforce our laws and we. We've gotta get specific. What changes do we want to make and how please? Investigate crimes arrest people whatever those changes are. We need to have concrete policy discussions. and. The get concrete policy discussions about housing. You know one of the issues that we face are. many of our Jeanne these lack of portable housing well, that can be essentially public. Policy topics, you know I know one A. multifamily housing project in my single family neighbor well understanding. But that leads to more expensive housing. So you have to get trying to create about some of these, and that requires some frank, the bay and give and take to reach. House see prescriptions that the public will buy into and we need leader. She will provide the leadership and communicate the reasons why in why one plus one will St. Well and The other big issue going on in the world still is covid nineteen. And Y- organization Texas Twenty, thirty six is really built on the premise that data can help. Better informed tough decisions so with that Lens. Think the best moves are for Texas and other states. That are struggling with having lost so much classroom time for for our kids. Well clear in just so many different issues facing education space, but I mean for. Most amount belt life. We've argued about a loss of learning time in the summer. But now the summer is GONNA be March to probably September. And cannot afford to let. Our children mess in essence. Year of Education. Term on task I want to learn when I worked in education was A. Fancy word educators used that you and I would just say yeah. You know you spend more term. Steady now number is probably gonNA make a difference. We'll term on task matters. In where we are the lag in the whole rest of the world about front, we spend on task and education. That's gotTa stop. We wouldn't matter our Olympic athletes. Train for global competition by working out stays. It's ridiculous that we don't spend more term. in the classroom and again that raises issues of the digital divide. Have they do it safely? How do we do in wise children? Can they say? But we cannot just say well Our kids get two or three years off. Until we get back saying all right, let's see here. We can't. We can't let her go. So we, we've got to let you go here in a second time for one more so following up there, we already have an achievement gap in our schools, and like you said that that gap isn't helped by the digital divide. And covid nineteen, only making things worse. So what can we do to close that gap in this environment? Well we, we have to be honest with ourselves that that that gap is real. We've kid ourselves in many race in many ways since president, Bush left office that. Quo You know y you don't understand we. Are you know we have a diverse population were not like China. We're not like Asia were not like it when my the. I mean. It doesn't matter the fact of the matter is we're behind the rest of the world and our rigor. What would require our students? And we had say the reality. that. We need to do better and we're not doing enough. To help our students prepare themselves for the twenty. First Century. And we have to be real about that and rigorous about that and I know. President. Bush has always felt that way about him. Bless him board, but we need more than ever now. While Tom thanks again for spending a few minutes with us here to to close out what we started a few months ago, so really appreciate it and Tom Be careful out there. Stay healthy, and and we'll talk soon. Thank you so much, take care. Learn more about Texas. Twenty thirty six visit Texas Twenty thirty six dot, Org, and you can also learn more about the Bush Institute's work in education, reform and Bush Center dot. ORG SLASH ED reform. If you enjoyed this episode of the strategic. Please tell a friend or give us a five star review or send US note on social media at the Bush Center on Facebook instagram and twitter. Thanks for listening.

George Herbert Walker Bush Ross Perot president Tom One Texas Texas Ross basketball White House Margaret Spellings secretary Bush Center Tom Loose Smu George Bush Presidential Cente Kevin Sullivan Dallas Houston MAGNA Carta President
Dr. Juliet Garcia - The Richness of the Texas-Mexico Border

The Strategerist

00:00 sec | 5 months ago

Dr. Juliet Garcia - The Richness of the Texas-Mexico Border

"Doctor, who Is a product of the Texas Mexico border. She was born in Brownsville. Texas and the Rio Grande Valley parents who diligently save ten dollars at a time to make sure she got a generation, not only did she get that education? She eventually became the first Mexican, American female to head a US college or university. While president of the University of Texas Brownsville to fully appreciate the richness of the region. We're hybrid, and that's not a bad thing. Actually, it's a very good thing because living on the border with the Rio Grande, Valley sits between Mexico and the United States on the Gulf of Mexico. Couldn't be a richer place. It weaves together. The richest part of what I believe is to be of both countries in. Both Customs. Dr Garcia tells stories from a childhood in South Texas shares lessons. She learned while heading up a border university such as how the hiring of one great physics professor and Time Lawson to an entire department so strong that she believes it helped convince spacex to come to Texas. A major. Kaufman and this strategic risk presented by the George W Bush Presidential Center. This episode of the strategic was recorded earlier this year in person at the Bush Center. Welcome to Dr Julio. Garcia the first Mexican American female to head a US college university. She served as president of the University of Texas. Brownsville for twenty two years was on President Obama's transition team in two thousand eight, and is currently a professor in the Department of Communications at University of Texas. Rio Grande Valley Dr Garcia. Thank you so much for joining us. TCI's is real, almost cost one. Co Host, who I don't know if you speak Spanish not is an winks. Yet. And is the an Kimball Johnson director of education. Reform Bush Institute and is our expert on all things education and thank you for coming in on. It's kind of a dreary day in helping US Andrew I'm so happy to be. Thank You well Dr Garcia! You have a just fascinating story that began early as that began as the daughter. You are the daughter of immigrants. How how did your journey began? What was your? What was your early life like before he became this renowned professor? I grew up in Brownsville. My father was from Monterey and he and his family had come to the United States. During the Mexican revolution. My mother was from Harlingen which is about thirty miles up the road and had been a pioneer family. There We grew up. Crossing the border almost every day. Two Languages two cultures we. Shared, two different MAURE systems, we could convert vessels two dollars. Fahrenheit disintegrate I thought the whole world. Cup did that right normally right. And so I had two brothers and And learn to play and make up and fight boys. That was a good training will come in handy for later. Our mother passed away when we were very young. She was forty years old and that was before Md. Anderson I mean was just barely getting started and of cancer and so My father gave us great strength at that moment because he said you've already gone through the hardest thing that. Any child will ever go through. You've lost your mother and your survived. And, so you'll survive. Whatever comes your way because you already have, and now you're stronger and more resilient and I you know now as a mother and a grandmother. In retrospect, it was the wisest thing he could have done, so we grew up. My father's like wild Indians, you know. Because, there was no mother in the House and he tried everything he could kind of contain us out, but his job he said was to push us out of the nest, so that when we failed fell, and he was still around could help us and. That's how he saw his mission in life, and so he did my brother. One of my brothers is on a nurse, registered nurse and owns a s centers my other brother who say civil engineer with a masters from ut Austin and then I went into education communication. One I was listening to your tedtalk did a while back and one of the things that you talked about really eloquently was was your father's commitment to your education. Could you tell us a little bit about that? The the notion in our home was that everybody was going to go to college. Mother had been Salutatorian of her class, thought been able to go onto beat college because of the Depression but was smart and in both languages. By father also very smart, and did very well, but again depression and responsibility for other members of his family, so he couldn't go to college. You can imagine how horrible it must feel to know you can do be prepared and then for. No fault of your own. Not Be able to do that, so they decided that. Their children would not would not suffer that, and so from the very young age. Our Father Mother started a savings account for college. We didn't know what college was, but we knew it was really important because dad would take us to the savings and loan in those days and deposit. Ten dollars a month for my older brother came along another ten dollars every month for me, and then my younger brother got I think fifteen or twenty. And so so while I was treated differently as a girl in the house, I washed the dishes in the boys washed the car, but when it came education, there was no difference in expectations were high for all of us so so it was clear that the money that he had was. Alcoholic and so we said You know dad. We only have one restroom in the house with boys I wanted another rescue the very least sure and begged pleaded for that, and I think. Why don't you take some of that college savings? And a little restaurant, and he said they said he never know Sadaqa that money you don't touch. My brother would want a new car. Of course. Our cars were seventy eight years old, whatever gave my way and again the request was made against that same response would be given, so we learned very early on there was going to be high expectations, but it wasn't just us. So important is in our family. That's how it was. If the father's got together, he and his brothers got together for a funeral or wedding or something. The conversation was all about their children, and there was always about. How is your son doing well? Let me tell you what my son show. So on the way to those reunions. Father would say give me something to Brag about so we'd have to kind of think of so that it was very clear to us that you were to be measured. By how well you had taken off the advantage of the opportunity that our parents and brothers and aunts and uncles did not half, so it was a sacred. Trust. Did you feel a lot of pressure? Was that was that? Did you feel a burden at all or was it? Was Not really how? It felt like a bird. For All of us right? What if I fail and how I go back home? And not have succeeded at this. When you know my dad, mom works so hard and but it just. We were just convinced that we were smart enough to do it and we knew our parents were smart. We did get an encyclopedia Britannica in our house, and so it was no excuse for not knowing we'd have Google but but. You ask a question, right? Dad would say. Go look it up. Do you want it I? Got It go look it up and so we. We were in a wonderful environment. We've played a lot, but we also studied. When needed. Yummy was a that was a major purchase back then. I remember my parents saving up. So that I would have access encyclopedias. We were a world book family though we had ours on top of the piano, and that was yes, look it up. It was my dad's favorite thing to say to us. Yeah, but it was fun I mean that was like you could discover the world flooding stop. Friedman reading. Yeah, and then we had one of those huge dictionaries. Stand yes. Yes, and Panamerican World Airways had closed down and Brown's been there for many years, so dad went and bought a very old. Stand and the dictionary I'm sure it's still in my house somewhere. It sends the message that learning is earnings important, but yeah, that's that's the most important thing those things do. It sends that message absolutely. One of the things in your Tedtalk, which we, Andrew and I both really enjoyed. You talked a lot about the importance of raising your hand, and when I think about your career and the impact you've had in the roles taken on. It's very clear where you have done that throughout your career, but could you tell us a little bit about why why? That's been so important where you think that came from? Well it worked sometimes. It didn't others as you have to be prepared for that radiohead so so. I! Just happened to all of us. You see some go to a restaurant and they're not serving you pro- appropriately. You're that organized ride and you think boy if I was a manager. You. Husband keeps reminding. You're not in charge here. Sit Down and have a nice meal. But I think there's a sense in some of us that we could do that a little better. And so you're just anxious, not for the position in the authority, but just so you can solve the problem. Fix It. Make it better. Improve it, and so I, always felt and I was must have been horrible. Cynical Faculty member because I would criticise everything right. I mean how organizer and I was young. I didn't know what I you know it's. You're probably mostly right well. To me. So I remember flying for the presidency of Texas south. Most college a Community College that I attended years earlier. And now member of the faculty, and I had gotten my doctors and I thought I was God's gift to molly. and. And an applied and I knew I wasn't gonNA. Get even a a week of support from anybody. And what I hesitated was not personal. It was for my husband because it's a small. Town people everybody these like what's wrong with his wife, thanking she could apply for the presidency. That's sweetheart. I'M GONNA. Apply I'M NOT GONNA get it. But I want you to know why doing and I wanted. I wanted to call attention to the fact that I thought. I could do more than what I was being assigned. And I had been teaching the courses. I had always thought. Are you kidding I've become this brilliant person and you're not using all of this so I hope it doesn't sound arrogant. Is just give me a try at it because I think I can do sadly so shared. Of course I didn't get it, but I was in the finals list of applicants, so I got interviewed. Well, that process is a good process to experiment with, and it was horrible interview, but I learned from that. So. Know Seven, so the president was selected and the President I think wisely thought this GonNa give me troubles. Is signed me administrative job. It was a worse job in the world in in retrospect, it was. Running the steering committee for reaffirmation of Accreditation with Southern Association holidays in schools. That is no small administrative. No, no, but I had no clue what yeah, so he says. Do you think you can do this? And I said well of course. The question was going to be of course. So I agreed, and for the next three years organized that process and borrowed people's credibility because I had. A baby professor, and so I would find the smartest lady, the smartest gentleman that were professors or do we know things. Someone had run a school. Someone had been a principal. And I borrowed their credibility and borrowed their knowledge and tried to steer US tour, discovering what was going on with us against these standards, so by the end of the three years I member of that. Had learned more about the college than we would have ever learned in any other singular position, so I knew how many books there were in the library on English literature and where they were and. So how many cars were in our fleet and when they had to be turned over and So so it was a wonderful preparation. Eventually I became a dean for five years, and then the presidency opened up again and now i. And I got. A couple of women on the board. And I think the women opened the door. which is I mean that's such a great story. I think your point on the front end of that about you. Raise your hand, but be prepared that you might not get it the first try. I always think that such an important lesson because sometimes when you're young and you think. Wow I know all the things now, right? It's you have to. You have to be prepared for the learning experience. That doesn't mean you shouldn't raise your hand, but just because you raise your hands. Part of it too right. When you when you don't WanNa Diet, but you need to you say the moment you say it out loudon now you know people say well. How's your Diet Right? Well moment it becomes public. Your measured against what you said you were going to do so when you apply. Then people will say well. How did it go and your face with? It didn't work out. And so that public -ness of trying out raising your hand is hard. Yes, and you have to put on another layer of skin. Yes, to be able to survive it I think it gets If you condition yourself to do it or that, it's never comfortable but I. Actually think it's you won't hyperventilate every time. Okay, so here's the analogy has apparently if you take a piece of steel and you put it into fire. like a sword. You WanNa make it stronger. You, do it. I firing it up again and because more resilient well. Being in the middle of some catastrophic moment my husband would say you're like the sword in fire, and this is going to be. You're going to become more. Yes. Fire. Heart's Burnham's and and my family is feeling it to because that's also what happens, and but he was right so just what you say is another way of saying it. Those things at the that challenge you also give you strength I mean the death of our mother. Living without to parents as difficult Surviving marriage is tough working at a job doing having children, having together is top, so you better get ready because it's not going to get easier is going to get harder so our job I think as parents is presidents deans. That teachers is to help. Students toughened up. And then either when we can to help them. Get back up and move on, I think it's incredibly incredibly important night so I always feel when I was younger like most young people who you think. He kind of bored when you'd have to talk with an older person you'd be like. You'd be polite right now I. It's people are so much more interesting. The older they get because they've actually lived, the store survived. Incredible highs and lows now that I'm on the older end of the spectrum. I like to think that I'm very interesting, but I I have I reflect on that all the time. I was I was just with a group of girlfriends who we have been friends for thirty years we were. Everyone, we were reflecting on. And things and people have done big jobs interesting things, but they have but everyone's experience very profound, real loss, profound joy and everything in between, and it's so much more interesting now so because you raise that issue. One of the mistakes that I've made is not to keep connected with women friends, and so could you make a lot of mistakes right? I mean you are focused and there's just so many hours in the day, and you're dealing with the political environment with the academic environment with with physical environments. To what are you going to call up someone and say? Let's go out never hot toddy. Just doesn't fit. And doesn't fit in for decades. And that was a mistake. Now I'm spending as much time as I can reconnecting with, but he must with cousins or with family. With friends, old friends that I've neglected over life Edwards wonderful. Is that gracious and they allow me back in and we pick up. Wherever, we were yeah, so don't lose it now. Aligned the way I'm always reminded of that. I appreciate you the additional reminder. One things. For we have listeners who are all over the country around the world, not all them Texans who may have heard about the Rio Grande Valley on the news or just maybe no of the spring break many years ago, but I always find the valley is such a complex and compelling place and I would you. How would you describe the valley and what your favorite parts of the valley are? In Science, we have interface zones, and you know when they say by this plant. If you lifted solo shirt by another plant of you live that okay, so we do that with plants, we have zones for animals to you'll only find the silver fox in this place. Well. My sense is the valley is an interface sewn. Where languages convene mix merge and then separate out if you go into the interior of each country where? Measuring Systems or customs do the same thing, and so we are a little bit of a hybrid when I would. Call US mutants because plant mutate right in an interface zone. But. People don't like to be called Mutant so. So I think we're. We're hybrid, and that's not a bad thing. Actually it's a very good thing. Because living on the border with the Rio Grande Valley sits between Mexico and the United States and on the Gulf of Mexico. Couldn't be a richer place. It weaves together the richest part of what I believe to be of both countries, and and both customs, so we grow up living straddling order and and. Thinking that the whole world acts that way, but as I've travelled and. been able to study other borders. It's very similar to other borders that are international, so instead of thinking about Oh those poor people down in the valley in the South Texas. I'm always thinking just haven't been there yet. Right because we are at the epicenter, not only these two countries, but we're at the epicenter of the Americas. And and so, that's where all of south and Central America meets its northern America partners as well so if you had to choose a place to be from. I choose. This. This wonderful little place where we're not pure anything and we're a wonderful album mation of many things. Yes, I recommend to visit of. Looking for a place to go well the other thing about that if I may and that is that. In interface zones in science is where mutations occur, and it's offense for survival. Because, you got to survive in this new zone and so you got to grow a little bit taller or you got to. Develop a little bit differently of your plant or an animal. Eight people do that, too, and I think we've had to. To? Believe flexible in how we act, and if I'm dealing doing business in in Brownsville, I've act a little differently than if I were in Austin. Who or if I'M IN WASHINGTON? DC I mean. Why should they see her or new? York City? Because you know and I can I can adjust all of those, so it gives you a flexibility and of an awareness that's important global environment, so we didn't invent the global environment, but I contend that people who grew up in the valley are well prepared to deal in that. Yeah, that's interesting. So. What does that mean then for the education of those students? So you're president of university right there in that in that zone? What what kind of challenges did you face? And what kind of opportunities did you see as as president? Too many opportunities right and too many challenges because. With a high growth area, it's a very young population. And it's also very poor population so often it is, it is. On, the statistics MSA's the metropolitan statistical areas in the United States. The Rio Grande Valley's counties are often the poorest or second poorest in the United States. So we know a lot of of educational. Attributes are closely linked with socioeconomic level. And seed in my own children, my grandchildren, because they have what I think are get parents, right, my kids, and their and their partners, and and you see it in the grand babies. They're just. They're just miles ahead. Because of the languages languages that occur in their homes, so if a child grows up with a single mom with very little time to talk to a child, and with very few words in their environment, that child's not GonNa get to pre K. in the same way that my grandchild, so so that's real, and that has real impact, so that's a challenge and and and it's real. But the the the antithesis of that is that this flexibility that I was talking about in fluidity a moment ago. We have kids in the Rio Grande Valley. That are that are playing chess at five and a half years old and beating. State wide competitions. In Texas and the states, a pretty big deal for chess, and going to nationals and winning, so it is that The valley and Brownsville? Texas started kind of this. Chess, infection is what I call it, and it's infected all cities in the valley, so we can have any at any one time between four and five thousand kids involved not in football dot in soccer, although they do all of that to basketball, but in chess and this it's highly competitive chess that if a kid can learn and win at chess. Nationally, and internationally, because they also compete internationally, they can become engineers or physicians or lawyers, or whatever so there's nothing wrong with a human capital in the valley. And chess is my argument for that. If, there's nothing wrong with the human capital. Then it's just an opportunity that's missing, so my job was always to value. What skills students came to us with? And say okay. We're not GONNA fix you. We're just gonNA prove you can just go there. Add to the strengths you bring to this endeavor and we're GONNA. Make you biliteral by bilingual bicultural by literate. Many of us are bilingual and we're by cultural, but few of us are by literate, so that's where the schools come in. If I can help you become literate in both languages, hone those skills really well, then there's no you compete engineer, but. Graduate from am or Austin or Brownsville and and if you can do that in two languages, who's going to get hired the monolingual or the bilingual in the global environment. You've turned what people consider disadvantage. into an advantage and so are. My job with regardless of what position I held at any one time or whoever I was working with was always to start out with. What are they bring with them? How do they come to us what they need for us to help them? With opportunities. That's why the puff fund was so important. Because this was access into the Permanent University Fund. 'CAUSE IF I can't afford to buy you, the Tanis that I could afford to buy you and you're both playing in the same basketball game. And somebody else went and stuff up, not you. It's it might be the tennis shoes. It might be the libraries by the programs. They have to offer so opportunity counts. I love that term where we're GONNA prove you prove you I was thinking like talent. Intelligence is equally distributed around all around us and I think but opportunity of course is is sometimes what the limit is I think one of the things I was I been so intrigued about in my time in the valley is the places where I'm seeing education institutions try to create opportunity I know that in medicine. For instance there's been. been really interesting partnerships from the business side of the hospitals into higher ed into some high schools, and that's one example, but I, it's. It's a very interesting openness to partnership that you don't always see in other places and I'm wondering if you if you could say why you think that is I. Think I think you're right and I. to observe that and I think it comes in part because of this need. This need running and we can't do it alone. Reason we started the community college and put in university on top of it was so we could share a campus, so we could do it physically smart model that took advantage of the assets, and and share them and built a better deal on the other end of it. Right Community University so so. necessity is the mother of invention, and where there are lots of needs than I think you do get inventive partnerships that grow out of it. I WANNA mention. Another, one that that you'll be hearing much more about in the future and that's physics. We started physics program on our campus many years ago now. Because I, had this brilliant physicist that we had hired where you gotta start out with a good as good. Right because before then we did, not we had. We had a hat point five physicist point five chemists right? This one man taught and that was so. We got this brilliant physicist from Adam Dina. and. And he wrote a grant, and he was able to hire another physicist through the grant, and then they wrote grants, and they hired more physicist, so I hired maybe about four of them, but they built now. What is over twenty four I? Think physicist that are there at the campus so when I would say that was going to start this physics program. You don't come to meetings here or in Dallas or Houston or in Austin. People would say like why I mean we've. We've got so many other needs. Why would you do physics and I'd say well, because that's where the physicists are, and that's where students are well Lo and behold who would have thought that years and years later after we develop the programs that we started having great success in the schools, recruiting high school students to the programs, and then taking them through their bachelor's degrees there, and then off to their masters, and then to the Max Planck Institute in Germany for their doctors. SPACEX needs a place to reside well, and they were looking at a place that was close to the water check. They were looking for a place that had a state that would invest in them some capital for. Installing this facility here? Texas decided to do that. They were looking for a place closest to the equator, because apparently when you are. Shooting up a rocket. Fuel use the closer you are to the equator. New Physics. And so we met that criteria, so the one criteria that was still missing, then they needed more investment, so we got system to any up, and they did so the thing missing was human capital, and you need that in industry of that kind. So, our physics students went to the hearing community hearing that space x did see if this was the right place for them to come. So you know as a chamber of Commerce guys in the economic development folks everybody putting their best foot forward, but they silver aren't quite yet convinced the last eight speakers in this convening. Physics nerds as I call them lovely, our physics guys went over to to testify. And it was like you know a match made in heaven that the SPACEX, skies could speak their language, and they and they said who are you? And the these guys said well. We're physics. Students from ut Brownsville where people yes. and. SPACEX, guys said. What's a UT browns? So our students said you want to see our labs well. We built this lab that looked like look like A. Star Trek and regular classroom, but they had redone it and it really was cool, so the spacex guys after the meeting was adjourned. Win over to our. And spent like three hours, and then it was super nerd to super nervous. The rest of US nobody was in that conversation, and they were talking a different language so I believe always will that one of the reasons space x finally decided to choose taxes. was because we had all those other things going in forums, but we also had the the human capital. So so you never know you know you talk about economic development for community. How is that going to change the valley in the future? Who knows I can't predict it, but I know we're ready. and I know that you've gotta be. You got till the soil before you plow the field before you're you end up with trees and and blooms and so. We'll see how that works out. They're here. And they're starting to do that. It takes time, but it's. It's the were-they put in twenty years ago. Now that is really seeing. Coming to fruition. and which and you'd like to talk about some of those success stories over the years you were. We were talking before we started recording your year such a natural in this podcast, because you are a podcast or as well with the next generation. which is available on Apple Itunes tell. That project a little bit well. One of the things that that compels people to do this work is to hear the story of the impact. You've had, so. You run into a student at the grocery store and they say Oh Ma'am you know your university helped me do this or someone's. You're in the hospital and the nurse has if it hadn't been for you, yeah. But, so you run into your product. Everywhere if you're lucky. so when I now in this different phase of my career. I wanted to chase those people down and those graduates and find out what they were doing and I wanted to tell their story. I wanted them to tell their story in their own words. The good, the bad the hard ships so that that my served inspire other students. So that was the intent, so I started to Scott. You know to dig around a little bit and find our students and the stories are. Just extrordinary. Young lady who is just finish her PhD in, genitive medicine at UTM. And she is growing human lungs. He's part of a team that is tried to generate lungs out of your own DNA so that when you need a lung. We. Take your DNA, and and we do some things magic with. She had to dumb down the explanations of. Exactly exactly and and so she did I understood kind of and then she said in the and right now I said so. So where are you in the process, so they're there in research deal? It'll be still another eight to ten years until they can have human trials. or the young man that started out at our university. In Biomedical Sciences and ended up. Getting picked up because picked up by Harvard. To work on his doctorate, full blown scholarship plus a stipend. And then got picked up by venture capitalist firm to be the fellow that would interpret the science, so your venture capitalist, you have money societies that comes and tries to sell you a an idea, but you don't know the science, so his job is to interpret the science to the venture capitalist so that they can decide whether to to support this idea or not me. Who would have thought that down? He's done that learned a lot got his MBA from Harvard, so no telly. What he's going to be doing later on or the young lady who became a teacher and It was her choir. Who was the first in her school district to ever win? State champions all right, and it was. The story is just fascinating, but but the boys walked out the day before they were going to go to the tournament or the competition and the girls left with. The teacher choir director had to decide whether they would compete anyway, and they said, of course we are. They competed and they WANNA on so that's powerful story so you. You learn a lot from hearing. It's like President Bush was famous for saying the soft bigotry of low expectations, and it's such A. It's such a moral disservice, but it's also a disservice to all of us as Americans as we think about the human capital, this country and what people are capable of doing and leading in big and small ways, but. It continued to advance and coming up with sort of miraculous things whether they're small. Miracles are big. I'm always struck by that. There's just there's nothing quite like human potential. Let loose you know when you just let people. Go which is, it's really a remarkable story about and you don't know there's you don't know people stories that get to know them. You shake hands. You do the business you need to do, but they everyone has a story office. Yeah, faculty members became the first four months array of Mexico. Originally ended up at Rice and she tells a funny story about. Learning about this place in thinking. Why would they name at university at Ross? We assume that everybody understands right. What like should I tell them that's. Good for her. She gets a scholarship goes to address university to rise and. With her husband by that time, and he's also an engineer from Mexico she'd already had a bachelor's degree. She ended up becoming the first. Hispanic woman to get a PhD from rice in. In structural engineering. She's now a faculty member at ut V.. Launching that next generation of engineers, so you never know. Doesn't matter if you're from new. Yorker Brownsville There Dr Garcia. This has been wonderful. Thank you so much for doing this again. If you WANNA hear more from from Dr Garcia the podcast is called next generation, it is on Apple. ITUNES can also learn more about about at the ut Rio Grande Valley website Dr Garcia. Thank you so much. Pleasure thank you. After this conversation Dr Garcia joined a panel discussion at Our Future of Texas program for engaged at the Bush. Center presented by capital management. You can watch that event at www dot bush center dot org slash future of Texas. And if you enjoyed this episode, please leave review for share with a friend and tell us what you thought on social. Media Tags at the Bush Center on Facebook, instagram and twitter. Thank you for listening.

US Texas Brownsville Rio Grande Valley Dr Garcia president Mexico engineer professor SPACEX physicist spacex chess University of Texas Brownsvill Bush Center George W Bush Presidential Cen South Texas Andrew Rio Grande
Dana Perino

The Strategerist

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

Dana Perino

"After spending seven years in the Bush administration rising to press secretary Dana Perino had become comfortable speaking speaking on behalf of others including the forty third president but she transitioned into roles on Fox News after the White House Dana develop her own voice who cared what I thought I could tell you what President Bush thought and why he thought that are how we got to that decision and I was very comfortable in that role on the first episode of Season Season Two of the strategic wrist Dana Talks about how she always remembers to focus on the good news how she deals with social media trolls and how her career in country music is progressing. I'm Andrew Kaufman and this strategic presented by the George Bush Institute what happens when you cross the forty third president late night sketch comedy and compelling conversation. The strategic has a podcast born from the word strategically which was coined by the now and embraced by the George Bush administration station we highlight the Americans feared of leadership and compassion through thought provoking conversations and we're reminded that the most effective leaders are the ones who laughed. We're joined for today's episode by Dana Perino former White House press secretary and now Fox News Co host the five host of the daily briefing Dana Perino podcast co host of I'll tell you what she's a bestselling author so you're pretty busy. Thank you for taking the the time to do this. This honored to be here. I I love coming here to the Bush Center. It's whenever you step in that front door. It's like wow this place is beautiful. Thank you for saying that and doing such great work thank Q. and our co host is Hannah Avni your friend and VP of external affairs. She's back again Hannah. Thank you for doing it again. Thank you for having me again Andrew so Dana you so you recently you're now we're recording artist as well. Gaza May dierks dirks a Dirks Bentley superfan right. I yeah superfan Fan. Also I get to call him a friend now to happens if you stock long enough so. Do you think he's going to invite you to be on a song the backup side when you have a number one song in the world. It's kind of like you. I don't need to really do it again. I don't think but it's pretty funny when I worked at the White House. Well let me go way back when I I was in college and I thought I wanted to go into media back then if you wanted to get into TV you had to start in radio and I didn't want to have to do my radio experience after right graduated so I got a job part time job as a country music. Dj working overnight and Pueblo Colorado and I ah I didn't really I had grown up in the West but I had really listen to country music when I was a teenager I didn't really do that so I was completely out of it I I I introduced the first night a song by Tracy Lawrence and I said and here she is with their new Song Tracy Lawrence and then of course raises Lawrence's a man uh-huh tricky. I we have to do so fast forward and during the years at the White House. I don't think I listen to any music back at all. I didn't even have an IPOD when we left. That was the technology at the time I had nothing I listen to. NPR or whatever else was happening rush limbaugh or something so Kakitumba on the news and so when I left the White House or when we all left the White House I got an ipod I guess it was and I used to travel back and forth to to New York a lot and I just started downloading country music and Dirk Bentley Song Come. A little closer was out at the time China so that's how we became a fan. Would you like to sing a little bit of but I do have the worst voice but the other thing you're talking about is I don't I'm blessed with having lots of ideas and not a lot of time to execute however so in two thousand sixteen the five went on a bus trip to go conventions. RNC Indian say and at one point in the back of the bus Greg Gut failed and I were sitting there and he was making me laugh so hard because he was just making up nonsense country songs about the five about Fox News about everything and he just had me giggling so much and I said we should should go to Nashville and record a song about the five and record it with a real recording artists and then release it for charity so three years later it came true. We have a wonderful executive producer of the five called Megan Albano. She figured it out we teamed up John Rich from big and rich who is a wonderful person big fan of forty three's as well and we went to Nashville and in one take he's saying the song that we sang the backup part. It's called Oh shut up about politics and it's not about shutting any particular person up. It was just about how politics has entered into everything sports music music theater technology. Everything's just too much and so we have a song called shut up about politics. We released it and within two hours it was number one on the country charts and then and that whole weekend it was number one in the world bigger than Lady Gaga Justin Bieber it was astounding. It's amazing it was amazing and all the proceeds go to folds of honor so we're pretty proud of it. Ninety nine cents you can download it on full. Honor does great work. We've done incredible work. We're familiar with there were pretty well and they're just such great such a great organization. That was pretty fun fun. I have a question for you off of that. Though I mean you're right politics is in absolutely everything you cannot get away from it and we talk about that a lot too. I mean even when you're going through Instagram instagram stories. It's just permeates every bit of it. It's in your life obviously multiple times a day. How do you get away from politics and focus on the thing? I feel a little a lot better than I did even from a few years ago because I've really embodied this idea that politics is what I do. It is not who I am and I have carved off my weekends and my evenings when I'm not working but but I don't go to dinner to talk about politics with people unless I agree with them now. That's GonNa sound like Oh that's not very fair and balanced view but I argue all day long and so in my personal life I pretty much. Don't I have a rule that I wrote about in the in the Jasper book which is no politics at the dog park. You're that's a safe place for me and if and even people that WanNa talk to me about politics at the Dog Park Mike Sorry I don't talk politics at the dog park. I have a policy and then laugh about it and they move on and I also carry a lot less about social media than I did. In Two thousand sixteen. I was really attacked by the Russians. Even though I didn't know as Russians at the time I remember actually coming here to the Bush Center right before the two thousand sixteen election. I can't remember what I was doing and AH chance to see President Bush and he's how you doing and I told him I had the worst professional summer of my life you know being attack and I was really kind of in the fetal position under my desk and even like my husband would say how can I help you. There's there's nothing you can do and it gave me a big appreciation for what parents are going through when their children are consumed assumed with their phone because you don't know what's being said and it's so demoralizing I was a grown woman. I've been the White House press secretary. How could this affect me so much and and I remember President Bush saying? Why didn't you call me like a really imagine if I had called President Bush and said Sir people are being really mean to me on twitter he would have said get off twitter on it solved this one's easy and actually it is easy so once you step away from from it or somebody gave me a tip to only have mentioned from people that you follow and Eric Schmidt of Google actually pulled me aside at one point in two thousand seventeen as I was explaining what it was like to be one of the people that was targeted by these Russian boots but I didn't know they were rushing at the time I just said it's overwhelming and he pulled me aside Dana? These are not real people and you explain to me how the whole system worked in Saint Petersburg and I don't know that just gave me an ability to say it doesn't matter. It just doesn't matter no so I it's weird to say that as much as politics permeating everything for me. It's probably less a part of my life than in the previous elections that I've covered for Fox. Was it similar to how you regrouped. After you left the White House taking a breath stepping away from it no not really I mean I remember the day that we'd left Andrews Air Force Base and Peter and I left to go on the trip to Africa. I leaned my head back against is the seat and I said nothing I do for the rest of my life will ever be that important or that hard and it's really true when I make a comment now. I'm not gotTA START A war. I also have a great appreciation for what public servants go through and I want to support deport them. No matter what party they're from if you're willing to put your self out there and run for office and try to do the right thing I try to be supportive. Okay talk to us about mercyships touch. You talked about a little bit when you left the West so interesting about mercy ships. There's actually a Bush connection there too okay so obviously President Bush and Mrs Bush were amazing leaders. When it came to Africa I I got to go to Africa with them? In February of two thousand eight and in typical forty-three fashion we did five countries in seven days. I got my first migraine. I couldn't even go to the Kigali event because I had to stay on the plane and two liters of fluid into my arm and so I didn't get to go to the and and I've been sad about not making it to Rwanda ever since given the statistics about pep far so many times at the podium that I thought I understood Africa and then I was just totally blown away when I went there and I came back and I said Peter we need to go for six months after the White House and he said how about six weeks so we did six weeks compromise and yeah so we did a pet farsight that's on in Fishhook South Africa and Peter and I just had this confusing time and that did help us reset our priorities and our hearts and to reconnect as a couple as well because we're so blessed here in America and you can get caught up in what about me. What am I gonNa do to the White House and just being able to have a bigger world view? After I left was great great fast forward mercy ships asked me through my speakers bureau if I would come to Dallas and moderate a conversation between the president and Mrs Bush in front of their dinner group so I said well sure that sounds great so peter and I were coming down here now prior to that I had join the one campaigns women advisory board and I had gone to several countries with them. I had also been on the Broadcasting Board of Governors under President Obama and I'd gone to Africa on behalf of of that organization as well trying to increase the amount of content of for women in particular and Africa because we found that men will definitely listen to the radio for news in sports but women will listen if it's about health and their kids so anyway it's just little bit of an effort to do that so at the dinner right before the Q. One eight with the president and Mrs Bush. I'm sitting there and somebody says well. Why did you get interested in Africa so I'm telling him than soul story that I'm telling you and then I I said just a few months ago I got to go to Sierra Leone and I went to this place called the Aberdeen Clinic and it was started by Scottish heiress us and it's so amazing they were doing fistula surgeries there and the day I was there? They were teaching the women there how to count to ten and the lady next to me said Oh she's not a Scottish heiress. Her name is Ann Gloag and she's sitting right behind you. This is a self made businesswoman in Scotland who was a burn unit nurse for twenty years but then she and her brothers started a bussing service in the UK when Margaret Thatcher deregulated the transportation sector and they became very successful and as the company expanded she took Africa and and when she got there she said this will never do so she started doing all of this philanthropy there and that's how I ended up talking to her and I said to Peter we have to go see mercy mercy ships for ourselves so that's how we got involved and it's a surgical hospital ship they do the West Coast of Africa that night they were kicking off a capital campaign for a brand new ship because they I usually retrofit and old ship and everybody makes do but now they have this beautiful new ships that should be available in the next eighteen months and they'll be able to serve so many more people so awesome I remember your pictures from that trip and they're just in quilt and I have to say Fox. News has been incredibly supportive now Peter my husband he's not a professional photographer offer videography by any means but he's very enthusiastic and foxwoods send us with the latest equipment and then Peter would get as cargo pants on and that's all that video that you see that fas his wow he did all that and we do some interviews and I came back and the young producers would be so excited they would edit the packages together and management like Suzanne Scott Our CEO now before that she had a different job but very enthusiastic about airing these pieces pieces on Fox News Multiple Times so I've gone twice and I usually go after an election year so it in two thousand thirteen march of two thousand thirteen in March of two thousand seventeen so looks like I have to go again march of twenty twenty one to another thing that was important to you is diminished mentoring project that you worked on. That's another one that you started. You started yeah so I just I learned something when I left the White House that every call all you get to do something you think that's going to be the last call you ever get because you think everyone's GonNa Forget about you and it's not true but what you end up doing is taking on everything everything so I was spread extremely thin but I felt a responsibility to accept any invitation from women especially working in Washington who wanted to and get some advice for how they could advance their careers so I went to this bipartisan women's Congressional Staff Association. That's the name of the group terrible name but anyway eighty people showed up Republicans and Democrats they were all there and I try to give them my best piece of pieces of advice all in one speech and then I did a photo line about eighty people so let's say I would say sixty. Two of them asked me if I could get together for coffee or lunch and I was absolutely overwhelmed and like I can't go ah the bathroom. I don't have time to coffee with everyone but I thought this obligation so my girlfriend Jamie's why back who also worked in the Bush administration and at the Homeland Security Department and the Justice Department we were walking back and I said wouldn't it be great if we could figure out a way to do mentoring but like speed dating because what I've found is that young young women in particular they all have the same questions it's the same type of question over and over again and I don't have all the answers and in fact when we do a minute mentoring event now I feel like like I learned just as much as anybody else about time management or asking for a raise Goshi hitting dealing with sexual harassment at the workplace all all of those things so we have minute mentoring and we recently did a joint event with we work oh cool and that was in Washington in. DC and Lauren Fritz is a good friend of mine. She actually grew up here in Dallas. she has a top position at we work in communications and so she she helped organize that it's a very it's a good natural fit because they have really ambitious clients they call them that have rent office space from them and so we did this event and we're hoping to figure out a way to expand it because I have limited time but it's a really it's a really a good program and mentoring dot Org. There's a guide as to how you can host your own event when you work on those projects does that does it re-energize. You does that really bad guys and in fact we did one at Fox eighteen months ago and I still have people telling me it was the most important day of their careers. Here's there or when could they have it again. I one thing I did when I did. The Fox one is expanded it to not be just for women but for the for men too young men Nida the as well and I have thought about how did you expand it because they need help as well and they always wanna come and they could use them advice and I thought well no one's stopping anybody else from starting minute mentoring for men. I don't have to do that as well happy to have them. Come to my events too but it is different and both genders will ask different questions agents if they're in a mixed group will so I I'm going to continue minute mentoring to the extent that I can. I just feel like I wish I had an extra four hours in the day. Maybe six I'll take it if you have it again. I really love the title of your of your first book the and the good news is because because everyone thinks of thinks of the news they think of anchors and reporters on TV's just talking about the about what's wrong in the world and so you came out with just this optimistic message in that that really resonates with us because the Bush we think of the Bush institute is a really optimistic place. Where do you draw that optimism from? I think probably from my upbringing. My grandfather in particular rancher from Wyoming always woke up on the sunny side of the bed It's funny that you know that the title has a couple of different meetings and the good news is in one way was about my life. I talk about in the book Oh cow. I've always been a planner firstborn daughters look out the disaster. Worry about everything you first daughter. Yes you can always tell we work. Ah The minute mentoring event who here they all the raise our hand because they know and fathers know what it's like to have a firstborn anyway I tried to plan everything out and when I finally wrote the Book I looked back because people would say how do I get to become White House. Press Secretary Mike well first. You have to start as a country music. Dj then it's over but the reason I think that the title really spoke to me about my life. Is that looking back. None of my plans actually worked out and that was the good news right that you don't have to worry about it that you can turn it over to God and you can work hard and be prepared and open to risk and the good news is that things will work out the way that they're supposed the other reason is because when I started as a press secretary on Capitol Hill Way back when Holly was my chief of staff for Congressman Dan Shafer and I was as learning how to be a press secretary and is never go in to the boss and say I have the best news. You just won't believe how great your coverage is going to be on the front pages the New York Times tomorrow. You are GONNA love it no one ever why would you go see the boss about something good so she says when you see the congressman and you have either difficult difficult or bad news to deliver always leave on a high note so you always have to find a reason to say and the good news is so I got into that habit so you might say well. The good news is we were able to get Andy Card on the phone with the reporter and his quote will be in the story or and the good news is there's. There's a big press conference happening tomorrow so this won't even be an issue tomorrow whatever it might be even if you have to really stretch the good news is it's chicken Taco Day at the white whatever it might be something and then from a mentoring standpoint people don't WanNa work with complainers or negatively. There's just there's too much competition out there and if you want to hold yourself back negatively is is the way to do it. That's great great workplace advice we really is I have wondered so many times. I can't believe never actually asked you this. What it is like going from the White House podium yeah to being on the other side of the equation is really doing the interviews and making the news didn't even really start out that way right so when I left left I've had a PR firm and is doing all those things spread too thin but then the thing I'd like to most to do during the day was the hits I did on Fox snooze? I remember Marlin fitzwater who was press secretary to Reagan and forty one. He said to me look just figure out what you like to do and the money will work itself out because I was spread so thin Charles Krauthammer also gave me similar advice he said I don't see how somebody can do. Both things have clients and be an analyst and he said you'll have a lot more fun being an analyst if I make more money if you do pr but I don't see how you can do both know some people do both and it works for them but it was is pretty clear to me early on it was not going to work for me. When I started doing hits on Fox I had never once said my personal opinion in in public who cared what I thought I could tell you what President Bush thought and why he thought that or how we got to that decision and I was very comfortable in that role and for the first I frankly two years after the White House when the next administration was quite critical of President Bush I was always the one who's the spokesperson on air and I love that role? That was comfortable for me. I knew what I was doing. Then I started doing the five and I remember Greg Gut felt at one. The point is like no what do you think about legalization of marijuana and I said I remember I had a moment of Oh I I don't I don't know and I really credit him. Suzanne Scott even even Roger ailes others like being patient enough with me to let me figure out a way to then become trouble expressing my opinion on my own. It took a while it was quite a transition actually to be go from speaking on someone else's behalf for so long then to speaking for yourself. It has tested also make you feel kind of super cautious right because I I was. I'm a cautious speaker. I don't offend anybody even last night. I said something on Tucker Carlson's show that I wish I hadn't even though it's true but it was about bill de Blasio uh-huh and in New York State Right now Donald Trump is more popular than bill de Blasio really Oh yeah and I said something like well. The Look Dislike Donald Trump and a liberal state is a given so think of how much the Liberals was actually hate de Blasio for him to be less popular than Donald Trump and then I kind of felt bad because I was like uh-huh Gosh you know about anyway. I live in the city and it's crap but I don't like to say out loud and then you don't want to be boring on air but I noticed that if I'm not myself I can't do it so the five has been incredible to allow me. There's room to run and I remember almost to the day when I finally realized I'm never going back to being a spokesperson at the White House I'm never going back to having PR clients that are going to be offended. If if I said something bad about Bill de Blasio so it was so freeing and I think that also comes down to what I was saying earlier about night worrying about politics all the time like I don't care and then what about when you added the second show so that was pretty exciting because after the two thousand sixteen election I was really did well. I feel like I'm in therapy that affect after the twins sixteen election I was thinking taking twelve hundred again like what should I do like. Is this my highest invest us. Should I do more in Africa should do more with mentoring should I whatever I was exhausted. After Twenty Sixteen election emotionally physically physically I sure could we worked so hard and my husband. Has You know Peter Peter he's eighteen years older than me and I thought maybe this is the time nice transition finish out this contract and then maybe it will go live in South Carolina and it'll be great and the way the holiday work that year I had nine or ten days off in a row because of the holidays we're in my time off and so I get down there and I played tennis. Once a day. I went on five mile walks. I got naps. I read books. I went to dinner with friends. I had coffee. I've got my nails done and on the fifth day I came downstairs to go to dinner and I said I can't can't do this. I just needed a break. I didn't need to change careers so sorry. Your question was how what was it like adding the second. I can show the second show so I decide to stay but then I realize I'm not quite busy enough because during an election year I'm working nights and weekends and everything but then there's not that and I only had the five and the podcast was like well maybe something to do and then they asked me. Would you be interested in taking over the two o'clock. Show which is a news hour and what's so interesting is that when I decided not to stay in local news and leave graduate school and go back to Colorado and then I decided to take take the job in Washington working for congressman. I said I have had narrow horizons. I thought now I'll never get to work in television now. I'll never get to be in news and the good news is right. It all worked out yeah so I really love it. My days are full though I just don't have I don't have much time time to breathe that I get a five thirty I start reading. I take a break from eight to nine for some sort of exercise and then as soon as two o'clock and and I have a quick meeting with my show the three PM Eastern quick meeting with my team and then I got to prepare for the five. Is it harder transition from a show where you were you are the host and the centerpiece do an on Samba cast as the ensemble we the five is the number one in its timeslot every day since it started it was in the top five shows of all cable is kind of an explicable in some ways. We're about to have our eighth anniversary to see that coming. No we were told that show is going to be six weeks temporary and Greg Gut failed and I are the only two people that were there from the beginning but I I I really love it so I kind of have the best of both worlds at a pinch myself a little bit. Sometimes I feel like on the two o'clock show I worry that it's too newsy and we'll be boring until on the five o'clock show but what if I say something on five o'clock show that will make somebody think that they don't WanNa come on the two o'clock show and blue. I over think that a little little bit but that's that first born daughter kind of thing constant. It's the planner we've come this far to have. My parents adopted older sister. Call Them Up. Let let us know what they say is. We've come this far. We we've hardly talked about America's Dog Jasper Jasper. You look around. You don't see a whole lot lot of Hungarian visas walking around on walks with their own. I don't know do you. New York are very popular right interesting. Although instagram instagram is probably distorting my view but in New York there's a lot of visuals down here. We're we're big on the doodle craze. I think in Texas doodles or five people love their dogs the the reason he's called America's dog. It's not because I'm arrogant and say though he's the best dog in America it's because one night on this show called Red Eye which I'm sure you know. Did you watch red eye right. I that was a great show that show actually probably more than anything else helped me. Come out of my shell because it was on a three. AM like watching. I remember one night on this show. It's on Youtube and Bill Scholtz who was on at the time he said what if forty three were watching you right now and I started laughing so hard but then I started crying on the show 'cause I thought what if he is I'd be so mortified if he was watching this safe to say so it was about this woman who was mad because Paparazzi was following her around and taking pictures of her little dog and she was like don't take any more pictures of my dog and I said I'm not like that. I think think people can take pictures of my dog. All they want in fact. I'll take the pictures for them. If they can't have a dog. I will share Jasper with everyone. He can be America's doc so that's how that happened so oh he's on he's seventy and he has certainly grown up with Fox and it's pretty funny about the only possession that I care about in my life is is president. Bush painted a portrait of Jasper when he was a puppy Oh and truly the most treasured thing in my life I took Peter says I know I know grabbed the painting. Where's it hung in your home in the living room? When you walk into well home apartment city city living we walk in and it's Veritas spot of honor yeah so I think one of my favorite pictures that you've ever posted? I don't know maybe Peter told me about this us but I do want you to tell your love story and meeting on the airplane. It's my favorite meat. Cute of all time is the picture of Peter on his motorcycle with Jasper in the sidecar those goggles on and I mean it just makes me laugh at the cutest thing. You've a love it so my husband husband loves motorcycles and I I'm fine with it but I don't have a lot of time to be motorcycling around and he bought a nineteen eighty-six six cream colored Harley that was a police car and it came with a Sidecar Jasper knows he loves jasper loves to ride. He knows he can't ride if he doesn't wear his dog -als it's not a word I came up with the brand. He knows he has to wear them and it's so interesting that he knows the people are looking and laughing pointing that kids love it and Peter for Costume contests on the Fourth of July Peter Dressed it's up as Batman and Jasper as Robin implementable of actually and we won first prize of course we won like I price three years in a row and I was like okay. We gotTa Stop Office. It's like the women's soccer team against Thailand. Let them mercy. I'm still laughing about dogs. Let's yes the name so yeah the Harley it's actually pretty funny. Peter's travelling say I'm walking on the street and if he hears a Harley because obviously that very distinctive patented patented sound. He'll look that my dad is that my that's really cute. Okay tell us how you met him. One of my pieces of advice that I my family's advice it's in the book entering all the time is choosing to be loved is not a career limiting decision. I mean a lot of young people who are waiting till they get this job or this the promotion or this thing and then they'll find him but it's so interesting. I'm reading a book called the defining decade highly recommend it as a woman named Dr Meg Jay and it's about how your twenties twenties are so important and how these young people think that they're all these things that are like blowing things off in their twenties but they think in their head that between the ages of thirty thirty one and thirty four everything's going to happen. It's not true and never works out that way so I was having kind of a quarter life crisis as people do and at twenty five on Capitol Hill I do my job with my eyes closed. I wasn't thrilled with the Republican leadership. At the time that was in the middle of the Lewinsky Linski scandal and impeachment anyway fast forward. I had to go on a business trip. Where I took the congressman around to the editorial boards it's in Colorado and then ida fly back and I almost missed the flight and Peter Almost earlier one but it just so happened to me? We're both on that flight assigned seats next to each other seat thirteen. A and C on American actually knew I saw me. There's no be- because it's American whatever so so we just hit it off ended up talking and I remember looking out the window and say Okay Laura. I know I asked you to help me find someone but he lives in in England. He's eighteen years older than me. He could be an axe murderer did eventually lives in England and I really think it was well. I was love at first sight. I don't think it was it was and then I moved there nine months later and we've been together twenty two years it's amazing yeah and he in you have the step children and grant yes children. He has two children from his first marriage Kelly and Barry and frankly that much younger than me Berry is a I called Peter and bury the happy couple whenever they're around. They're just so so happy and yeah. It's a sweet relationship and a uh-huh just going back to the career thing I i. I don't think I could have done any of this without him. You know after nine eleven we well. We were living in San Diego when nine eleven happened and Mindy Tucker who was amazing communications person for President Bush on his reelection campaign for governor then was working at for Ashcroft at the Justice Department she called called me and asked me if I'd be willing to move back to DC because they needed another spokesperson and that's how I return to Washington and but we were living in San Diego and who doesn't want to live in San Diego it's fabulous but Peter said leave it with me I left I think a week later and he packed up the House and moved to DC and then when we were living in DC and I got the the request to come up to New York living in New York and it's hard because it's so much more expensive in it's a real mental shift and he said I got it all just focus on that and he did all the moving and all of that stuff so there's also a pretty funny story about his support for me. I don't even know if President Bush will remember this I think he probably would I know Dan Bartlett will remember I was brand. New Deputy Press Secretary and I don't even think that President Bush knew my name mm-hmm really and Bartlett asked me. Could I sit in on this interview that was set up with David Ignatius and I said sure what do I have to do so well. I'm GONNA come to the pre brief and Oval Office. I'll do all the setup and you just have to sit. There took the time when it's over and then tell me everything that happened back. I've done that before I can do that so I get to the Oval Office at the time and then as Bartlett's explaining to the President what's GonNa Happen. The President says we I'm not doing an interview with him and Bartlett Says No. Yes we remember it was going to interview and he's like No. I'll I talked to him. I'm not doing an interview with him but he just got back from Iran. It's like yes I. I don't WanNa do an interview because then he'll write about it and it will look like I'm trying to negotiate with the Iranians through David Ignatius and I'm not going to do that so I'm not doing it and therefore for she doesn't need to be here and he looked at me and like tilted his head. Get Out of the Oval Office so I just sort of like like slinked out of the Oval Office and I went back to slow down to the press. Secretary's Office does pocket doors at the time so I closed the pocket door and I called Peter and I was kind of tearful and what happened. I said I just got kicked out of the Oval Office and he said why I told him I just think for the rest of your life. You can say I've been kicked out a better places basis than this such a good guy. He's really good very wise and he's been great for all of my girlfriends that come over and need advice girlfriends but anyone who needs advice Vice Peter is super wise and was huge fan of the president so left never quite happens. We expect with it not at all. I remember on on his book tour. We were just is talking about things that had happened in I said do you remember what you kicked me out of the Oval Office. I'd never kicked around the Oval Office. Actually one hundred still still upset about that. I think a little actually so one last question. We'd like to put people on the spot a little bit. You're on microphone all the time. It feels like twenty four seven even but what's the one question that you never get asked that you wish he would so. I listened to strategic just so I kind of had an idea. This was coming and that really upset with myself because I can't think of a good answer because I feel like there are things that I could say that would make me sound so awful like doc. Could we leave you alone for an hour like nobody ever asks me. Could we leave you alone for an hour three young sons. I think that is totally valid. I think whenever asked you leave you alone. If someone asked me that question today on the on the on my way here I I was reading three months worth of columns from written by Neil Ferguson and Ian Bremmer and I felt so smart at the end of it I I if I just had two hours where I could read every day. I'd feel so much smarter my husband I should I should frame it this way that would you accept except one hundred percent pay rise like now. That's a question I wish somebody would ask. Yes absolutely unfortunately I can't ask kind of strange sometimes on well because the fives on eight years we do all these shows where on Fan mail Friday I feel like I there's nothing new finessed every question but people people know everything about me. They know I go to bed early. They know like my life's kind of an open book and I really love our fans. They're they're they're wonderful and everywhere and hilarious and they think they're our friends which is really good. Let me pose it slightly differently. What is something that people are not not talking about that you think they should be well a year ago? When I was asked a similar question I had just come Tom from an event about human sex trafficking it is shocking the numbers? I know that the Bush is well aware of it but I don't know if people are aware where just like how pervasive it is and there's a young woman who worked in the Bush administration who is affiliated with the group who is doing we work with the NFL Michelle Paraiso Yeah so she helped organize something with us so that the two o'clock show I was able to interview some. NFL fell football stars. We did an event with Major League Baseball. I think that that is that is an issue. I feel like here's the thing I would ask everybody just to remember this goes back to the Bible so it's not like it's like any unique thing but it is something you have to remind yourself over and over again is that especially in the age of social media. Everybody's life looks perfect. Everyone's got something going on. Everyone suffers everyone's in most most for most people ninety nine percent of people are trying their best and life is pretty hard we have it's so good here. In America. We have the power to fix a lot of things I don't know if we have have the will to but we can fix a lot of the problems that we have right now in our country whether it be homelessness mental illness we I call it like we did the surge urge could we can we can fix a lot of these things and being optimistic about solving them. I think is probably what what I wish. People would focus on a little bit more well. It's the perfect last word Dana. Thank you so much for the time you spent here with us also tonight monitoring highland capital lecture with with Ian for Neil Ferguson in Brummer Dan again thank you so much be sure to listen to her on her podcast Perino and Star Walt. I'll I'll tell you what catch on on the five which is at five eastern four central and Fox News the daily briefing at two eastern one central breeder books missing anything follow Jasper. You're not instagram for Jesper pictures there. It is at Dana Perino there. It is Dana. Thank you so thank you. Thanks enjoy today's episode would like to help us spread the word about the strategic. Please give us a five star review until your friends to subscribe for available on Apple Podcasts spotify and all the major listening APPs. If if you're tuning in on a smartphone tapper swipe over the cover art you'll find episode notes with Helpful Information and details. You may have missed FISTER TEDIOUS WAS PRODUCED BY U. N. Pappas at the George W the Bush

President Bush Peter Peter president White House Dana Perino press secretary America New York White House Washington Bush Center Africa Greg Gut Fox congressman Jasper Jasper instagram West
Gary Sinise

The Strategerist

33:51 min | 1 year ago

Gary Sinise

"The classic American success story is a kid with a dream making a big by creating his own opportunity and starting a company Oscar-nominated actor Gary Sinise did just that by starting a theater company. The now prominent Steppenwolf theatre in Chicago, and though many of Gary's connections with veterans came about because of his work in film and theatre particularly in portraying Lieutenant Dan enforced Gump the seeds of his passion for veterans were planted by members of his own family. But when I met her brothers and her sister's husband, they changed everything for me. They just start telling me about the now what it was like to come home to a divided nation. Gary shared insights into life before Lieutenant, Dan and Forrest Gump as a young actor with an entrepreneurial spirit. And we talk about house foundation and new book grateful American Journey from self to service highlight the importance of serving our veterans. I'm Andrew Kaufman. And this is the strategic presented. The George W Bush institute. What happens when you cross the forty third president late night, sketch, comedy and compelling conversation. This strategic podcast born from the word strategically which was appointed. By the now in braced by the George W Bush administration. We highlight the Americans feared of leadership and compassion through thought provoking conversations. And we're reminded that the most effective leaders are the ones who laughed. Well, we are really fortunate today. We have the wickedly awesome. Go trying to east coast theme and honor Madame Don here, but we had the wickedly awesome. Gary sinise. Joining us today, a real league awesome. Exact band co hosting with us today is Matt Amazon or director the Bush institutes military service initiative. Matt, thank you. Thank you honored to be here. Gareth? Thank you so much you met and welcome to the Bush center seated on the beautiful SMU campus. Thanks and a real gem at SMU is the meadows school of the arts where they bake entrepreneurship into their curriculum. And a big part of your story is that you founded the Steppenwolf theater. So for the students out there listening. Did you ever envision yourself as an entrepreneur? Well, if I guess if you look look back at some of the things that are in the book that I wrote. You see a kid who kind of is a little bit loose a little bit lost a little bit trying to find his way and eventually having to to make up things to to to get along. And you know, I I was from an early age. I think I was always the type of person who just took initiative. My dad was working all the time, and my mom and her hands full with my brother and sister, my grandmother her sister, they all live with us, and my mom just had her hands full. So I was kind of running around like on my own trying to figure things out. And so I ended up being the kid who kind of organize the baseball game in the neighborhood or the football game or hockey game or the rock concert or whatever it was took initiative after high school to start a theater company, and because I. I was not a good student in high school and and. The idea of going to college just wasn't wasn't making them after struggling through high school so much. So I I, but I wanted to continue doing what I was doing in high school. I learned how to act in high school I stumbled into feeder in high school, and I wanted to continue that and so what do you do if you're not going to college you either go as an actor you go to Hollywood or you go to Los a- or New York or. You know at that time. There wasn't a whole lot going on in Chicago, theater wise, there were few theaters. But I just wanted to continue doing that. So started the theater company at eighteen years old, and and that theater companies now forty five years old he owned four buildings in Chicago. And it's started by kids. So it really is. There's a there's a part of grateful American the book, I wrote here that really talks about the freedom that we have here in this country to take initiative to do things if you can dream it up, you can figure it out you can do it. And that that's kind of there's some pretty funny stories about the the loss kid in this book, but it all sort of manifested itself into action, and that's kind of the kind of person I've been you know, my life is just kinda see something and go get it. Right. And that's to me the best part of the book is that over and over there. That lesson that you gotta go take action yourself and from eighteen year old kid, the will Steppenwolf theatre to the man that made the Gary Sinise foundation, which now supporting veterans and and doing such great work there. Well, yeah. Yeah. I mean, that's the question. Good one. It's I tell you. I I think the title of your book is so meaningful and so property it, of course, as we all should kind of reflect on the blessings that we have in this nation. So I was very taken with your book and with the title, but I'm always fascinated with those decisional inflection points in somebody's life. So I think it was you randomly on a whim audition for west side stories that right? You're your first ever in highschool. Can you just I mean, so that was a decision you made that really started a path that leads to today almost and what was that decision? What was the call of the theater was just some new or in? You know, what we we all have those moments in our live where we're standing there. And just something happened on next thing, you know, ten years later. It was the moment that changed our line. Right. You know, and you look back at it and say, if I wasn't at that particular place or didn't meet that particular person at that moment. I I don't know what I'd be doing now. Same thing with me. I mean in in high school. All I just happened to be standing there when the, you know, with I was as I said, I was really struggling student and so much so that it's possible. I would have been asked to leave. Gently asked to to leave the school because I of the trouble I was getting in and music was kind of the only thing that was keeping me motivated. I love playing music I had bands. I was standing this hallway with some of the people in my band, and we looked pretty pretty rugged, you know, and the drama teacher walked by and saw us and said, she was directing west side story, you know, about the the gangs. Right. And she's thought we look good representing again. Gang members. So so she invited us to come in audition for the show on me. And another guy one of the other band members did and I didn't know what an audition was at no idea what any of that was. But I saw all the pretty girls going into them. We just followed him in, you know, sat down and didn't know what. And then they handed me a script. And I was like what are they what am I doing all the you could tell all these theater kids were used to it they on dishing before? And so they were getting up, and they were very poised and polished and spitting their lines out. And I was I could barely read. And I just started making jokes when it got to my turn, the talk, and and everybody was laughing, and she she was the teacher was even laughing. So next thing I know next day, I see my name on the cast list. And I got in the show, and she put me in the show the chapter in my book that I talk about this is called baptism. And and it was it really was. The moment that I was kinda baptized into this new world that changed everything for me. I I mean, I went into the business. I created a theater company. I ended up making a living at it. I had a film career all and the moment that it started. Was that moment where she walked down the hallway? And and I got in the play. And I remember I I was such a struggling kid that I didn't know what it was going to be like, but by the end of that by the end of that experience in west side story, I was totally submerged into it. I remember crying my eyes out when the play was over because it was so life changing. And it's I think it's kind of a very moving section in the book for for any young student to kinda may be searching for something or not connecting to his fellow students or anything, I all of a sudden stuff. Doubled into this thing and the community of the theater kids kind of embraced me. And saw that. I something was something special was happening to this kid who was just about to get kicked out of school, and it was life changing. And from that point on. I auditioned for every play. I could I went to build the sets I painted the sats. I'm ran the lights. I did the sound whatever theater experience I could have in high school. I did. And as soon as I graduated I started the theater company that still here forty five years later. So a good teacher. Absolutely. Was you know, what I I didn't go to college. But the experience that I got from her and the the incentive that she gave me to just rely on my instincts and to trust my natural ability to sort of just get up there, and do it that I learned so much there in those early days, and I just took that right into the founding of. Theater company, and then and that theater company included John Malkovich and Laurie Metcalf and Joan Allen the woman who would become my wife five years later. And and we're we've been together now for, you know, since nineteen seventy six so a lot of things happen because of that theatre life, and we have a nice space at the Gary Sinise foundation called our center for education and outreach. And it sort of tells the Gary story of how I kind of stumbled into the acting world, and then kind of took that it's a little bit like the subtitle of the book here, it's called a journey from self to service, and it tells that story, and it starts with the it starts with the theater and the acting part and then moves into into the service work, but without the theater and without the acting career and with item. You know, I would have never played Lieutenant, Dan, right? If I wasn't an actor, and that, you know, life would have been very very different. Lieutenant Dan was something that changed my life in many ways, you know, not just as an actor because I hadn't done that many movie parts up to that point. But it had set the stage for so much of the of the good things I've been been doing with regard our veterans, and that that was twenty five years ago, the the movie came out that's a proud organization that you create an Steppenwolf and before we get to more important things. I have to ask why Steppenwolf? Yeah. I it's funny. So I as I said was when I was eighteen we just got some high school kids together. I tell a story in the book that my class my graduating class was nineteen Seventy-three. But because I was such a screw up in high school. I didn't have enough credits to graduate with my class. So it was either just not graduate or go back and graduate with the next class nineteen seventy-four class and take another semester of school. So you know, I wanted to get a diploma. So I went to bed. And did another semester in high school. And I was and I talk about this in the book how I felt just terrible. You know, like terrible failure, even though I was one of the top theater kids at that time. I was still I didn't I didn't feel good about myself. But I ended up doing another play, and it was very meaningful. And it was a good play to do. So I graduated with the class. We we say in the book nineteen seventy three and a half. Yeah. That's that was my graduating class reunions. If you wanna have to either. You're absolutely right younger one. I thought. And so when I graduated I just you know, I I wanted to keep that feeling that I was having in high school with the with doing place. So I just got some kids together there were still in high school kids. I knew from the theater barmen and we started doing plays and the first play. We did we did at this church that my parents knew the architects of the church, and I asked them can you talk to the church and see if they'll let us use the space to put on a play. And so they they did they let us they gave us a key. Instead, just log up when you're when you're done or her sing. And we went in there. And you know, we didn't charge for tickets or anything like that. But we advertise all the parents were coming all the cousins and nephews of everybody and everything that's what the audience wasn't. We wanted to have something on our program that said, we were theater company. So we were looking for a name and we were at rehearsal one day, and we're all just sitting around. What are we gonna call this thing and? Somebody happened to be reading the book. Do you know the book it's by Hermann Hesse ES as he -solutely and it's called stepping. Okay. He was reading that book. And we looked at it. And I said, let's put that on the program. And so we put stepping we'll Steppenwolf theatre on the program. I I never read the book. I never read it since. Then I I think it's a better story that keeps saying that. I haven't read, and I thought it was your favorite band. We we would have people call the theater and say Steppenwolf plan. Say yes. Which is in stepping well, those early days in those theater days brought you to the play tracers, which according to the book is really where a lot of your work. The veterans started. Did you anticipate at that point that play was going to be such a a life changer in your career? I didn't know what what it was was because of the veterans in my own family, and particularly the Vietnam veterans because they were they were not that much older than I was Vietnam veterans on my wife's side of the family. I started to meet them when when I got together with her and she introduced me to her brothers and her sisters husband, all who served in Vietnam. All in the US army. They started to cut it educate me a little bit. And when I was a kid Vietnam war was raging on. I mean combat operations were over in nineteen eight seventy three year, I was supposed to graduate from high school. So all through my high school years and all those years preceding, the Vietnam war was raging on and yet and on television. You would watch the casualty reports, and I knew my mom and dad were kind of fearful that I was going to graduate and get drafted all these things. It was a difficult time for country difficult time for our soldiers. And but as a kid, I was preoccupied with by rock band, and my theater stuff, and the girlfriend is usually. Actually, I surely I wasn't. I was just being a kid. I wasn't paying attention to what was going on with the war that much, but when I met her brothers and her sister's husband, they changed everything for me. They start telling me about Vietnam, and what it was like the come home to a divided nation and a nation that had turned his back on the veterans. So I when I took over as artistic director of Steppenwolf theatre, I was so kind of tuned into Vietnam and wanting to do something for the Vietnam veterans, and and so as artistic director of theater, your primary job is to find places to do. Right. So I'm always looking for plays. And I'm looking at publications from around the country that tell what their local theater communities are doing and everything and I found this play called tracers and was written by a group of Vietnam. Veterans and they were performing the play on stage. And and most only a couple of them had ever done any theater before the rest of them were just Vietnam. Veterans at this. This one guy who done theater conceive this and in who was a Vietnam veteran conceived this idea to put a play together and get a bunch of Vietnam veterans together and kind of. Right. A play based on their experiences. They would all sit around every day and talk about what they did. And what they saw who they knew and experienced that they had and then they would act it out, you know, trying to act it out together. And this one guy would sit there and write at all. And he ended up creating a play. And then the same guys would go on stage every night and perform it. So most of these guys have never done place before they wrote a play. And now they were onstage performing their own stories. And so I flew out from Chicago and saw it on stage in Los Angeles. And was completely knocked out by went back the next night and saw it again. And it was exactly, you know, this is what I want. I I want to be a part of this. It's telling the stories of Vietnam veterans and prior to that this is in the early eighties nineteen eighty when I saw it prior to that Vietnam veterans. We're in the shadows. This is two years before the Vietnam wall was was built and dedicated Vietnam veterans are still hiding yet. These guys were coming together every night and performing for two hundred people every night because the show is a big hit in Los Angeles. So I begged them to let me do it. I said you gotta let me do his show in Chicago. And I tell the story in the book that the the the guy who wrote it he said, no, no, no can't do it. It should only be done by veteran. Right now. Veterans are the only ones who it should ever perform this play. And I said. Okay. But I'm going to still keep bugging you. So. Every everytime months. I would call the guy and say, well, let me do it. And then it closed in Los Angeles. And then I would call and call and say, what are you doing with the plane nothing's happening with it? It's just going away. This shouldn't be seen. And so he didn't know who Steppenwolf was nobody really hurt his Steppenwolf at that point. So I had him come out to Chicago and see another play that we were doing that Malkovich. Directed that. I was in a whole bunch of our ensemble. We're in it was just a rock and show. I mean, it was it was it was one of our in the history of Steppenwolf. It stands the top ten shows was called balm in Gilead. And it was just a wild show. It had Springsteen music in it and Tom waits music and Rickie Lee Jones. And it was just a really great show. He came and saw it. And now he he thought Steppenwolf they're good. If if anybody should do the play I'm going to let these guys do it. So he. Gave me the rights and I directed the play onstage put a cast together two of which were from outside our company, but we're Vietnam veterans, and then the rest of my cast were not veterans, but he didn't mind that he said that was okay. But he would only give me the rights for Chicago. He wouldn't give me the rights for New York or anything I wanted to worldwide rights and to do it and. We ended up doing and that show was so powerful in Chicago that the veteran community just word started to spread. And and so I wanted to create a night for veterans at the theater, so every Tuesday night veterans would get in for free. And we would we had two hundred and twenty seats and we'd have two hundred veterans in the audience every Tuesday night who would show up for free. And some of these guys would come back week after week after week their stories we're now being told on stage. This was now nineteen Eighty-four. The wall had been unveiled at that time. Some things were starting to change right around in there. It was about ten years after the fall of Saigon not quite nine years. And in the Vietnam veterans were starting to be, you know, the country was starting to say, hey, hey, we we didn't do. Do right by every veterans. We've now got the wall. There were some parades and things like that. And these stories of veterans were being told on stage every every night. It was a galvanizing moment for me. I took my cast to the VA to talk to veterans who were dealing with post traumatic stress in one thousand nine hundred three learned quite a bit. And you know, the unfortunate thing is when I made the decision to do it. When I got the rights. I was really looking forward to my brother-in-law MAC Harris who was a Lieutenant Colonel in the army. I was very much an who would taught me a lot about Vietnam and leadership and West Point and all the stuff I wanted him to see it so bad, and he was diagnosed with cancer just about three months before I started rehearsing the play, and he died he died about a month before I started rehearsing the play. So he never got to see it. But that in some ways just motivated me. In more to do right by Vietnam. Veterans wouldn't amazing opportunity through the theater company to use that as a megaphone and a mechanism to kind of deal with misperceptions by season opinions of the Vietnam generation fascinating to know that you had vets and non vets in the cast were their initial tensions when they started working with one another. No, no. Because the the the the vets who were in the cast were were also actors. Okay. So and they were bringing, you know, really one of them was Dennis Farina. Remember Dennis very so Dennis was just starting out as an actor. He was a Chicago cop, and he was just getting into acting and he'd done something else with us. And you know, I asked him to play the drill instructor. And he was a Vietnam veteran. He served in Vietnam nineteen sixty three and sixty four early on in the war. So he was he was great. He was really into it. And. The Vietnam veterans who were in the cast and the other one also they were real contributors because they had been there. And so it was good to have a couple of veterans in the guest. And and I just had a great visual idea of how to stage the show, and and it was very dynamic, very exciting, very powerful. And to this day. Thirty five years later every one of our plays at Steppenwolf. We have a vets night and veterans get in for free. We provide a meal for them every single play since nineteen Eighty-four since we did that show, and that's a lot of lot of place. So a lot of veterans have been through Steppenwolf to see our shows over the years, and it's awesome. One of the one of my favorite spots in the book is really is in the very first chapter where it's in a footnote that you had called post traumatic stress instead of post traumatic stress disorder you as President Bush has said money times, you've dropped the d on the disorder through all of your work with veterans at what point did you? Did you realize that that was a powerful move to to try to focus not just on their physical injuries? But on their mental state as well. Yeah. Well. You know, as as I'm sure it's been for President Bush. You know, the more folks, you meet that are going through trauma, and that have been to war, and that are dealing with physical challenges and marriages that are impacted in. Oh, and families that are going through difficulty folks who've lost friends, you know, children who've lost parents families who've lost loved ones all these things you, you know, there's a lot of mental stress. That's that's. That accompanies that service, and I started working with our wounded twenty five years ago after I played Lieutenant Dan supporting the disabled American veterans organization, there's a story in the book. I in the in the very beginning of the book. I talk about a moment where I was invited to the national convention of the DAV. And I didn't know what the DAV was at that point. I'd I'd been very tuned up to Vietnam. And the Vietnam veteran experience so when nineteen Ninety-three came around and I had opportunity to play via number veteran. I very much wanted to do that I had been working with Vietnam veterans since the early eighties. But I haven't really spent any time with disabled veterans or gold star families or that much. It was. It was it was it was when they invited me to the national convention that had a there that there were there was a galvanizing moment in terms of you know, when you walk out on stage, you're introduced in front of a crowd of twenty five hundred wounded veterans. It's gonna is going to have some impact if it did with me. I mean, it impacted me so much that I never never left it, you know, and continue to support the DAV. You know? So all all these years ramped? It all up after September eleventh when our new generation of real life. Lieutenant Dan started coming home from Iraq and Afghanistan, but prior to that I was teed up. You know, it was teed up to to to support in any any way it could. And and I learned some valuable lessons from the Vietnam veterans that were in my family, and that I'd befriended after that experience in Chicago working with them supporting them in different ways. Now, the some that I talk about in the book, and then the opportunity to play a Vietnam veteran who's struggling with post traumatic stress. Lieutenant Dan isn't just somebody who's missing his legs. But he was the Lieutenant who marched his platoon into an ambush. Into into into a spot that where they were just surrounded by tree lines. And they got cut down and a bunch of his guys got killed or wounded, and he's dealing with that in a that's when you see Lieutenant, Dan and he's not doing well. And he's drinking too much, and he's is located himself, and he's by himself, and he's down and out and everything that it's not just his physical disability that he's dealing with their he's dealing with a lot of pain and anguish of being the guy responsible for for losing people that and that's a that is not an untypical story for people that go to war. I love that trajectory in the story there on the movie where you really see it initially the war. He wanted wasn't the war. He got. Yeah. Turn all his history. And then you see that sort of the moment on. The fishing boat where he faces the storm and the positive end, which is you see him in a in a wonderful relationship at the end of the at the end of the movie, and what an example for those who perhaps are facing the same challenges. And I've found that when when I started visiting the hospitals after our deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan and visiting this new generation of wounded. And I'd walk into a room and nine out of ten of them wouldn't know my real name in. They would they would just say Lieutenant, Dan and they'd start. And they'd wanna tie in here. They are they're missing their legs or whatever and they're in the hospital bed, and they wanna talk about Lieutenant, Dan. And he and they. Tenant. Dan is such a that that story line in the movie is such a positive one. Because he's all right in the end. You know, he's he's successful in business. He's moving on with his lives on new legs. He's married. He's he's forgiven himself in oh, he's he's forgiven. God. I mean, he's moving he's moving forward in his life. And I always talk about this all my messaging. I mean, I play I've played hundreds of concerts for troops. And I get up every single one from the time. I started back in all three to just the other night. And I deliver a message all the time. And it's it's a very it's a positive message. Because that the story of Lieutenant Dan is the story that we want for everyone coming home from war that they can make the transition that they can be okay that the the don't keep going in this direction, you know, but the term. The a good one. It can be a good one. And and that's a hopeful story. And you know what? That story of Vietnam veteran had never been told before in the movie business, if you if you go back to nineteen seventy eight when they started making movies about Vietnam. And that's when the like the first movies started to come out about Vietnam. Vietnam experience it was the deer hundred right? It was coming home. It was platoon. It was casualties of war. Some of these movies in the in the late eighties early nineties late seventies. They started to come out. But the you always have this question at the end of the film, if the Vietnam veteran was going to be okay. Broken generation. Yeah. There was so many you can look at you can look at it just a dozen of them and the Vietnam veterans only Apocalypse Now he's crazy at the end. You know, you just don't know of Martin sheen is going to. That and then along comes Forrest Gump. And you think maybe it's going one way, you know, because he's down and out. But by the end of the film, he's standing up his friends getting married. He's business. He's a business guy. He's successful. And you know, that story of the Vietnam veteran had never been told before. And there were many stories like that of guys who were able to put their their war years behind them and move on and business and succeed to leadership. So it was kind of cool that that that story line started to resonate. And that research, I certainly found it was resonating with the people that I was visiting in the hospitals that they wanted to hear about that story. Gary we can't thank you enough for the time you're spending here with us talking about your book and with our engaged at the Bush center, presented by Highland capital management audience after this. And of course, for all the time that you spent serving our veterans over the years. Well, thank. You and and I hope hope the book resonates with with folks. And and that they're able to see there's some positive things. And I talk about a lot of wonderful people in that in that book grateful American Journey from self to service, the New York Times bestselling grateful American is now on sale in bookstores be sure to get a copy. It's it's a great read. Thank you so much Gary that thank you. You bet. Thank you very much. If you enjoy today's episode like to help us spread the word about the strategic, please give us a five star review until your friends to subscribe for available on apple podcasts Spotify and all the major listening apps if you're tuning in on a smartphone Taffer swipe over the cover art. You'll find episode notes with helpful information and details he may have missed the strategic was produced, but you Anna Pappas at the George W Bush institute in Dallas, Texas. Thank you for listening.

Vietnam Lieutenant Dan Chicago Steppenwolf Gary Steppenwolf theater Steppenwolf theatre Gary Sinise Gary Sinise foundation George W Bush institute Bush center New York Andrew Kaufman Forrest Gump SMU George W Bush administration director John Malkovich
100 - Asking For Help With Bobby Dove

The Military Veteran Dad Podcast

55:37 min | Last week

100 - Asking For Help With Bobby Dove

"Definitely better in every way because of what happened to me. I'm a better dad on better husband a better friend thing. I'm just a member of the community. It is so easy people look at me and they seem you miss parkson in thank. It's like bad but in my opinion is it's the opposite. I mean i think i've been given me a great gift by these experiences and trials. I've been through and everything that's come out of that during his dad coming home. Welcome to the military veterans dad. Podcast where it is our mission to bring every dead home. I'm your host. Ben coy. I'm a united states marine veteran husband and a father we will bring authentic conversations to inspire action your life so we can close the gap between the dad. You are the day and the dad wanted me tomorrow. This is the military veteran dad. Podcast welcome back to military veteran dad episode. Wait for it one hundred cat. It feels good to say that and it would not be possible without you the listener whether this is your first time listening to the podcast or whether you've been a longtime listeners to beginning i humbly and wholeheartedly appreciate all the time you've invested in this podcast mike growth would not be possible without the continued support of you guys out there listening and reaching out when something that i said impacted you and allowed you to come home and be a better dead. This podcast has been a personal vehicle growth of mine. And i have love sharing that journey with you and i hope that's come through on the podcast. No it's come through for a lot of you out there because you let me know against said early. Appreciate every tune review every email and someone reaches out to let me know of what i said impacted their life and now there were episode. One hundred if you know listening to the previous week so episode one hundred leading up to it. I was struggling to figure out what to do for episode one hundred and i was thinking. Go big go anywhere. I was like. How do i figure out who to do. Episode one hundred and for me. I wouldn't right back to my heart and right at the core of my heart is being a dad. And so i reached out to the bush center the find a awesome dad and they came through wine colors because they hooked us up with today's guest. Bobby dove growing up in virginia. Bobby dove love spending time with his grandfather. Korean war veteran. They watch the history channel and war movies together and bobby listened to his grandmother stories military and his own childhood. His grandfather taught him good character and respect for authority. He was the most influential person. And bobby's life in august. Two thousand eight. Bobby joined the army special forces. And after three years of continuous training earned his green beret. In august two thousand eleven he loved the camaraderie the military as well as its challenges. Bobby recently founded hooligan charters inshore in near shore. Fishing guide. Service is a joint venture with his teammate. Cliff was one of the first one to come to. Bobby's aid in afghanistan. Bobby has learned of himself that he is resilient and driven. He looks forward to a very full life. In a specially adapted smart home provided by the gary sinise foundation and unpack in. This episode. is how bobby's life was changed on. June ninth twenty twelve and. I'll let him tell that story. Because it's so much more impactful of how on that day. His life transformed. But you heard in the intro was one of the best days ever because it allowed him to see his life an entirely new way and he can't imagine having life any other way so guys without further ado. Let's get started with bobby dove and like always to hear my biggest takeaway of this episode say tuned for the other side of this episode. And i'll be back. Walk into podcast bobby forever. I'm super excited for this episode for one hundred different reasons. I'm super excited for every episode. I realize i say that a lot as a podcast does but this episode is episode. One hundred and i could have gotten any guest on the podcast and like got any guests. Some guests are still out of reach. But i wanted to go where in a different place because today. I'm talking with bobby dove. He has a story that he's gonna pack for us but has a story that i really haven't brought to the podcast and today we're going to dive right into it. And how he has had to redefined his life as a man as a father to be a provider. All these different things. Bobby's going to impact. So bobby go ahead and tell us about yourself your military service and limited by your story. I'm where you are today. All right So i'm medically retired steps. Or bobby dope. I was a green beret. In seventh special forces group i was in eighteen delta assefa medic. Before i was in the army i grew up in virginia. I was actually born in maryland. My parents split. When i was young. My mother myself. My two older sisters on the youngest of three moved in with our grandparents in gloucester. Virginia which is right by williamsburg yorktown on the chesapeake bay. I grew up there so anytime anyone asked me where i'm from. What was claimed virginia That's definitely my home but but You know. I was born in maryland. Boy where toss six or seven grew up in a broken home. you know. There's a lot of things like in my childhood and into adolescence. That i didn't really like a not to say that that's blaming anyone else but just things that i wished would have been a lot better so i think even when i was young i kind of had this idea. You don't really hear a lot of men. Say i can't wait to be a dad but you know even when i was younger i was really excited to one day. Start a family and be a dead and start my journey of changing improving things. I didn't like in my life. Best ford a lot of other years. I went into the army in two thousand eight. My training to be a green beret was about three years in total joint. What's called sf recruit or eighteen x. Ray so i did basic infantry airborne all at fort benning georgia then i went to fort bragg. I did a short. prep course. Selection got selected and entered the q. Course because Longest version of the core. So when i showed up to basic training to win. I graduated the q. Course i was almost exactly three years after that. I got signed a seven special forces group. Which brought me here to this area. Northwest flora eglin. Air force base where. We still live about an hour. East of pensacola. Mr pretty big part. They're given that flash forward. A dad actually died. When i was fourteen he had lung disease at a battle. Very hard did a great job and about a year before he died a little bit over a year before he died. He had a double lung transplant. That was a huge success. Unfortunately about a year later or just over a year later got an infection and because of the immune suppressing everything that ended up taking us life but even more detailed between malaysia. My father and myself. He was outdoorsman. Through and through hunting fishing out outside was totally his life and as because of that it totally became and still is a huge cornerstone in my life. Not only is something that i love to do but i will never have difficult times like we all have in life and some especially difficult Injuries and things sustain the outdoors especially hunting and fishing. Both have always been a kind of where i come back to to refined myself so go ahead and unpack a little bit about what happened in your military service. That got you to where you are today. So after i got assigned a group I did a lot of training on my team. Most teams have two medics of because there some shortages. At the time. I was the only metric on my team. So we did pre mission training and then deployed to afghanistan. I think about five months after gotcha group. That was in very early. January of twenty twelve and in june two thousand twelve. We were on a combat patrol. I was actually driving up dirt bike. And we're in a really remote area. So use dirt bikes. Tv's all the time and We were returning to our base. And i went over pressure With my front tire so the blast cut basically cut the bike in half took the front end all took my right leg all above the knee cross. My pelvis knocked me out and broke my arm. Burt my hand will be bad about pardon. My hand was still on but unusable so as knocked out for about a minute. I came to when i woke are woke to the sound of one of my teammates on the radio. Saying it was bobby was bobby. He's he's messed up. All my training. You know immediately kicked in to sell aid for myself. So i tried to bring a tournament off my carrier because of the effects in in my hand was broken. everything. I couldn't even break a single rubber band to get turned off so i tried to roll on my right arm which is basically the only thing i could see which was really bad time and when i rolled i felt my left wing. Hit the ground right. Thought my right leg still was but you know obviously was not so couple of teammates got to me said turn Attorney did they went to work. Stop the bleeding by all means instantly. Save my life there. We very rarely had another army medic with us. That was in support for us in the definitely one very few days where both of us were on the mission. A few minutes later. Few minutes later Army specialists my colon got e and continued dream. Means stuff like that. Before it got picked up by medevac helicopter Kantar and then bounced around about a week later round up and read it but does maryland. So when i woke up i was in an induced coma all that time and one of the hardest things that i dealt with dana and still to this day that you know for me it was. It was the blink of an eye from going from afghanistan to walter reed and it had actually been about nine days time so when i woke up my family was there are now wife was there and i didn't believe it was then i didn't believe i was there. You know in my mind it was like this is impossible a really tough part that i had to do with but i can imagine that. That part was losing nine days of your life. You're like what happened what we're where how'd you get like you said but then also just kind of like is it a bad dream like you did just wake up and this happened like is somebody gonna walk by eventually and i'm just gonna wake up and realize oh man. They really didn't happen. I'm maybe i'm way back in afghanistan as well. I can imagine that there's something you felt there. Yeah exactly and you know being the medic. I just really love taking care of my brothers. So you know not only was broken. But i couldn't watch over my rose in all of that was kind of perfect storm of this mountain coming on top of everything that has happened. I'm gonna lose my job. My you know my whole purpose of life. So there's a question. I wanna ask going back a little bit further in your timeline. So your dad died when you were fourteen and you had a pretty healthy relationship with them. Sounds like yes so fast for a little bit further. What brought you to the army like. What were you looking for to be filled in your life that you no longer fell are you. Didn't feel like you could get anywhere else other than the army. So i think with my dad being a big outdoorsman. We were always like shooting doing things outside. So you know. I really took to guns and shootings or and things like that so having a job or career that was outdoors was kind of a big part for me but after we moved in with my grandparents my grandfather was a korean war bit and you know he was always talk about the army and we always watch the history channel and i think those combined kind of said it in my mind that i used a perfect storm for you to join the exactly. Yes your mom's sleepless nights was doomed. The moment those two guide combined grows decision. I ever made never regretted being in the army or or volunteering for sf or anything like that. I absolutely loved every second of it. When you think about losing your dad back then. Was there a part of you that now you understand that you have kids that you maybe lost a certain set of programming that you or maybe even your your parents separating like zero part of you now that you have a family that you didn't have back then when your family separated after your dad passed away. Yes so you know. I was young when my dad. I became ill So we had a disease called primary pulmonary hypertension which is a lung disease and You know. I didn't really understand that at the time. My dad struggled a lot in terms of pain. Had basically no energy loss tunnel way. It can really week You know his body just wasn't absorbing oxygen and everything like that properly so but the thing that i observed all that was you know he was obviously going through a really difficult time but we still did everything that we wanted to do. you know. We still hunted fished. I absolutely loved my father. You know and i know that he loved me and my sister at the time. I knew he did now. I'm a father You know. I know that that was even a million times more than tonight perceived at the time but i think going through injuries on my own you know it. Kind of makes a full circle. Now that i'm a father you know. I can continue that example of that. Never quit attitude. You know gripped before anything so sounds like that was definitely a piece of wisdom but then also a legacy that he left with. You is your only your only given up when your dad and you never quit and you continue to keep going forward and as long as you gotta breath need to keep trying yeah. We'll we'll restroom did. Yeah there's plenty of time to sleep when you're dead. Sounds like a good army slogan. That'd probably both marines army us you to get an app when you're dead when you started having a family. How would it having the injuries play into that. Because i know you probably didn't feel like like i could be like the dad that you had because you couldn't walk or that you probably maybe even didn't think you could do all the outdoor stuff like there's probably a lot of reprogramming what's possible like you probably had to sell like. Yeah i can do that or i could find a guy that knows how to do that with the type of situation that i'm in right now because you can find a wheelchair now correct. No so we're a a very high on my my leg. And i'm a blow elbow diamant my right arm so the prosthetic leg that i wear i. I am pretty mobile. The one that i used to wear. I was pretty mobile but it caused me a lot of discomfort. I basically hit aware ratchet strapped around my waist to give me stability until about a year ago. I had an operation called osceola immigration where they basically put a giant screwing. What's left of my femur. Comes out of my skin and my lake now straight to so i'm still the we rehab phase for. That's so i'm not on my feet. Quite as much as i used to be. But i'm starting to get pretty close again now. Do use wheelchair at whole so most the time around my kids in everything i am in a chair but we leave or go do something a simple myself so to say that we can. We can do some better things. How did you walk yourself through that process of going from walter reed like your life is computers woke up and how the rest of your life looks is completely changed to now being a dad to just not giving up on yourself because many veterans in your case dads they give up and it's very quickly like i can t. I'm sure you can speak to this as well. It you very quickly have to talk yourself out of that. I'm not a burden because even when you have all four limbs many dads feel like a burden with their. Ptsd or their anger issues or any crap that they haven't dealt with they'll feel like a burden and that's what leads him to take your own life so in your case is probably even easier to slip into that fraser in that mode your burdens. How did you process through that to be someone that was just as capable within the family as anybody any other dead so yes. I'm most definitely had the burden. Feeling and to be honest i still drift in and out of that all the time now. Before i was hurt i was really independent. I was always someone that i wanted to do. My own thing. Basically as soon as i graduate high school. I was out of the house. You know i. I like to travel. So i've always been on my own self sustaining individual so to say so. When i went into that phase of dependency that was very hard to swallow is still. Is you know my wife who's sometimes referred to as caregiver you know still does a lot for me at times and it still makes if feel like a burden in. It's pretty hard for me to swallow. Was there a particular role model or a story or mentor. That you had that helped provide an example of that. You are not that because it's it's almost unthinkable war inside your head and it takes people the right kinds of people To really perceive. What the invictus invictus games provide they provide like there. Are people doing things out there. That have way more issues than i do. And i don't i have all four limbs and you're like man they can do it. I can do it type scenarios. So what was that for you. You know so. When i was injured in two thousand twelve. -tory that max capacity for for inpatient outpatient rehab everything so it was kind of cool in a sense of when i was in my very early stages i was able to see a lot of other guys that were in their late stages and you know people that were as interim mayor earn other cases even worse that reno outdoing still lives in still great family. People bothers you know all that there's will partner that. I'd like to not leave out so when i was in afghanistan. I decided that i was going to propose to my girlfriend at the time. When i got back this is obviously before i got hurt and i really wanted to have kids Maybe not immediately. But down the line when i was injured. You know when i was first in the icu. My pelvis was cross at a lower body injury so i had a lot of swelling and some other things so the doctors were like we don't know about your function in terms of if you can still reproduce or not and to be honest like that was the biggest punch in the gut i had gotten even more than losing limbs and all the issue dreaming about it since you were a teenager. Yes they mentioned. You know we can test in this. And i was like you know what i don't even wanna know right now. I'm just going to continue to set my goal. I will be a dad now. We'll be a husband not only those things but good at it all. Seek god's will the end our that means. I have kids of my own or or we adopt or something but one way or another is going to happen. That's definitely not a lesson that you want to leave out there and i was. We just celebrated our ten year anniversary. And i was listening. We drove four hours up north. Wisconsin and i was going through all my old playlists in my phone as i was going up and one of the songs. That played was rascal flats. I think. It's rascal flatts. I'll stand where i wanna say. It's like a story of a car accident where she gets out and walks and then she gets hit and paralyzed in her recuperation is that she stands up at the at the the wedding. It really resonated back to me. That did you. Walk down the aisle for your mary. Your wedding or did you. Yes yes the perfect marriage to that idea of walking. And saying i'm going to stand and up to this monumental occasion and almost have like the rest of your life defined by if i can rise and walk down the aisle like i'm capable of really anything as long as they don't give up on myself so another part our marriage is my wife loves disney and she always told me that she wanted someone who proposed to her during the fireworks at disneyworld. So i when i was still in the icu. I asked her father. If i could still ask me. He said yeah. I was like that time. I had no idea what my real injuries. Because i was in a coma for so long i literally was almost like a quadriplegic. I couldn't move at all. But i was like you know i was like day dave dave. I'm going to relearn to walk in propose steward house. You always wanted so that coming december. Only six months later on did exactly that. I think you know you're talking about being a burden earlier. A lot of that for me. I think has been continued to set goals and not only goals to get through it but ambitious goals. You know not. I wanna walk but i want to walk. Y you wanna talk exactly yes the why not just been a huge shot Try to keep that ball rolling. You know as soon as i reach goal you a lot of times in the military talking about meter targets no or five meter target fifty one hundred so you know. We're sitting short goals along ones. I just try to keep that going. I could definitely see how setting goals. And i definitely see you do it naturally. Was that something your dad taught you 'cause not everybody sets real goals or anything in their life and that's how they get into the drift mode. So what where did that instinct come from that. I need to set goals to get into achieve. What i want to be honest. I was kind of a not very good student. And everything when i was growing up. I was a mess up without saying Bad works so win. When i got older. And looking back in maturing some you know. I realized one of my biggest problems was that i was just drifting around. You know i wasn't setting goals. I didn't have that defined purpose. And when i got into the army and you know i had these goals like graduating different schools and scoring certain scores on tests and things you know i realized how once i put my mind to it in that fashion. I basically accomplish. Whatever the heck i wanted so i i just amputee. You're not I try to keep that tally goal. Setting has been huge for me. I can imagine there is a process within what you've had to go through where you're leaning on other people which even if you have all four limbs veterans military men we really suck at asking for help and so i'm wondering. Where did you see the like learning the skill to ask for help. How have you seen that unfold in your life in ways that you maybe didn't expect when it first happened to you i have and i still lamb. Even god tries to remind you every day for dozens of times day. Yes so you know. I mean that needs you know asking my wife to help me hand me something or or you know something bigger in terms of like treatment or health or whatever so i we live in a house built by the gary sinise foundation. I was offered some things like you know. Adapt polls itself and putting it all and a friend of mine finally talk. I actually tried to apply him. He talked me into applying also not in. Its turn out to be one of the biggest blessings for us. But at the same time i also carry a lot of guilt for receiving stuff like that. I've never felt entitled to those type of things so asking him for help. You know it's it's it's always been hard. I kind of tried to approach it as you know. What would i say to a friend of mine. I would never judge any friend of mine for asking for any type or amount of help. So why the hell would. I just myself so i try to keep that howard. Look in the mirror about that topic. Not sure how you're going to answer this but it's one of my favorite questions asked in the podcast. You can go back in time when you just woke up at walter reed and leave a sticky night sticky note sized piece of advice that you need to hear then that would have kind of fueled you perspective. What advice would you give yourself when you're just woke up so i would tell myself. Don't worry about a damn thing and that may sound odd but you know i talked to a lot of no other people have rooted after me and everything you know and the first thing i was trying to say like man if i could go back in time to when i woke up i spent so much wasted time anxiety and being depressed about thinking. I wasn't going to be able to do all these things and come to find out. I do every single one of them anyway. So you know. I mean i i just. It's just totally wasted. My arm in worrying about stuff that in the end was was definitely gonna be okay. I can definitely see how that would be something and even when you have everything in your life they most people have that idea of over worrying over thinking needed plague in this podcast and different things that i'm trying to do so more important is believe you can take action and do it then it is really figure out and worry about it and it's just that it's probably like the internal anxiety that you're not going to be enough because when you're in the military and you're serving you being enough your friend next to you is counting on it like you need to be enough to be able to make sure he comes home and that the team operates in the way. And if you don't do your job the whole team might suffer that enough newness. I could easily see how it carries over on the other side. When you're going through this of. I am no. I'm now missing pieces of myself and physically and i'm not going to be enough to make sure that everybody that i love in my life is going to be taken care of exactly and honestly i still do that everyday. You know whether it's amid a day or twenty. Three and a half hours of a day. You know i still Adrift out of that. I i think i. It's a lot of misconceptions that point you get over it all. But it's just you know you of maybe extended period of time between being in those slops so as a father from this particular view of life that where you're at and what you have to deal with every day how do you think your kids have changed you ways that you maybe didn't expect being a father with this type of situation so i love being a dad and i absolutely love both for kids. We have to our son. Wyatt just turned six and our daughter abbas before they obviously weren't born until after. I was injured so they grew up with dead being wheelchair. You know haven't robot parts and all this kinda stuff so that's just totally normal to them. I think what. I always told myself. Even if i'm disabled Maybe i can't play football. The same with son is other dads too. But i can sure as heck love my kids just as much or more than anybody else but you know. I just try to be really supportive of him. Tell them. I'm proud of him like three thousand times a day to my knowledge. I don't think that they think they're missing anything. So you know we still do a lot of fun stuff in that feeling of being love. There's game remember the guests. We had in the podcast but he gifted the the advice that there are several studies. That like the best predictor of a child becoming a good adult is how consistently did they feel loved through their childhood. It doesn't matter how many sports it doesn't matter. How many different things you taught him. What schools you sent him to the feeling of love from their father and their mother is like the core fuel that runs throughout your life if you think of a an adolescent boy that's like maybe eighteen twenty and he didn't grow up with a father. There is a feeling that he walked round whether he knows it or not of just trying to be approved by someone. And when you have that from your father being proud like i say to. My son has well over one hundred different things. All of that is so impactful. Because that's the fuel that keeps them going. And what experienced on the other side of waking up and maybe this was growing up in a split household that it wasn't consistently affirmed every day that you had doubt that you were enough to do it and i think if you have the father like you are right now where you're always instilling that you are enough. I believe in you and you can do anything like there. Isn't that doubt that that creeps in when they because they've been challenged growing up and proved with their fathers reaffirmation that they are enough and they can go out in the world and and figure out how they fit in and actually try to make an impact versus. You know what. I can't really do that because people might judge me like that was something i haunted with. I always haunted like oh. I can't be that person because that's not who i am. Or that's not how people see me and i never really could see my own value. That was something. I really struggled with understand. Like what makes me special man. You're like reading the thoughts on my head. That's a good podcast interview. So it exactly how you were just saying you know the the need for information right So i struggled with that a lot. It had lessons because my parents were split in could see my dad a lot and died and then my mother was always a working her butt off many times to jobs To have needed so think. When i had relationships everything into my heard i kind of was my own worst enemy in al. I was dealing with things. And i think a lot of it goes back to that. You know so that. That's really why you know i'm always trying to affirm kizzee you how proud i am of how much i love. I don't want them to have those types of struggle so you get the perfect combination blamed girl. Are you going for a third. But at some point or are you guys dud. I think we're good. Good it's official now. Your wife might listen to this podcast episode. I think she's more done than i am. So my wife has done more than i am. I would love to have four kids but she's pretty much done at the beginning we talked about having more. We both really love what we have right now. They both get the wrong kind of attention. They are both get a lot of attention. Now i think they have a lotta great politics because of that so probably gonna stick it with two. I want to go to a different topic. Same topic but different channel so a lot of dads with either. Ptsd or physical injury like the most common advice is people figure out how to move through when they find the purpose within what happened to him not as a to them but for them. What is that for you. How is this really happened for you. And that you've been able to find purpose even through this happening for you. Yes so ironically. I think would happen to me was literally the greatest thing that ever happened to me from the moment where you know. I woke up to where being a medic knowing my injuries i knew that my chances are survival. Were extremely slim. So at that point i was flooded with grit. Not what i had done. But all things i had you know i hadn't married this woman that i love. We hadn't had kids yet. You know all the deer ahead hunted the fishing so much unfinished business. Yes the twenty point buck. Yes so that now becomes my purpose. A huge part of that you know obviously need purpose outside of my house alone so being a medic wanted to do that because i love taking care of people done a lot of nonprofit stuff and trying to help other friends of mine and similar situations and all that together combined. You know if if it's just one part you know i think a lot of it would crumble but all combined together is really kind of what sets it sets a good for me and just being able to once you see like there's so much like this is what i didn't have ptsd so i've only really observed one hundred episodes. We've got with you now. Is that so much of what is happening. They find that purpose. But once you realize it tappan like having a thousand. Snap on toolbox thousand piece nap on toolbox. And i've said that advice a lot but i feel like it's so true because you just have so much life experience compounded within a thirty second window that i'm sure there's been moments in your life that you have a viewpoint piece of wisdom holding your hand out. I'm positive for a friend who's just coming home. Maybe without a limb like you wouldn't have been able to do any of that without that experience and you wouldn't have been able to be that friend that reached out just like so much of what happens is more importantly probably with your son and daughter. There's gonna be a moment that you're going to teach and you're going to pull back from the your toolbox. What happened and you're like man. I couldn't have taught that lesson without that wrench. And i never knew what that interest ford till this moment but now i can't imagine doing way without that wrench. I'm definitely better in every way because of what happened to me. I'm a better dad on better husband on my friend thing. I'm just a member of the community. So you know it's so easy. People look at me and they seem you missing parkson in thank. It's bad but in my opinion is the opposite. I mean i think. I've been giving me a great gift by these experiences and trials have been through and everything. That's come out of that. So i want to go to something that you talked about before we hit record and you hinted at it but i want to go deeper into that part of what happened to you. What happened for you. Is that all the abundance of time that you had in the future to accomplish. Your goals was all immediately taken away and then you only got a bite sized piece back to really start. Chipping away at it again. How did you redefined your life. Once you realize that my time almost went down to zero. And then i started getting a few minutes back now. I've got my entire life back. What's different now that you've had essentially that life or death moment in front of you. Another weird car is the feeling of imminent death for me was again. One of the greatest gifts urban. And it's you know. We spend so what i feel like. All of us said times or another. We spend so much time wasted worrying about stuff. That doesn't even matter. You know what we were to this or our hair was messed up or you know what we said exactly you know. It doesn't even matter and the real steam of our lives. Our families lives so being able to look at something in terms of. I'm not distracted by the things. Don't even matter. I'm focused on the actual rebuilding my life and my family's and everything was also i feel like people think i'm not being honest when i say that but i mean straight up like it was the greatest gift i've ever been given. I can definitely hear that in your story and see how you're in the early stages of your fatherhood but man thirty years to now when you look back like your. That's one hell of a legacy that came from something very negative and this is what a lot of people get hung up on that these negative moments aren't like it's not the ending it's just a period and you can start a new sentence right on the other side hit space and start typing a new sentence that you can really redefined your life in a different way. I think i know the answer this next question. But i'm going to ask it just to clarify and give you a chance. Maybe to pick something different or to confirm exactly what's in my head. What do you think you really really needed to learn in life that maybe the bobby before the accident wasn't honest with himself on and what you became honest with yourself on on the other side that this really almost had to happen to you for you really to learn this lesson in. Have the life that you have now. I think about that often. And i can't my finger on a specific thing. I was prior to the head of a encyclopedia flawless. I worked. I worked on a lot of those not trying to say i. I had come perforating. But i had worked on a lot of those. You know up until my time especially you know going through all this training and especially in your time in combat and everything. So i get i can focus know our just talking about i mean i i feel like i kinda scatter brained before in equality. I god is that you know understanding. What's really important and You know what's really important is. What's really in my heart. Not somebody else. What they're telling me or try to push me into so. I think that is probably one of the best things that i got out of it. You actually just put his thoughts together and be selfish not to share what i just put together in my head. That based on what you're talking about there well came to. My mind was wrong or not but before that incident accident the capacity to love yourself was very low and then the other side. You've really really had to dig deep. And now you have an abundance of love for yourself and i wonder if that true love for yourself and who you are accepting exactly who you are with all the flaws with something that this was teaching vehicle that really had to crack that open and while yourself to feel the love for yourself and then receive it from others to probably as well yes so. It's kind of funny. I feel i spend all this time trying to put something into words. You ecuador's talking about but as a powerful podcast here because we hear it said so many times in my brain works like macgyver and it just takes random bits of information and pieces of them together. So it's a curse and blessing. Because what i use it on my life. I get overwhelmed when i use it to other people like. Oh that's a really insightful. Thought i'm glad you said that. I mean you know the the self love and i think more so self approval you know was always a problem of mine. No it's it's definitely gotten better. But i still deal with that a lot now. I still feel like. I'm never going to be good enough for my wife or you know stuff like that just because god wheelchair and things even though i would never abused somebody else in that situation that way on the super hartselle so learn to approve myself not be so hard on on me has definitely been a struggle but something very good learn. It had to learn it the hard way but it was like in december january. Hit me with this idea that to really move your life forward you have to look in the mirror in love unconditionally. As who you are in the outside in on the inside and you have to realize there's good bad and the ugly and you gotta approach you with love all around because it's all happening for you and when you can get to that point where you can start to unconditional love yourself. Maybe not all of it but certain pieces. That's when you can unconditionally love the others in your life. Your your wife your friends because then you're not expecting anything in return because you're kind of meeting your own needs for love and you're not having covert contracts within a marriage or different things like that because you're just bringing lovers i'm gonna give you love but i'm expecting this love and return at the same time like that's something that i had to really go through this year in the past been big huge area growth from me and my own area so i want to ask a question. How would you lead with your son and daughter to make sure that they know that are enough. So there's two things like you can reaffirm it but how do you actually give them examples in their life to know that there are enough other than reaffirming it like a lot of times. It's either putting him through tasks where they have to rediscover kind of boot. Bootcamp does like it. Just rebuilds that grit. So what does that look like for your parenting and fatherhood to really make sure that your kids understand that. Instagram hasn't where your daughter gets value from is from with inside fate. I for my approach. I tried to have a foundation. Kind of i always tell them that. I'm proud of him at all. Level you in. And that's not i say that at times when they're not doing anything so it's not you know i'm not proud of you because you condition well right exactly. You know. it's it's the only condition. Is that your child. And i love. I think you know this is one of the things that was talking about. You know some things that that i thought could have been proved in mild tight. My childhood d. Total information at not conditional so i try to push that into them. I guess so to say so your son six years old right yes. So if it's anything like my six year old son this is really where he's like pushing the boundaries of the rules pushing the boundaries of who. He is what he likes curiosity. He just had his first sleepover the night. Like that was its own for big thing and like he's going out in his own. How do you how you lead your son at that age six like what are some of the example of maybe you could share with us. Some good advice on out apparent a six year old son to make sure that he grows up into strongman because it starts at these early ages. This is the ages where the seeds are planted for later in life. Yes so he's definitely getting to the point where you know. He's obviously too smart for his own. Good i thank you know. I definitely try to be the hover the hoverer parent you know. I try to give them some guidance but at the same time i do want him to understand failure on his own consequences on his own versus not just getting in trouble for something but why why. This wasn't a good idea. Why making this huge mess with. It wasn't a good idea stuff like that versus the concert. To him has just been told no he actually sees the negative repercussion. Something in that. My my oldest daughter is eight So my son six. And i've been figured this out until january with my oldest and i think it's something that many adults mess up as well is we use words like responsibility. We don't probably use integrity but we have in the back of our head especially in the military. But these words don't have shared definitions. And what i really realized with my daughter was i use these words. Like responsibility There's a few other ones that i can't think right now but i'd never had actually explain what these words are and making sure that she understands like what these words mean. And what actions resemble these words like what are some examples. Also something but then those at early ages making sure you operate on a shared vocabulary because it's so easy to assume that they know what you know especially as apparently you just don't have sometimes have time to slow down like does he really know what that means and but like a bedtime talk is really where i use a lot of teaching. Talk for explaining vocabulary talking about something. I've been really working on responsibility. Like what does it mean for a boy to be responsible to grow up into a man like that means you pick up your stop because there shouldn't be needing someone to come behind you to pick up your stuff and you should be able to take care of your own room without someone telling you to do it like that is responsible but departmental leising it and its own little gift box like this is the example. This is our definitions. This is what i expect responsibility to look like for you. That is huge portion within raising a son. I want to ask another question. Have you ever thought of doing like initiation with your son. Has that been ever something. That's been introduced. Or maybe you did it with your father out in the woods my data. We never did any sort like initiation thing. I've never really thought about that. One son to be honest. Sorry now you've got to start thinking about it. I do you know what we're getting to a point where you know. He's been shooting a bb gun and we have a both shoots and you know we talk about a lot of safety. And i think it. I if he wants to shoot and you know. I really try to drill and that you know there's a lot of things have to happen before we even get to that point as for your your first question so i tried to kind of really hammer into them that they have a choice you know so we were seeing him. Do south thing set of. Just y'all ma'am about tell them you choice to either. Continue doing it that way or you can choose to other stop or do it a different way. You know so you know. I think that's kind of way of without using words like responsibility and you know stuff like that they understand. I can lift it right. I can dump. This whole box. Lakers out then have to clean it up next five hours or i can just get out what you know and you were talking before we hit record. That choice is something that you had to learn as well on the other side. That every time i have thought i have a choice to do something with that and my reaction is the only choice that i have. And there's lots of invalids including your accident in choice is something that you really had to learn to the process of redefining. Your life of every time. I wake up. I have a choice with them. So go ahead and unpack. What your perspective is that for us. Yes definitely so very early on in my recovery. It was very apparent to me that you know i could be. I could have my body parts. Taken abilities Whatever else you know stricken for me without my permission. But the one thing that i always retain was my ability to choose how i would react or my ability to choose. You know what i would do next you know. I think that's one of the things that i really try to show an example of to the kids and everything's we all want to do things or or something else but we have the ability to thank you know. Think about for a second and thank you know which direction is really going to be the best one for long term success or you know how we were talking about goal setting earlier you know which one is really good inch me closer to that goal rather than just pushed me in some some drifting ran of direction and you reminded me of a story when you were talking about the bb gun of cape remember. The story came from. And i'm gonna mess it up but this talk of like you give a man of accident. Send him in the woods for six hours. The right processes spending five hour sharpening the axe in one hour cutting down the tree. I think i've got most of that right. There are a few pieces. I think i messed up but the basic ideas are so much preparation into that one bullet. I mean. even the practice like marine corps boot camp. I'm not sure what it is for the army we spend an entire week pointing a gun at a can with a little i on it entire week without ever actually putting a bullet in the chamber mean a full day everyday for tighter week just pointing the gun because the fundamentals are that much more important than worrying about pulling the trigger and getting the bullet down rain because there's so much underneath that and you're teaching very little lesson but that's as you start to reinforce that lesson of what you execute on isn't just as important it's all the little stuff that leads up to it. Yes being a six year old. He obviously doesn't have the attention span to dry fire for a week every time every time before we do you know we we go over the safety check. You know making sure. We have a backstop. You know. there's no people or dogs or anything out there were will get in the prone and i'll have them practice breathing and we're talking about visualizing you and we're probably that for good five to ten minutes before we shoot anything in our case so far we're just shooting a some cardboard with a red ryder. Bb gun. But so i think you know just how you're saying that i've never heard that analogy before but that's excellent. You know. I think some related to like. I actually don't know i i feel like abraham lincoln some connection to it but if you extend a man of the woodshop donna trading him. Three hours is a good man. We'll spend like to our sharpening getting one hour because like hitting a tree with a broken axe. You're just gonna wear out like i mean. How many a veteran bangs head against the wall before he thinks of you know what. I'm using a dull ax here and it's a or another nationality. Is the same thing you go. Send a a lumberjack into the woods chop down trees and he does awesome. The first day he keeps going but then each day gets a little bit slower and the lumberjack or the manager. Lumberjack doesn't understand why thinks he's just being lazy turns out. It wasn't sharpening acts like it's just as important to like when you get into the motion like you need to re sherpa your tools. Because they do get dull after using. There's so much just self growth within that story that can't just keep hitting the same acts the same thing with expect a different result without ever sharpening. There was another random story that very similar back when you talked for asking for help of. There's a story. I can't remember where this comes from either. But it's about a guy in the middle of a flood. He's on his top of his house. And he's he's waiting to get rescued and a boat comes by and both says. Hey let's get in. We can go and he's like no waiting for god and a helicopter sends comes by and drops down rope and said hey. Let's go no waiting for god. And eventually he drowns in dies and he gets up to heaven and he's like god. I kept waiting for you. And god's like. I sent a boat and a helicopter. What else do you need like. You don't realize that the people that come into your life could actually be the person that was sent in exactly the right time to be there and if you're ignorant and just pushed away i mean that's the idea that you need to be able to ask for help. And that was such a huge part of this episode for me. Because i it really hits home to. What many veterans need to learn the hard way but not the hard way because when you let go of that assumption and the crap to go and we say the ego is a. I need to turn off when you get out of the military because it just set you up for failure. Learning to ask for help was such a powerful part of this episode. That i'm positive. That part will be a big theme in this episode. That people take away from as we wrap up this episode. What is a parting piece of advice that you want to leave military. Dad's something from your perspective. It can be anything that you want to make sure that like. Every dad of this is one thing they take away. This is the piece of advice they need to understand. I tried to always come back to like love your kids above anything so we teach about the shooting and the other things and a lot of that we're talking earlier belts performance based but really you know i think having that affirmation of they are good enough on their own especially in. They're really young years. I think that really sets up a lot of really great character qualities and everything and you mentioned the priorities with the kids. There's something that many veterans get hung up on read. It doesn't matter whether you're gonna get this backwards is recognizing the priority and commitment to your wife is above like the one thing that i had to learn the hard way as well. That whether there'd be this podcast that i've committed to whether it'd be a job that committed to doesn't matter. All of those commitments will expire long before the commitment to my wife expires in many people. Even with your with your kids they. We often prioritize our kids for twenty years and then we realized we don't even really know who the person we married anymore because we became strangers in prioritize and then the kids leave and next thing you know you problem maybe ended in divorce so so important to be your wife your kids and then whatever else you commit because when you said i do that was the one that's going to go all the way till eight feet under and oftentimes our priority. Never our choices everyday. Don't really reflect that. This is the only priority that are only commitment that goes to the end of time. Where my time yet definitely You know when i was first you know understood i was going to be a dad sir. Reading a bunch of stuff about parenting and everything and you know in my mind. It was kids. I you know our kids i. I was lucky enough to read something. That was exactly what you're talking about. You know you really need to view it as marriage. I because that's obviously the foundation parenting and guiding your kids statistics. Nowadays you know there's a lot more divorces and split homes and stuff you know so i think doing all our with our own families but you know in our community to keep many together as possible as in coming from a split family like it was probably very difficult. Freed is worked through like how to make not self-fulfilling prophecy. That because you spend family they were just destined to repeat that and just having that awareness you can begin to start changing. Your family tree in there was an episode that was titled actually titled as because it was such an important lesson. Always kiss your way. I and the dad that shared it with me shirt. Because he's like. I always want to walk in the door and kissed my wife. I because that's symbolizes to my kids. She's my number one and that example. I want them to realize when they were open to being adult that the fuel and the love that i have from my wife is what you wanna find for yourself and your life and that you are important to me but nothing is more important than here at that. Such an important less than they actually wanted to model to his kids because that's huge stepping stone for them to go out in the world and understand what love looks like. And how do i bring it in my life correctly. Yes so my famous situation as a kid. I didn't witness that. And you know now that i'm on adult. I see all that negative consequences from that so right up there again with no one of the most important things we can talk about or recognized. Obviously try to practice on own will buy. This episode has been everything that i hoped it would be. It's been an amazing episode. One hundred and now hopefully many more episodes beyond one hundred that first one hundred episodes is kinda like the first big milestone and think january first twenty nine thousand nine that i would be here. The week of veterans are reporting this episode to launch this x. Coming week i wouldn't even fathom it that i've actually put one hundred episodes like it just makes me almost stressed out from the amount of work. That was the amount of sleepless nights trying to make sure this podcast get out. So i can't tell you how much i appreciate you coming on. And making this episode hundred super impactful special and just opening your heart and revealing who you are and hopefully inspiring a lot of dads to come home back to their family because fatherhood fricking matters and if you lost a friend in afghanistan or iraq like don't let your job as a father fall because he died so that you and be the best dad you could be can't get enough for having me on. This has been a huge honor. Thank you so much thank you thank you thank you. That was an impactful episode. As can imagine and i can remember on this podcast. Because we really haven't had many dads with his perspective on life and gone through what he's gone through an has to face life every without a leg and her arm and that was something and his story will always leave an impression on my heart and the big big massive and the hint is the title episode. Always ask for help. I think that is a lesson that as veterans we as he said he is continuing to learn it daily in. It's something he struggles with what it is one of those lessons. That has so many more rewards. Because there's always someone head of you. There's always someone behind you in as i've said before be a barrel of monkeys learning how to reach out up for help in down when someone is behind you. That needs a hand. That is the best philosophy. And this is the solution in my opinion till a lot of the veteran crisis that we have today is we do not have a barrel of monkeys mindset and i loved the way that bobby brought it to us. That advice struggle and he was really open about that vulnerability of learning to ask for help every day. Even though it's been years since that incident every day he's had to regrow through that idea and reinforced. It's okay to ask for help. And i think the big takeaway also was that learning to love yourself when he was talking about and i helped bring that to the surface of before. He was really struggling to see his true worth in value on the inside but on the other side he was able to fully feel who he was. I think that is a core message. That many veterans do not get in depth with. I don't think we get in touch with an hold us back from being the amazing dads that i know every dad listening to this podcast can become and just a final wrap up again a special thanks to the team at the bush center because this episode would not have been possible without you guys. I appreciate everything. You've been supporting with route this year and look forward to many more episodes hopefully working in conjunction with you guys and with that. I will talk to you guys again on friday.

army bobby Bobby dove Bobby bobby dove afghanistan gary sinise foundation walter reed Ben coy mike growth three years maryland bush center virginia bobby dope assefa Northwest flora East of pensacola nine days gotcha group
James Farmer

The Strategerist

24:54 min | 1 year ago

James Farmer

"Southern born and bred James farmers expert, conservationists an interior designer and a bestselling author and he's saving the world. One plant at a time. We are what we eat. And we are what we during. And that that there's they're awesome things that can be done to help preserve and protect, but knowledge and that information truly truly is key. We got James on the phone to have a wide ranging conversation covering robotic vs, the beauty of native plants in life is a business owner and don't worry. He's got some gardening tips to I'm told that even I can grow mitt. I'm your host Andrew Kaufman. And this is the strategic presented by the George W Bush institute. What happens when he crossed the forty third president late night, sketch, comedy and compelling conversation. This strategic has a podcast born from the word strategically which was coined by SNL and embraced by the George W Bush administration. We highlight the American spirit of leadership and compassion through thought provoking conversations. And we're reminded that the most effective leaders are the ones who laugh. Well, I am very excited to welcome James farmer to the show James. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you Andrew for having me. So James, you're one of the featured speakers at the inaugural forum on leadership at the Bush center last year alongside people like Bondo and secretary Condoleeza Rice and Jeff Bezos. But when the dust had settled in the days after the event, the buzz around, the Bush, center offices was on gardening and conservation and James farmer. Yeah. Really must not have anything else to talk about. But I'm flattered. Thanks. Well, you had a great session, and we want to continue that conversation here today. But before we get into gardening tips. And we will get to gardening tips for all you aspiring green thumbs up there. We wanna start at a broader level. Why is it important that cities both big and small find ways to create beautiful green spaces and community gardens? Well, I don't think the size of the city really matters. But the size of the Greenspace is what really truly affects us. So you use my hometown. Which is Harry, Georgia us, Dallas, New York. No matter what a green space truly effects us. And in that sense. I always refer back to what my grandmother taught about when when she was setting table. And that was we eat with our eyes. I and so anyone who talks to me knows that this is the mantra that I live by you know, before we take that first bite. There's a visual feast. So it may be tomato sandwich. But that tomatoes started somewhere. So it's looking out and seeing some kind. Kind of of greenery that that starts that starts fees that starts the meal that starts the event. So in a city, especially where you have a lot of hard scape. It's so nice and refreshing to have a place of rejuvenation. That's green. And that could be a pot on your balcony has cement and always tell people if you can't grow pot a mint. Well, I don't know if we even have hope, but the pot of men what it is at my be Bandra. I guarantee you I can get you to grow cement. But what I love about that is this you look outside, and if you're surrounded by harder things you concrete steel glass things like that the softening aspect that that visual feasts that eating with our eyes versa. Green provides really starts working on our psyche. And a very good way. And to look at that, you know, pot of mint or could be basil or some other herb to look at that pot Amon and thing you know, what I can just look at that. Immediately blood pressure goes down. I can think of all the studies and think about hospitals. Nursing and rehabilitation places that were green really is so important in those places. So it's just as important of big city think about that sprig of met I could put it in some warranty. And I've got a delicious beverage, I could take it. And hey, it make it even more of a libation or spirited beverage. I commend julep or that pot of basil. You could take just that one leaf and put it with that tomato sandwich. And maybe you've grown that tomato too. So there's a there's a whole cascading effect of how green really affects our psyche on a small level like a like a little small pot. But think about what it does when it gets grown into a larger area like a park and how a park were a strip of wildflowers between the north and southbound lanes of interstate or maybe it's just the the preservation of of some native trees or grasses it allows our eyes to see a arrest arrests that and it starts rejuvenating. So it goes back to that we eat with our eyes. I and I've learned that from my grandmother, and I think that's applicable. For a table setting. I think it's affable for big city in a park, or or you and your backyard on the topic of preservation, we've tried to do just stat. At the Bush center, we sit next to a fifteen acre park that restores the land to a bite of looked like for the city of Dallas arrived is filled with native trees and flowers plants and grasses are you seeing more of this type of project and other cities or do we still have a long way to go before making a true large impact? We do have a long way to go into that. First question. I am seeing it, and I'm fortunate enough that with my books, and my design business, I do get to travel, and that's one of the first things that I look at a touchdown could be an almost city or may be in Roanoke, Virginia or or Santa Barbara wherever the place is that a lay on the first thing that a look for is what are they doing ear to give back to to nature to the town to the environment. And part of that is that that exciting Greenspace I love which all done at the Bush library and the Bush center. Because you get right back to that Texas Wildflower that Texas field, and what it does it sets the tone. You know, we're fortunate enough that we can bring in or concerned Hawaii or roses from, you know, south Texas, or wherever and put together amazing, flower arrangements and hotel lobby, but they're still something pretty authentic, an amazing about having something that has has been there, you know, since time began and having those wildflowers in those native granaries around really really do not only favor to the environment. But they give back that psychological effect that that a Greenspace truly has see said we still have a long way to go. Are you worried about the planet? I was just reading a story recently about a be shortages and others not enough of them to do the vital job of fallen eating plants and the source suggested that robot bees can help which to me sounds like the plot of horror movie, but it's out there as a possible solution as a man that is one with nature. Are you worried? I am worried and the worry is this. I'm going to answer your question with a question. Did you the glass to orange juice this morning or coffee? Did you have some berries with your yogurt? If you have eaten any fruit, you know, in the last twenty four hours, you can think of be, and I think the first the first key to really any problem to begin. Any solution is knowledge is that information of how do we tell people? These really do affect our daily life. You may not think about as you reported the strawberries over your cereal this morning, but those strawberries were pollinated somehow and the bees and those on insects order doing that. I think fantastic that we have technology that help us, but the original tried and true method of that pollination with the bees is incredible. So it is it's a it's a big daunting task to think about the environment and and any in any solution. How of how to fix it? I think the first and foremost thing to do is inform people to let them know. You know, what Bayes do pollinate our fruits and vegetables or two thing. You know, what it really is amazing that saving this much water or this much gasoline. Or whatever it is. If one person does it in a dozen people do it, and then a couple does that really can control. You have an amazing fact so and I'll get it all goes back to me and growing up the way way that I grew up is that we are what we eat. We are what we drink. And there's also some things that can be done to help preserve and protect, but knowledge and that information truly truly is key for the city dwellers with small yards or even no yards. He mentioned growing some men or some herbs what else can we do as individuals to make this a better planet to live on while. I always like to have something that says, welcome home. It could be two pots by your front door with with firms and them it could be a collection of a couple of containers on your balcony. It might even be that one great house plant that says welcome home because there's something about about greenery about flowers, you know, whether it's hotel lobby or the entrance to golf course reviews Ziam or wherever you go. The first thing that you see or there's landscaping is the flowers. So I love to create welcome home moments for clients. Those may be those pots the front door, maybe the fresh flowers inside. So if you don't really have a big yard. Then what I like to do is encourage people to think about inside things. Maybe it's just picking up a bunch of flowers at the farmer's market each time, and and putting them in a Mason jar or pretty vase. And maybe that's that's the one thing you do. But it creates this visual. This visual component component of beauty. The the two the two earns or pots or containers by your front door that just say, welcome home. Andrew it's something about that. And they'll remind you that watered them though, will well, they'll they'll say, welcome home until I give them too much water or not enough water, and you know, kind of fall apart from there. But remember knowledge is keys. So when you know, how to water something, and how to how to take care of it'll rewards. What plans? Do you have on your doorstep? And what are your welcome home plants? Well, right now, I have some bamboo palm that are in terra cotta pot. It's and I plan them usually around Easter weekend, and they go almost all the way to Christmas. So I really get a big bang for my buck with those their green for most of the year. And then I I take them out in a storm for the wintertime and then during the wintertime, I put something like this evergreen like a camelia or Rosemary or some kind of conifer topiary. And that's kind of my my welcome home. I definitely practice practice. What I preach. You will know what season it is. If you look at my steps, I always have something going on them to say, welcome to welcome home. Welcome to farm, Dale my home and welcomed welcome to the season. Chaim call yourself, a lazy gardener? What do you mean by that? Well, I am truly the laziest Gardner of all because there's so much that I need to do. I have mentioned maybe I'm the second laziest Gardner bond binds you, but the reason the reason I call myself lazy gardeners, this I get I get distracted as soon as I pull one. We that's a stick. That needs to be picked up as soon as I got one sick. I see something else that needs to be done. And there's. This this compound of things of other things that I need to do our iphone checkout Instagram where I think I really wanna read this blog about hummingbirds. So I don't know how lazy it is. Or how distracted that that had that I am as gardener. But I'm also one of these people that believe this this bodes well from business as well as to hire your weakness. And so I'm not really good in the full sun all day long. Guess what Lantana is succulents? Are. There are some other plants that love the full sign and will grow and do amazing. So rather than taking something that is crushed and dainty and needs down gallons of water. I plant something that will thrive and survive and do the work for me. So then people say James your land Hannah looks amazing. And I just kinda grant and think oh, thanks so much. All I did was planet and get it started. So that's the lazy gardener me. I'll have another plan. Do the work for me. And it makes me look better than I really am. And that's key for conservation to right? You would wanna put a water thirsty plant in an area without much rainfall, right? Exactly. So that that lazy gardener is kind of a fun catchphrase? However, it catches people hooks them in. And they think oh, I can be lazy gardener. Well, sure, it is gonna require some work, but you put the right things in the right place. And and over ward you how did you develop such a love for gardening? I really think it came from my grandparents on both sides. My grandfather farmer had a small nursery. And I think farmers nursery people thought well, his his name alone. He knows what to do. So that that's one one aspect that. I think I got from him. And then my mother's parents grenades. They have always instilled in me, whether it was the love of fresh flowers and fruits and vegetables for my grandmother or knowing what was in season. You know, people think okay? It's peach season. Do you know how many varieties of peaches? They are my grandmother knew it down to the week. She would so in this week. The the July prints are perfectly ripe for they'll burners or whatever it is. And my grandfather always kept a vegetable garden, so knowing that that tomato that's grown in the backyard. Hard in the deep south. What we do is. We grow flowers and vegetables, you know, in in a garden, but the yard is for all the other plants. That's that southern nominee HR, therefore, you but Greenwich would grow squash and tomatoes and okra zucchini and things like that. And and we would we would artist, and I was mesmerized as a child that I could go outside and and pick something, and then we would eat it and that combination and that that symbiosis of knowing where something started and where it came from. And how it became our food was fascinating to me. So I called the garden gene real early call. It can be more fitting with your name. I know people ask me all the time if I've made up my name to ride gardening design books, and I know it was given to me it was the the best non diploma ever bestowed. So speaking of those books, the author of seven the most recent one being a place to call home. It sounds like you're living the dream that you've been able to turn your passion into a business. How did you pull that off? Well, I was asked a very. Interesting question, very recently. And someone said did you always know this is what you wanted to do. I lifted them and without without any hesitancy. I said, yes, I knew that what I wanted to do involve design and how we live and the the lifestyle that I feel like the south has such great hallmark home. So I went to college for design, I studied at Auburn university study landscape design and our history and that led into the interior design and the gardens on business, but I've always known that. And to me, that's one of the biggest blessings and gifts that any person can can have. And that is to know exactly what they wanna do. Fortunately, for me, I found that out early on so I- spearheaded. My my ideas and knew that I could one make money by helping people with their with their homes, but also knew that I never would have to work a day in my life because my work so much fun. So that that really became a true blessing that I that really reflect on very. Right before each and every day the books have been an amazing segue because I can I can do interviews those and right for magazines, but the books really give you a great bit of street cred in the sense that that I like to practice what I preach to write about it and not shared from a platform like books, I'm still I'm still an old fashioned. So I love books to hold them to read them to turn the pages, and thankfully, other people do too and as a budding entrepreneur, what are some of the most important lessons that you learned early on one of the most important lessons, and I'm mentioned earlier. And I think it's so worth harping on is to hire your weakness injury. If you want me to tell you how to make your house beautiful, I've got that all day long. But if you want me to file your taxes, I'm the last person needs to do that. So I realized early on. If you hire weakness is gonna to your strengths to really be your strong hand. So for me, I'm great at geometry. I know I can work geometry all day long. It's design at shapes. That's how it works together. Math is not my strong suit. So by having an accountant having a businessman or having someone on my design team who was an excel spreadsheet. And then they make me cringe. You know, it really works together. So that people think how do you do all that you do have a team? And that team allows me they give me the ruse to keep me grounded. Give me the wings to allow me to fly. Well, that's a classic American success story from the south and so much of what you do in your business is identified as southern speaks of this southern lifestyle in a strong, southern identity. You've even been editor large southern living magazine. But I've yet to hear of Pacific northwest living magazine. What is it? The keeps. This southern ethos going. We've got it. You know, I think one of the big things is first off. I don't talk like this for fine know, this isn't a fake accident. It's not a fake name is James farmer. And yes, I say y'all every other word, and by the way, I do have a glass of sweet tea right here side me all that said and done is the south truly has a hallmark on entertaining. You mentioned, you know, there magazines that are that that that don't have northwest northeast or whatever it is in the in the title of their of their publication for us in the south. I think it goes back to one word, and that's unapologetic. We rarely say that we're sorry that we don't have a full set of China or silver or matching chairs or whatever it is. We just put it all together, we cut things from the yard and the garden we bring it in. And we serve it with a smile, and there's something about that unapologetic nature that gives us our hallmark. You know, we don't say, oh, I'm sorry. All I have is okra. Garden. Well, we can fry we can we can put in Dumbo. There's so many things that we can do with it. You think about it? The south has been a part of the fabric of this nation, but really is such a Milan and a mix of so many different of so many different cultures. And what I really really love to celebrate is what we do. Right. And that is food that is a faith in a family and how they're all connected. And and what we do is. We celebrate that. So if you're having a baby we're gonna bring you pound cake, if you're getting married, we're gonna bring your pound cake, if your grandmother passed away, we're gonna bring your pancake who just shows you that food really is kind of I and first and foremost on our minds, and we and we have all grown up together and been raised together. And so we have worked together in our arms and gardens, and we eat together, and we are from one another and you put us all together. And and we just have this unapologetic nature to say, you know, what y'all come on in Serbia, something good. And by the way, not everything we serve as fried. I think I think farm. Farm-to-table it it really really has a huge place here in the south that mix. It's just that that amazing hybrid of of wearing your Sunday best to football game or eating your Cheerios with a silver four or soon silver spoon is that amazing mix and juxtaposition at the south the south holes. And we rather than say, I I'm sorry that ain't my with my grandmother, silver spoon. We just do. It. Don't apologize for it and keep going so now a little bit of a different track. What is something that no one asks you that you wish they would. I wish people would ask me about proper pruning. I know that sounds silly. But so many garden and landscape questions could be answered with proper pruning. I ride a chapter in my book, a time to plant about about knowing when to prune, and and how to prune different things. But to me plans, they are a lot like people because each plant has has a distinct personality. So if you take a plant that does not like to be pruned, and you are. Constantly chopping it into into a poodle. Well that plant is gonna make you look like a terrible person because the plant's not going to thrive. It's just like a person who does not like to go to the beach because maybe their fair skinned and don't let the sun, but you drag them out to the beach all the time. There's a good chance that they might not be your friend for long plans to that same way with knowing the the knowledge of how to prune and take care and catered to plant to his needs that goes back to being lazy gardener knowing what to do and allow it to do its job and the right place really makes you better. So to me, pruning, is one of my favorite things. I love whether talk about that people rarely ask they always talk about water. They about sunlight, well, I think you know, it all goes back in August back to pruning, really for me. Okay. And now a correlated question. What are we not talking about that we should be talking about to me the lack of of knowledge and information, and or excuse me mammy, but the the lack of absorbing that that knowledge. And information. That's what people aren't talking about. People talk about problems all the time. Rarely do. I hear people talking about solutions. Now injury apply that across the board. You can apply that to all sorts of bigger topics that that we don't we don't have time to fix today. But we can we can talk about gardening now. But whether it's the design project or or a garden project are are my business is tasked with solving problems. All the time our clients asked us questions, but they're they're they're not realizing that information is there to be absorbed right there, whether it's water or pruning or sunlight, you know. Sometimes rather than thinking, you know, what I'm going to give this a read or give this a try. It's not taking some sweat equity into our own projects rolling up our sleeves or in this case, really literally running the sleeves and getting dirty. Sometimes that's the way to actually best. Learn to be hands on to read it. And then apply what you've learned. So I think the absorption of information and knowing when to plan when to. Plant with with cooking knowing how to insert this into bowling water. How to season or flavor? I think that that's a big a big part of it. And don't and don't be afraid. Just try have have a good time with it. And try but absorb some of that amazing information that's out there and rather than harping on the problems. Let's let's talk about solutions. And I think this is an exciting way to share some of them. Absolutely. So at the top I promised some hands on gardening tips. Let's let's not make liar out of me. What are some what are some things that anyone can do to make a difference in their garden life? I think growing some herbs right off the right off the bat. You know, it can be a little bit of salon tro that you can grow in a small pot in this amazing was launcher in due to taco Tuesday couldn't talk as a home throw some fresh lunchroom there, by the way, you just pay four dollars or five dollars for that. Just launcher the grocery store. It would cost you force. Yeah. To grow, you know. So there's a little bit of fun economic playing. Think about there. But plant some herbs you take takes Rosemary, it grows it so hardy takes Rosemary mix with foam Hepburn, your potatoes, roast them at four twenty five or twenty minutes and founding is absolutely delicious. So gross something just try it. And just watch how it can really really change the way you live. And especially the way you we herbs are are really one those incredible ways to do that, my my grandmother always go back to her. And and what she said about we eat with our eyes. I so setting a pretty table. They may just be some some cut some cut flowers that you bought at the farmer's market or you grow yourself. But Mamie, my grandmother also taught me that we feed people body and soul when they're at our table. So when you cook for someone you're serving them, and you're allowed you're lowering yourself to serve them. Maybe in a way that feeds more than just something to their bellies sticks. Their ribs a little bit more. So we feed people body and soul and to remember that in our lives when we're entertaining. Or taking someone out to eat. Or maybe it's just, you know, looking cross all of us and say, hey, come eat lunch with me. And you you ask those questions, and you get you get those stories. That's what I love about about. Cooking and gardening because the ask a southerner in particular about about cooking about gardening. I get a story. And that's what's so exciting to me. So what's what's absorb them formation? That's out there, and and ask ask questions to engage conversations and don't be afraid to try a little pot of herbs. I guarantee you can it can change the way you live the way you eat. And and it's so exciting and rewarding to to grow something in and bring it inside. And let it be a part of your your stuff. Well, I know that I'm going to go home and see what kind of plan is going to work best on my doorstep. And I hope that folks listening. We'll take it to heart and give some of these things at try in their own home. James? Thank you so much for being with us today. Thank you injuring ago. When James this latest book, a place to call home is available now, and you can learn more about him and everything he's working on. At WWW dot James, farmer dot com. You can also get more tips from him on Instagram at James t farmer. If you enjoy today's episode would like to help us spread the word about the strategic to please give us a five star review until your friends to subscribe for available on apple podcasts Spotify and all the major listening apps if you're tuning in on a smartphone tapper swipe over the cover art. You'll find episode notes with helpful information and details he may have missed the strategic was produced, but you Anna Pappas at the George W Bush institute in Dallas, Texas. Thank you for listening.

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After Hours: The Duties of Citizens

The Strategerist

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

After Hours: The Duties of Citizens

"The spire by conversations from the first two seasons of the strategic the strategic after hours brings together Bush institute UH experts to discuss. Today's hot topics in this episode around table takes a look at the responsibilities. We hold as American citizens and our role as individuals and making checking our union. A stronger one. We'll also get a few tips from a former diplomat and find out what we can learn from Michael Scott on the office. I'm Andrew Kaufman and this strategic not dress presented by the George W Bush Institute. What happens when he crossed the forty third president late night? Sketch comedy and compelling conversation. This strategic has a podcast born from the word strategic which was planned by us the now and embraced by the George W Bush administration we highlight the Americans feared of leadership and compassion through thought provoking conversations. We're reminded that the most effective leaders are the ones who laughed. Welcome to another episode of the strategic after hours. Where are we take topics that have come up on the show and bounce them around these fine minds at the Bush Center our panel today first off? We have Hannah Abney the VP of external affairs. whose voice you're gonNA recognize recognize from our interview with President Bush? Hannah thanks for coming back. Thanks for having me again. And we also have Matt Ryan eat the Director of the Bush Institute. SMU Economic Growth Initiative Mad. It's been a while L. But we're glad you came back to honor. Thank you and we have making her debut on the strategic just Rhonda Houston. WHO's chief of staff to percenters CEO? Ken Hirsch Ronda. Thank you so much for being here. It's an honor. Thanks for the invitation it. Finally we have podcast veteran. Lindsey Lloyd the Bradford M Freeman Director of the Human Freedom Initiative at at the Bush Center making his debut on the strategic as. Well Lindsey. Thanks for doing this. Glad to be here. Thank you so. On the first episode of the strategic our guest was Carly Fiorina at the end of the interview. We asked her one of our usual questions. What are we as a nation not talking about that we should be talking about and her answer? We thought was kind of interesting. And she said said that the role empower that each of US citizens have. We're not talking enough about and so we wanted to follow up on that today and take a deep dive into that question so I wanted wanted to start by going around the horn and just hearing from each of you. What does it mean to be a good citizen of the United States? Hannah what do you think well so i. I was doing a little research before this giving. You're always prepared. Well you know these are some smart people. I'm at the table and I wanted. I just looked up pew. We did a poll recently. The talked about actually this very topic. which was the question they asked was what makes a good citizen and the response they got? I'll give you the top three voting in elections paying hang on taxes. Yo and always following the law. It went down serving on jury duty respecting the opinions of those who disagree participate participating in the census volunteering. But I thought it was interesting and maybe this is the softer side of me. Coming out with three little boys who I see growing up in an increasingly divisive community Well not community. I think the community there is pretty great but a defensive world how far down on that list was has listening to people dislike just respecting them even if the avid disagreement helping others following. What's going on in our world? I mean obviously voting in elections is really important. I think more people should do it paying the taxes you. Oh you should probably do that and yes you should absolutely follow the law but I think one of the things that is increasingly obvious to me is unless we start respecting each other more and being willing to have sometimes is uncomfortable but really important conversations. I just don't think we're going to be able to Get past some of the divisiveness and some of the just just meanness. It's occurring in our society and I think I think that's what's important in being a good citizen. No no nothing against paying paying your taxes or serving on jury duty which I think is very important. It's almost like a hierarchy of needs like you have a you have to pay taxes and don't murder people at the base ace but then you keep going up and these other things are just as important guy. I think sometimes people think it's cool to be snarky and tough and divisive even louder being right and being loud instead of being a little bit softer and now your perspective. You came from a State Department background. He spent a lot out of years overseas as an American living in another country. What's what are your thoughts on on? This tend to start by saying that contrary to carry Carly Fiorina arena with respect to her. I would actually argue that. We're talking a lot about citizenship to quote Mark Twain. Everybody's talking about it but nobody's doing anything about it Martinez said that about the weather and so Hanna says I see US talking a lot of people talking about what they are entitled. Oh to as a citizen or what their what their rights are as a citizen. But I don't see enough people talking about what their obligations are as a citizen. And you know this talk of you've absolute right to do. Something is actually kind of not a democratic sentiment because there are no absolute rights and democracy all rights come with obligations nations. And and we're not really talking enough about that in my view and that kind of goes back to Hannah's point about about the need to be respectful of others which which flows from the thought that. I don't have any unrestricted rights. I have only rights that are embedded obligations to others. And I don't get to exercise the rights until I discharged the obligations nations But we're kind of skipping that step in my view in our society these days are there specific obligations they feel like a really particularly being ignored well the obligation to be respectful of others is certainly being ignored it. You know I'm tempted to say that it has to do with our car culture because you know if you're up if you're in a European city and you're walking down the street you're not gonNA shoot the bird at somebody's only two feet away from you right but if you're in your car safely distance safe distance from another driver evernote drivers something does something the offensive you shoot them the bird and then and then that translates itself into social media where you can say anything because you know you're never going to have to face to face confront the person that you're insulting or or trashing or calling out. And so that that sense of an unrestricted restricted. Right to say whatever I want without having to face the consequences sequential the reaction of the person across the table from me and the feelings that mice speech whatever. It is in insights in that person that there I think is creating the kind of coarseness in the culture that Hannah commented on Interesting Rhonda. How does that strike you? So you know I think we focus Salat on big picture and globally and I think a lot of times we don't think about it as far as our own intimate. Ah Free and our own intimate community is concerned and I think if we thought about being a citizen in our families in Ah what that means in your family what that means in your your close friend network. I think we think a lot differently about it because I agree with Hannah and Matt that sometimes when you have that distance between you when you're on social media or you're in your car you're not. You don't think that that you're going to have that contact close contact with people and so if you know that you're GonNa have an intimate conversation with your friend or your family you are less likely to be as divisive As you are when you when you don't think you'll ever have contact you'll ever see those individuals and and so We just have to get to the point where we think about our world in our extended community more as a family family of citizens that we are related to because we are all citizens of this great country in his great world so it sounds like we're ready. We're all ready to blame social media for the fall of modern civilization. But I'm here. We never have any more podcasts. Never Never Lindsey. What data? Where do you land on this? Well you know it struck me opened by talking about pulling data and we at the Bush Center did some polling of our own last year with the partners From from the Penn Biden Center and Freedom House kind of looking at the health of American democracy and there was a lot of a lot of reasons for concern there but there was also a surprising amount. I think Of of of reason for optimism. we you know we know that People are dissatisfied with our system is working. They feel that our democracies and delivering on even the most basic things fixing potholes and the streets. Were you know kind of very local issues that touch people but the flip side of that is we have seen scene upticks in voting participation As toxic as social media can be. We have an explosion of people who are making their opinions known for better for worse in ways that they couldn't do ten years ago so the You know young people participation which we hear about all the time in the twenty fourteen Midterm elections it was about twenty one percent very low in the two thousand sixteen Twenty eighteen that went up to thirty one percent so on one hand. That's it's basically a fifty percent increase in people who are going to the polls on the other hand. It still means that two out of three young people didn't feel it was worth their time to go out and cast ballots. So there's a lot of work to be done but I think that in part because this is so divisive that more people are engaging maybe not always the the best ways maybe not always the most positive ways but they're we have seen an uptick in all kinds of different involvement in people volunteering and people speaking out in and hand in voting. So this is interesting you were saying Matt was saying that people aren't necessarily meeting their obligations toward democracy. And you're saying that some of the polling data was saying that people feel like democracy isn't meeting their basic needs like wh who who come which comes first. Yeah I mean I think they're both right at the same time. I made the but this notion that that our democracy somehow is is no longer able to deliver on the way On the things that Americans need compared to you know ten years ago go twenty years ago whatever the figure it. Is You know if you look at a lot of the big issues out there. That have just been Stalemated in in Washington for years like immigration reform which everybody agrees needs to happen but it can't happen because we were in our respective camps and we can't seem to compromise anymore so democracy is not delivering on things that people genuinely care about gun control would be another one. Nobody has a perfect solution of this but but everybody wants to see things change so we don't have these weekly mass shootings around the country. I think it's so interesting to When I was looking at this other poll I also saw something on Pugh for a year ago? I think that talked about the difference between the Post Small Neil inject an millennial generation and I to be totally honest. Get a little bit tired of the whole conversation around. Like what are the young people think versus. What are the older people? Think I. I think it's a little bit overblown scratch that question for me but it reminded me there was also an interesting article in politico yesterday. I think it was politico. That talked about how much older our society is in terms of the age of our government and the age of those who represent us and I wonder a little bit about what the future's going to look like because when you look at things like Questions on whether or not increasing creasing ethnic and racial diversity is good for society the gap between what Gen Z.. And millennials think sixty two percent. Think it's good for for society. I wonder a that seems low to me. Actually but only forty two percent of the silent generation forty eight percent of boomers said that increasing greasing ethnic or racial diversity was good for society. Think about it that way you can think about the difference between how men and women answer questions about whether there are enough women in top political positions executive business positions and we're just on totally different sides of the field on this. Yes I feel like I wonder how that comes together. You know sort of as this younger group of people grows up and starts to Take on more responsibility and places of work and hopefully in places of our government I wonder how some of these issues will be Sort of shaken loose. Or if they'll be take unless you know I feel like when the when the history of this period is written we will observe that we today are facing using kind of like tectonic shifts in the society and the economy. The way our politics works and and we haven't yet articulated. Would it to ourselves. What plates are moving in what direction they're going and things like demographics? I mean there is. There is a fundamental reality and the demographics demographics graphics of this country that the native born population is stabilizing and headed for decline. And at the end of the day to have a growing economy a thriving economy. You've got to have a growing society and if you don't have a growing society you can't have a growing economy and we haven't really internalized that we hadn't really explained to ourselves. We have articulated to ourselves with the challenge is in a meaningful way and in a way that lets us come up with an agreed solution. And so we're fighting over Trivia and we're fighting on the fringes of issues like like demographics like the incredible repetitive technological change which is gathering pace even as our ability to deal with the consequences appears to be declining and and we have a government structure. That's inhabited by people like me who who came up at a time when those things weren't true yet and it's difficult for us to internalize what it means you know. It's a pretty fundamental challenge. Where are you going to get more people? You gotta get them from somewhere. They don't come from nowhere and the kind of iron rule of demographics is that you know people who are going going to be forty twenty years from now or twenty today. You can't manufacturer anymore and so And we're just not. We just lack the leadership defined as a leader but also in the society as a whole to understand those challenges and and kind of articulate them in a way that lets us come up with a solution or at the moment. We're just kind of spinning our wheels as we as we wait for that Emerge yeah it's like we're camped out and our little tribes kind of afraid to talk about things that might be uncomfortable or harder might make us actually compromise with each other. But also to Hannah's point we can't we can't put technology analogy in internet and all the advancements that were making back in the box however we are it also contributes to what separates racist because we listen to people who speak our same language. we only watch what we people who agree agree and who co-signed on those things that we see and believe so. How do we get past? You know how. How do we introduce to someone who can choose? You know so easily what they see in what they hear and introduce other ideas and other thought into into their sphere which brings us to the point of. Whose job is it to to make a good citizen? Isn't the government's job to make this happen. Is it a family's job. Is that really fall entirely on An adult individual like where. Whose responsibility does this fall on? Yes A- all of the above and then some I mean I think you know there's been a lot of criticism awesome. That schools aren't teaching civics. Well enough. That schools aren't teaching citizenship. Well enough and that it's probably true you know that piece of the curriculum has been displaced for more attention mentioned science or more attention to math and things like that but it it it starts in the home it starts with civic groups it starts with businesses with with politicians. You you know if if our politicians we're doing a better job more people fewer people would be turned off by politics. You know the the ugliness that we see in Washington state government MM makes a lot of people. Just WanNA WANNA run away from it so we could be doing a better job there. Too with our elected officials and appointed officials Doing a better job. But it's it's really I think. Think all the above have to be doing more ultimately. It seems to me that if you look at kind of the philosophical roots of our democracy and the and the enlightenment ideas that flowed into the declaration of Independence and the Constitution our society is basically built on the premise. That the individual is the fundamental building block of the society and and and so the individual ultimately we all as individual voters are responsible for these things and and when we let ourselves get sucked in by. It's it's unbelievable to me that anybody could have been taken in by the whole pizza gate thing right but there. They are apparently responsible individuals who probably pay most of their taxes. This is and generally follow the law the rest of the time and they buy into this and so ultimately you as an individual you have to you have to police yourself. There's the way our system is set up if the individual police himself than than we're in deep trouble on that almost seems like it should it needs to come from a place of compassion should have said if the individual can't police theirself while the grammar police just police myself. Yeah you did. You gave yourself at grammar citation saw. This spent Germany so so is that something that we're we're missing is the compassionate element missing because social media is it seems like it all comes back to putting yourselves and the feet of in the shoes of the person next to you like why are we falling short. I feel like I feel like we are the first really Mass Society Eddie like we were the first mass industrial society. The first society that was not essentially tribal and and and therefore we are the forerunner and try to answer that question. How do you reconcile the fact that you're just one individual in a society of three hundred and fifty million people in in which you You're surrounded by people who think very differently from you and in some cases you don't necessarily recognize as your peers and you have to find a way to deal with them and you know most other societies on this earth are basically tribal in the sense that most everybody feels some central form of kinship with the people around him. And we're the only we're the first society kind of challenge that norm and so. I think there's no obvious answer to the question. And it's it's and there's no foreordained outcome to the problem either either. I mean it could easily come cropper. We asked the question we posed the question is what does it take. What does it mean to be a good citizen of the? US is how much how. How important is it to be a citizen of the concede yourself citizen of the world versus seeing yourself as citizens the US is we start looking at trying to find ways to work closer Mr Together? I think we have a pretty strong point at the Bush Center on what that means also wonder a little bit feels to me. I think to a lot of people most people probably that sometimes this is cynical right like we go through these periods of Isolation and insulation in our country in our world And then it doesn't happen again for kind of a long time and I think maybe a lot of our society there wasn't around or doesn't remember the consequences of of that perspective. I think that also goes back to what Lisi was saying. Your question about who's responsible bull. We don't learn it in school anymore. You know we don't teach our history and so the old saying if you don't know your history are destined to repeat read it and that's that's kind of what we're doing I think. Also do you ever feel like we're afraid to have conversations whether we're in the viciousness is going to create the situation. I remember I had a friend who mentioned to me that her children didn't see color. She hurt because at the same. Mitch's Mine I'm in her nine year old doesn't see color and I kind of took that home and thought about it and I came back to work actually the next day and I think Rhonda you and I had this conversation about about. It didn't sit well with me that comment because I thought I would never say that like when you actually just had this conversation with someone to when you in my opinion when you don't see color you don't see a big part of what makes someone who they are and all of what goes into you know them as a person as an individual as a human being right because there are you know their their their ancestors and the things that their ancestors went through mid something and has a lasting effect. And so if you don't see color then you you almost don't see a big piece of. What makes them them? I adore my friend. I think what her comment. What sat with me that evening? Evening is how what a privilege that must step is in you know. I'm a white girl from suburban Wisconsin. Like what a privilege it is. I guess for the for it. It is privileged with the definition of privileged. I guys for us. People say things like we don't see color because it's not an issue that we've experienced and deadly in and you know I would would. I don't think that you can't not see it. Yeah you can't see it and you know I think it makes people feel better to say that they don't see it But how can you not well. Aren't we all richer if we do see an we talk about it and we understand the different parts of our that. Make our society so rich so we we've identified several things as we've as we've used up about twenty minutes now probably we've identified a lot the things that we've really noticed that are playing a big role in where we're at. Let's talk about some solutions. Like what are what are some things that someone listening right now can go outside and do other than I think. We all agreed maybe little less time on social media may just look just a little. Don't get off entirely just a little bit. Just stop being trawl Lindsay. What do you think what are some actions that we can actually take and do instead of just ruminate? I mean if you start with voting you know making it easier not harder to vote in this country. We go a long way towards improving things. We've got kind of a trend that's happening here in Texas happening other other places around the US where where there are active campaigns to make it harder to vote cutting cutting the days of early voting making More documents required to vote and so forth in the name of combating voter fraud. which by All you know all reasonable evidence doesn't exist in any sort of. Oh you know at any sort of phenomenon that would be cause for concern so you know looking at ways to make it easier to vote here in Dallas County. They're going to In the next general election the ideas that you can go to any polling place in the county and vote the The voting machines are the same. You don't have to go to the one by your home if it's closer to go one by your office or near Your Kid's school. Whatever you can do it? That's a that's a good step. That means that it's you know marginally easier for busy overworked people to make their way to the polls so I I would start there. How can we make it easier for more? Americans get engaged and this comes from the perspective of you spend a lot of time looking at North Korea and Burma and places whose democracy is really. Just just fledgling what are non existent. I'm sorry Burma fledgling North Korea wet. What should we learn from which we learn from watching these retainers are? Are we taking what we have for granted. What can we learn from this? No I think I think a lot of Americans do take it for granted. I mean you know. Even though there has been a modest uptick in voter participation over the last several elections a lot of Americans. Just choose to sit it out. Particularly younger Americans particularly on White Americans so for a lot of people they you know it gets back to what talking before about democracy delivering. They don't believe that their vote for specific candidates or a ballot proposition will make a difference and I think we need to be thinking talking about how do we how do we change that mindset to make people understand your I had before I came to. The Bush had the great privilege of working for Democracy Organization overseas overseas and got to observe elections in in about I think it was fifteen countries around the world and to see people who don't take get for granted who will you know stand in long lines and Hot Sun to cast to cast a ballot. Because they believe it's it's it's important and they fought for that right and they've waited years for that that right. That's an experience which I would love to be able to share with more people in this country to make them understand that this you know this process that we take for granted in all all the noise of politics is actually something that people around the world are still creating an and we. We are so blessed to be able to cast a vote. That was a good point. I'm the first one to to say I've got away for ten minutes. I'll do later. I can't I can't wait for ten minutes to do this. And donuts weren't fresh that they provided it's ridiculous dickey's but you get you take things for granted you know if you wait an hour for table at your favorite restaurant you should be true. That's very true and also. Where are you voting? Where the right near what was? I can't remember the name the school but it was a school. They had two boxes. Fox's donuts it was great just to buy podcast. I'd better not named the address. That's certainly not be legal actually no But to give it to you after you have to after you come out then we'll give it to on the way in we'll have noticed. They had donuts and not roles. This is true. You know that's true. Yeah what if it's a their dietary restrictions on some people not everybody could have something to eat and then think about gluten free there were not conclude free options as I recall it was options were sprinkled not sprinkled. So when you you're a big big you are a big proponent of being really involved locally to and I think as all the talk nationally and everything on twitter and you turn on the TV. It's all about what's happening at the national level. What's happening happening? In Congress what's happening in the Oval Office but what about locally with schools and what how do we get more people involved there. Yeah that's a good question. Well I mean I think when you're a parent and you're in a school all the time. It's a little easier than when either you don't have kids who are in the school system or your your past at that time. I think you have to also to be realistic about. Not Everybody's GonNa care about all the issues and we can't expect everybody to always be at all the things so I you guys know that I'm kind of like a hippy. dippy Yogi in a lot of ways though Hannah's currently wearing four different crystals bad Mojo. Oh Gosh Anyway. I follow a woman on instagram. Named Glennon Doyle. I don't know if any of you have heard of her. She's an author. She is an advocate. She's married to Abby Wambach of soccer fame but she I'm going to paraphrase and she was so much more eloquent when she says but she's she says a lot about making room at the table for the person person who is the most different than you or disenfranchised. Because you never know when you're going to need that person and I I think when you see when I just said it when she says it does not sound self serving at all I just just set it completely self serving but I think that is so critical and I think that happens most often in our communities making room. I'm at the table for people whose experiences are different than yours. I feel like we are at our best as a nation when we are coming when we come together and when we appreciate our differences and learn from each other and I think that's something that I know everyone who my kids go to school with all the moms and all the teachers were constantly And the DAD's of course we're constantly working on with our kids. It would be good for us to remember at every now and again. I caught myself in that in that group so so I was gonna say the exact same thing. I'm sitting here right. My notes is everyone is talking and seeking out people who are different from you to include in your friend circle. I mean you. A lot of us are fortunate to work in a diverse environment. However when we go home we go home to a very homogeneous environment and so when you include people who are not like you when you get to know people rather who have different experiences France's then you see those when you see things that happen on television or when you see things come across social media you you can attach it to someone who's real and it's not an abstract abstract person year or so ago? We had a conversation sation here at the Bush Center. We had a staff conversation actually was two years ago when the shootings police shootings in Dallas happened and in that conversation are relate eight something that happened to me personally and afterwards someone came up to me and say wow. I cannot believe that happened to you you know. I'm outraged at that happened to you which was appreciate it but you ought to be outraged. That happens to anyone not just to someone that you know but when you know someone you have a different effect and it and it becomes more personal and so if we seek out people who are different than than have different experiences and actually get to know them then some of the some of the myths and the stereotypes are broken just because of that interaction you know keeping with the individual individual theme in my thought that we are for better or worse society of individuals. It's too it seems to me. I have like a couple of rules of thumb for living. One of them is never eat or drink anything at a cocktail party. Well a diplomat for many years and and the basic reason is that first of all the alcohol Louis they'll loosen their tongues not yours and secondly the food's better for you all by definition hoping you were gonna say someone who would like poison spiced intrigue. Yeah but I was not worth the effort. But so a couple of rules of thumb and one is in your social media in your comportment Portman when you're driving down the street and you're important when you're walking down the street any any one of these kind of mediated interaction with other people never complete yourself in a way that you wouldn't if you're confronting that person face to face if you wouldn't tell a joke or make a comment or make a gesture or say a word to a person who's sitting right next to you then you shouldn't do so in social media seems pretty seems like a lot of the clutter on social media would go away if everybody did that and the other thing I think in terms of our Arolla voters and participants in the political process is to me the moment a political leader starts to characterize is his or her opponent's position. Oh they're going to do this if they get elected he wants to do this or she wants that. The instant those words start to come out of their mouths you should tune them route because whatever they're saying is tendentious and it's not going to help you understand the other person's point of view and it doesn't say anything at all about the person who's speaking. He's pointed therefore it's wasted time. And if you actually listen to most political speeches these days and edit out those parts. They're pretty short. There's not much left interesting. That's a good point it is. Are there any other diplomat tips. We should know about dip tips tips. We do a whole podcasts. On just dip kind of intrigued by that. Yeah so one is commonly said not just diplomacy is before you criticize a person you you should walk a mile in their shoes because that way when you criticize them you're a mile away and you have their shoots thing might mean we're out of content. We started this episode by tackling. What Carly Fiorina suggested? We weren't talking enough about as a nation so now y'all have to play forward and answer the question. What are we not talking about that? We should be talking about Rhonda kicks off at its. It's always hard to go. I Hate I'll I'll Divan Dan. I don't think we talked enough about The role of faith and the role that faith plays in our lives as individuals in our community In our country. And I think if we you know we're we take faith out a lot. But I think if we start to put faith safe in whatever an individual's faith is if we start to put faith back into our daily lives that we would some of the challenges that we face We went face them a little bit less. Let's see what do you think I would say that we as a society have been have become very the Wary of talking about what we believe. In as Americans that the principles that that guided the formation of this country in which we have sometimes lived up to better than other times but the notion that America can be a force for good in the world that we can talk about democracy even though ours is very flaw in very imperfect the notion that we can go out and talk about human rights even though we have many issues here that we haven't fully dealt with just. I think reminding us as a society eighty that we can be a voice for good we can be a force for positive change and sometimes I think we're we're ashamed to do it or afraid to do that. And I wish we did more orbiting a country impressed that we've asked this question many times. These new we haven't heard either one of those answers so far yet and we didn't tell you we're GONNA ask him and see to that off the cuff no pressure hand and Matt who wants to go who wants to go first to really a joke kind of riffing off the last after after after dark after our hours is it after in. which was I think you guys talked about lost? The television show lost which I've never seen I feel passionately about okay. I'd have never seen. Here's what I feel passionately about when it comes to television. What are we going to watch now? That net flicks six is no longer showing the office. Oh man so there's that but before season of this is about to start. Yes tweet a your answers to at the Bush Center because we need suggestions some tips yeah net flicks keeps email by like for sure dot org but my real and I guess it's actually it kind of goes together. My real one is about uncomfortable situations and uncomfortable conversations which occur frequently on the office but I think also shows about totally but I can also occur in our in our own lives and this is something that I'm I've challenged myself to do you and I'm like kind of succeeding not really is stick to what makes you uncomfortable and lesson without judgment and let the perspectives of other people's no matter how uncomfortable it is Inform my own. Opinions doesn't mean necessarily that I'm going to it doesn't mean I'm GonNa Change my values values. It doesn't mean I'm going to change what is matters to me But hopefully if I can stick to something matter how uncomfortable it makes me listen and without judgment trying to clear the judgement from my mind. People are talking which I think is hard which I know is hard And allowing those ideas to inform form I own perspective I know that that will make me a better citizen and probably a better human and we talked a little bit about respect earlier And I think when you listen genuinely to someone else's perspective and opinion you respect you have a little bit more respect for them and that opposite Pierre absolutely other words. Don't do Michael Scott would do in any given situation. DD W S. It's GonNa make for a log bracelet. So here's a diplomatic I think we talked too much about wealth and not enough about well. Being in this country and it distorts our personal lives because we consume ourselves in an ultimately self-defeating effort to accumulate more stuff than then the people around us and it also. I think there's distorts our policies and our in our national debate because we make policy away designed to maximize wealth and and ultimately discounts wellbeing. And I think that's really unfortunate four on fresh answers guys. Thank y'all so much for doing this thing. This was fun. And what do you think we only ever. We're here about you as the host. I want to know what your perspective is. I was not expecting that. I'm not ready for that. So here's here's what I'm Gonna I'm GonNa have my script coho uncomfortable conversation here. We go. Your parents are both immigrants to the country. That is true came from Peru. Your Dad came from Hungary. And I know we've had a lot of conversations about that how that informed your childhood but like what to this moment informs my daily life. Almost all comes comes back to that in a lot of ways. So what do you think with their voices in your head. As to people who came here in search check in a better life literally fleeing oppression and a lot of ways. But do you think I think we we take a lot of things for granted. I think we we need to always. I think we don't talk enough about is that is how many opportunities are available to us here in that the if you really work hard at your education and work hard bettering yourself. There are so many opportunities and there's still that having been said it's not a perfect place. There are people that work hard and aren't able to capitalize on everything. The country has to offer for a no fault of their own. And I think it's important that we acknowledge that we can make that we can say America is a great place and we really want to make America and even better place. I think you don't have to say America is terrible needs. Is All this work and you know. Let's say that America's perfect if you disagree with anything happening here you need to leave. There's a middle ground. which is that? It's great and we're aiming for better and I think that's it's the country that my parents came to the place that they know is great and that they wanted to personally try and make better Not just through them but just as you know thinking thinking not even terms themselves been what a future family would look like what opportunities their kids can have. I've been very blessed to have wonderful opportunities. Because of the sacrifices they made as imigrants fifty sixty years ago and I'm I'm incredibly grateful for that. Thanks for asking that I appreciate it possibly had better conclusion. Okay so I guess we'll and their thanks. Thank you if you enjoyed today's episode and would like to help us spread the word about the strategic to please give a five star review until your friends to subscribe for available on Apple Podcasts spotify and all the major listening APPs if you're tuning in on a smartphone smartphone tap or swipe over the cover art you'll find episode notes with Helpful Information and details. You may have missed. The strategic was produced by U. N.. Pappas at the George W Bush Institute in in Dallas Texas. Thank you for listening.

Hannah Abney Bush Center Carly Fiorina US Matt Ryan Rhonda Houston America politico President Bush Bush Institute George W Bush Institute Michael Scott SMU Texas George W Bush administration Andrew Kaufman Lindsey Lloyd Dallas Ken Hirsch Ronda
Bob Chapman - People-First Businesses

The Strategerist

29:16 min | 4 months ago

Bob Chapman - People-First Businesses

"Many of us spend a majority of our waking hours at work. That's time with coworkers, employers, customers and time that's often filled with stress that bleeds over indoor home lives Bob Chapman CEO, of Barry. Way Miller, which employs twelve thousand people ardently believes that business leaders do themselves a disservice when they don't put employees I, and yes, that does mean forgoing the old adage that the customer is number one. I went from seen people as a function. WHO WORKED FOR ME? To see somebody WHO's everybody's precious out. If tomorrow everybody walks in. To their span of care, the people there and sees them as somebody's precious child, and treats them with the same standard of care they would want their own son or daughter treated like and are the leader. They would want their kids to have. The world could be dramatically different place. We'll discuss. Workplace leadership has learned skill, and how your treatment of work can affect your health, maybe as much as your family doctor does I major Kaufman. And this is the strategic presented by the George Bush Presidential Center. It's episode of the strategic was recorded earlier this year in person at the Bush Center. Joining us today on the strategic is Bob Chapman CEO Global capital equipment firm Berry Way Miller named a top twenty five most audacious company for putting its employees I and he's also. The author of everybody matters the extraordinary power of caring for your. Family. We're with an. Audacious, company I wanted to make sure I got that word right Bob. Thank you so much spending few minutes. Pleasure to be here and our coast today is Lindsay Kanoute's in who is the director of our leadership programs at the Bush Institute Lindsey. Thanks for doing this. Thank you Andrew so happy to be here with Bob, so Lindsey heads up our leadership programs at the Bush Center which includes their presidential leadership scholars program, but dives into how to solve big problems by working. Working across our differences and our liberty and leadership program for young leaders in countries, transition to democracy. We have a we lead program for women in the Middle East North Africa Afghanistan understand to veteran leadership program works to support the men and women of our armed forces that are coming back to civilian life and Bob. Year. Mission really is in workplace leadership, which is where so many of us spend the majority of of our waking hours. So how did that become your mission? I started off. With a very traditional business education entered the business world with that foundation went into public accounting, then eventually got into our family business to try and give it a future. And took the tools of the education experience I hadn't tried to apply them. which is very traditional business layoffs downsizing cost cutting prophet, you know the language businesses very much a monetary language, and so I was able to deploy those skills and try to reshape a company that had a tough history, but trying to create a better future for it so. That's how I kinda. You know so I probably the first twenty years of my career. was in. Traditional call, Management and again as you'll learn I think the word management is horrible. It I define the word management, meaning the manipulation of others for your success. That does not sound great and leadership is stewardship of the lives that you have the privilege of leading so dramatic contrast from a nippy relation. To Stewardship to to genuinely caring for the people, the privilege of leadership, so it's been A. it was a big transition for me especially for an accountant. Who you would not think it was possible, but you don't look like an account I know the greatest compliment somebody every game is. I can't believe you're an accountant. All the counts out there listening. It's nothing personal. And so, when so let's go back in time you your your your story. Kind of starts is as I. Understand it when you took over your father's business, which today's at three billion dollar business? But at the time was was not. Where did that that familial story? Play into this and what? What Genesis, well. I was thirty years old I'd been in the company, and my dad had invited me to join the company very broken hundred year old company that he'd bought into in the nineteen fifties and invited man, and my title was somebody he could trust so I began my career kind of a kind of a broken company by professional care ban public accounting. And? I worked around my dad I. Mean The beauty is my title was somebody you can trust? So I had a lot of freedom to work in various parts of the company and learning so when he suddenly died in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy five. When I was thirty, it was an eighteen million dollar company had rarely ever made. Its financial plan was probably a little too heavily in debt. And my dad died in the first person I met was our banker who pulled our loans, so my journey began with a pretty traumatic shock of the loss of my dad and our financial of. Integrity, the banks were providing so I always say from my worst challenges came my greatest experiences, and so kind of experience in my dad, suddenly dying, and then having the shock of the banks pulling our. Caused me to rise to a level of competence. I didn't the Guy I got intense about shaping the company, so it had a future. So my dad died three months into our financial year the first nine months that Iran at twelve months company had the strongest here in its history. Payback our debt. and. I began to build from there. So that's kind of how I got in the game very much. Deploy traditional things cutting costs. Trying to value pricing, you know a lot of traditional things, but it was not on the human side. It was kind of on the the brute force strategy. Execution side, so it was. That was a good experience for me because it was you know you live day to day and not knowing how you're GonNa, pay your bills. You learn a lot. and I had a chance to learn a great deal of the very young age. Make a lot of mistakes have to pay for that which led me to through those learnings to shape a business. We had today so I mean probably. Again. My. Dad died and seventy five we drew. We grew from eighteen to seventy, two, seventy, two and four years. We were the talk of Saint Louis where the talk of our industry everything I touched seemed to turn to gold. And then in nineteen eighty-two everything that looked like gold turn to a different color, and all of a sudden all these new initiatives for different reasons had experiences, and and then in nineteen eighty, the fall of eighty three. The banks pulled on again this time my fault. Suddenly and I live nine months our our on cash one while breath away from bankruptcy again I learned more and that nine months than I ever learned in my life. But I merged from that and I said to our team. You know what are I'm proud of our history with made equipment for the Brennan's I'm proud of our history, but our history does not give us a future. We need to go out and do some acquisitions, and some products and technology gives a future, and they looked at me and said great idea by. We'll have one problem I. said, what's that and they said? We have no money. Practices Bob no money. If you understand my personality, I may terminally optimistic. And I looked at him and said I didn't send money I said. We need to do acquisitions and went out and began to an aquisitions with no money. Shopping without a wall. Shop. And that journey that began in Nineteen eighty-four. We've acquired one hundred ten companies I mean. What are you buy? Initially with no money you buy things nobody else wants, and they'll pay you to buy so I began very crudely, but I began with such passion that I started. Kind of bringing passion and positives to these companies in the started working. and and again today we operate in all over the world, but really our company is shaped by those traumatic experience, I only. There's all expression only grow one way when you eat ice cream. Good Times to make good people. Okay is our if embrace, our mistakes learn from our mistakes. That is the company created. The company we have today is is is based upon the mistakes. I made in the early seventies late seventies early eighties, and now we are up a vibrant company. That's San our share price. Go of, even though we're privately held. We have a share price. I share prices got up fourteen percent of your compounded for twenty five years, and the secret sauce is people. How how did you make that discovery? Teaching up at Harvard Berry, case study, and after studying at the professor, asked the students who who are all executive MBA. His very successful. Because of its strategy or its culture. and. Seventy five percent of these. CEO's executives companies in the audience of the class said it's his culture. It's not. I came out of that experience with an incredible strategy. You can be the nicest person in the World Ryan the nicest business, but if you don't have a good strategy, if you're making our cash registers and all of a sudden, you have ipads. You're paying off of your out of business. It's fundamentally important that we as business leaders. design. A business strategy that gives our people. A future is say the responsive ever leaders to give the people in your of care, a grounded sense of hope for a better future, so it's not just a good culture. It is a good strategy and a good culture because you cannot be good to your people. If you're not creating value. Okay, you cannot be good. You can't be good your family if you don't provide them with reasonable income, and you could not be good to your people if you don't have sell and for through about. Through! Two thousand. Era. We was mainly a good strategy deployed with traditional management style. It was through the revelations I experience in the very early two thousands that changed me from. If you will traditional business focus intensity. To what I call truly human leadership, which is I now see. Our product is our people, not the machines we build the machines are the output of of the people in the talent. We have, so it really transformed the that journey really transformed. My view of are responsible is leaders. I want to kind of expand on that A. Fundamentally being good people is based on something that most of us think is so simple but I. Think you've found that it's not and that's listening. Yeah. When and really the transformation about fourteen fifteen years ago now when we created the guiding principle leadership, and we said we need to create disciples who carry it because I was worried that it would be all based on me and you know going in the second half of my life I was worried that it would die with me. We don't want it to die. We want our legacy. Live on through our children. We want this case our legacy to live on for the company. So we started creating these this idea that we needed to teach people how to be a leader, the move from a management to a leadership position from focusing me to focus it on week. What are the keys? One of our one of the gentlemen our company? David Vulnerable and said if we're GONNA teach people to be leaders. We need to teach them how to listen. I said. I mean we're adults Nautilus Right? And they overrode me and they developed three day. Class I didn't pay much attention I was up in Minneapolis. Young who are department are Minneapolis? Operation came up to Semester Chapman I. Just took. You're listening communication skills. Class I said Oh really what was it like I had no idea. She said it changed my life I, said wait. We taught a class at work. That changed your life. She said yes I not OUGHTA. Raise my two year old daughter. That profoundly touched my heart and I started. Doing tours around the country when I was doing operational reviews, I would get groups of people to set. How many of you took this class? Talk to me? And I started hearing I wouldn't be divorced now. My mother, my mother and I are talking my husband and I have the best relationship. My teenage daughters are calling me. We start hearing these. And I said Oh my God, what what gifted we been given. And, will we realized? Is that one when we created leaders and the I team had the idea created? People given them listening skills. Because I always thought when you cared for somebody who went over and talk to them. It turns out when you really care for somebody you go over to listen to them with empathy. And, that is skill. It's not a natural skill. It is a learned skill. And so we started seeing this transformation in our team, members and people got emotional, and they started, and what we found. Is that when I started carrying for Mary? Because I. Want people to go home. Safe healthy and. Mary Start Caring for Bill Allison Fred and Ted because carrying US contagious when people feel safe, they're not worried about losing their job. Being downsized right-sized fired, so they feel safe, so they could be intended to be. And they and they have the skills of listening people start naturally caring for each other, and so we realized that is the ultimate goal of any organization is to care for the people of that organization. A. Lot of you know here all the time. Our customers number one right. We'll if our customers are number one. What are we okay? We're not number one, so I say to you our our overriding principle as we met. We measure success by the way we touch the lives of people. Touched lives RT members touch lizzo are bankers are suppliers and way we touch them is is embodying care in the key caring is listening, which totally surprised? I had never heard it neverland. So we now teach around the world in French German Diane. Were just translating Chinese. How to listen because I would say, I would say to your listeners the most profound thing I've learned in my personal professional life. The Greatest Act. Of Love, the greatest active carrying the executive leadership. And Stewardship is to listen with empathy. And I'd never would have known that I never read it anywhere. I'd never heard it until people start, and when we have these classes grown men and women come to tears. Because, they realize. That they were hurting the very people. They love the most in life unintentionally because they didn't have the skill of listening. So me, I'll take a contrarian approach, and let's say there's somewhere. There's a businessman other we've got. We've got to squeeze a little bit more out of our employees. We got hit our numbers this quarter. We've got to squeeze a little bit more out. How do you reconcile that that desire? Just get a little bit more versus this that a hard driven work environment can cause. Perfect question allows me to make a statement Simon sending Simon Sinek works in the military with Pentagon, and he looks it works parts. Our Society but Simon came up with the following expression. I'd love your listeners can. Listen to. In the military. We? We honor those who give themselves in service of others. Business. We sacrifice others. In Service of ourself. Make GonNa make the numbers. Could do layoff. Get the numbers down, okay. We have not taught. People in business as we do in the military in the military, it's called officers eat last. has nothing to do with eating has to do with your primary responsibility of a leader in the military is the men and women in your care. And that is embedded in in the military. We don't Simon would say to you. Why can't we teach businessmen, their primary responsibilities, the men and women their care. Why can't we? Why is it just in the military? Why can't we on our people and business? Whose primary responsibility and primary responsibility does not mean, be nice. It means making sure you have a business model to sustainable that that that you you design it to. Be Helpful protective of your people so I would say to you that that is very clear to me that. We need to teach business leaders, their primary responsibility that Simon Sinek second book really based upon his study. Berry is called leaders eat last. Not Officers eat last. But leaders eat last. That concept is not taught or practice in general, and you might have a nice executive. Who's a nice person? But it's not from a scale from just from a good heart. We need to give people the skills and the courage to care, and it starts with listening with empathy. And making sure you have a good business model, so you're people are safe in your Spanish here. So what's one thing that everybody listening can do tomorrow? They're gonNA. They're gonNA. Show up at work tomorrow. What's a tangible thing that they can do to start moving in this direction whether they're whether they're the CEO or Someone on the assembly line, or in the middle somewhere between. You know the way I'm going to answer. That is kind of go back to an. Ocean about the wedding story. Because I think that is something, everybody can relate to in your audience. Again going to friends wedding seeing him walk his daughter down the aisle. Everybody seeing how precious she what how was? It made me realize that all twelve thousand people that work around for us are just like that young lady. There's somebody's precious child. They may be fifty five. They may be thirty five. They may live in England or Japan, but there's somebody's precious. Child has been placed in our care, and that's what the father that's walking the dog. And so what I realized is that? That day when I saw that what I went from seen people as a function who worked for me to seen somebody? WHO's everybody's precious out? If tomorrow everybody walks in. To their span of care, the people there and sees them as somebody's precious child, and treat them with the same standard of care. They would want their own son or daughter treated like and are the leader. They want their kids to have. The world could be dramatically different place because all all the time I get the question. What do you do about the people that don't get? Said easy treat them like you would like your son or daughter treated if that was them and people's immediate response, that would be different and I said. Why is it different at somebody's son or daughter? You're treating. And so I think if we if the standard of care, the standard of leadership is. Treat that. Person You have the privilege of leading as you would want your mother. Father son daughter. Best friend treated, we would have a dramatically different worlds, so in terms of. Every day interaction and do it through listening, not talking. So Bobby leave the wedding. You have this moment. How do you place this moment into practice in your company? What we're this next steps you took? And how did you see it shift? Well we had that moment, and what I realized is that we can't ask people to do that because it's like asking him to speak Chinese they, they might say yes, sir, I'll try, but I really don't know how. Okay so asking people to care. was like asking. Speak Sam because we've taught him to us not to care. So, how do we do that? We credited the university where we taught people. We said I don't know where you on your journey, but we're going to help you along to go from from a me. Society to a we society. from management to leadership, so we took people on that journey, and it's a rich combination of teaching people how to listen. Which is caring and recognition celebration. We began recognition celebration where we looked. It's it's called shining light and the organization looking for the goodness and holding them. Say Thank you. Thank you for what you do because people profoundly want to know? That who they are and what they do matters, and it is a skill that we teach listening skill. Leadership is a skill. You can't just go tomorrow and expect your leaders to change. Despite their heart is a skill, leadership is a learned skill that we now teaching. So, what would people do tomorrow? And my opinion that we need a world where people feel cared for. That is what we're missing desperate this world people remember. Tell you tell your audience here that again. We live in a society right now you are all expensive. Society were eighty eight percent of all people feel that were for a company. That doesn't care about them. Okay. We have a twenty percent increase in heart attacks on Monday mornings when people have to go back to work fifty five percent of all people. Feel disengaged and what they're doing. And most recently had a startling statistic while the other thing we were told by leading renown healthcare institution that the person you workforce at work is more important to your health and your family doctor. When I say that people do exactly what you said. I never occurred to me, I thought. My job was to be a manager of the accounting department. A lot of pressure it's well. Do we prepare people to be good stewards of lives and trust them now we give them a Prussian into a job and we do not give goods like saying. Gee. Nice, Guide WanNa do surgery tomorrow. Okay so so we don't prepare people, so give you know the thing that strikes people more recently the way we lead in our department and our company in our role. Not only affects the way people's health. But it affects the way they treat their spouse, their family their community, so when you see the pain in our country, and you think that eighty eight percent of all people feel they worked for a company and care about them. You can understand. The pain that people are experiencing. They have jobs. They're going on vacations or sending their kids to school, but they don't feel valued. And that's issue we face and specifically. This is always shocking to good, but we just. In the last few weeks that sixty eight percent him. All people would give up a salary increase if they could just fire their boss. Okay. That's pitiful well. What's what's interesting, too? Is that you see you often see in workplaces that the that if you're if you're good at your job, whatever your job is. Maybe you're project manager. Maybe you're. Receptionist. If you're really good at your job, you get move into a new job wherein you manage, or you become a leader of other people, which isn't necessarily a skill that was critical to your previous role. Set someone up for success when they haven't necessarily been. In that role yet and yet by being good at their job. They become a leader well again if if I see. A nursing and say boy. You're really good nurse. Would you like to do surgery tomorrow? We wouldn't even consider the fried right. When you see somebody running a good sales. good sales executive, you would necessarily say well. Therefore you'd be a good sales leader right right as the roles are entirely different. So. I would say to you we're. We're aspiring well. We're going towards. Is that anybody in a position of leadership where he has lives in this care has to take our class. We've got you got to assure us that we will. You'll take our class even in the cup, so they may have been promoted before this, but now it's going to become mandatory that everybody has to have the skills to be a leader to be in a leadership as just like skills to be a surgeon to be a surgeon. And so we are, we're moving towards a more disciplined approach because. Again if. And I believe nobody debates this. If in fact, the person you reported work is more important than family doctor. If in fact, the way you treat, those people care affects the way your marriage and your kids. We need to take this seriously we need to say. Great, salesman, great accounting team member, but if you WANNA go into leadership position, you've got to take this class to have the skills, so you can be a good story to the lives. Put in your hands because we affect people's lives the way we lead. Affects the way people go home and live, and that was never taught to me. I never heard it came through a sous revelations every so many people to spend at least forty hours a week with their co workers, and they go home and have dinner with their family. Then go to bed, and you do the mash like. Wow, that's that's a lot more hours with these people at work who I didn't choose to be with. I got signed up to work here and all of a sudden I'm. People spend on my life with so when you when you look at it, that way kind of all make sense that Nope, nobody. No, no, no university! Nobody debates what I told you so far from what we teach, and what his practice. It's kind of like if I look outside and see the moon, nobody's GonNa as men there, but I don't know how to get there. I. See it I, agree. It's there, but I don't know how to get there. People don't know how to get from management to leadership. Because they were taught management, they experienced management and they're gonNA. Do what? What they've been taught what what was modeled just like? Our kids are GONNA model parenting they seek. The good news is I'm a simple accountant. If I can do it, you can do it. Again we're not picking on accountants. A little bit. While we've got to let you go here in a minute to go you. You're GonNa speaking also with the smu Cox Business Tonight's. We gotTa let you go to that, but we never let her. Guests go without asking one without asking them one of two questions so thorough you you're. You're always doing QNA's you. You did one earlier today with our staff here. What is a question that no one has asked you? What are these QNA's that you wish they would? That's a good question. You can pause for second we'll. We'll edit out. We'll edit out the silence. I would. I. Want to answer it this way what? And some people imply that some people will. But it's so. It seems so simple. Wise, not everybody doing it. Okay that's. I. Mean You just heard it? It's simple, right? It's just caring. Seen People if somebody's precious child treated with respect and understand the impact. We're making them. Why isn't everybody doing this? And the answer is. Because they'll say to me, do you know many companies doing I said? Very few I can working with a couple now encouraged by, but. Why isn't everybody doing this? Because when you see the pain in the world? When you see these young lives that are drifting, see organizations. That are you know I'll call it just brutalizing the people in the interest of economic, gain. It seems so simple. Bob I mean the number of people have said it seems so simple and I said I'm a simple guy. Right carrying. Karen's not easy, but it's the concept is simple. Just looking at everybody is somebody's precious child and treated them like you would like your son treated. which gives them a grounded sense of hope for a better future, so I mean I. Guess That's the biggest thing. Why isn't everybody doing this at seem so simple and the answer is here. Because going from what we've been taught and practiced to way it ought to be. His not easy because it's not easy. Changing our education system is not changing. Our political system is not easy changing listening. It's not easy to change behavior when it is so ingrained, and so that would probably be the question that people. Seem so right wire. Why isn't everybody doing this? Bob Again. Thank you so much for spending the time with us, you can. You can pick up his book on Amazon. Everybody matters the extraordinary power of caring for your. Family and you can learn more about the leadership institute live leadership institute at CCA Leadership Dot Com Bob. Thanks again, thank you. If, you enjoyed this episode of the strategic. Just please leave us a review and tell a friend or send us a note on social media at the Bush Center on twitter facebook and Instagram. Thank you for listening.

Bob Simon Sinek accountant executive Bush Center CEO Berry Middle East Bob Chapman CEO Global capital Minneapolis Berry Way Miller Bob Chapman CEO George Bush Presidential Cente Miller Kaufman Lindsay Kanoute Bush Institute Lindsey Dad Andrew Bob Again
Mrs. Laura Bush

The Strategerist

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

Mrs. Laura Bush

"What happens when you cross the forty third president late night? Sketch comedy and compelling conversation the strategic adress. A podcast more from the words strategically which was appointed by us in an embrace bed. At the George W Bush administration we highlight the American spirit of leadership and compassion Shen who thought provoking conversations. And we're reminded that the most effective leaders ones who laughed. We're really excited about this special episode. I offer co host is Lindsay Newton. The director of leadership programs here at the Bush Institute and who served in the White House as personal aide and special assistant to the first lady from two thousand three to two thousand nine Lindsay. So glad you're here. Thank you Andrew. I'm so happy to be here. And our guest is that first lady herself. The incomparable Mrs Laura Bush. Thank you so much for chatting with us. Ma'am thank you very much. I'm excited to do this podcast. I think this might be the first time I've done. A podcast. Cast who while we are beyond honored to be the first so I understand you were recently in Jordan with President Bush and while you're there visited rubery Hania Bossy Bush institute suit we lead scholar. We had a wonderful trip to Jordan to Oman into Abu Dhabi but in Jordan we got to meet with Rubel who had been one one of our scholars of are we lead scholars. which are women from across a broad broader Middle East and Northern Africa? And she you went back home and put together a whole program herself. She may have actually designed it when she was with us as part of we lead to work with Arab women and her program is called Arab women. Today it's at the Arab Women Today Center. Really what they are trying to do is empower women. It's women helping women all these women because they were you know from the broader Middle East are Syria or are in this case a S- Jordan really needed help helping each other. They have obviously they come from countries that have a long history of women being left out although we we see and we certainly see this with our Waleed scholars that women are stepping forward All the way across the broader Middle East but what happened was ruble lose. Lose the skills that she learnt here with us at the Bush center as a we laid scholar and put them to use now for Arab women at this Arab Women Today Center as she's helping many of these women start their own businesses as they can help provide for their families and the women come come to her with certain skill some of them do already knew embroidery or soap making or jewelry making and then she's worked also to help educate. I am in in these skills that they wanna be able to use and they make things that they can sell to jeff chance to do some shopping or pick anything up one of the things I bought in fact it was one of the only things I bought on this trip. Were little bracelets. Poppy our granddaughter's who I know are gonNa Love Them That one of these women had made so cute so I was happy to see Rubel. Use the skills that she learned here through our we lead program and take him home and teach him to Muslim and Christian women in her country. They are absolutely incredible. Women that are that are there and it's it's so great that we're able to just give them. I am a little bit of a boost. Sell them accomplish their really amazing goals. That's right we also give him a a network with each other our in our other we lead groups when we had just women from Egypt or just women from Tunisia and now this last group that we're women from across northern Africa and the Broader Middle East but they have each other her to talk to and to compare stories and to talk about what they're interested in it gives them a network that they might not have had before and of course they can stay in contact with us. And I will say that when Ruby's here in the program she's a natural mentor so she developed this role as being a mentor to some of the younger scholars as Mrs Bush said that network expands beyond Jordan says she has some Lebanese men. Tease in the cohort. So I know it was so special for you and President Bush go visit her project. It really was great right and great to see her. So we're recording today at the Bush Center in Dallas and the Bush that are sits on a fourteen acre restored prairie right here in the middle of town and the driving force behind that park really was Mrs Bush where did your love of conservation originate from well. My mother was a conservationist. She grew up out on the Chihuahua desert in El Paso but she was always interested in nature when she was my girl scout a troop leader. We got our bird badge. Which of course I barely remember but she became a very knowledgeable bird watcher? And join the mid nets. It's the midland naturalist. When you think midland an oil town you probably don't think of it is a town with a lot of naturalist but of course it is because their businesses the earth Geologist geophysicist a lot of people like that that our work in the oil business that are particularly obviously made their life in their interest in the earth So was inspired by my mother who was a conservationist been birdwatching with her. A lot in midland win win The band DDT signed started going up on the telephone poles around town. I knew it was my mother who is putting up those bandy. Dt Science came in her Audubon magazine that she put up so for my whole life really because of her. I've been interested in conservation so I wanted this These these grounds that we have around the Bush center to look the way. The native prairie would've looked here in Dallas. There's very little native prairie left anywhere in our state. Even though that's what we were and certainly out in far west Texas where I live. They say that prairie was the grassland was flying high on on a horse when the first people settled out there so one of the things we did here was work with the lady. Bird Johnson wildflower our center to develop a native a mixture of Texas native grasses. That make a nice low grass. They don't have to be watered. Very often are mode very often. And that's what we have our whole lawn out of here at the Bush Center. It's gray. She can now buy. You can buy the seeds of it from Douglas gluskin growers or from the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center but of course it's not traditionally dark. You know bright green like a like a traditional additional non native grass lawn would look in fact I understand. There's a man across the street here that offices across the street that calls the president of SMU SMU and says. When are you going to mow because it does get taller? We only need to mow it two or three times a year but we also have never had to use you city water to irrigate. We collect all the runoff from the building into a cistern where it seeps through a cistern iron and then We keep that water in the cistern. And that's what we use when we do need to Eric and Mrs Bush as you just mentioned your love of conservation goes back to with your mother and your grandparents and pass Oh and Midland and you've your childhood friends from Midland. You've shared that with them. Ever since you turned turned forty two national parks. What are your memories of sharing the National Parks Conservation Memories with your with women that I grew up within midland every year for in our national parks? We started a years ago With the Grand Canyon. I was our first trip where we floated on the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon and camped on those little spits of beach that are along the Colorado River and then hiked out at the South rim. When we got there? Are we love that trip. We did that again. That was the first trip we did. And then we did that again. Years later when we lived at the White House and on that trip we took our daughters offers. All of us have daughter. Some of my friends have sons as well but we took our daughter's on that trip and as I remember the girls hiked out in about four four hours in the old mother's barely made it out in about seven hours of hiking out But we're so fortunate in our country to had been set set aside our most beautiful natural environments with all of our natural national parks that are everywhere and besides that one park of course horse with this same group of Midland France everywhere from Denali in Alaska Appalachian the Appalachian Trail and on the east coast. And and so we've had the chance to see all these magnificent sites that we're fortunate are conserved and preserved as national parks speaking speaking of daughters in national parks. I remembered engagement. We were in the White House. That's right Henry Ash Genita- Mary him on Cadillac Mountain. The in Maine. which is the place where you can see the First Sunrise On the obviously the East Coast First Sunrise and he made her they were camping. Andy Cindy made her get up and hike to the top so they could see. Be there at sunrise when he asked her to marry men Genesis. She complained the whole way up. She was cold just typical shoot. Got Up to the top. And then that's where they got engaged and then they obviously married while we lived at the White House awesome and speaking of national parks. We'll keep going on that theme and in two thousand seven the theme for the For the White House Christmas was holiday the National Parks and this year. We're going to have a a Christmas. Exhibit is going to be a replica of that theme. So why did you choose the national parks in two thousand seven. Well of course had chose the national parks because they've been important to me for all these years that I've hiked in a national park and during those years that we lived at the White House is a national park every year with my same France. Brand's these friends that I grew up within midland a with entered the national park concession lottery to hike in Yosemite Yosemite has a very short season season in the High Sierras and there are tended camps their camps. Up there where you can hike from camp to camp and so but it's a lottery because they're just such a short season so we'd never been drawn to hike in Yosemite so when George was elected I call my friends. Said guess what we won the lottery so we act in Yosemite that first summer of two thousand one and I'm glad we did it then because it's very difficult there's some twelve mile days and it's hard hard it was. It was good that we were that young to be able to do it. We couldn't do it now but anyway so because of our love for national parks it was a perfect theme. Aim for Christmas one year and That and that's the theme that we will be reproducing this year. The two thousand seven at the White Dow's Theme was Christmas in the National Parks. And so we have all those decorations. You might not know it but when you leave in the White House you get to leave with the decorations that you used for each of those Christmas holidays. And they're stored here in the archives. The papers of the presidents are seen as belonging to the people people of the United States. So the papers are all here and including the decorations from each of those years of Christmas in as part archives here at our library so this year if you come visit the Bush Center for Christmas you'll get to see what those decorations were in two thousand seven Christmas in the national parks. What kind of what kind of ornaments and decorations to tell us what we used A? We sent out actually a big balls and Estevan American artists to decorate them with a painting of their favorite National Park. Our National Park. That was close to them or that was in some part of the a country where we lived and so we have those as well and then of course we did ever sort of natural decorations like many people would using pine cones in Magnolia leaves. And the things that you might be able to just get in your own yard like in a natural way like like you would if you wanted to visit a national show park. It's GONNA be beautiful. I'm really really excited about it. Mrs Bush just on the Christmas themed for a minute such a magnificent memory timid all the memories and the White House what are some of the With all the bushes came to town and everyone went to Camp David or some of your memories from the White House years. One thing I remember is there's a group of people they're just volunteers who decorate for the White House every year decorate the put up all the decorations and they come in sort sort of around the country a number of our florist who already have decoration. You know skill in being able to decorate but they decorate from year to year. They're not necessarily supporters of whoever the president is that lives there but but it was really fun to have them come in and I remember remember that one year when we use that fake quite snow. You'll you'll have seen it. That kind of you shake out of the box was piled up under the one of the Christmas trees. I use it. They decorated then. They SORTA had snow fight at the end of the decorations. There but then what we always did was go to Camp David so I know we have a record that no other family will ever hold because we Bennett Camp David for Christmas for four years. When George's dad was president and then Then for the eight years that we were there all the Bush family came to Camp David and it was the perfect place to be there for Christmas. It led the White House. The people that work at the White House off for the holidays and the people at Camp David are stationed there. It's a military base. It's actually a navy base which is odd because it's not on the water but when it was founded during the time of Franklin Roosevelt the crew from the presidential yacht were the ones that staff to Camp David and they were navy at. There's no longer a presidential yacht but there is still of course Camp David so we were with The families that were stationed there so they were there with their own children in their parents their wives and husbands and we had always had Christmas Eve Church service at the Little Church there at Camp David with them and there was something very special about getting to be with members of the military there at Camp David Well and the national park system that that is the base of all of this to they. Don't I think everyone thinks to them is just taking care of Yosemite in the Grand Canyon but they also do the the national monuments and the White House. And the Alamo and even like I'm GonNa get this name wrong so correct me here Popa Magoo. Yeah that's exactly it. which now McCook is a national marine monument that President Bush designated in the northwestern Hawaiian silence and I got to go there? It's so far in the northwestern Pacific way up there that it's a long flight even from Honolulu up up to Papa. Now McKay Midway Island is one of the islands and Midway Island has You know a landing strip and everything because it was a refueling refueling spot during World War Two with planes that flew from the United States toward Japan. So it's the only one of the northwestern Hawaiian Y in islands. That actually has a landing spot but I did have a chance after George Name. Bid is a national marine monument. Had the chance to go there and see it but why why is it so important that we protect our oceans and assets like Honda Mokaba. Okay thank you for bailing the added. Thank you well. This is one of the things we saw when we were there. There is a very large bird the lace on Albatross that nest up there. In the northwestern North Western Hawaiian islands they nest on the ground. They don't have any natural predators that are there on these remote islands. And so these as little babies were waiting little baby lace on Albatross. Chicks were in their nest and their parents go off and fish for squid on top of the ocean and then come back that can feed their chicks. And so every once in awhile. There'd be a little dead chick and we'd look at it and when we opened it up we'd see that the parents hadn't comeback with squid but they'd come back with plastic bottle caps in toothbrushes little plastic toys and just the plastic. That's out there in that in that remote part of the ocean and of course it's not all from the United States it's from Asia from many parts of the world but we saw the effects of plastic in this most remote place. You can imagine now not every little albatross was dead. Obviously there that grew up. And and you know this big great big lice on Albatross. But still it was a reminder of how small our world is now and how important it is that we all pay attention to what we do that what we do can make an effect you know when whatever we throw out washes down to the river and then washes out to sea and so it's important for us to try to conserve our beautiful world. We only have one plan. That's right and it's interesting because that's on the one hand that's this remote island that you and President Bush care so much about and also just your own literal backyard. Kyar Prairie Chapel ranch is an is another conservation example. When it's right on we're about either for the w one hundred that's right? We're about to go. Georgia think goes tonight to WHO The ranch and then I'll go tomorrow after the Bush Foundation Board meeting this weekend he's hosted warriors wounded warriors for the bike rides at our rats. We have a a lot of bike trails that have been built over the years. They're a new group of warriors will ride with him and then the alums who've written with him in other ears can join on the second day and ride with him too so I think that'll be a lot of fun. But one of the things we have done it. Iran's she's trying to restore the prairie that was there the native prairie that would have been there and of course it was gone because he'd been farmed the area around Waco. Oh which was a cotton producing area. And that's the farmers that we bought our property farm from at plotted but we've spent the all the years since we bought it about ten years. Now I guess we've owned it or maybe slightly longer. First plowing up the non native grass over and over year after year a year after year until we finally really got rid of it and then using these little seed from these little remnants of intact prairie that are native with grass man. That helps us at at ratchet bought up and so now we probably a little over one hundred acres of ninety prairie which means we've seen quayle again again at our ranch and we're not quite in the quail area of Texas but but we do have them because they're ground nesters they're dependent on prairies nice to nest and we've gotten to see those plus we're just proud to have it now. We have. We can met. Hey are native prairie so now we have our own native. I'd say it can continue. Adding more acreage is As we can Mrs. You've taken this idea this innovative idea of bringing Texas back to nature when you founded Texan by nature. And can you tell us just a little bit about that. Well when I moved home from the White House with this same group of France some of from where the My friend Midland friends. That a hike with Several of them are ranch. Women that grew up on the big ranches of Texas the Armstrong ranch in south South Texas Ranches Round Albany. We all joined together to try to encourage people to use native plants in everywhere in their landscapes in their churchyards wherever you can plan it and especially we wanted them to plant the milkweed. The native and low porn milkweed that monarch butterflies depend end upon to where they lay their cocoons as they migrate towards Canada for the summer and then fly back down in the winter toward Mexico coat the breeding grounds at the Monarch Butterfly. So we've worked with a lot of groups. A lot of corporations that have corporate campuses is a hundred and forty acres are so have gotten together and started to plant this antelope porn milk. Wait in one of a defense contact tractor out of close to Austin now. They're keeping bees even because they know how important it is for Po- for US ahead pollinators. We couldn't have agriculture culture if we didn't have pollinators and it's very important that we That we continue to make sure that we have enough native plants around round For the pollinators that are dependent especially then of course the monarch butterfly and as you can see sort of shape of Texas were the actual flyway of the Monarch Butterfly up from Mexico up to Canada and then back back as they fly back down. They fly in successive generations. They only live about nine days so they have to have the end low part beltway to put their coon on for the next generation. which is why it's really important? And of course nearly all of that mid part of the United States has been plowed because it's the agriculture belt. I mean we were dependent on it to write That's how we eat. But there are ways we can mitigate at the destruction to the milkweed to the end obviously slate to the monarch butterfly. You see these headlines every now and then of of in be counter down and butterfly counselor down. It's such a delicate cycle. That really is is. And that's why it's important to make sure you plant some native plants in your yard or in your on your corporate campuses like these companies around around Austin or doing or in your churchyards and so that's what Texan by nature is which is to try to encourage people to use native plants and of course they're the ones that thrive if they do the best In our pretty unforgiving atmosphere that we have here in Texas our weather I should say taught hot in December called in so as we as we get ready to wrap here I think we. We've gotTA know. We've talked so much about national parks and you've been to. So how many national parks. So which one do you think parents should take their children to which we go to. What do you think well? I think you should go to your closest national park. Find out which park is close to you. find out your national historic sites that are in your neighborhoods which are also part of the national park system and visit those and certainly the parents we the trip that we would make for Midland would be to the to the big band which is our big great big huge national park down at the band of taxes. This is but then also to San Antonio to visit the Alamo and all those things that Texans like to do and you might not know it but the Alamo's national historic site right so Research and find out what are the ones closest to you and take your children to those first and then give them the opportunity to visit others versus. They grow up that I think that's a perfect message ended on Mrs Bush thank you so much for news. We know you're busy and it's an incredible treat. Thank you very much. Thank you Andrew. Learn more about the bush. Institutes we lead program at. WWW dot bush dot org slash we lead scholars and view photos from Mrs Bush's trip to Jordan at www dot bush center dot org slash towards trip enjoy. Today's episode would like to help us spread the word about the strategic teachers to please give us a five star review until your friends to subscribe for available on Apple Podcasts spotify and all the major listening APPs if you're tuning in on a smartphone tapper swipe over the cover art you'll find episode notes with Helpful Information and details. He may have missed. The strategic was produced by U. N.. Pappas at the George W Bush Institute in Dallas Texas. Thank you for listening.

White House National Parks Mrs Laura Bush Bush center President Bush United States president Texas prairie Midland Bush Middle East Dallas George W Bush administration Bennett Camp David Bush Institute National Park Yosemite Jordan
Anne Chow - Keeping People Connected

The Strategerist

28:44 min | 7 months ago

Anne Chow - Keeping People Connected

"Seo AT and t business and chows leading organization that is playing a big role in many of our daily lives. And she's doing so from a place of optimism about what the world can accomplish when we worked together. We had humanity have rallied together in a way that we never have on a scale that we never have quite of a common enemy and that is the virus. We'll also talk about how lessons learned after nine. Eleven have helped first responders in the medical community during this crisis. An- An- tells us about her life growing up as the kid of immigrants and how to help shape her into who she is. Today I'm Major Kaufman. And this is the strategic presented by the George W Bush Presidential Center. We've been talking recently with several nonprofit leaders about how their organizations are pivoting adjusting to all the changes in the world because of in nineteen today. Though we're talking to a business sector leader to hear about their side of the world and Chow has been at. At and T. Business for thirty years and in Twenty nineteen was named CEO. The first woman and the first woman of color to hold the position of the company and welcome to the strategic. Thank you for doing this. Thanks so much. Appreciate you having me so next week. We're launching our latest issue. The catalyst that Bush Institute's Journal of Ideas and we're focusing on America at its best and the things that are making us optimistic. So and what are you seeing right now? That's giving you hope. Yeah interesting question and I think that there's you know there's nothing like a crisis of epic proportion to US. Great clarity about what's important in our lives. And that is both are professionalize in our personal lives holistically and I would say that the thing that really I find so inspiring is how important the power of connection is you know what this pandemic has shown us is that You know the world works whether it's You know in our communities whether it's across any business of any size the world works on connection and that connection is You know is manifested both in the sense of technology and kind of networks and the business that. At and T. You know eighteen business are responsible for but also the power of connection between people and the fact that we We as humanity have rallied together in a way That we never have on a scale that we never have in common enemy and that is the virus. So that that I find incredibly inspiring is how we have come together as a business community as they philanthropic community as humanity and society at large and how were rallying together In a common mission. Yeah it really is amazing to see everybody has a little bit different set of resources available to them and everyone is using their resources to the best of their abilities to try and bite this thing and I know just in terms of tying a little bit eighteen is trying to imagine what this last what these last few months would have been like without Internet access. This had happened even fifteen years earlier where we didn't have video conferencing and we didn't have high speed internet or thirty years ago when very few people had what would have looked like. Is that something you've thought at all about is how incredible the timing of this? Yeah for sure. Yeah I I have fought long and hard about that. I've actually spoken about it as well. You know when You know as really kind of leading teams and serving clients. It's it's always easier to do. So when you see a very clear purpose right when you see a very clear mission about what has to get done and there's no question that our communication and our our reliance on communication which is enabled by Mobile Technologies. Internet technologies. There's just no way that we could have even survived right whether that's You know in any of these aspects of the fights on the front line You know whether whether you think about some of the pivots From a small business perspective about how you know restaurants have now had the ability to go online right and focus on delivery. I mean there's there's no aspect of our lives or the economy or society. We can envision what this would have been like us the golf right whether it's ten years ago twenty years ago thirty years ago Of what that could have been like. And so now for sure this pandemic and in nineteen has really brought to life the power and the importance of communication. You know even beyond Internet our access to data but even just voice right and how true acted we are and how important it is to have that connection whether it's through video through voice right because we cannot for the time being largely have that physical connection in that physical proximity that That we all thrive on you mentioned small businesses which are just critical to our country. What are y'all doing to make sure that That those needs are supported. Yeah Yeah thanks for that question. You know an and eighteen business. We are so fortunate to have an opportunity to serve businesses and organizations and sectors of the economy You know across the world and businesses of all sizes whether it ranges from healthcare providers to first responders to education and otherwise specifically is really small business. I have great passion for small businesses. I I have Been inspired by the fact that you know if you're a small business owner or if you're an entrepreneur you are in business because you have passion for Your Business I And so for us. Small Business represents a key clients for all over the country support of them have ranged from a providing them with a with unique offers to support them. You know whether it's You know call forwarding services Mobile Hotspot Services but importantly we've also joined You're very consistent with FCC Chairman Pies. Keep Americans connected pledge? We continue to support them through June thirtieth for both residential and small business customers. Who Tell us that. They're having issues with paying their bills or having issues Asteroids to the pandemic We have a commitment to them to not disrupt their service and we're waiting all late. Payments Fees You know we're we're also joined up with American Express in their Stanford Small Coalition Where we're supporting small businesses through various programs services offers tools we have encouraged our employees to donate and actively contribute to small businesses as well. And you know we've got the unique offers around the different president services that enable small businesses to operate whether it's in a remote work environment or otherwise and so we've really worked hard to run the gamut of what is it that are small business customers. Need you to navigate through this crisis and move onto the next as which I like to characterize as kind of return and recovery Internet usage pattern must be changing right now in that. I know I'm using a ton. More Internet at home using video chat and watching fair amount of net flicks not during not from nine to five and my bosses are listening. But everybody's usage patterns are changing and at the same time you've got the Medical Community First Responder Community that has pretty serious needs. That can't be interrupted. Has the networks. Struggled at all to adapt to really seismic change and usage patterns. Yeah so let me tell you. It's IT'S A it's a fantastic multifaceted question Let me see if I can hit on all the different points if too complicated. Yeah no no no. It's not a complicated. I just WanNa make sure I address it all because I think it's vitally important first of all you I'm GonNa Hearken back Answer to the first question you asked me which was or the things that give you. Pride and optimism and one that I would like to reinforce here is the fact that our network has performed beautifully and it is the result of billions of dollars of investments that we have made both in our our mobile and our fiber network Over the years and so the network is performing well Let me touch on just a couple of factors because I think it helps. Bring to life Those usage patterns that you talked about how that has changed during the pandemic and so are not work at the end of last year at the end of fourth quarter on a daily average. You know we were carrying about three hundred thirty five head of bytes of data on an average day through this pandemic were more than four hundred. Peta Bites And so that gives you a sense of yes. Data traffic is significantly up in terms of. What's riding over our network during twice during the pandemic We We are customer. Set a record for text messages And so obviously the previous peak that we experience was fifteen thousand texts per second. Thank goodness that's not my children or you're trying to kind of all right number mid-march and on Easter weekend customer sent more than twenty three thousand texts per second. Okay so we've seen that peak broken a couple of times. I'm videoconferencing right. I mean you know zoom before was not even a word right. I mean it was kind of a you know I don't know roadrunner or fast. You're running or something or a fast car right. But now we saw you know at at a high During this pandemic four hundred seventy thousand Webex calls which is an all time high As to just demand and our coordinate network traffic you look at. You know wireless voice minutes or consumers calling from home Our core network traffic. You know world well up over twenty percent and Wi fi calling Is Up over seventy percent right and so so the the network demands have been great but the network has performed really well. Now I wanNA take a moment because it is so vitally important to To our country to the protection of life itself on the role that we've played In support first responders. I'm not sure if you if you are or your listeners are familiar with I net but let me spend a moment talking about it. Yeah I'm I'm really not familiar with it. I'd love to hear about it. Okay that's great. That's great so I was actually born out of the nine eleven commission And it was born out of recommendations to enhance. The country is communication infrastructure across the entire public safety community and so I met is a program that was created with the input of public safety oversight by the Federal Government and now it exists to strengthen the communications capabilities of first responders and all those who support them. And so this includes you know. Law Enforcement Military emergency personnel firefighters Nine one on communicators and I is all about making sure that That are our first responders are able to execute on our public safety mission And it is a all about providing a dedicated lane of connectivity for our first responders when they need it the most. At is the proud of is the provider And the only provider of I knit services that support first responders and in fact You know we are now up to over twelve thousand agencies and over one point three million I net connections across the country so agencies like FEMA or the US coastguard or the city of San. Jose are all examples of agencies and customers of ours who harnessed the power of I met Now getting to your comments about. Oh you know the network and you think about You know consumers and businesses first responders utilizing the network and utilizing services. What are the greatest? Differentiator is about You know I I and services are what we call a priority and preemption. I'm an all that effectively means. Is that You know if you are if you've got a first net service you have priority And your services and your connections again to that point of a deadly. It's affected dedicated lane of connectivity We'll go through for obvious. Reasons right our first responders are on the front lines and they are fighting for life itself right and so who service should get priority for sure For sure it is it is I net and so You know we are. We are proud to provide these services. We have seen an incredible demand for I You know across the healthcare sector state and local governments district. You know Our our our military agencies and so You know demand has been really really high for for obvious reasons right and it is a It is an honor and privilege to support public safety And to worker in support of our first responders yameen you know like you said with each major event like this that we have we learn things and we build on the challenges that we faced. And I'm sure we're going to a lot of changes when the dust settles after this one and because if you go back and read the accounts of the first responders that were there and the days after nine eleven and those folks that are on the front lines here often how difficult communication was. Yeah Yeah it's it's for sure one of those big learnings Out of nine eleven and I was actually living on the east coast In the Tri State area at the time So it It's very much home for me. is is some of the challenges that you're that all of the different agencies whether it was fire or police or military or emergency you know and the lack of interoperability of of how how the various groups of first responders indicate with each other. And so you know true. I net Which is this government. Mandated dedicated mission critical set of services is. I'm not only do. Our first responders and public safety have You know have priority and preemption. They also have interoperability. And so there's no question you know to our earlier conversation about the importance of connection Across organizations across silos across even just the boundaries of our personal and professional lives. Right I mean. Many of us are are are sheltered in place and working from home and that lines of blurring has occurred all across many facets of society so the Bush Institute is really. We're passionate about education and that's an area that's like really all areas but education has been particularly hit hard. A lot of kids are able to hop online learn whether that's through schools distance learning or through educational programs like Sesame Street but not not every family has access to the Internet at home. And what can schools do to help? Keep teaching kids when they can't necessarily come into the building. Yeah yeah no for sure and You Know Andrew as as we think about some the macro trends right of what we've seen through cove and how it will alter behavior and how we live and work in the future right. It's you know we talked about remote work You know we touched. On the first responder we we haven't explored enough surely around telehealth and telemedicine and importance there but another big trend And a big imperative that you're touching on now with education is distance learning right and the ports of And the importance of distance learning and so You know as as we've You know works to Support School district Whether their teeth through. Twelve or higher ed All across the country you know there are a couple of things You know we we have know. Put together a set of of offers to provide support from your sixty days of unlimited data to qualify schools. Right so that They can promote evening. So we've been working as as we have gone through this crisis. Mark of these last couple of months of supporting a school systems and teachers and students With with safe and secure solutions if you will to support them You know we also made a ten million dollar contribution to distance learning the first million about one the conic the connectivity which I think everybody is probably familiar with now. They're a great online learning platform and As of March twenty fourth we are also underwriting sixty days of free access and unlimited usage of Caribou which is a video calling application that I'm helps families Read and drawn play games with one another while they're in disparate and distant locations. And so what I would say to Educators out there you know it's it's it's all about you and if I think about. The range of educational institutions are districts. That were serving. It's really about standing and working to serve your entire constituency right whether it's the the the child the parents of the educator the administrators and really coming up with the right kind of infrastructure and support model which relies no question on technology to what we talked about before right in communications technology and connectivity technology but also in how you think about You know you know applications Training and support and just You know this huge shift in terms of what we're expecting needing for Pamela families to a kids to do and this whole notion of enablement and how we naval students and how we enable teachers right and how. We enable the school districts and the states Is that is honestly? It's it's a profound responsibility that we have in our line of business and I'm you know and I'm thrilled That That we share that You know that passion for education With the Bush Center the Bush two for sure and so I wanNA pivot a little bit now and talk about use them and so we we love talking to people that have gone through their career and gotten to some pretty high and responsible places with a lot of responsibility and as CEO and T. Business. I think that qualifies. We're also the Bush center were passionate about immigration. And that you know America's in a lot of ways been built by immigrants end so you're a you're the first woman of color to be? Ceo OF AT and T. business an asian-american daughter and daughter of immigrants. I'd love to hear what you learn from your parents Yeah no thank you for asking this question and I couldn't agree more In terms of the you know what what makes America who we are. is just incredibly rich. Tapestry OF OF PEOPLE AND CULTURES ETHNICITIES PERSPECTIVES RELIGIONS. Political affiliations only the above And it is really the land where you know we're hopeless right and so I'm a signature Erica's as you said and What I learned from my parents is several fold You know and I do think that. It is pretty characteristic as you know compared notes and spoken with many different groups and individuals about having a You know being a second generation generation third generation American one is the power and the importance of education. you know. My parents instilled in me and so much of the reason why they came to this country. was because of the education system And my parents reinforcing me. The power and importance of education and the fact. That education doesn't just End At school right when your school is done. When you've gotten whatever degrees you've gotten but that You've got to be a lifelong learner. And those lessons about the importance of education. You're of learning have really factored into my leadership approach I would say the second thing that my parents taught me was And I and they'd never use these words by the way and I I would bet they'd probably don't actually wouldn't understand even what the word meant that. They embodied it and how they raise me Is the importance of of servitude right. And and this importance of you. You can't just be good right or looks good right. You GotTa do good and me this notion of. There's no way that any of us have gotten to where we have have gone to or need to get to where we need to get you without Other people right and we have a responsibility. We have a civic responsibility to pay it forward because it is impossible to pay back all of those people that have helped along our way in our own journeys so this notion of servitude and just serving Whether it's the fact that they You know I joined the girl scouts right at a young age I You know that kind of notion of service You know to your country and service to your communities inherent in me and I take my parents for that Another one is Is just the ability to train right when I think about? You know dreaming for a big goals or aspiring to big things. You Know I. I always think back to the giant risk that my parents took in coming to this country with less than five hundred dollars a us to their name and they took a risk of epic proportions and that risk Because they had a dream for themselves they had a dream for the family that they would ultimately have my brother. And I Fuels me right. It feels me in a way that says there is. You can actually do anything right and in this country in particular you can aspire to be anything that you want to be in and The route to get there may not be the route that you thought but there is a way right. And so that That ability to Dream Hope And the fact that Hope Springs Eternal Is One then the last one I would say is And people was gonNA kick when I talk about. This one is just this like I. Have this This edge of immigrant paranoia. Okay and and what I mean by that is you know. Look there's there's always this Worry this the side of me that comes from my parents that at any moment all this could evaporate right. You know your health to be taken away. You know what you've earned to be taken away. Relationships could be taken away loved. Ones could be taken away right. And so this paranoia of you you always gotta you know you always gotTa make sure that you're planning for a rainy day right and You know I am a eternally person but I constantly in my business practices and even in in my life and even how I manage my own You know and support my own family. You know I have this constant thing of you always WanNa plan for the worst and wargame out the possible scenarios while you hope and work towards the best but you always have to have a plan. B. and plan CNN. Plan D and that kind of immigrants paranoia about. Oh you know something really bad could happen and you better be prepared. Has Sort of also informed My leadership style both both professionally as well as personally so those are just I if I think about the learnings from my parents and Being the child of immigrants those four really ring true to me in an and carry those throughout throughout my adult life. They really do resonate. I'm I'm also the the son of immigrants. My my folks also came over with next to no money in the one really was what you said about education because my parents were obsessed about my education. Because you know that's one of the reasons they came here is that they didn't have educational opportunities growing up and they wanted to make sure I was able to take the most advantage of it and it sounds like very common of immigrants for to have that mindset. Yeah for sure and so you took piano lessons early on. You went to juilliard for some of them. Pretty early on if I if I want to be. Ceo Shy start taking my piano playing little more seriously. How did that happen? Yeah so this is probably one of the most bizarre things about About my background. Because he probably wouldn't find a lot of people who spent their early childhood years. Dreaming About Performing Carnegie Hall is the Epitome of their lives so So my Admittedly when I was four. My parents forced me to take piano lessons. Could does this sound familiar. All right you know. And I and I'll openly admit that I also force my children to take a piano and music lesson. What I what I say about that is You know the whole juilliard path for me. was one that was again in in my in what my parents aspired for me to have wanted for me to have the opportunity to become the best that. I could the at at anything that I might choose to be right and the pursuit of Julia at the time which I started at juilliard pre college when I was ten. What's really about whether or not Because at the time. And perhaps even rg now. Juilliard is the best or one of the best music schools and Schools entire world right. And so they're they're they're encouragement of me to go to juilliard. What's really about pursuing whether or not my best could be realize and quite frankly right It also helped me figure out that my best during those years was not was not really the best right and I realize that professional career music was really not destined was not my destiny. So what I would say a little bit tongue in cheek. You're your them about you. Know she takes piano lessons seriously. I would say this. This is really more about Trying as many different things as possible and encouraging especially our next generation of leaders try. And whether you start them off at four or five or ten or twelve or fifteen or twenty or twenty five right Starting starting next generation of leaders off with a mindset that says I am open to try new things. I am open to understanding the fact that I have to have discipline and practice to get better at something right that I can have the resilience and build the grit that it takes through success and through failures to find my own unique path of what is that unique value proposition that I will bring to this world and the only way that each of us will do that as individuals is if we try as many different things as possible in search of that that profession in search of that practice in search of that purpose and passion That makes each of us such an important contributor to success to society no matter no matter what our title or role is. That's what I would say. You know. I feel like we can keep going for another hour. But I've gotTa let you get to your next stop but I do before I let you go. We always ask our guest one of two questions as a closer and going to throw out at you. What are we as a nation not talking enough about that? We should be talking about. Yeah so so my my thoughts are this is I feel like we as a nation are not talking enough about what is so come to lights during this pandemic. Which is the criticality of collaboration across borders right. You know when when when we rallied together and whether it's across economic lines political lines technological the digital divide line is that we have an obligation of humanity. Together right there is only one race and that's the human race right as it relates to this planet. Earth right we only have one planet or right and what. I don't feel that we're talking enough about is one of these deep learning from this pandemic that have brought us together. As a society where our focus on the crisis has built bridges across chasms which existed but it has also posed other chasms which exists right and those chasms which exists and perhaps gotten even more amplified through this crisis we have to be purposeful about bridging them because the only way that we You know as a country as a society as a world We'll come out of this. Stronger is if we focus more on collaborating Across across borders across silos. And I feel that we're not talking about that enough because I strongly believe that that will be critical Whether you talk about crossing the line between public sector and private sector Per You know the the the importance of Physical Health and mental health. All these different kinds of borders which exists this will be paramount to our recovery and our return and how we rebuild how we revenge reinvent and how we revitalize our society so I feel strongly that we've got to be elevating that more to the forefront As we approach this next phase of the pandemic yeah we. We couldn't agree more and not. Just we've what we've kind of felt that for a long time in that are presidential leadership scholars programs kind of based on that principle of get different people from different backgrounds and different activities and professions. Put them together and see. What kind of great collaborations they can make? We've seen some some great results into great example of something we would love to see just spread throughout society of that when you when you mix people that you don't expect to hang out together. Good things happen. Yeah for sure. I mean that that is what diversity inclusion and belongings all about right. I mean there's no question that this has been a you know this has been a rallying cry for us You know as a as a society through his because you know together right together we will get through this together. We can get anything done and I may firm from front believer in that. Amen to that an thank you so much for doing this. I know we've got to let you go but really appreciate the time and thanks so much for taking time out of your day to do it. It's my pleasure and thanks again for having and I appreciate all the great work that you're the bush and I are doing if you don't already get notifications in your inbox. New Issues of the quarterly catalyst journal come out be sure to sign up at. Www DOT bush center dot org slash catalyst dash sign up. And if you enjoyed today's episode be sure to subscribe run apple podcast. Google podcast spotify everywhere. Else you find podcasts. And don't forget to leave a five star rating and tell a friend. Thanks for listening.

George W Bush Presidential Cen CEO America US CEO and T. Business T. Business Bush Center Major Kaufman Chow Small Business Journal of Ideas Webex American Express business owner AT Google apple
After Hours: Technology for Good

The Strategerist

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

After Hours: Technology for Good

"Inspired by conversations during the first season of the strategic the strategic after hours brings together bush bush institute experts to discuss hot topics and news of the day in this second episode we cover technologies expanding and often disruptive role in education nation the job market in our everyday lives i major kaufman and this strategic presented by the george w bush institute and what happens when he crossed the forty third president late night sketch comedy and compelling conversation this strategic a podcast form from the word strategically which was coined by us the now embraced by the george bush administration we highlight the american sphere of leadership and compassion through thought provoking conversations and we're reminded the most effective leaders are the ones who laughed. We've assembled a panel of bush center experts to tackle the topic that continues to make headlines which is technology and how it is changing our lives from education to job markets job markets and the economy enemy and more starting with ken hirsch the president and c._e._o. Of the bush that are ken. Thanks for joining us once again on the strategic. I always love being here. Thank you cullum clark. Our director director in the bush stu estimate economic growth initiative. This is his first time of strategic column. Thanks for joining us great to be on the strategic and another first-timer and wicks ext the end kimball johnson director of education reform and thank you for joining us hi andrew. Thanks for having me. Can let's start with you. You wrote a piece for the catalyst catalyst. The bush institute's journal about the slow world in the fast world colliding the slow world being government and policy and the fast world being with these innovative disruptive technology based companies that are out. There is the coalition of these worlds. Is that dangerous or is it a good thing well well whether it's a good thing or not a good thing that's happening and i think it's going to be the defining force or dynamic or conflict. Whatever whatever word you want to use. It's going to be the defining element that will determine where the united states goes and where the world old goes in the next twenty to forty years and <hes> it seems pretty obvious when you look at it that and i quote prime minister trudeau from a couple years ago where he said things have never moved this fast and again they will never move this slowly and the fast world favors speed and things are picking up speed artificial intelligence robotics instant journalism gene editing cryptocurrencies. These are all disruptive and they're disrupting econ economy. They're disrupting institutions. They're disrupting the way we live and the slow world is trying to slow it down and slow world doesn't value speed as much as values accuracy. We have three branches of government. The checks and balances system parliamentary systems which are coalition forming is designed to be slow multi-party agreements are designed to be slow and deliberative something like a jury trial. It's designed to be slow so that you can actually get to the truth. Even declaring war requires an act of congress which was meant to be deliberative and so these are the element where slow had a positive connotation annotation and all of these institutions were were designed to be more deliberative to be slower to be more careful. I e good outcome speed and is is disruptive is now has a positive connotation right. If things are getting faster and things are getting faster and so the the fast world wants to disrupt the slow world and the slow world fighting back right in china and russia there is no doubt who owns your data who owns the network and if they want to slow it down or they used speed to their advantage. They're doing it. They are applauding the size of alibaba and tencent and by do in china and we are vilifying defying the size of apple amazon and facebook here okay and most recently to have the secretary of the treasury say that amazon killed killed retail amazon is retail. I mean that's like saying that that that the trains killed transportation because they put horses out of business business. No rally right are transient so it just to me is something that we need to get our hands around. We need to understand it and most importantly. We need to come to terms with it so so an how do we in this so we have this world now. We can't fight it. It's going to happen and we have these different policy issues that get to wrap your brain around. What do you think are some of these top policy issues that we really have to address to to live in this world. That's a big question andrew. Eh talking about the like if there's ever been an example where luddites have won like let's never win right. If we sort of know that as our tourism you sorta sorta you have to figure out how to prepare people to get comfortable and understand risk right so i was just thinking about this through through and education lens so oh how do you grapple with the complexities of speed and risk which is what can was talking about. It's like risk and opportunity amplified through all the speed. That's so different now than it would have been end fifty years ago or one hundred years ago. I think that's why we care so much. In education about whether kids can read and do math and solve problems because because the only way you can grapple effectively with risk and opportunity is actually if you have a baseline of context and you can read and interpret information and and you use math to solve problems so if policy opportunities obviously i care a lot about the education policy and why we about accountability but when you think about sort of broadly the one of the things that's uniquely american is that were built on people understanding and seizing opportunity in many different ways economically politically really otherwise and i think that is important. It's essential and distinctive so when the treasury secretary is talking about retail and we're talking about the size of technology companies you have to we have to maintain sort of a uniquely american clear-headedness about opportunity and risk and i think that's what makes this country so different than many the reader risk of this causing a haves and have nots society well. We're we're we're trending in that direction. In general i think what we we have seen with an with essentially the what a lot of people call the third industrial revolution the i._t. Revolution is that it's been accompanied by growing inequality in a a sort of a lower income or lower middle income <hes> population in america that hasn't seen very fast income growth probably reflecting the fact that it's difficult for the people to sort of tool up to skill up to deal with modern technology so so that's been a benefactor for sure when we worked on a lot at the bush institute institute is what's happening in terms of economic geography in america and clearly there is a heavily geographic component to what's happening in the economy essentially early twenty five or thirty big metro areas have been kind of pulling away from everybody else because they are the centers where all of the technological revolution is taking taking place so we're thinking a lot about about kind of what what happens with all the other places and also about issues of well do <hes> does does the person who starts to promote relatively disadvantaged background have a reasonable opportunity to kind of to make it in the big city where the action is which of course we all think of like silicon can valley new york but it's also dallas austin and charlotte and raleigh denver places all over america which are facing some significant challenges in terms of affordability affordability. Hey column what's interesting is historically our economies location-based. We either that the the coastal cities were where all the action was because that's where trade was coming coming in and out of this country and so they were big population centers immigrants came into port cities. They tended to congregate there aggregate there for <hes> for generation. What's odd to me is it is it is it hasn't always been the case where twenty or twenty five major metropolitan areas were were. Most of the action was and people mike but people migrated into those areas so that's question one. Is this time different or not. It's just different locales. The second thing is it feels to me like technology is one one of the things that removes the geographic constraint. You could be on the internet from the middle of some some remote area but you couldn't you know once upon a time you couldn't couldn't manage a fleet of steamships from a remote area inland area so i mean it's why isn't technology liberating the necessity for people to be in specific areas or maybe the fact that it's not it just sort of shows something anthropologically that we we like to congregate. Let's see the great questions. Can i think he's the c._e._o. I think on the first the first question you ask is. Has it always been this way. There's been a few places that lead change. I could not agree more that that has always been the reality. We also sometimes have had forces for catch up by other places. Ah you know other places can they may not be early adopters but they can ultimately essentially build me to companies before long there as well so that's probably going to be part of the pattern has it has been in the past so yeah i i would agree on that. <hes> there is one thing that's a little bit new in the pattern <hes> and that is around a housing and real estate prices because historically directly what has happened is when people start moving to where the action is as you say there was a point in time when it was northeastern upper midwest later it became west coast when they start moving essentially those places build enough new housing and enough knee real estate such that the supply of space goes up as fast as the demand for space and the price ice remains roughly where it was before relatives people's income nowadays we've experimented for about a generation with all kinds of new essentially heavy-handed land use regulation to a much greater degree than existed in earlier times in america when we had relatively free market land use and the the result is that the hottest economies in some places says are dramatically unaffordable and not building out enough which has which creates the remarkable outcome that for example the san francisco bay area is losing people not gaining then embraced but isn't over a fifty year period. Doesn't that balance. It's out that that people would say. It's way too unaffordable here. I wanna open my business in omaha muhannad bresca because i think that's it's so much more affordable and i can. I can have five times the quality of my life and absolutely workforce. I mean does it does it. Does it even out out or does it. No i think i think it doesn't necessarily even out thinly across all of geography but certainly you create new centers and i would argue. That's what you just said is the single most important reason that it places like dallas and houston are as much as they are because they are where the people are going shirt now to bring it to education and one of the big things when you have in the perfect world you would have a place like san francisco. Let's just call california because its cost of living so high and in the major metropolitan areas where incomes have kept up but those the public goods like education teachers salaries haven't kept up and and so now ends buyer for firemen policemen so now they're living. They can't afford to live in the communities that they work in yes. I think it's a huge problem. I'm not sure i don't have a solution for it but if you create many monaco's right if san francisco is where it's it's it's so expensive the people who are living in that community. It's like a very unusual community because the people have such a high income and such a different style of living and then there's like a ring of people that would support the work of that community that live outside. It is not a very sustainable in the long term. I think you see that both in l._a. And san francisco where people had to move so far out from the center and it's untenable out of the capital two districts one through thirteen correct correct. It's a dystopia in future. We're heading towards danger to two and losing some of these rural areas like we still need those those regions and there's communities there that are just getting ravaged by by this movement would we. How do we help those people well so this is where maybe i don't sound like a very nice person but i think there's like what responsibility do we have to sustain communities parties that have lost an economic center or something like you know sort of that that i think happened over and over over time all over the world. It's not sort of a unique to now now and i think the challenges how this going back to this idea of seeing opportunity or risk if a business has gone away. We've seen that a plant enclosed something like that. What's the community's responsibility to retrofit essentially like how do you how do you restart. That reengaged that if that's being being in that place is so critical to the experience you want then. How do you recreate that. That's one of the bigger issues. I think that it's not an and you're not a nice person. I think that we thank you. I think that we've we've we've lost the ability to take a breath and say that disruption doesn't mean failure correct okay cracks and and we think disruption is failure and we need to do everything we can to slow it down or stop it to fix the problem. That just happened. Two days ago i look in a region like north carolina. North carolina was the furniture capital of the world and textiles styles and furniture got completely disrupted thirty years ago completely disrupted by cheap labor in asia gay both those industries and dan rather than trying to the federal government to protect furniture and textiles north carolina. Today is healthcare bio medical research financial services. It's a diversified economy. It's got the some of the best universities in the world. It's got some of the best companies in the world and now it's so much more stable and so you can look at that ten year period or fifteen year period where there's massive disruption and now i look at it and say that region is set for one hundred years now a historian would look at that and say okay you know ten or fifteen years. They were so highly concentrated that got your for a long time. They were concentrated if you had tobacco to it <hes> and then then they had this restriction period and then they reinvented themselves with for it was a public and private move ooh and now it's so much more healthy enable and more resilient so and that's not so we don't sound like heartless heartless capitalize. There's clearly human pain in a disruption for that doesn't mean that doesn't exist and there's ways to think about that as as like humans who care about each other but i think you're right micro. Well yeah but also it's like. How do you help the help. Humans understand disruption in the way. Ken was just describing it. I i mean i i think i'm very much agree with with wet kenan and her saying <hes> but <hes> any any kind of policy program to slow the disruption is equivalent slowing progress. It's bad idea and it will finally fail right <hes> finally it has to be about adaptation. Adaptation is fundamentally people. Moving around part of people moving living around is creating new communities new social capital in places but i think coming back to kenniston interesting second question. I want to come back to that which is has technology liberated us to go anyplace and i would like to suggest we've had a couple really big surprises. As the third industrial revolution rolled forward over the last generation. The first surprise is is that we absolutely weren't liberated to go anywhere. We don't have software coders making just as much money sitting in the rural north dakota as in <hes> cupertino california or seattle or austin. What we've actually found is that new technology has if anything accentuated the economic economic advantages of having lots of smart creative people together in a relatively dense tight location all exchanging ideas with each other <hes> and that is is really different from what people our age were were being told in like high school and college about how the way the future was going to play out so i think it would be nuts to predicted the world's going to change. That's that's been one big surprise the the other surprise i don't. I don't think perhaps it should surprise any of us know history but nonetheless something of a surprise is that as technology is rolled forward. We we all know all kinds of jobs have been destroyed but look at the unemployment rate more have been created uh-huh all kinds of new categories. I was just with a friend the other day. I asked what his daughters who had recently grown up. We're doing both of them. Were doing jobs. That didn't exist ten years ago. I had to ask what what does that even me and as he described these job descriptions but they were doing great and they were making pretty good income it was it was very interesting. I think what we see instagram influencers please say now they're not influencers but they're definitely around social media okay fair <hes> one of them's representing. I think a like a hospital system as social media person. Don't say you don't understand it 'cause then that puts us luddites again and said we're doomed. Yes if you're a good luck to you my friend no no don't don't worry about it but it's been really interesting to. If you take the long view right i mean if you go back to the year nineteen hundred when seventy percent of the people where where farmers and a whole lot others were essentially in the business of producing shelter and clothing and that essentially those three things food shelter and clothing dominated people's wallet. If you had said said we would go from seventy percent of the people farming to less than two percent people would have predicted mass unemployment economic chaos. We'd all be starving. I'll be starving. What did we actually fine. We all have anything too much food around and we we produce mountains of excess corn and wheat and so forth we're doing just fine on that front and what actually happened to people's wallets islets well food shelter and clothing if actually produce all those things much more efficiently than we used to do so now they consume less than forty percent. I think pri- closer to thirty percent of people's wallets what has taken their place all kinds of things that barely existed in the year nineteen hundred many of the did not exist at all and all of those in turn created enormous numbers of jobs. I think it realistic z. Prediction is that what will happen in the future so and what does that mean then for what is education. He'd look like exit. This world is getting is taking a._i. Coming we have you know bitcoin taking over on the currency front. What does education need look like now to keep up with this world. I'm gonna sound like a boring broken record but i think you you have to just teach kids make sure they can read make sure they can make sure they can do math and have an ability to solve problems and that sounds ridiculous but so many of our kids are actually not on track to to do that so when you imagine we were you you can predict sort of reasonably what jobs are going to look like in about ten years. It gets a little sketchy or when you start looking out beyond that twenty thirty thirty years right. It's hard for us to say. If you just go to coding camp andrew i can guarantee you sixty years of really solid salary and employment the rest of your if you you go to coding camp. Don't you just learn to write code that will go out of existence within ten years yeah which could be a great thing to know and learn i think the differences the expectation like when i think about my son then as he goes through school that i wanna make sure he understands. He's always got to be learning right. You're not just sorta vaccinated with all the knowledge that you have by age twenty two and can go on into life. You have to expect to kim's point things are going to constantly disrupt and change and you're likely going to have to figure out new skills learned to adopt opt understand opportunity and like all that i think is that actually has to be the focus we hear a lot of people are like we just give ipads to kids and if we really understands stands stem or steam those aren't wrong but they're not shiny objects solutions that will magically help our kids be successful over time. I think it's a mentality to be excited by change and not scared of it and if we educate kids that change is good. It's positive <hes> <hes> and you can be a part of it <hes> and tap into that am that innate imagination and wonder and rather than have it be fearful. Have it be a source of of of optimism that that excites people's minds and triggers creativity and and that ingenuity happens and that's one invention happens and most importantly that's when adaptation happened so even if somebody isn't the sharpest knife in the drawer they're. I'm not scared by chains. They say okay well that that maybe that didn't work out. How am i gonna reinvent myself. You know this is an opportunity. How cool is that and and rather than beaten be the beaten up by the idea of change you have to be energized by it and i think that starts it very young age and and with an it's hard if their parents are feeling beaten eaten up and out of it people are generation or feeling oh my god. We're being left behind so how can i how can i still that with my kids. I think he makes such an interesting point can't about <hes> reinvention because we sort of imagine that that's incredibly wrenching and difficult but gosh look around the five of us who are in the room too far as i can tell we've all totally reinvented ourselves sells and come up with new things to do and continued to come up with new paths in our in our in our lives professional lives and in other respects and i think that that you know one of the things that president bush has always he's always fast to point out is that the ultimate compassionate outcome is creating a set of conditions where there's equality of opportunity entity not necessarily equality of outcome and and if you create that quality of opportunity now we're fortunate in this room because we've all been to good colleges and we've all oh had that opportunity. Not everybody has that so. I think that back to an earlier point on there is a responsibility on making sure that that that base level sort of table stakes on success exist good education right safety public safety right if you can if you can get out go to city park okay as a kid or walk to school as a kid and not be afraid i mean we take that for granted here in the united states and most most those parts of the country but for those people that don't take that for granted there they they wake up in the morning and their mentality isn't about how how optimistic changes you know. How can i be optimistic about the the changing world so that that to me is where is where the basic building blocks that we can't lose sight of that. That are the building blocks. Those are the building blocks for with this sort of opportunity society and then if you have that i really am optimistic about people and i think people will survive and thrive absolutely absolutely i mean everything we know about humanity and kids and how people learn is this open to the new only happens when you're not concerned about surviving from point a. to point b. right and i think that is the that's always the dilemma about how do you support people to to have that ability ticket excited about the new yeah but but you know it does to come back to the very first thing you said andrew about fast versus slow it does also give grounds for optimism when you think about for example the role of government government right it may be as says that we're going to have to live with attention that government is the kind of institution that moves slowly right but it may also be that the most important functions of government or actually to do certain very basic things well which doesn't require very high speed change public safety is hard but we've been doing it a long time with success and a lot of places reading writing and math right an and her team working hard at figuring out how we can do that better but nonetheless we've been doing that a long longtime to we don't have to radically radically innovate figure out how to teach a child to read so maybe if we maybe if we kinda focus on well the institutions titians that move slowly do a few things and do them really well that maybe perhaps we actually have some grounds for optimism about how well do the job yes as we're kind of starting to near the end of our time here. We spent all season the first season of the strategic asking our guests. What is something that we're not talking about that. We should be talking about. We got a lot of really interesting answers. And what do you think we're not talking enough about that. We should be as a nation boy andrew. I don't recall here. This is what just popped in my mind so this is my unedited answer as they should be adulting like which is an element of what we've been talking about. But how do you actually properly prepare people to have prosperous self-determined lives and like do you know how to change your tire. Unbalance your budget. Do you know how to be now like like really practical adulting sort of skills and i'm partly inspired by hearing molyneaux millennial the other day described to other millennials gleneagles about how to do well at work and her advice which i thought was particularly spot on was no understand how you can add value and then explain that to someone else but if you don't start with your value proposition you're gonna be stuck and i just thought oh what a perfect capture of a piece of great workplace advice for a young one person so i wish we all talked a little bit more about the practicality of adulting. Is that the job education system not solely right like. I think that that sort of i'm not sure who is responsible but i think there's a little more collective responsibility probably for all of us and this is not to say that people over the age of thirty have like nailed eld adulting clear i know i haven't i good luck with that. Enter a. i'm thinking maybe my fifties were really going to hit my stride on that front colin. What do you think <hes>. I would say applying the lessons of brain science and let me give a very practical example. We've learned a whole lot about human brains work right. One thing we've learned is that it's incredibly beneficial to human beings to slow down go outside. Maybe take a walk through some greenspace well. To what degree are we actually acting on that lesson i mean there's abundant evidence that the people essentially become creative smarter calmer their heart rate goes down all of these things if you actually in a sense let them unplug a little bit from this high-speed world that we've created right well. I think we have a lot of work to do to actually create more opportunities for well. The kids the adults the those of us who are adults but not quite great to actually work that into our lives a little bit more. I think we could use to talk about that a lot more interesting and we have a great park outback hope to uh. Hopefully we'll see you walking around and every day right. I do and i absolutely don't have time for that. I go out on our balcony and look out and try to take it in the green and decompress. That's a little bit for all of us. Can what do you think is <hes>. We're not talking about. I don't think we're talking about the twenty two trillion dollars of debt. The united states has love and probably three to four times that of contingent liabilities so the justice i was starting to compare and switch ironic is is that used to be at the top of everybody's list the national debt clock and everything else and now now it seems become fashionable to say it's really not anything to worry about but just like a household insolvency creeps up on you and you're fine until the moment that you're not fine and somehow we're not talking about that but that's what i was going to answer. Two answers versus the daily double here. I think that the the the ultimate irony in that people are accepting of the fact when i hear this it makes me cringe and it has nothing to do with republicans door democrats because it's happening in both this acceptance of what we're calling a post truth society that were facts don't matter and and we're in an age where facts are more accessible than ever and people are accessing them the least so what are you. What do we do about it. How do you how do you change because because part of it comes from the echo chamber as you look for people that are that agree with you and you hear what they say. Okay well. This number of people agree with me. How do we how do we get past that. I don't have a good answer answer. I think that people are becoming very experiential and i think that if it happens to them then they'll start to get it so i think that when you're talking about some of these major forces <hes> that we couldn't we might see it coming until there's a riot in the street people are we're going to say oh well. I guess the conditions were bad weren't they but they had to wait for the riot to really wake up to it and all the empirical data at all all the research reports and all the all the people who are talking about it at think tanks all over the country and all over the world <hes> their <hes> their their actions actions and recommendations will then get pulled out and say look at the people who were talking about it. What are we supposed to do about it but it is. It's a real problem and part of it. I think is there's a real cynicism. <hes> it's generational <hes>. It's it's across countries. It's political and that cynicism awesome has had people say when they see something they don't like they have one word whatever well i was a singing your example about out the debt clock and post truth right like the debt clock and the debt cliff facing us as a fact but post-truth simon adjust whatever that can whatever ever whatever you're so boring about an monday. I'm going to try and i'm gonna try and ended optimistically though 'cause we. I think this is andrew yeah so that's that's why i'm here. I like to think but the that's really highlights. The importance of programs like the presidential leadership scholars program where where they are really working hard to make sure that people from opposite sides of the aisle are both learning how to listen to each other learn how to solve problems together now. Can i know you've seen and that's a that is a great that is a that's a great example. I am also also very encouraged. There are millions of non viral stories out there of really extraordinary things being done by ordinary people we we we're are you able to see a subset of them at the bush center but we obviously can't see them all applaud them all in highlight them all but there's so many people in every community around the country who who are who are helping and doing that the generalizations the that's what will will fight the generalizations and and and and so there there there is a lot of hope out there because there's a lot of good work being done completely guys. Thank you so much for doing this. This was this was fun. I hope we get to do it again and and keep debating topics. I think we we didn't we hardly even got to a is. Let's do it again. We'll talk. We'll really dive deep into a on the next one or east sports or sports more which my dad promised me. I was never going to be able to make money playing video games and now now look dad see see. I should've been practicing the whole time. Thanks guys if you enjoy today's episode like to help us spread the word about the strategic to please give us a five star review and tell your friends to subscribe for available on apple podcasts <unk> spotify and all the major listening apps. If you're tuning in on a smartphone tapper swipe over the cover art you'll find episode with helpful information and details. He may have missed fister. Mr teachers was produced by u._n. Pappas at the george w bush institute in dallas texas thank you for listening.

united states andrew america ken hirsch president george w bush institute bush director california san francisco bush institute dallas bush bush institute north carolina george bush administration amazon congress bush center austin china
Dan Gilbert

The Strategerist

19:03 min | 1 year ago

Dan Gilbert

"Detroit native Dan Gilbert was forced to watch his hometown. Go through some hard times left the city shell of his former self, but as his businesses saw enormous success, Dan became a central figure in the revitalization of Detroit, a revitalization that was carried by the unique character of the city. I was asked not too long ago within the last week. See you gotta name Detroit in one word, and I use Grady. So in the grit comes from a scars. I mean, it comes from being through very difficult challenging times like trade has for fifty plus years sixty years up until several years ago. And I think the old cliche again of, you know, won't kill you makes you stronger, I think that's that's sort of the the feeling not just in leadership at across the the city and the suburbs. And the whole state recorded live minutes before Dan went on stage at the forum on leadership, we talk about Detroit. But also lead our nerdy sides show, a discussion about dictionaries and the SARS and this basketball fan. Well, this Dow. Mavericks fan couldn't resist asking the Cleveland Cavaliers owner about jerk the scheme. I'm Andrew Kaufman. And this is the strategic presented by the George W Bush institute. What happens when he crossed the forty third president late night, sketch, comedy and compelling conversation. This strategic has a podcast born from the word strategically which was coined by the now in braced by the George W Bush administration we highlight the Americans feared of leadership and compassion through thought provoking conversations. And we're reminded that the most effective leaders are the ones who laughed. We are recording live on location for the first time on the strategic are first foray into this into this new adventure, and we're joined by Dan, Gilbert, a fellow new podcast or who is the founder and chairman of Quicken Loans and the founder and chairman of rock ventures. And of course, the chairman of the Cleveland Cavaliers, Dan, thank you so much joining us now, it's great to be here. I got two nights ago. Forty eight hours ago, I was on the other side of the Mike I got to do or got to interview Carly clause. And you got me I think I got the better hand. She's I mean when you talk about a smart young lady who is killing it in a lot of areas. I mean, we'll get around here too. I'm going to say we're going to give her a call and trying to get her on this show. We're also joined by our co host today. Laura Collins, who's the director at the Bush institute estimate economic growth initiative, Laura, thanks for spending a few minutes here before you go on the main stage again, well, we're in Dallas, and it's been about twelve air twelve hours since the Dirk Nowitzki era ended so I kind of have. To start by asking you as a fellow NBA team owner, what is Dirk meant to the league from your perspective. You're not tell you what nowitski was one of the classics, and there's several of them, of course, or many of them the NBA. But he is you something special because he comes over here from Germany, you know, a lot of times over the years European players. Sometimes got out, you know, a little bit of a bad rep on saying, you know, only a handful make it and this and that which isn't really true if you look at some of the numbers, but he just carried himself with such such class was always great to the fans was great Dallas love Dallas was loyal to the franchise all these years, and you know, Mark Cuban who I know fairly well, virtually podcast guest. True. He'll go down and he did it in a tank top. If we don't we don't roll quite that way Bush center I noticed, but I don't know if that was good for anybody. Mark Cuban we like to kid around. But I I gotta tell you that. I just think man, Dirk Nowitzki. You can't say enough great things about them. And hopefully, he'll do great things going forward in Dallas. And in. Nited states. I think he's established as a leader. And we're all about leadership at the Bush institute, we were want to start with you is what have you learned as an NBA owner about leadership like you come into this as as a as a successful businessman, and what lessons have you learned since becoming an owner. Well, NBA ownership or any professional franchise sports franchise ownership is really very different than any other business. I mean, it is a business in a sense. But you know, when you're not true for Noor or a business leader or leader of anything any political organization, you generally can come in in the morning, and there's all these dials like hundreds of dials of things, you could do to change just ideas and things you can get going. But when you're at that level in sports is really there's really three things you can do if things aren't going good during the season. Well, you can maybe say how can we draft better players with address one day? You're right. So that takes care of that. If there's free agents that are gonna be sized generally in the summer over ten days, and then there's trades is another way to improve your Astrum prove your town and trade. We need the other. The other side has to agree to trade is not always easy. So I I would say you have to be more patient than maybe normal. And I think y'all should be patient. But you really have to have a lot of patients, which is really conflicts with typical entrepreneurs. So so I think there's a judgment period when you realize that, hey, you you may own this franchisor business, but you don't control everything my, man. And you know, that's what I would say to somebody don't control it, all and and got to be patient and set a culture. So so what we learned quickly. We have to just set the culture and make sure that we're hiring the people in coaching front office and everybody else that sort of matches that culture, just like any other business. Yeah. You mentioned Coulter cultures very important to your other businesses as well. Can you talk a little bit about? I think you have was the nineteen 'isms the one thousand nine hundred twenty s and one added soon, but we don't add them on very lightly. Like, we try to look for you know, when somebody makes a suggestion is that covered already because we put too many out there, then sort of dilutes it all, but we. We have these nineteen little cutesy things that we call 'isms, but they really are sort of long thought out and a based on observable behavior. What we think works and doesn't work the way we look at culture is maybe if you look at a garden, right? Good soil good sunlight, you know, great, fertilizer and great water rights. If you have those elements, we think that's our job in a business, and maybe any entity that we're involved with. If you have great environment. You have those those elements then the seeds that grow growing. They're going to thrive in our case in most businesses caso Caesar talent people, and so you could take the same seed, right? And you put it in a bad condition garden, and they'll grow little bit. But he put it in great garden. It's going to thrive and that that's the way we look at it. And the the 'isms these little things are sort of the guide post or the compass, and if people make decisions priorities and actions and behaviors in line with who we are in essence, which is our 'isms things tend to go a lot better than they would do you recruit for culture or do you? Cultivate, it so great question. I think both I think that we don't want people say these words, all I'm not sure he or she is a match. I think that they most cases the that's what they mean. They may not be saying. Yeah, they'd probably mean, they don't match our culture. And you know, there may be people who do great who just wouldn't thrive in our garden for whatever reason it's probably better for them better for us that they thrive somewhere else. So, you know, we we definitely pound the table on culture, but we still have miles to go. I it's a hard thing to do. And I think that culture is not automatically or by chance. It could be good or great. If you don't have won a lot of businesses. We'll tore people through and I say to them. I always ask people what your culture like. And some people say, we don't really have a culture that means it's bad automatically. They clearly have one. They just either done what it is. Or don't want to admit to exactly and it can't just by happenstance. Just oh, it's happens to be good because I from experience. I mean, you know, over three decades and business you. Even we go all out, we stayed it. We have meetings via orientations I'm still involved with every employee your every team member the first six weeks there somewhere in the first six weeks for a full day. We take them through it, and we still have challenges. So, you know. You just automatically deteriorates. Like, the default is not good. Sharon, so. Yeah. But but but once you get once you get it there, and every guessing you're hiring for it's like magic. Yeah. Great. Yeah. Well, you've got such a a wide variety of interests and investments through through your theoretical holdings. But one of the things that caught our is that you're the owner of dictionary dot com. The Sorus dot com is there another name for the source. Do you know? That's an excellent question. Yeah. So you got me twenty minutes. Give me twenty minutes. Actually, I was being facetious when I asked somebody that the other day, and they said, yes synonym, and they got me. Right. Isn't it sending them sort of? I can I can see a little bit book synonyms. Maybe. Yeah. Maybe. Yeah. There you go the collection of synonyms. We we we bought that. I don't want to say on a whim, but we just are. So so married to the digital economy and ecommerce and all this business, and it was a little bit of a fun play. But we also think there's got a got a huge upset in connection to Oliver businesses. Because really if you think about language language is the currency of the digital world. Yes. And there's a lot of ideas flying around dictionary. But you know, I could only have nine minutes left. Do you have a favorite word question? We're thinking actually of getting celebrities and others. That's one of our ideas actually to put their little page on dictionary. And then they could put their favorite rewards of the enchanted. So as a nerd, I would love that. I would too. I would I would be all over that. There's there's not I'll give you since you guys are into the dictionary thing things finally found some people. Hell, yeah. You're in policy Spacey. I'll hurt. So we think we think we can sell words now. What does that really mean? Right. Well, dictionary dot com is the well, I guess these self appointed official keeper English language, right? But we do have dictionary dot com, and we're thinking that. So let's say you're Nike Nike has to buy sneakers. If we're going to have somebody, you know, you go to it and it's owned by Nike, right? Or let's say, you know, if you really want pressure, your wife or girlfriend or husband or boyfriend, or whatever, it might be, you know, if you just imagine it's Valentine's that you bought them the word love, and they own it. I mean, that's. Star. Right. We'll see, you know, people say that except stars are really can't get there. There's no tonight's and do people go like this. So it's taking that and saying these are real words like is for businesses like even on you guys gonna George W Bush or something trademark, you know. It's like why not have a certificate and every time somebody comes to that word you can play around. Maybe get, you know, get them to go to your site, or whatever it might be. So it's just infancy or you're a lawyer and I'm malaria. So if we had more time on the podcast, we could talk about whether you could it's and trademark general use words. Well, yeah, you probably you can sort of unofficially, right? Say see you on our site you own this work meal. Yeah. So that's that's that's an interesting one more because you guys around. Okay. So micro dictionaries like menus. How many times you've been a restaurant all these food? So we wanted to have the micro dictionary that anymore. That's ever been using menu. Every Bill click it oh that same thing for pharmacies right for drug, and you can go on and doing that all the time. I can't identify half the foods on the menu. I can't pronounce them. I thought Dallas. Are you guys are all just, you know, steak and potatoes? No, this we've got I think one of the one of the newest restaurants just got named to the chef something she got a big award for being an emergence emerging talent. Okay. Because I was excited to just go get some this is really basically we can the name you can do steak we can't do barbecue. But we we doing disservice though, we didn't talk a little bit about one of your true, Love's which is Detroit, and that leads us into really your conversation that you're going to have on the main stage here at the forum on leadership with Laura Laura key, give us a little bit of a preview of what we're gonna be talking about. They can't tell me how the answers before. Now. Now, this is we're all friends here. We really are interested in the idea that the private sector can effect change in communities, Detroit has had some very public struggles particularly in the public sector, but you you made a decision. Almost a decade ago to move your company's downtown. And so and you've had an outsized effect. I think on on on the community. I've I've had the good fortune to travel to Detroit, and I've seen the revitalization. Hold on. Kgo were you there? I think I was there in two thousand sixteen in the summer. I'll tell you what three years in Detroit dog yourself twenty one. But but yet because we're on this certain trajectory, but this will love to have you come back to you even saw sixteen. There was a significant change. Yeah. And you can see it as you drive in sort of how it's moved outward from downtown as you drive in from the airport, and you see some of the things that are I Kana cly decayed. And it's so sad. What was allowed to happen in that city is funny because I remember, you know, for sure I'm fourth generation detroiter kids are fifth. So I always tell people I'm like trade farmer. Wave moved in the square mile on going west to me was going. East lansing? They don't want. It was. So I will tell you that. I remember pulling up as we moved our first people down retry. So it's almost nine years ago. And the saying the same thing that you just looking at how did this happen? How did this happen? What kind of failure leadership at every level headed happen? Because to me, that's we're all starts end. Yeah. Yeah. Definitely. It's it's come a long long way since the bankruptcy and thirteen the city's Bank. See mean things have been, you know, rowing in the same direction with all groups, which is critical for and have any public private partnership or any success? Yeah. I you know, I think Detroit has this reputation as being sort of gritty. I mean, my image of Detroit are the the bad boy pistons teams in the eighties and nineties are you old enough to remember that I am here member that or young though, eighty nine ninety? Yeah. Man oppressed, are you from are you from now, but I'm from a basketball fan family. And so I just I those things were on TV a lot. I remember those teams I remember Dennis Rodman before the tattoos and. But in visiting it's I think people don't realize sort of the deep seated and beautiful culture of the city that exists independent, and maybe even because of the manufacturing that was there before. And so there is this sort of fine arts element and this beautiful architecture. That's in a place, and it was a lot of crumble, and that's fundamentally I think you mentioned the leadership issue. It's just so sad that there weren't people more invested. We could go. We could go on forever. For good news is you'll have another chance shop, but I will tell you the you've hit it. Right. I think he trade is a very very gritty city. In fact, I was asked not too long ago within the last week. He got a name Detroit in one word and I use gritty. So in the grit comes from a scars. I mean, it comes from being through very difficult challenging times like Detroit has for fifty plus years, maybe sixty years up until several years ago. And I think the old cliche again of won't kill you makes you stronger, I think that's that's sort of the the feeling not just in leadership at across the the the city in the suburbs and the whole state. And so now, you have people are starting to believe because there's not just us, but us an and others, you know, getting people to to believe in things that are happening. You know, we're saying happening employment. Now, you know when I think it was twenty five percent unemployment at the peak down in the seventy eight range or something. It's still high. But it's comparably so huge almost civil employment. Yeah. You really in downtown where we are. Which is very solarge downtown's seven seven point two square miles of downtown. We are one hundred percent occupied and residential and office. So you can't even we gotta go vertical. Now for the first time at decades to grow you can't grow. If you don't have any more places for people to go. So that would be on heralded on if I were to set it at somebody nine years that's going to be the case here until twenty nineteen. They would have probably put me away. Does. It is. But people, you know, they start believing in the momentum breeds momentum. And here we are. And as a as a Detroit businessman, what would you tell other business people that are wanting that need to move the needle find a place for their company? Why would you say come to Detroit all the best place for tech company, especially because I mean, you can be in downtown Detroit and five hour drive, which is a big it's a big sort of metric that companies use like how many population? What does the population of five hour drive of Detroit? It's like fifty two million people. I mean, all the way up to Toronto and Chicago, and Pittsburgh, Indianapolis, and you know, you have all these universities that are pumping out computer, engineering tech people and Canada's on the border and on people know that so Detroit is actually the only place that is north of Canada in the United States, South Dakota wanted to Windsor. Right. So I still think you must have a cousin in Detroiters. That we took our work up there. We work on NAFTA. And we took a bunch of people from the US Canada, Mexico to Detroit and Windsor, and we did a couple of days in the city, so tunnel or bridge to candidates you go on my on my scouting trip. We did tunnel with the group. We took him in a bus across the ambassador bridge, which is as you know, quite scary. If you get stuck in traffic, and you can look down and straight through the concrete and do you want to do they are built? Yeah. There you a second bridge. So a few miles a few miles away. But I think that I'm I don't even know what we're talking about. Well, let's come more questions for you. Actually, I think we need to get you to the main stage. Now, I think it's time for the for the big show, which you'll be able to watch on WWW dot Bush Senator slash forum on leadership, and you should absolutely listen to dance new podcast the speed of the game, which has had Mark Cuban and Tom Izzo already and more. Great guest to come. You know, as I mentioned earlier, currently Kloss, and we also interviewed a quantum physicists from Canada. A woman came shawnee, and I can't remember last name gauche geo G H O, S, H, brilliant, one of these quantum physicists. And we can we can spend our some of that. Maybe we will. Or maybe we already have. You have a podcast. We have a podcast, there's all kinds of Lear. We had several quantum physics questions written down. We just didn't quite get to them this. We can get we're entangled. So we'll sometime maybe already. Did. We don't right. Thank you so much. Thank you guys. Great looking forward to it. If you enjoy today's episode would like to help us spread the word about the strategic to please give us a five star review until your funds to subscribe for available on apple podcasts Spotify and all the major listening apps, if you're tuning in on a smartphone tapper swipe over the cover art, you'll find so notes with helpful information and details he may have missed the strategic was produced, but you Anna Pappas at the George W Bush institute in Dallas, Texas. Thank you for listening.

Detroiters Dallas Detroit NBA founder and chairman Dirk Nowitzki Bush institute basketball Mark Cuban George W Bush institute Dan Gilbert scars Laura Laura key Andrew Kaufman George W Bush administration Cleveland Cavaliers Canada ambassador bridge Carly president
William McNulty - Veterans with a New Mission

The Strategerist

23:45 min | 7 months ago

William McNulty - Veterans with a New Mission

"Just because of veteran has left active duty military service doesn't mean that they've given up their sense of duty as communities struggle with the far reaching effects of Colvin Nineteen Team Rubicon. Volunteers are building field hospitals delivering food to neighborhoods in need and doing everything they can to help team. Rubicon. Usa CO founder. William McNulty talks about how mission to help Haiti after the earthquake turned into a global reaching nonprofit. The hard skills and soft skills that you gain through your military experience are to disaster zones in it was a realization. That my co-founder I had there in port-au-prince in the aftermath of the earthquake that he'll Puerto Prince looked like Palooza or any other destroyed Iraqi city that I had seen. We'll also tells the story of a veteran who is so eager to help in Haiti that he talked his way onto a private plane. Found someone to drive around Puerto Prints looking for the rest of his crew and got straight to work. We'll be talking about this example of America at its best on the strategic presented by the George W Bush Presidential Center. Welcome to William McNulty co-founder team Rubicon and founder and CEO of team Rubicon Global and. He's also a presidential scholar which will cover in a little bit. We'll thanks for being here. Dan Andrew. Thank you for having so our next edition of the catalyst. Bush Institute's Journal of Ideas is going to be about America at its best and while there are a lot of great examples of America is best team. Rubicon jumped out at us as being an example of America at. Its best right now as we deal with the cove in nineteen crisis. Can you start by telling us a bit about team? Rubicon sure and in Andrew Team Rubicon started his team Rubicon USA. It was a nonprofit that utilizes the skills and experiences of military veterans pairs them with first responders in rapidly deploys them as teams as emergency response teams into natural disasters and it was a it was through that continued services during natural disasters. That the veterans that we were recruiting into this. 'cause received a new sense of purpose or mission a new mission A community or pure supports A new sense of identity. Those three things that veterans lose when they're taking off the military uniform and has been so successful so far that you've you've taken a worldwide right today team. Rubicon is no longer a single organization. It's a it's a brand teamer. Become brand that veterans around the world. Identify with so. We have team Rubicon Australia. Which is headquartered in Sydney team? We become Canada which is headquartered in Toronto Team. Begun Norway which is headquartered in Oslo team will become UK which is outside of London and Team USA. Of course which is headquartered here in the in in Los Angeles in the United States Team Rubicon global is the is headquartered in Washington. Dc in soon to be moving to Europe. Mtr G call. It is the hub of this network of spokes around the world and these folks are the country units around the world in so trg bills out that network by launching new country units and then continues to support that network through central services and technology training partnerships in fundraising to name in. The few I know makes me optimistic. As we all fight this pandemic that the vets are out there acting on that higher purpose of helping others. They have so many times. What kind of missions are they taking on as they quote Unquote Deploy Right now? So there's no country in it right now is deployed outside of its own country. Each country unit is engaged in the domestic response of its country to to in nineteen or a if there are any natural disasters Tr UK in Kingdom is conducting mortuary affairs So that's a first for tr helping remove the deceased from homes and hospitals to to mortuaries while on tr. Canto along with team. Usa has created neighbors helping neighbors initiative where they're individual acts of service. Canada is also Staffing foodbanks the USA is also doing food delivery to underserved populations. It's it's also built a field hospital in northern California. Norway is using its veterans in a similar way as candidates conduct acts of service across the country in Australia which is obviously in the summer southern hemisphere so that they're in the upside down world And they're just going into their fall during fall going into winter whereas here in the northern hemisphere where we're going into summer. Kobe has not struck. Australia is hard as in the US and UK so team of Stra is preparing with local and state governments to provide a surge capacity in when and if called upon or global. I should say I should make it clear that global When there's no international operations to support globals role really in this situation is just to provide operational grants to the country units. Which is what we're doing when a veteran comes out of gets out of the service Mike Yourself. You're your marine correct correct. Yeah so what did when you founded team Rubicon. When you co-founder team Rubicon founded team Rubicon Global. What was going through your mind. Were you making conscious effort of we need to get these guys kind of back in action to rethinking more in terms of doing greater so team Rubicon? First operation was importer port-au-prince Haiti in January. Two thousand ten. I had just left the Marine Corps. Not Too long ago before that and so I was wondering what the next chapter of my life was going to be. I was working in the intelligence community at the time and I was also thinking of you know. This isn't something I wanted to do for the rest of my life. I had been working on Iraq for many years at this point in so I guess we founded it almost by accident activity. You could say kind of I mean. None of us have deployed on that first. Operation TO HAITI THOUGHT. We were building a veteran lead. Disaster Response Organization International Scale Right. I know that I had thought that Annette I operation that I was going to go back to Washington. Dc in continue working in the intelligence community but my background in a way before that was in the Marines as he said and I come from in fourth generation public servants so I was named after my great grandfather who was a Chicago firefighter. That's I grew up in Chicago. And so I you're allowed. I grew up in this lineage of I'm a public service so I was not surprisingly when I graduated from college. It was you know you're either. Join the military our our never and so I enlisted after graduating from college which is also not a popular thing to do. But it's it's the it's your calling right. I thought Perhaps I didn't have the confidence That that I that I To become an officer at the time but really what I really wanted. I wanted that experience of being the low man on the Totem Pole. And what it was like you know when Shit Rolls Downhill what. It was like to be at the bottom of that hill. I thought it would make me a better leader one day and I would bet money. That probably has at this point as your we see the position that you're in now that remains to be seen so when you see these guys that are supporting their home countries in the code response whether that's a field hospital delivering food or doing whatever operational support is needed in the country when you see these guys and ladies that are involved in this on the ground do you see a change in them. What do you see when you watch the the people that are getting involved in your organization? I think you see a transformation in the people that get involved in team Rubicon and it's not just team Rubicon. There are other great organizations out there. There's T- Mar. Wbz There's the mission continues. But as I said before there are three things that you lose when you take off military formulas purpose or mission you lose a community or peer to peer support system. You'll lose a sense of identity and you regain those things through through tr or the friendships that you form through our WB when when you leave the military These men and women disperse to their hometowns lose those fiscal connections to each other. Those men and women they served with and by engaging in these like TRT MARK WB or the mission continues these veterans bills a new support system. Helping them realize that they're not alone. And what kind of impact have you seen them? Make too? Because I think that's the big part of it we. We often talk about veteran employment at the Bush Center and we see time and time again. That these these guys and gals come out and they're great leaders and it's just a matter of translating that resume. I would assume you see that too on the quote unquote battlefields of team Rubicon. Where they're probably incredibly effective doing these food delivery. Infield hospital missions. They're incredibly effective. You know the the skills on the hard skills and soft skills that you gain through your military experience are applicable to disaster zones in it was a realization. You know that my co-founder Had there in port-au-prince in the aftermath of the earthquake that important for prince looked like volusia or any other destroyed. Iraqi city that I had seen and at the same time. Those skills that these veterans had in by chance the majority of our team that went into port-au-prince the majority of them just by chance for war veterans. But it's obviously not by chance because these are these are people who are determined to raise their hand. Their volunteers right the volunteered to serve when they wore the uniform so that they are continuing to volunteer. And you'll find him volunteering to go down to port-au-prince after the earthquake I guess shouldn't be that surprising right. I mean just like your your firefighter grandfather that came before you peop- folks that run toward danger. Not from danger I want. I'll say this to you. Know One of the things that I'm proudest about is building a partnership with team red white and blue in the early days of tr. And it's a way to the way I saw. It was a way to stay like mentally healthy by staying active by state mentally healthy there. You are more prepared to respond to a disaster and there was some debate about building that partnership with NTR. Not everyone wants to do it because summer. Viewing it as an organization that would be competing with for funds or whatnot. But fortunately more of US felt that Physical fitness is foundational to to mental health in that partnership with our WB as we call it would increase the readiness of our volunteers to respond to natural disasters so we found at the Bush institute that these peer to Peer Networks. We call them like teamer. Wb and team Rubicon there. A real benefit veterans that are transitioning from the military. And so we said. How can we help these organizations already doing such a great job and so we founded the you want US alliance which works make sure that the vets and peer to peer networks like yours can get high quality help for the visible for the invisible wounds of war when they need it. We've started pilot program currently running a central Florida Houston Colorado specifically for the on the ground leaders of organizations like yours. We wanted to be able to help. Those leaders be able to connect their charges with mental health. Care when they see someone that might be struggling a little and as one of the leaders on the ground. What have you seen as far as relationships between veterans when they're back in action on a mission through team Rubicon? So it's a good question in what I've seen in the field is when you take these men and women in you. Put them in a situation where they're doing hard labor for At least eight hours a day at the end of the day. They've dropped their defenses And they're opening up in ways that they would not be opening up Had they just been going through their regular teens In not deployed in? What we're seeing is them being moral talking about their experiences in the military so it's almost cathartic in a way that the service that we're providing is also providing this this opening for them to talk about their experiences in the military things that they otherwise had bottled at bottled up. Is You know it's it's I don't recall any part of my military training that encouraged me to talk about my experiences. I was if anything you know. Keep a stiff upper lip and don't show any sort of weakness. Maybe that's changing in today's Marine Corps. I don't know I think it probably is. I think we're learning a lot but I do think that there are There's a place for programs like tr in the way that the service provides this indirect mental health benefit to the individual veteran. You know before we came on. I was watching. You gave the commencement address at the University of Kansas a couple years ago. Which was so I am really should be calling you Dr McNulty. Got Honorary PhD. Then so I apologize for my for for not calling you. Buy Your proper title Dr. Yeah that that speech. You talked about a volunteer with team. Rubicon named Named Clay Hunt. It was just a really great story. I was wondering if you could tell a little better that story here today from the I think that's from the Puerto port-au-prince early days of team Rubicon. Right right. Well Claes Amazing Story. And even the amazing man and he Clay was at Marine Corps scuttle sniper and he didn't join us on our the initial eight team that crossed over into to Puerto Prince. He actually I think he was. He wanted to However he had a wedding or something else that he had to attend and then he started reading about us in the news and I was down in port-au-prince in received this I received this message. From my cofounders. Father in clay had served with my co founder. Jake what in In in the Marines so only by reason that my blackberry was the only film that was working because T. mobile somehow worked in port-au-prince but at and T. in sprint and verizon and others did not my phone the conduit to Our people back in the United States that were helping organize following teams. Received a note that said. Hey Clay is on his way to. Port. Au Prince in a relay. That to my co-founder and he was really angry because he said hey tell him. He's got a coordinate his movement. He can't do this. We can't be responsible for him. I mean it was a logistical nightmare. Right to get someone to this point where we were at importer prints considering everything that was going and we're conducting operations in the medical triage operation so In a disaster zone in a disaster zones that I convey that message back that said you know tell him to stand down and I got another message back. That said he's on his way he doesn't have a phone. They'll find you in Puerto prints in so you know. I conveyed that to jake and Jake just shook his head and two days later We are at the General Hospital port-au-prince and that morning there was an earthquake and we had Everyone inside the hospital had been removed. Moved outside into the courtyard and It was probably a mid to late afternoon and picking up the hospital beds in moving them back into the hospital because our our firefighters had determined the structure safe in. I'm picking up one corner this bed in the other corner. I see this man. Pick up the bed. And he's got this tattoo on him that I had heard about In it was clay hunt in because I recognize the Tattoo in there. Were no words exchanged. He just said he looked at Megyn. Ready one two three lift in we move this in. I later found out how he found. Us importer prince. He had bought a ticket from Los Angeles to Santo Domingo in the Dominican Republic he befriended he somehow befriended two people Who had a small plane in convinced those two people to fly him into port-au-prince amazing he walked out of the port-au-prince airport? He didn't speak a lick of French in. He hired someone to drive him to a hospital because he had heard that we were at a hospital in he went to a couple different locations before ending up at the General Hospital in. That's when he found us and just went straight to work. And when you hire a veteran that's that's the kind of guy that you're getting right there is that it's hard to put on a resume you put on the line of the resumes determined and resourceful. But that's how you actually see it in action is going to convince. A convinces stranger to let me fly on his private plane into a disaster. So I can help. It's a testament to what you guys are are made of after Jake. Stop Parading Him. I think then. He gave him a hug putting work. All right earned it so you're you're also presidential leadership scholar Miss. We didn't spend a couple minutes talking touching on that real quick. That's our partnership at the Bush Center the Clinton Foundation the Bush forty one library and LBJ foundation. What was that experience like for you? Those a few years ago. So how where were you in your career? And how did that change who you are today? We'll presidential leaders have leadership. Scholars was at a great experience. I was in the inaugural class. The Guinea pig class. And we're still polishing things at that point that's right and part of it. Everyone shows a project might project was team to become global and so I was using what I learned who through P. L. S. Explain that a little But I was using what I learned through. P. L. S. to to launch build and launch team Rubicon Global Time including launching team Rubicon United Kingdom. Which was our first new country in it but it is a fascinating program that you do a deep dive into the decisions of the last six presidents in their administrations in their executive staff each module has its own theme in these are things like negotiating leadership partnerships development building alliances in. You learn how the administration's came to decisions that affected civil rights economic trade packages building coalitions for military action. It was that last thing that I mentioned that I was so interested in having spent twenty five years of my adult life in mid twenties in our in Iraq you worked on on team Rubicon global in these still keep in touch with your fellow classmates is that is that never selective for you. The network is very active in. You know we hold annual reunions city reunions but we annually. We hold a reunion which gets every class together last one was in Washington. Dc there you continue to stay. Active introduced a colleague of mine is the chief fellow. Appeal scholar is the chief administrative officer for the city of New Orleans and so when they were preparing for Corona virus you. He asked me if team Rubicon could help them in their response because they were under resourced and I was able to make an introduction team become USA who are able to provide assistance to the city of New Orleans. So we continue to use that network in one instance that mean It seems like almost every natural disaster given the The frequency and severity of are increasing. It seems like someone pl SS reaching out with a connection than I selfishly taken in exploited for the for the people that the victims of disasters or or are teams trying to deploy into that disaster zone thinking quite call that exploiting since it's for the greater good but we gotta get you back to running the things that y'all are up to but before I let you go. We always asks everybody at the end. One question which is what are we as a nation. Not Talking enough about that. We should be talking more about. I think income disparities the single greatest issue security issue facing facing our country. I've read that Columbia University. Researchers have projected that poverty rates in the US could soon reach their highest levels in at least half a century in at the same time. Billionaire have increase their wealth by nearly ten percent over the three weeks since Corona Virus. Too cold so it appears that the virus is only exacerbating income disparity because our system of government mainly knows how to protect the economy in the corporations. And I don't think this bodes well for our future in there for government will at some point have to step in with policies that reverse this trend. That's one reason why we're grateful for nonprofits team. Rubicon that's really providing a lot of hope to people in a lot of areas and inspirational for us and so we really can't thank enough for the work that you're doing. Thank you for having the Good luck with your work out there and thinks Andrew Learn more about team Rubicon at www dot team rubicon global dot. Org and team Rubicon USA dot. Org You can also learn more about the BUSH INSTITUTE WARRIOR WANT US ALLIANCE AT WWW bush center dot org slash W. W. A. And you can learn more about the Presidential Leadership Scholars Program at www dot presidential leadership scholars dot org. If you enjoy this episode of the strategic. Please tell a friend and give us five stars and Apple podcasts. And if you'd like to leave feedback you can reaches at at the Bush Center on twitter. I'm your host Andrew Kaufman. Thank you for listening.

Rubicon US port-au-prince Rubicon Global co-founder team Rubicon George W Bush Presidential Cen United States Team Rubicon glo Rubicon Australia team Rubicon co-founder Dc Haiti Rubicon USA Marine Corps Bush Center William McNulty Washington Jake Dan Andrew Puerto Prints
Hector Barreto - Entrepreneurship and Immigrants

The Strategerist

31:09 min | 4 months ago

Hector Barreto - Entrepreneurship and Immigrants

"Hecker Baretto grew up an entrepreneurial immigrant family that believed in hard work. His father even had him in his quote. Unquote executive training program which early on consisted of waiting tables in the family restaurant, and that training must have taken hold because that zeal for hard work carried through Hector's life. He eventually headed up the small business administration and the Bush administration from two thousand one to thousand and five, and now serves as chairman of the Latino coalition and through those life experiences. Hector has remained grounded in thinking. Thinking of America the land of opportunity, it is like no other country in the world. There's something very very special. We should never take that for granted for those of us that opportunity travel we. We understand that we have something really really special here, and we should always serve to protect it. We'll discuss entrepreneurship and the policies that encourage it and hector shares what he's learned about the Latino community throughout his career I mean Andrew Kaufman, and this is the strategic presented by the George Bush Presidential Center. This conversation was recorded earlier this year in person at the Bush Center. Welcomed or guest today, Hector Baretto Hector form headed up the United States. Small Business Administration today. He's the chairman of the Latino Coalition. Thanks for waking up early with us. Do this actor thank you in our Co host Laura Collins, once again. Welcome back, Laura. She's the director in the Bush. Institute smu Economic Growth Initiative thank you. Thank Santa I. Only wake up early for this I know we. To Peel back the curtain we're here at about seven thirty in the morning in Dallas and Lauren I were comparing notes and turns out that one of us are morning. People so hector. We're looking. We're looking at you. Demand on. West Coast time. It's like five thirty in your body clock Oh. That's rough. Hector's here for our SME Economic Growth Advisory Council where he is one of them. Is that help guide the policy work that we do at the Bush Institute, because both of his expertise is the forty first administrator, the small business, and because his work with the Latino Coalition. Let's start with the former when you were with the small business administration. What was the goal of that department? What were you? You, all working on the small business. Administration was actually started in one, thousand, nine, hundred, fifty, three by President Eisenhower and there were some small business programs before that, but they unified those all into one agency, and it's really the agency that supports and advocates for America's small businesses, and that role has become even more important over the years when they formed the SBA. There probably weren't thinking that was going to be over thirty million small businesses in the united. United States and I like to say nothing small about small business. They really are the engine of America, the engine that fuels the economy of America not only are there a lot of them, but they represent over fifty two percent of the gross output of the economy. It's the place that two-thirds the net new jobs of our economy comes from, and it's also the place that a lot of our innovation comes from. That makes us the envy of the world. World in terms of our economy so very very important agency. A lot of people have heard of it, but they oftentimes don't know everything it does. Where does your passion for Small Business? Come from a well? That's easy. I was fortunate to be born into an entrepreneurial family, so the first business owners I ever met where my mother and father and my father was especially a serial entrepreneur. He loved business. He loves starting businesses. I'm not saying he loved running. My mother ran the business ideas, man yeah, but I learned a lot about a small business I used to joke that everything I learned about business. I learned in a Mexican restaurant because that's why I worked when I was a little kid. What jobs is you? Hold with your parents Oh, a lot of them, you know we were an immigrant family and. There was five children. My mother had five children six years. I have four younger sisters, and so we were all recruited to my father's executive training program very early on, so we all had to work I remember waiting tables when I was nine years old. So And then I. as I got older, I got more responsibility and help run some of those businesses and start some of those businesses, and my father had a number of different businesses. We started off with the restaurant business, because that's an easy business to access, but then later on at a little import export business, a little construction business, none of those businesses wherever really large, but they were very important to our family helps support us. They helped educate, and we learned a lot about being in business and working with the community and customers, and so your father came to America start these businesses. He actually didn't. My father was an immigrant to the United States in the late nineteen fifties. I don't think he was planning on staying that long. But he met my mother. My mother is also from immigrant parents from Mexico they've shown love, and and of all places they started their journey in Kansas City Missouri that's where I was born. I grew up in Kansas City Missouri and my father. He had a lot of different jobs as a lot of immigrants do when they first get here. His first jobs were picking. Picking potatoes for fifty cents an hour in rural Missouri and later on, he worked at a railroad, a literally pounding the spikes into the ground, but in the winter it got too cold, so he moved into He started working in the livestock business, and it was very difficult. dirty work. He was cleaning out stalls, but at least it was warmer than being outside. When he was working at the railroad later on he, he was a janitor at the school that I would eventually go to, but my father used to always say that he was a business owner, and I would say dad. You have these jobs. You're not a business owners. They know what I have to do right now, but eventually alone my own business, so he was very passionate about that. He always wanted to work for himself, so he starts so then he starts these businesses and his career trajectory starts trending too so far up that start happening. Yeah, my father was a very visionary leader very. Very charismatic you know he when he's grown up used to say know. I came here with nothing I didn't know anybody. I didn't speak the language. I had no money I had no power, but I believed in myself I was willing to work hard, and this is such a great country that affords us the opportunity to go as far as we WANNA go. We're only limited by our own imagination our own commitment, so he he's. We started these businesses, but later on my father was kind of an organizer as well, and he wanted to belong to the Chamber of Commerce. This is in Kansas City. Number of others spanning businesses. There were there at the time, and my father started asking. Where's the Hispanic Chamber? And they said well. There isn't an Hispanic Chamber. My Dad said well there should be, and if nobody else is going to start it, I will so my father was one of the founders of the Kansas City Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, that was in the mid seventies, and later on, he said well. You know there are a lot of Hispanic business all around the country I'd like to be part of a National Chamber of Commerce, and his friend said there is no National Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. My Dad's well. That's not right. There should be so if nobody else is going to do it. I'll try to do it, so he started organizing with other leaders around the country, and they formed the United States. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce now. That was in the late seventies, and we're getting ready to get into a presidential election and my father didn't really know anything about politics and not so much. Much about policy, either and he started asking around, and his friend said well. We're panic and we're Democrats, so you should work with the existing administration. which was the Carter Administration? My Dad said that's fine, so he tried to reach out to the campaign, and they really weren't interested they were focused on other things and my father didn't wasn't upset. He didn't get mad. He just said I really. Really. Don't WanNA. Work with anybody doesn't WanNa work with me. And just as it happened, he reached out to by the Reagan campaign. My Dad didn't know much about Ronald Reagan. He heard that he was the governor of California, but a really convinced him that they were very focused on the small business piece. They wanted to do better in the aesthetic market. My father started working with the Reagan campaign. Campaign obviously Ronald Reagan won that election and later on my father was asked to be part of the transition team to advise on spa of all things later on to be a surrogate for him, internationally, especially in Latin America and the chamber just took off to during those years that the eighties and they had a very good close working relationship. It just so happens that at that time, my father. Started working with the vice president, because the president could go to all the conventions and all the meetings, so dad started working with Vice President George Herbert Walker Bush, and they hit it off as well. They became good friends. My father also. George Herbert Walker Bush when he decided to run for president, and then just a little a point of privilege here years years later I was in California was working in a business organization called Latin Business Association and I had worked my way up because I didn't know anybody in California and my father said best place for you to meet people. Is that this chamber this organization that works with US SO I. I worked my way up and family became the chairman of the board. This is in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety nine. My father called me up and he said Hey. I know you're getting ready to have your big convention out in Los. Angeles. Why don't you invite the governor of Texas to come and speak and I? Of course I was a smart Aleck and I said Dad. WHO's the governor of Texas? And why would I invite the governor of Texas? Speak at my event. California says well. The Governor of Texas is George W Bush and I think he's going to run for president. And you ought to meet him, and you ought to invite him out to your vet so I did. This is nineteen, ninety nine, and ironically initially the campaign was getting going and they. You Know California is are. We going to get any support, so I had to kind of talk them into it right, so they came out in late nineteen, thousand nine, this would have been about September October of one, thousand, nine, hundred and nine, and they didn't know if there was going to be anybody there. We had three thousand business owners at the Convention Center to listen to the governor of Texas, and it was my fortunate that Governor Bush at that time decided to basically give his campaign speech at my event. Little speech call leave no child behind. Behind which ended up becoming the education initiative, and obviously one thing led to another got to know the governor. He asked me to join the campaign. I'd never been involved in a campaign before, and so I became one of the Co. chairs and California and ended up being a surrogate for him during the campaign for Hispanic groups, especially business groups, and then after the campaign I was honored and privileged, that president asked me to come back and run the SBA, so it was pretty good piece of advice that your dad gave. You see what you can do about the governor of Texas I'll my father always gave me the best advice that I've luckily followed most of it. Isn't that's the beauty of of America's that this man who was picking potatoes and a janitor becomes an adviser to the president. His son becomes an adviser to the president. Like that's. That's America. It is, and it's one of the things that makes this so grateful and proud that we are part of this country. It is like no other country in the world. There is something very very special we should. Should never take that for granted for those of us. That have had an opportunity to travel we. We understand that We have something really really special here, and we should always serve to protect it. You talked before about small businesses, really being the engines of America, and you know obviously with your work with the SBA Dads with Hispanic Chamber and now your work with Latino coalition you're working with. A lot of small business owners and a lot of people who are very entrepreneurial, most of America's not like that. So, what do you think are the things that we could do to sort of jump? Start the entrepreneurial spirit in America and. What are the barriers that you see to? Some of the business owners in your coalition requests in law. That's why she's here. She's grains. Great Question. I agree with you know not. Everybody's going to go into small business, but you know we have thirty million small businesses in the United States, women are starting businesses faster than any other group, especially at Latina women five times faster, and it is one of the things that is enabled us to be the powerhouse that we are other countries used to come and visit me at the ESPN and say how do you do it? How do you do? We want to do what you guys do because they saw how this grew the middle class and all of. Of the opportunities and innovation that was created by these small businesses, but many times, those countries don't have the kind of well first of all. They don't have the environment. They also don't incent the small businesses, and it's not something that is actually promoted. In fact, sometimes, the opposite is promoted. Don't go into business too risky. If it doesn't work out, you're going to be ruined forever and I used to tell these countries who said we're not like that you know. A lot of our folks is the most successful people that we have have tried multiple times before they were. Able to succeed, we try to support them. Also most everybody knows the small business owner there in their family. They worked at a small business. The small businesses that they are in their neighborhoods, so that should not change. Some years back. We noticed that less people were starting small businesses and that. was somewhat of a byproduct product of what happened during the financial meltdown, the two thousand eight, where people got very very risk averse especially young people. You need young people to want to be able to go out and create something from scratch with no guarantees. We're starting to see that change. especially as the economy is starting to grow, but a critically important our future and I meant what I said. We are the envy of the world because we're able to do things that no other countries able to. And we should never lose sight of that and forget how we got here. And we kind of doubled down on creating some of those opportunities opportunities that come from organizations or government agencies like the SBA Chambers of Commerce local government state governments. There's so much that we can do to help small businesses because fifty percent of small businesses fail in the first four years, and it's not because they don't have a good idea they simply don't. Don't know what they don't know. And usually when they start, figuring out might be too late so if you can help a small business in those first four years, their chances of success grows exponentially. You said you're saying younger people start businesses more. Do you see that more as you know? My cohort, the millennial sort of the mid thirties on up, or are you seeing that you know with? The generation is generation Z. that even younger. you know it kind of runs across the board and I'm not an expert on this, but some young people have said you know we don't want to do what our parents did. We think they were focused on the wrong things. We WanNA WE WANNA be focused more on on things that are in our minds more meaningful for the future and Dif-. Different issues don't want to take the risk and also don't feel like they want to go into dead and buy a house, and and all of those things, so you see some of that as you know very well. Immigrants are great entrepreneurs. They are so excited they. They're like I. could work as much as I want to. Keep most of the money that this is the greatest thing in the world I can't do that in my home. Country women for many years. We're not encouraged to start. Businesses and more women are creating business, and they're being very successful and their great entrepreneurs and. And they bring a total different skill set to the equation, but I think anything that we can do to educate people on what the opportunities are and again I sometimes say it's the hardest job you'll ever love because it's not you know. Sometimes people have these idealistic notions of what is going to be like to be in business. You have plenty of free time money. and. Now? And I will tell you. It's the exact opposite you'll. You'll pay everybody before you pay yourself. You'll work more hours than you've ever worked in your life, but the satisfaction that you can get from it, and the independence and freedom is just phenomenal. I WANNA. Talk a little bit about you mentioned the immigrants starting businesses, and I think the last time I checked the statistics was start businesses twice. The rate native born Americans do immigration in this country obviously very stuck in this is a conversation. You and I have had off-line conversation that this is something we talk about all the time at the Bush Institute. When you are out amongst your coalition in your business owners is a sense from them that we really do need to fix our immigration system absolutely, and it's very frustrating because we know what a great country having. We've tackled some major major problems. You know we put people on the moon. Built for? Lately can't figure that out. Yeah, that's too complicated for US unfortunately. It has become so politicized and I hate to say I've talked about this. I think both sides get what they need out of that debate, and they're almost senate not to fix it, but we need to fix it for the good of our country for the security of our country. It makes all the sense in the world. I think there's a lot of good ideas out there i. don't think that we need to reinvent the wheel. We just need to have some convictions and well. Some profiles and Kurds that we don't have right now. What is role of the Latino coalitions? You had up to Latina coalition now. We talked about immigration and talk about small business. What is the role the work you're doing now A. Latino, coalition organization it's been around for over twenty five years, and where national membership organization or an advocate for the interests of the panic community, especially small businesses we provide different tools and advocacy for them do some very high profile events or launching some some tools that we think that can help them get more business, and so I kind of think of Latino coalition like A. For the Hispanic Community and Many. People know the. For retired persons says that they're a national advocate for fifty million constituents. Their constituents are called Seniors Arkansas call Hispanics. they also get very involved in policy. they any major issue. They're on the frontlines advocating for them, they provide services for those members, and so when we want to be as successful as they aarp as and so, that's kind of the way that we structure ourselves again the. The three pillars for us which are really the three pillars in the Spanish community and they don't really change. Its economic empowerment especially is that relates to our businesses and the jobs that we need in the Economy Education K through twelve and education, but I would extend that even further education throughout your life, especially as you need to take different skills to be competitive in the changing workforce and healthcare. Hispanics are still berry under represented in terms of getting access to healthcare. They've made made lots of promises by former administration that didn't come true, and so that's still an issue that we've got to focus on and try to come up with some strategies, preferably more private sector strategies to helping them get access to the health care that they need one of the things. Things that I'm always struck by in this conversation of you know what Hispanic voters or just spanks generally really desire or believe in our want from their government. They're the exact same things everybody else does, and so it's always so funny to me that there is the sort of divide because we are all sort of pulling the direction. We all care about our families. We all care about you know how we're going to put money in the bank and food on the table, and how our kids are going to be educated, and do you find the you? You're in DC A lot. You're talking to a lot of lawmakers. Do you find that that's something that they understand? They understand when they're trying to reach out to in. They're making policy that opinion sort of we're all pulling the same direction and these are things that don't need to be necessarily divided. Completely agree and that's a an ongoing challenge. Many legislators have very few. In their districts especially in the south, you know a lot of our population, we're all fifty states and eighteen percent of the population, sixteen, million strong, two trillion dollars, purchasing power, but a lot of those lawmakers, and this is both sides they'll. All those lawmakers really don't get. you know we. One of our continuous jobs is to demystify Hispanic community and you reminded me of a story. I heard one time One of the first is S- panic. Lieutenant Governors in California was gentleman by the Cruz Bustamante, and when he got elected this many. Many years ago, the reporters would I'll ask him. What is the Hispanic Plan? The Hispanic Strategy? You must have this secret strategy and he was like he didn't know how to answer that. And finally he said okay. I'll tell you what the secret strategy is ready here it is, we want good jobs. We want to live in a good neighbourhood. We want to send our kids to good schools, and hopefully have higher education would like to have a little money for retirement and concerned about security, and the reporter said that's not a secret plan. Buddy wants, and he said exact spoiler alert, right? That's exactly what we want. And I think sometimes maybe lawmakers too complicated, and maybe sometimes complicated, because they think they can get a certain advantage an electoral advantage if they're saying certain things, one of the things that you know, we sometimes complain about for lack of description is that we're noticed every four years, but after. Between those four years in other words when there's a presidential election, everybody wants to talk to. And see what they want and see if they can get their votes in between time it not not so much, and so we've got to. Hispanics or mainstream where young people we will be twenty five percent of the US population in the next thirty years. Where very patriotic we love this country, but we're also bicultural. We're also bilingual and we don't want to lose that as well as many other immigrant populations have discovered and emphasized over there evolution in this country. Can you talk a little bit more about that by cultural, and I think that and having worked immigration. Immigration for for the time that have one of the broad misconceptions particularly about Hispanics is that they don't assimilate or integrate whichever word you prefer, and they don't become fully. American you and I both know that's just completely false, and that you don't have to abandon your roots in order to fully embrace your new country can talk a little bit about your experience with that and your family's experience with that sure another great question. I. Heard a demographer one time very well-known demographer in California David. Hayes about these good friends at Ucla and this is many years ago and we were doing event. Was titled Demystifying the Hispanic Market This is like going back over twenty years ago, and he said oftentimes that question is presented in the wrong way. He said it's not an either or proposition. He said the immigrant mother who is raising her us. Born children here knows that those children need to simulate need to cultivate to be successful. She loves those children. She wants them to have every opportunity, so they're going to learn English. They're going to go to school. They're going to stay out of trouble. They're. They're gonNA. They're gonNA. Do all the things that you need to do to be successful? He said that our immigration patterns are different. He said in many years past lot of our immigration came from overseas and when they got here. They knew they were never going back all right so they some of them for years with try to hold onto their. You know ethnicity and their cultural heritage number of German language newspapers that existed in the United States uncle, three world war, pre-world wine is huge. Forget that but the and many schools only taught in. Amazing but our Hispanic population, obviously first of all my father would say we didn't go anywhere. We were already here. But. He would say it's an an proposition. Hispanics are going to simulate are gonNA culturally, and they're going to onto the things that they grew up with the food that they grew up with the customs that that's a vital part of their identity and their heritage, and these things are not mutually exclusive, and they do not also diminish their love of this country because they're American, remember ninety percent plus of Hispanics have no issue with their immigration status, and yet the things that oftentimes they're asked about. Immigration and immigration can become a very polarizing issue. especially the way the both parties approach it, but I totally agree with you. You that Hispanics are over here. They're not calling anywhere. Most of the population growth now is childbirth. It's not an immigration anymore, and and we gotta get our immigration system right because in the future we will need additional skilled workers to come to this country. We're not producing enough marcel, so we better get that right. Absolutely, there's an every immigrant kids is so acutely aware of that? Every their parents made sacrifices to come here and that those parents are here because of what they want for their kids, and did you feel that pressure knowing what your parents did? The sacrifices they made wanted to be to be. I absolutely did well first of all candy was not a bastion of Hispanic culture, so we. We kinda stood out a little bit. So I knew that we were we were different there. Of course you hear all the stories from folks. Especially, your parents and some of the really challenges that they had, and as I mentioned to. My father said came here with nothing I was able to accomplish something I expected a lot more you. You didn't have any of these challenges, so you better do a lot better than I did. TRY TO WORK! That in, but yeah you. You do feel it now. I mentioned one thing many years ago. some parents felt the best thing for their children would be for them not to say that they were Spanish pretend. They were something else, and they were doing that to try to protect their children because of racism and bigotry, and now some of those kids have grown up and I know some of them. Them and they're kind of disappointed that they didn't learn more about the culture. They didn't learn the language. They didn't go back to the old country, and so they're trying to kind of catch up with that, so we go through these different cycles, and we're going through a cycle right now. The cycle of the other you know, but to your point, the other is us. We're the say we're. We're we're. In the same direction, but we're. We're starting to run out of time, so there's a question that we usually ask our guests at the end of our episodes, and we always ask, either what should we be talking about as a nation that we're not talking about enough, or what's the question that no one has asked you that you wish they would, and so we're I'm feeling. We're feeling magnanimous today. So which one of the two would you like to? Show off. Well I think you've touched on some of these issues and I appreciate the opportunity in the invitation. Our country's changing very quickly very very quickly, and all kinds of different ways. Technology is changing our country and we've got, and there's nothing we can do about that. It's going to continue accelerate, so we've got to understand how that works in our life, and what things that we need to do to get ready to deal with it, and it's an it's almost dizzying changes. Going on demographic changes is is changing, and we're We're all in this together, so we better find better ways to communicate and work together. Together, you know. The the environment is changing. I mean the littoral environment is changing, and we've got to figure out what we're going to be doing about that, so markets are changing around the world We can't just be so insulated. It'd be looking internally. We've got to be looking at a around the world I. Sit on the US, Chamber of Commerce Sport and Tom Donahue says ninety five percent of the consumers live outside of this country. We better figure out how to be talking to them. So those are some of the things that we need to talk more about these are not easy problems to. To solve, it's going to require a lot of policy, but it should be top of mind on the radar screen all the time all the time all the time. Other countries are thinking about those things we ought to be thinking about to and the other question that I don't get as a lot about, but it's something that I've grown up with Warr Hispanics Conservative and why do is Spanish at? Why aren't Hispanics Monolithic? And why don't they all think the same way? And of course that's almost a ridiculous question. Because nobody. No community thinks exactly the same way on every issue. We're diverse community. We think differently. Differently about a lot of issues, but my father used to say that was kind of like the rationale behind creating the US. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. There's so many more things that we agree on than the things that we don't agree on, so let's stipulate. There's some things that we're not gonNA. Agree on, and let's focus passionately on the things that we do agree on and create more solutions for everybody. President Bush offense has said Multiple Times. If you focus your energies and what you agree on, you can get a heck of a lot done Lord. We have enough time to ask him about Tequila. Yes. Heard. I've never had the privilege of sampling your Tequila we'll. We'll make sure that that changes it quickly. Try to make this quick the last project my father was working on, and I didn't realize this. Because I was in government at the time was He bought a ranch and he was planted a Gob, and so he was planning on. Making a Tequila at some point in time planted it here in the US. Only. Can only make Tequila in Mexico and the state that he was from Lico is where eighty percent of the Tequila comes from, so he bought property and he planted the governor. My father unfortunately got sick and passed away in less than a year when I went down to Mexico his Lewis said. What do you want to do with all the Gava and I was like what a governor. I Beg your pardon yeah. And he's in your father bought a large ranch, and he planted a garden, and it takes seven years for the plant to mature, so we'll just pull it out of the ground. Throw it away, said no, no, no. Don't do that so seven years later we harvested the crop, and I went to some friends of ours, which was the Beckmann family, which is the Cuervo family and they're like. What are you doing the Tequila Business? Why are you doing this? I said it's a tribute to my father. And they said Oh that's a great name for Tequila once you name it that we did and so we. We made Tequila. We sold through most of it, but I will tell you that I'm developing his land now and we're building a Tequila factory this year. Oh Man on the land, so stay tuned more to come. We got to keep him around the next time. You're in town. We expect A. WE EXPECT A sample. You'll have it. Hector thank you so much for new. This had to wake up early in your on West Coast, thank you so much, thank you. Andrew Law is always a pleasure. Look forward to the next opportunity take. You can learn more about the Latino coalition at www dot Latino coalition, dot, com, and about the Bush Institute's work in immigration at www dot bush center out org slash immigration. If you enjoyed this episode of the strategic. Please tell a friend or lever review online. You can also send us note on social media at the Bush Center on twitter facebook and Instagram. Thank you for listening.

United States Small Business business owner America Latino coalition Small Business Administration California Hector Baretto Hector president Bush Institute Vice President George Herbert Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Hispanic Chamber Texas chairman Bush Center Mexico executive Hispanic Community Kansas City Hispanic Chamber o
Jean Becker Barbara Bush's Pearls of Wisdom

The Strategerist

00:00 sec | 9 months ago

Jean Becker Barbara Bush's Pearls of Wisdom

"Mrs Barbara Bush is simply a national treasure. Jean Becker spent almost thirty years working alongside Mrs Bush and recently reached out to Bush family and friends to collect the advice Mrs Bush had given them over the years. Pearls of wisdom little pieces of advice that go along way is now a New York. Times bestseller and features lessons learned from a life. Well lived including lessons. Learned while standing over a jigsaw puzzle by a Secretary of Defense and one of the recurring themes was putting a puzzle together with her at everyone from grandchildren to former secretary of Defense Bob Gates. He was my favorite that Bob would bring up. Do not put in the final puzzle piece at. I think there I had to do a whole section on puzzle pieces alone Because it was a recurring thing we kick off season three by talking about Mrs Barbara. Bush has sense of humor. And how she influenced those closest to her as well as her nation. I'm Andrew Kaufman and this is the strategic presented by the George W Bush Presidential Center. What happens when you cross the forty third president late night? Sketch comedy and compelling conversation. The strategic has a podcast born from the word strategic was coined by us the now and embrace the George W Bush administration we highlight the American spirit of leadership and compassion through thought provoking conversations. And we're reminded that the most effective leaders the ones who laughed R- opening season three of the strategic with the esteemed. Jean Becker longtime adviser for President George H W Bush and Mrs Barbara Bush. She was deputy press secretary from his Bush in the White House and she was chief of staff for President Bush from Nineteen Ninety four until recently passed away and she's behind the new Barbara Bush. Book Pearls of wisdom little pieces of advice that go a long way gene. Thank you so much for spending some time with us to talk about Mrs Bush. I'm so honored to be here. Thanks for having me. I've never been introduced as esteemed. It's usually the honorable though right now. Yes vowed that person. Well since we're here to talk about Mrs Bush who better to Co host? The Natalie Vanilla Platz director of the women's initiative at the Bush Institute who also heads up our first lady's initiative Natalie. Thank you for being here. I'll I'm really excited to be a part of this. It's an honor and I have the privilege of working on behalf of our First Lady's initiative which really highlights the unique influence the first lady's globally. In what better example of that that Mrs Barbara Bush? So we're reading pearls of wisdom obviously over the weekend to get ready for this and and it's it's really a delightful book that keeps Mrs Bush kind of fresh in our memories. How did this project come about? You know it's such a great question. It this book has been my heart for a long time and there have she of course wrote her memoirs and then a woman named Susan. Page wrote her biography so her story has been told by herself and am biographer woman. The the biography the classic biography. But I felt like there was something missing for those of us who knew and loved her. She was the world's biggest advice giver. She had an opinion about everything. She wanted us all to live the best life we could and she didn't hesitate to tell us how to do that so. I love with the forty. Third President writes in the prologue. I think is first line is there are those who say mother was Bossy but he goes on to say for those of us who spent her whole life getting advice from Barbara Bush. We're at an advantage. It's the rest of everybody else's at a disadvantage. We know a lot because Barbara Bush told us what to do what not to do what to say what not to say. So I thought it was time to tell the rest of the world and you're kind of uniquely suited to put this together having been with the family for so long. I have been with the family longer than I thought I would be. My very first day literally was the day that the forty first president became president of the United States January twentieth nineteen eighty nine. I was one of Mrs Bush as Deputy. Press Secretary is at the White House and then I just never laughed. I kept thinking I would leave but as you know. This family is not boring. No no they're not. I was about ready to leave. Actually and Nineteen Ninety eight ninety nine. I told I was doing a book of letters. That prayers for President Bush called all the best. I told them at the end of that book. I was probably going to. It was probably time for to go and then his oldest son decided to run for president of the United States of America and president. Bush said to me I totally am supportive of that. Would you please stay through campaign? We never talked about it again. That was it and that was nineteen ninety nine. It was through twenty and eighteen. Twenty nine hundred twenty eighteen guide November thirtieth two thousand eighteen. It's it's It says a lot about the family in the same exact same way for so long and in the book. Obviously there are so many anecdotes and insights from just everyone family members Celebrities You name it. It's represented here in the forward. You you you talk about how. You're not here to give your perspective but I was struck by your sort of the Pearl of wisdom that you took with you from your experience in. That was choose happiness. I was wondering if you could share a little bit about that and sort of why that stood out to so importantly in your experience with the bushes. He though I've it was my sister's who proof. Read the book with me for me. Who said Jean? You never say in the book what you learn from her. And of course I learned a lot and I decided I needed to pick one thing and bright a little bit about it and it was a short journey to decide what to say. Barbara Bush did not like winey people. She didn't like people who complained about their life. And I have a wonderful plaque in my living room. It is something she so easily could have said. It says life did not come with a remote. Get up and change it yourself. That is not a quote from her but it really defines what she means by saying to choices. You can be unhappy and grumpy or you can be happy in love your life and what great advice. An who among us doesn't sit around some days and you know have a little pity party about. I wish I was skinny. I wish I was this. I wish I was that and then you certainly I think of her and I'm like yeah I'm happy I don't have any problems. Life is life is good. The the joyful nature in the book really kind of shows that well and what's interesting about her that advice and her joyful nature think about what had happened to her by the time she turned twenty eight. She lost lost a child to leukemia. The love of her life was shot down in World War Two. Her mother was killed in a car accident when she was in her twenties and living a long way from home. George Herbert Walker Bush up. Read it her from the northeast. Were all family and friends lived and moved her to Odessa taxes to wear their first house. They shared a bathroom with a mother daughter prostitute. Team can you imagine? And so it isn't like her. Life was paved with gold. She went through some very tough times but she always managed to find the silver linings and and could for her well one of the ways that she probably helped find that is hertz. A sense of humor which in deformed by President Bush by sentence four or five. He's already talking about her her famous sense of humor. Tell us about the famous Barbara Bush sense of humor. It's a lot like our oldest son. I think they're both famous for quips. Her husband of seventy three years was a great practical joke player. He loved to play practical jokes. Mrs Bush just was a quiver and in after they left the White House. She loved to go to Sam's Club and Wal Mart. They're obsessed with the big box stores and I've started loved going with her because it was an experience at one of my favorite lines as she did over and over people. Come up to her. And say aren't you Barbara Bush? And she say oh no. I am much younger and prettier than she she. She did that. She just always had a comeback for everything and she just kept loose and she kept us lose and she kept us from taking ourselves seriously. One of my favorite things about Barbara Bush and we previously H- well. We had an exhibit on First Ladies. Here we had an exhibit about presidential retreats and one of my favorite photos of hers and her very famous mismatch cats and I think that that was the epitome of not taking herself too seriously and a lot of people don't know the cat story but it was such a part of who she was in Kennebunkport and they think really exuded her personality so while it really did badly. She embraced so she loved. She knew there was a buzz out there about the fact so while she was first lady they used to give each other very romantic gifts gifts. President Bush. She was lamenting one day. You can't just buy regular tennis shoes anymore. You know everything was running shoes reebok. You know she just wanted a pair of regular old-fashioned tennis shoes her husband being the president night states be I don Shirley probably called the Kids Company. And he bought her thirty pairs of kids all different colors and she had the idea. She had two boxes one foot one right foot through them in there and she would just draw out a pair of shoes and wear mismatched shoes and she knew people were talking about it and that just inspired her to do it even more and her daughter. Dora. We just were talking about this and there were people who thought maybe she was losing it a little bit. We had to say no. She's just worried her bisset shoes but it was a big part of her personality. Is that around the same time that a President Bush. Forty one third of wearing fancy socks. Gosh you know what he says about Assad. He swears that he always wore weird socks. I liked that you said fancy. I mean as a pair socks had a pair of socks that it's Superman on with little Capes Cape those were the weirdest ones can appear socks with president. Clinton's face on them. What President Bush swears he always wore colorful socks but no one noticed them until he was in a wheelchair. And then and it really. The Houston Chronicle did a huge story about his socks. It was marathon Sunday and the bushes were along the route watching the runners go by and the chronicle took a picture of him in his wheelchair and I can't remember the socks he had on but they were colorful and unusual and the chronicle did the story about George Bush and socks and President Bush was very. He's as I've worn sought weird socks my whole life but no one noticed until now you know he had dedication here you remember. He had these bright pink socks that he that he wore. And I was looking for a pair these great. I think he started a trend. I think he really did. I think he did who wear black and blue socks boring. Some of my favorite essays within the book are the ones that Their children wrote snow from zero to President Bush job. I was just curious. Why do you feel that was so important to start? The book with their perspective and I was really struck as well by the emphasis on the fact that in a believe it was Mrs Bush's letter herself that she never sent her children. That do you know. Don't worry what that your children. Don't listen to you but but worried that they're watching you. And I think that that was represented one in the personas that we know of her descendants and who they became the principal leadership they all exude but her children and her appreciation for her children and setting a good example for children with such a part of who she was. Why was that so important? Her she was a great mom. And you know president. Bush traveled a lot when the kids were growing up and I used to love. People used to ask her. This would be part of her quipping people used to say. There was this myth that the Bush family had this whole plan about that one would become president in to become governors and there would be senators and and the truth is there was no plan and Mrs Bush used to quit. I just wanted them to grow up. I you know. I didn't plot up who they would be but she knew how boy was she a good role model and as was her husband. Of course what was interesting about those five essays? It was such different things that the five kids learn from her and it was just interesting to get all their perspective of what they learned but they all came back to the same thought. They learned how to make a difference how to be good citizen. My favorite line and the whole one of my favorite lines and the whole book is Marvin. Who apparently was born a little past her due date and Marvin said I learned to be on time. I was laid only one. I love that line. I like to also in the in the grandchildren's section. You said you're going to print the responses to the lead. You ask each you tell the story. I'm ruining it. That was such a Barbara Bush thing to do so. I was a little frustrated with the grandkids. I'M NOT GONNA name names. You know who you are but I emailed all of them your stories and out of a seventeen grandchildren. I got fifteen and they were some some email me right away somewhere little slow so I kept sending reminders of I can need your email. I need your email. I'M NOT GONNA name names again. But to the oldest grandchildren Could Be Barbara and Jenna. They were among the last ones to send me their story so my original idea and they did and they were great but I was going to put them in chronological order of their birth. Which is what I did with the five kids and their essays and then I thought would Barbara Bush. Do I put them in the order in which they sent me their essays because some of the early the ones who sent me their essays right away were among the younger ones and they were being buried by their by the older kids and I didn't think that was fair should G G B last? Because I put them in the order and I don't know yet if any of them have noticed that I haven't heard yet. I love that too because it pleased to the Bush family strong appreciation for competition. Obviously you know. It wasn't an apparent competition at the time. But you're right. You played out that way but I did in competition thing. That's such a great point to make. I did last reminder I sent out I think I was missing five and I said I've heard from everybody but the five of you if you don't want to be in the book fine. Oh my gosh they all panicked and yes yes yes we want to be in the book so I WANNA put back to your question. I wanted to put the family first in the book just because the bushes so much about family and they always talked about faith family and friends so it just seemed natural that the five kids would go first and then the grandkids and then a bunch of nieces and nephews and first cousins and random people so Mrs Bush was kind of uniquely a a figure. That really did become America's Graham on a lot of ways and and JEB. Himself calls her a national treasure and the Book Proposal Wisdom. What why how did that come about from your perspective? Having worked for her for so long and having seen evolution politics and everything and all the conversations country how did how did that role become hers more than any other first lady? She really tried to discourage being call. America's grandmother for some reason she didn't like it I think I think she was flattered by it but she just thought I think she was embarrassed by the people she was beloved. And I think something that happened right. After it became first lady is just sort of a great example of why people began to think of her that way in a couple weeks after she became first lady she went to place in. Washington called Grandma's house which provided residents facility for babies with AIDS who basically been abandoned by their mothers and she the First Lady of the United States pulls up in a motorcade an walks into that house and picks up an aids baby and holds the baby on our shoulder and and kissed on the baby and nuzzle the baby. Nobody was doing that and nine thousand nine hundred nine with AIDS patients. Babies adults. Anybody I I like to joke that I think it was the first photo that went viral. We weren't using that terminology yet but that picture went around the world and it was a game changer for patients with AIDS and there are a lot of examples of she just knew how to make children adults. Everyone feel comfortable with her and with who they are. I have so many great photos of her reading to kids and whether she likes it or not. It was like your grandmother reading to You. She was so engaging with kids. And and you know drawing them into the Buchan. They adored her so the country adored her and our work here at the Bush Center through the First Lady's initiative we literally support First Lady's offices and using their unique platform to effect change in and Mrs Bush was part of our research study that we released a few years ago and one of the the key findings of that was the influence of soft power. That first ladies have at their disposal and they all use it differently. Unfortunately we tend to focus on those You know have flagship initiatives but Mrs Bush's example in her use of soft power really bringing the voices. The experiences of those who often are overlooked too light was was so unique And you know she. I think the Wellesley College speech and and some of the backlash she initially received when she was was first announced as The speaker for commencement that year but her remarks during that occasion where we're so profound in so on point highlighting that you can be powerful you can have command boardrooms and and bully pulpits but at the same time family and how you treat and make others feel is so important and and. I think that's really important and often gets forgotten. Certainly being forgotten now. I think in the current climate that that we all find ourselves and you know. Why was that so important to to Mrs Bush and something? She carried throughout her life as long as she carried out her life. And I love that term solves power. That's just a great term. One of her favorite first ladies was leverage Johnson and Lever Johnson talked about the power the bully pulpit and and her advice future. First Ladies was. Don't waste this opportunity because you have this short amount of time and which people will actually listen to you and Mrs Bush definitely embraced that advice and even though literacy was her big thing she uses it soft power. I want to steal that from you because I love that term One of my favorite stories about her as first lady would be a great example of soft power. She woke up one morning vibe of about a month before Christmas and all the malls in Washington. Dc WE'RE GONNA kick out the salvation. Army Bell ringers. They decided that they were loud. They were noisy. People didn't want to pay attention. They harass a shoppers. There was one mall in DC who was green to allow the bell ringers in and she was livid so she called her press office and she said get the press. Go the Mazda Gallery. Find the bell ringer and I'll be there in two hours so I got the press together and we went to the mall and the presses. What's going on and the poor bell ringer is like what's going on and honestly didn't know well in cheese swoops and my favorite part of the story is. She put eleven dollars in the red bucket. I did want to say to her. You don't have a twenty. I think it's all she had it or bill but she used her bully pulpit that day to say to the malls in DC. Don't you dare well? That was it. The balls reopened their doors. I mean her. The First Lady's pictures on the front page of The Washington Post. The malls were embarrassed. They reopened their doors. And I didn't even appreciate until she died. The Salvation Army the National Salvation Army put out a statement and said that Barbara Bush probably single handedly saved the R. Bell ringing campaign because they think other malls across the country would have followed the lead of the DC malls. And she didn't let him get away with it and it's just a great example of using her soft power to say not so fast and that was part of her power. She didn't hesitate to tell you what she thought. That's a one of those I I hadn't heard before I heard a lot of stories from about Mrs Bush over the years I was well. That's one that I'd never heard before. And it kind of goes to show that she had done so much at one of the. I love the passage of this book. About how about Jigsaw Puzzles because you think how can you get? How can you get advice from a topic has even even out of Jigsaw? Puzzle wasn't just one piece of advice. It was multiple piece of advice out of Jigsaw Puzzles. Were you expecting that when you sat down to to put these stories together Andrew? It was one of the big shots of the book. I so I email just all the family and just random friends and of course since the book has been published. I've thought about fifteen more people. I should've email but I started emailing random people and one of the recurring themes was putting a puzzle together with her at everyone from grandchildren to former secretary of Defense Bob Gates. He was my favourite that Bob would bring up. Do not put in the final puzzle piece and I think there were. I had to do a whole section on puzzled pieces alone because it was recurring theme. I put puzzles together with her because I was afraid to do. She was picky about it but it was all about. You don't put the last season and also that you don't you don't move pieces around without a purpose which I never thought about. Because that's my. I see Paul's prison showing you don't have her. Yeah I think it was one of the grandkids said. Don't hover over the puzzle table. Norma major the former first lady of Great Britain one of her stories is about putting together a puzzle with Barbara with and it was The per puzzled table and can among port was one of the focal points of the living room. I never sat there. So what? What was it like being Deputy Press Secretary for? What was that experience like for you in the in the early nineties late eighties? I had no idea what I was doing. I'd been a newspaper reporter my whole life life a short at that point. I've been a newspaper reporter for ten years. I grew up on a farm Zuri. I didn't leave the country until actually with I was with USA. Today I went to Moscow in One thousand nine hundred ninety seven to cover. President Reagan's trip to Moscow was the first time I ever left the United States of America so a couple of years later. I'm literally traveling all over the world. For the First Lady of the United States it was unreal. It was surreal. It was such a great honor. It was a lot of hard work but I will not wine about that. It was a great experience. One of mentioned mosque. I mean what a unique place to be your first international trip but I think of Mrs Barbara Bush and her relationship with race. A Gorbachev and Just how that relationship was so important. And and she even projected her love of literacy into the relationship there and I think of a make way for ducklings as you that that they then wanted or had in in in Russia as a result of it and I was wondering if you talk a little bit more about her relationship with her fellow first ladies because up until that point in time we really didn't see a lot of international first lady's working together for Mrs Barbara Bush's point four word. You know that has become the norm rather than the exception and you know she saw again going back to soft power the value relationship building and finding common ground and who who better to relate to than another another first lady. She was a leader of a natural born leader and dominated the room. I used to watch her walk in and they all gravitated towards her and one of the essays in the book is by Meal Maroni who was the First Lady of Canada and just absolutely adored her and ms but going back to raise raise a an nancy. Reagan did not get along at all and I think Mrs Bush made it her mission to along with her. I think she truly fell and I think she was right. It might actually help with her husband's work. If the two wives could get along maybe the working relationship between McKell Gorbachev and the United States would be better and she and raise a became huge friends and she took her to Wellesley with her Because it was the middle of a very important summit meeting and so she just took ways to Wellesley with her and for some odd reason she wanted to take raise to see the make way for ducklings statue in Boston Commons. So that was my site that day. I can't tell you how many people say to me. Oh were you at Wellesley. Now I was at the makeweight leads by and I might add. I totally lost control. The press they were running all over. It was a disaster of event but enrollment there. It didn't matter but I lost control the press and they were jumping over the ducklings. But it was awful. Yeah I got the what for on the way home but but raise what's so interesting which fascinated me is that we're ease. Gorbachev fell in love with that statue ensure those little statues. I guess I should say. And they're now in Moscow. Although sadly several of them have gotten stolen so President Mrs Bush call the sculptor and say we need some ducklings for this park in Moscow. I mean you can't make that stuff up. I love it. Well I completely slipped my mind. That race Gorbachev was there at Wellesley. She herself also made remarks. It was Mrs Bush's idea to have their but I remembered the make way for ducklings. Do I love that? You're effort is not lost on debut. Natalie thank you so much. Wish I could remember why she. It was such an odd add on to it already been a huge day but she wanted to show her those ducks and the rest is history. Those ducks well. We're pretty much out of time. I've gotten about three text messages already. People like Jean is here. I need to make sure she comes over to my place next. So we're GonNa let you go but before we let any guest go. We always ask one of two questions. We're going to throw this out at you now. So be ready. What are we not talking enough about as a nation that we should be talking about l? I love you for asking that question. Oh just now. I thought I thought we were kind of friends up to this. So in the book pages one ten through one twelve. I've been reading this. The end of all the Book Events. It's it's excerpts from her. Nineteen ninety-one commencement speech. She was not happy about something going on the United States. And I've done some research trying to figure out what was going on and I think it was maybe early campaign staff there have been horrible race riots in La but she. She was unhappy with America and just to read a little bit of this. She said she said to students that whole commencement season. I would like you to think about your relationships in a broader sense the way you feel about an interact with people beyond your loved ones. Real tolerance is an ideal. Our country has strived for since beginning. America was after all sounded as a haven of tolerance for people of all kinds. We've made progress. But we have a long way to go. We have a proud right legacy freedom independent thought but we can be better. You can be better. We should all be alarmed at the rise of intolerance on our land in the growing tendency to use intimidation rather than reason she talked about bullying. Bullying is outrageous and not worthy of a great nation grounded in the values of tolerance and respect wrote this twenty nine years ago lettuce fight back against the boring politics of division and derision. Let's trust our friends and colleagues to respond to reason. We must build a society in which people can join in common causes without having to surrender their identities. It is such a powerful message for today and I think if she were here. This is what she'd be talking about. She would not be happy with anybody. I'm not talking politics here. Both sides need to find a way to be more tolerant and respectful of each other. I think this is the message that she would want to give. And people have really been reacting positively. They clap they. They hear her voice. I'm bringing her back. Well Amen to that. We're glad you're doing it. Pearls of wisdom is available now in bookstores. Everywhere it's a delightful read Jeanne. It's just a fantastic job of putting it together. Thank you thank you for doing it for spending time with us here. Thank you for having me. It's been a lot of fun. Thank you. Thank you shade. It learn more about the Bush. Institute's work on First Lady's at www dot Bush senator dot org slash first lady's if you enjoyed today's episode and would like to help us spread the word about the strategic to please give us a five star review and tell your friends to subscribe for available on Apple Podcasts spotify and all the major listening APPs. If you're tuning in smartphone tapper swipe over the cover art you'll find episode notes with helpful information details. He may have missed the strategic was produced. But you Anna Pappas at the George W Bush Institute in Dallas Texas. Thank you for listening.

George Herbert Walker Bush Mrs Barbara Bush Mrs Bush president Barbara Bush United States Mrs Barbara Bush George W Bush Presidential Cen George W Bush administration America Bush family Jean Becker White House Bush Center George W Bush Institute Deputy Press Secretary Andrew Kaufman Bob Gates Bob
Harris Faulkner

The Strategerist

25:22 min | 1 year ago

Harris Faulkner

"Host of Fox News outnumbered over time and co anchor of outnumbered Harris Faulkner is a proud military brat. She reminds us that when someone serves in the military their whole family serves everybody has a role to play. And while we might not be on the battlefield. There were certain things that we needed to do at home. We chat about her father's military service, which included three tours of the at Phnom, and how her mom was a pillar of support and strength is that family moved from one post to another. And we learned how these experiences shaped Harris Faulkner, I'm your host, Andrew Kaufman. And this is the strategic presented by the George W Bush institute. What happens when he crossed the forty third. President late night sketch comedy and compelling conversation, this strategic Chris a podcast born from the word strategically which was coined by. And and embraced by the George W Bush administration. We highlight the American spirit of leadership and compassion through thought provoking conversations in. We're reminded that the most effective leaders are the ones who laugh. So we're thrilled to welcome. The anchor of Fox News, outnumbered overtime and co host of Fox News, outnumbered bestselling author Harris Faulkner to the strategic. I thank you. I'm so excited to be here. And we're glad you're here. Now Harris is the daughter of a Vietnam veteran and also joining us today is a military father within the Bush institutes house, warm, walls, the April and Jay Graham, fellow with the Bush institutes military service initiative Colonel Miguel. How Colonel thank you for joining us. Andrew, thanks for inviting me, I am thrilled to be here with Harris today in really excited to meet her dad Colonel Bob harasses. Well, thank you. I appreciate that. I feel blessed to be with you. And thank you for your service, and the leadership that you set as the bar for the rest of us. Let's start a little bit with families. And you're military Brad, essentially, not essentially exact sometime system wrap. Usually that was my background the Bush who believes that we have to. Serve our veterans. But before we can serve our veterans. We have to know our veterans and their families. So what was your life like as a military brow? Well, you know, whatever you are in those early years in your moving around a lot mom and dad had to kind of sell me on the military relocation program that we were on with observing, and, you know, oh, I'm gonna miss my friends. And so my mom would pack a big purple box before the moving van would pull out. My dad always insisted that we would drive stateside to the next assignment said when we went from Leavenworth to Fort Bragg that was a long drive, but she would pack this purple. We took some painting and painted a packing box. And that was always the last one that they put on the moving van, and when we got to our housing assignment. And usually we were on post that would be the first box that they would unpack. And my mom would tell me that you need very little to make you feel like home. It's the people you. No, they never lost that box in twenty years ever with all that moving around. We lived in Germany. We were all over the place, and I would open it up, and it would have things in there that she had chosen for me. And then things that I love to for instance, my Jenny bear which has not had for for many many years. My mother would always put a special travel dress on for her to make the trip. And of course, it'd be weeks sometimes before we hear, and she would just make the point that, you know, you don't need things. But these things may help you adjust better. And there was a diary from my whole life where I would write my friends names and people that I had met from post to post, and it did make it easier because sometimes we came cost kids in the military who actually our dads and moms already knew each other. So sometimes those new assignments came with already established friends little things that help move that along Colonel did you experience that absolutely in from from two on two fronts. Right. So I. Who was a military brat. Now, I'm the father of two military brats. But I remember distinctly when we made the found out that we were moving from Scofield barracks. Hawaii to Maryland, that's a long run. Yeah. And I was going from the seven to the eighth grade. And I remember distinctly telling my mom and dad that how unfair in terrible this was and I would never do that to my kids. Never joined the right and put them through that piece. Haley, my daughter has similar stories to tell and she would talk about that. You know, being a military Brad is both a blessing and a burden and I thank harass. You just you just captured both elements of that. And while I don't know your mom and dad, I absolutely know them gesture that story that you told and it's a real example of of how our military families moms and dads are really the anchor. So that whoever's wearing the uniform when they deploy when they go off to training, the family continue because military families look for the same thing as every family, and it's so critical that that moms and dads are are like like Harris's mom, so my license plate say US brat. I live in jersey and born raised and transferred. And what I think that dad's like you. You have given kids like me is resilience. Like, I know I never give up. Now, I've had some teachers in some employers who wish I had. But I just I don't I mean, I I look at every situation as one that has an answer. You may not be the answer. And I've met enough generals to know that make a decision already would you? And then go in with the decision that you've made there's a chapter in my book called think like a general, and that's exactly the thing. But it could be think like a Colonel like you and my dad to you know, I wasn't raised to have a whole lot of self doubt. When time came for a big decision, and your leadership and showing your children that it's okay to make mistakes learn from them and be bigger and better from them. Gosh, you only get that from people who are confident and their own ability. And and being Brad, I think that's probably one of the biggest things that we get from dad's like you. I'm gonna brag a little bit on my military brat. Haley, my daughter, she's not a large person for our listeners who can't see neither user. There you go. Thanks, Andrew for TNN that up. We've got the crew five five men here. Well, as as I told my son early on make no mistake. I'm a big, man. I'm just not in a big package. It's to a five foot tall five foot. Ten women. Goodness. So so my daughter is in Konami sized package as as we say how house, but she brings a lot of tenacity and strength in resilience to the table. And I think that was fostered growing up in a military family and the resilience that you talk about the really comes from from moving. I mean, my daughter went to twelve different schools in thirteen years. Wow. And the first few years of my life like the first fourteen or so we're like that too. And those are difficult ages to move, right? I mean, we're all keyed in. But I tell you now I can sit down in a room of five people or five hundred I'm gonna come out with a friend, even if it's against their will. So how do you think all these all this time of your father being in the military? How do you think it affected you like we've heard a little bit about how your family adapted? But how did that change who Harris? Faulkner is today. Well, my dad and now he's in the room because he's he's listening to this. I live studio audience now. The Colonel he told me to look at every man and woman in the I make eye contact with a smile and everybody is valuable in their own way. And from the military. He learned that the best generals were those who knew their subordinates, very, well and not just knew them as people, but understood their challenges for what their responsibilities were. And I just would love to give a shoutout to Colonel Bob Harris onto fronts in. Oh one, sir. Thanks for your service, but thanks for your service during the Vietnam war. And so as both the sun and the son in law of to Vietnam veterans, you know, I I know firsthand the service in the sacrifice that came during that period of time. And I also know from my work here at the Bush center that this generation of warrior, our post nine eleven warriors enjoys tremendous national support from great public. But I think that's partly out of a sense of. National guilt in that we were not as a nation able to differentiate the warrior from the war in that period of time. But also because of the leadership of Vietnam veterans who took hold of our post nine eleven warriors early on some of the first people that came to visit my wounded soldiers in Walter Reed were Vietnam veterans who said you shall never be forgotten. So so so thanks for that leadership in that service. Thank you so much for those words for my dad. I I know that when you chose to serve as well and raised a military brat on your own looking back and hear you talk about that leadership. That was pre existing really motivated you to serve. And now you have potentially another point of legacy. Absolutely. So Harrison I were chatting a little bit earlier before the interview. So I've I've two children. My son nNcholas is sophomore in college in his in the ROTC program air. Wow. You know, he's already. More than he's on his trajectory two to one day. Join the ranks his great grandfather was a private first class in World War Two. Wow. So it's really interesting the impact on families over the over the generations. Right. And so when when my grandfather went off to the South Pacific migrant mother was pregnant with my great aunt, and when he came home and met her for the first time, she was four and a half years old. And so, of course, we know firsthand through your book, the impact of the Vietnam war on that generation of warrior, and now, it's it's just different. Each war is is in some ways is always the same in other ways. It's there's different variables in. So for this generation. It's repeated deployments over and over again and coming back to a nation that while provides great support does it really understand one percent of America is at war and is in harm's way every single day just as important as the military wives. What what did you learn from your mother? How did you lean on your mother? How did she lean on you? You know, my mom's support services in our house were military like in legendary she could organize everything and no-one through a gathering like my mother and at the same time. She also understood compromise and sacrifice and wanted to instill that in me and. My sister. You know, when data serving the whole family serves and particularly for me because I was old enough in and my sister, and I have an age gap of about a decade. So I was really around during those those service years, but what she really instilled in me was this idea that everybody has a role to play. And while we might not be on the battlefield. There were certain things that we needed to do at home, for instance. No, the news. No, which wars are being fought know your own story. Really try to understand you mentioned the one percent who were serving. I don't think it's all that different. Really since World War Two. I mean that was a point where we had many more of our population in on the battlefield. But you know, you think about the one percent that we spend a lot of our time talking about there on Wall Street, but this is the other one one percent on the battlefield. And she really wanted me to understand is everybody has a role that the people who are not serving at home who were civilian keep the economy going and they keep but we all should be interconnected. And so she was really into community service and letting people know us as military people and block parties, and she would she would talk about military life with civilian friends. And she said it's very important for us to have shared experiences, and we know so much about civilian life because it's part of our KOMO commercial culture. But to teach people about military life about why we excel in school about why we are resilient about why some of us are extremely Taipei individuals with really shiny shoes. Always meticulous about our ability to pack for a journey in a short period of time. I mean with those things she said, you know, you can inform your friends of this. And let's get into the bloodstream of America. What we do. Well, an in who we are. And you can't have a country served by people and then have them come home with nothing to do. So the ability to. Higher and the willingness to hire comes from the accountability. Among ourselves to appreciate what they did. When they were on the battlefield. And to really understand that it's more than just that person. Serving. It's it's that person's unit their own special, forces know, I'm looking at my uncle Tim in the room and for those people who've read my book, and I talk about recruiting special forces. I alkyl Tim and Rani my dad's younger brothers were his special forces, and I talked about that in detail because you know, sometimes your family is chosen, and sometimes you recruit, but I felt like my mother really planned to the seeds for understanding what it means to be on a great team and not to suffer the difficulties in losses for people who don't step up and don't deserve to be on that team. So her whole thing was Americans need to be on the team. And if you feel like they're deficient and understanding who we are educate them school them. Make them understand do it out of love of country. It's a responsibility that we have for long time. The bushes. Does use tash tag our vets because that's that's right. What what we believe? You know, we talk here at the Bush center about our veterans as humble servant leaders of character that we need leading our businesses or communities in our nation for the decades to come. But you just your mother is the living was the living embodiment of why the same holds true for our military and veteran spouses, you know, one time I was I was traveling with my wife, and I was in uniform and the TSA agent looked at me as they always do and say, thanks for your service. And then he looked at my wife, and he paused and he said, ma'am, thanks for your sacrifice. Oh, wow. And I said, well, this is somebody who absolutely gets it and understands in. So it's the families that that bear the sacrifices of the moves and the finances and the stresses and raising great kids, but. But with that sacrifice comes Civic Leadership. And I mean, and that's what you just described with your mom. Oh my gosh. Influencing a generate the next generation to be civic assets to be engaged citizens surgery leaders. So when we were talking off, Mike right before I guess, it was maybe the walk over to our studio here. I was asked the question how did how? And when did you know you wanted to be a journalist? And there are a lot of stories that I can tell about storytelling and watching the news. But that conscience about service is really where it comes from. And you know, we're protected by the constitution. I think we're pretty important part of the United States and protecting holding the powerful accountable is is it's a service for sure. And that's why I mean social media's fine, which your life cannot be chasing click bait like it can't it can't be about that. And I think in journalism especially right now because we have a president who's walking outside the confines of. What we consider to be traditional establishment? Well, that's what he said. He was going to do it now is and now we have to chase him on skates. So, you know, but it is part of my service to the country. And so you find your lane, you know, I mean, I your daughter wants to be so she wants to be an orthopedic surgeon. She wants to she wants to serve those who bear the wounds the military. What does that fancy word? She dropped on you that you had to Google. Yeah. I had to look up a tryst. Right. And that's not just rehab for you and me when we you know over exercise on a weekend because we're gently over twenty-five. But, but that's what you have in a wounded warrior situation. I mean, these are these are dedicated long term trials and planning and purpose if you will prescriptions for rehab that your daughter wants to get into with our returning soldiers that is huge and the level that she will have to reach with her ability as a surgeon will be very meticulous and very high, and she's not afraid to reach for that rarified air and. That benefits are fighting forces. That's a beautiful thing. I think this comes back to what you said earlier Harrison. That's how your parents your mom and dad, but bad military brat shaped your character, your values, your your grit into nasty. But now you're calling to serve and you know, as my dad and mom's taught me as I've tried Eric. And I've tried to pass onto our kids service comes in many forms, you you can serve in military uniform or you can serve as you are holding those these are we gotta pull out of ways. In fact, we're one of the few western countries that does not require some sort of something Israel, does it probably more or better than others? But but it's not the only one where you can go into service. It can be military or it can be peace corps. Like, I I happen to think that that would make an entire new generation of American young people fortified for the future. How do you think we should be serving? Is it supporting our veterans that are serving are there? What are some ideas? The first of all I think you need to involve the generation that is veins to a body now able to communicate with each other in a nanosecond, I think that they need to look up from their devices and make eye contact. So we have to get these young people into the community. So that they can understand. And then they can also share real ways of of real time communication, and you know, what I would like is for there to be some sort of expectation of service. It doesn't have to be a decade it could just simply be a year or two right out of college. And we we have we have the sustenance of this as a country to be able to make this happen of volunteerism is really important because that makes everybody accountable for what's happening, and it it's helps them to take responsibility for the future. Now, what do our veterans need? What are our families need? They need to be part of something and not just on. As post, and I think that the war people we have in a service role the bigger the won't be one to three percent. It'll be twenty percent. And we know from diversity issues that when you get to twenty percent of women or people of color in any situation. That's where you see real change him than we know this military too. Yeah. Because if you were one of those first few women like Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii that you mentioned Representative democrat or. Martha mcsally the Republican in Arizona Representative if you were one of those first few combat fighting women, it was difficult as the ranks have got big particularly in the navy. I recently talked with Admiral Grady about those on board the USS Monterey that shot the Tomahawk missiles, and he shared, you know, are fighting force was all women that did that one of those rounds all women he said we've gotten to that twenty percent. And now we're seeing women on our leadership, they're recruiting other women. So I do think that getting millennials involved is important. And that's where the movement for women is, and you gotta you gotta get that into the bloodstream of of our military communities. You know, have them on post have a have a young person in the community day on post Fort Hood is huge. It's here in Texas. Can you imagine the outreach recently Veterans Day, and one of the things that we talked about in terms of a way to honor veteran. Rens a military service members and their families is to emulate a life of character service in leadership. And it doesn't matter what your chosen endeavor is whether it's in your professional life or at home in your community or volunteering at in nonprofits, or in your churches. There is a way to live a life of character service and leadership Harris, thanks for you. You you hit. I think the key piece and that is when it comes to veterans, and when we talk about veterans we're talking about family members as well. Not just the one who wore the uniform, but we're talking about their family members were talking about caregivers for those that are ruined ill and injured. And and and our survivors those whose military loved one made the ultimate sacrifice on behalf of our nation in our constitution. So it's all of them and connection is the first piece. In connection is a two way street, and that's kind of one of the neat things about these new post nine eleven nonprofit organizations is there majority of them are not veteran only they encourage members of the community to connect and be a part of those whether it's team Rubicon team red white and blue or Santa to here at the Bush. Absolutely. And then once you connect there are a number of, you know, there are some things we specifically asked for fine higher. Employ a veteran and a military spouse a military spouses sixteen percent unemployment rate four times, the national average almost forty percent that want to be employed find themselves grossly under employee. Not leveraging the talent that you described in in your mom. So where I work at Fox News. We have a number of people who are on board with us as Mentese, and these are not, you know, the type of intern that I was out of college. These are people who have served in a tremendous capacity with a kind of stick to of nece, and dedication that. I think sometimes we're all challenged by civilians, those multiple deployments that we've been speaking of, you know, they don't just leave the battlefield they stick in there. And that's the thing their ability to stick who wouldn't want that on their staff. I mean, they infect us with that at Fox News, and I work in a place where we already value that. But oh my goodness. We value it even more because we see them among us. Some of them are even active duty, they'll come in when they're home, and they'll be with us for a month or so, and then we'll all miss them when they leave. And you know, celebrate them as they move forward. It really is a special thing. And I think that, you know, small businesses make up more than seventy percent of those companies that hire people in the country, and we're already seeing our veterans fill out those roles pretty soon small business may overtake these large corporations as a place where we all want to work for. A whole host of issues, but that value sharing with our military members working at those companies is huge. It's a big component of of success for them. And I think for us as a country a Harris faulkners book nine rules of engagement is available now go to your local bookstore to get that or Amazon where we like to shop come to the Bush institute or you can kind of Bush has to do we have copies in our in our bookstore. You can also catch her on Fox News weekdays at eleven AM central for outnumbered and at noon central for outnumbered. Overtime that. I get that. Right. Yes. You did. I did the overtime show live here at the presidential library center. And it was pretty special. I told my executive producer when we wrapped up. I said, so I'm just going to stay here. And we'll just do this. And you guys can stay in New York every day. And they're like why because we can't or whether it's nicer to this little thank you for letting me do that here. Thank you so much for being here. Reprint Colonel out. Thank you as well. If you enjoy today's episode and would like to help us spread the word about the strategic, please give us a five star review until your friends to subscribe for available on apple podcasts Spotify and all the major listening apps if you're tuning in on a smartphone tapper swipe over the cover art. You'll find episode notes with helpful information and details he may have missed the strategic was produced, but you Anna Pappas at the George W Bush institute in Dallas, Texas. Thank you for listening.

Bob Harris Harris Faulkner Andrew Kaufman Fox News Brad George W Bush institute Bush US President Haley America Fox News Texas Harrison Bush institutes George W Bush administration Hawaii