17 Burst results for "Burton Malki"

"burton malki" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

01:57 min | 9 months ago

"burton malki" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"For marketplace. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> This final <Speech_Male> note on the way out today. <Speech_Male> Quick call back <Speech_Male> to that fed <Speech_Male> share. Jay Powell did <Speech_Male> this morning. I was talking <Speech_Male> about up. At the top <Speech_Male> Alan Blinder as I said <Speech_Male> a professor of economics <Speech_Male> at Princeton and occasional <Speech_Male> guest on this program <Speech_Male> by the way was <Speech_Male> doing the questioning <Speech_Male> those who have known <Speech_Male> each other. I'm sure <Speech_Male> for twenty years probably <Speech_Male> more so there <Speech_Male> are mostly softballs <Speech_Male> but still interesting. <Speech_Male> Here's one blinder <Speech_Male> asking the question <Speech_Male> from when they were just <Speech_Male> warming up. <Speech_Male> So this is your forty <Speech_Male> fifth reunion. <Speech_Male> And congratulations <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> on that. By <Speech_Male> the way <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> did you take economics? <Speech_Male> WanNa one <Speech_Male> incident. Remember <Speech_Male> who taught <SpeakerChange> to you <Silence> way back? Then <Speech_Male> I did. <Speech_Male> Burton Malki taught <Speech_Male> it. I took <Speech_Male> Micro <Speech_Male> and macro <Speech_Male> as a matter of fact my freshman <Speech_Male> year this <SpeakerChange> is the only <Silence> e concourses. I took <Speech_Male> though to more <Silence> than me. I'll tell you that <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> all right <SpeakerChange> we're going <Speech_Male> to. Here's your moment of economic <Speech_Male> context <Speech_Male> end of week inflation <Speech_Male> in this economy <Speech_Male> or rather <Speech_Male> the lack thereof <Speech_Male> an indicator known <Speech_Male> as the core personal <Speech_Male> consumption expenditure <Speech_Male> of the Federal Reserve's <Speech_Male> favored measure <Speech_Music_Male> of inflation. <Speech_Music_Male> Came out this morning <Speech_Music_Male> down. Four <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> tenths percent in <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> April from a month <Speech_Music_Male> earlier so no <Speech_Music_Male> inflation <Speech_Music_Male> now <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> thinking about what we said. Earlier <Speech_Music_Male> this week go <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> studied disinflation <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> again which <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> our theme <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> music was composed by <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> B. J. Liederman <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> marketplace's executive <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> producer. Is Nancy <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Farghali? Nancy <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> cast is the managing <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> director of News. Deborah <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Clark is the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Senior Vice President <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and general manager. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I'M KAI <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> result. We will see him money. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Everybody have yourself <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a great weekend <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> outside. If you can <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> stay. <SpeakerChange> Say Wash your <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> hands all I could <Music> <Advertisement> say

"burton malki" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

11:18 min | 1 year ago

"burton malki" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"We have a special treat today, talking about the death of the stretch IRA we have James Lang bestselling author, and I believe, also CPA attorney financial visor. He is the author of the book the two hundred and fourteen thousand dollar mistake, how to double your social security and maximize your IRA is a good morning. James morning. Thank you for great. Well for for those who don't know of your work. Can you describe your background? Well, my background is, and a let's call it a number cruncher. So what I like to do is. Jeez, for IRA retirement plan. Okay, we'll we'll, we'll have you call back. You're in a bad line. But folks were talking today about the two hundred and fourteen thousand dollar mistake, had a double your social security, potentially and maximize your IRA's. This is a free book, for those of you who schedule and keep your no obligation review. Jonathan Clements, author of how to think about money says social security is the best income stream available to retirees. And you want to get as much of this income as possible, but how to find out make it a priority to read Jim Lang's brief, but fabulous insightful new book Burton Malki will says Jim Lang has done it again in his clear. Sinked style, Jim is shown those about to enter retirement, what? What to do with one of the biggest decisions for their retirement? So call us going to take your questions all hour on any manner financial. So give us a call. We're talking today, how to double your social security and maximize your IRA's. We're also talking about Roth conversions and the death of the stretch IRA and we're going to be talking today about some of the big potential changes in legislation that passed in the house Farrar. A and retirement owners also to be telling you what you can do now. And what has to happen for this Bill? To become law. But in the book, we're giving away today, the two hundred and fourteen thousand dollar mistake, had a w social security and maximize your IRA's Jim Lang I talks about one of the reasons he wrote this book was to help marry tax payers get the most out of their social security benefits, though estimates vary as many as ninety seven percent of married social security, recipients failed to optimize their benefits. So that could be you a second reason is that the failure to optimize social security, benefits, frequently imposes significant consequences on the wife, who must go, it alone after the death of her husband's statistically, the greater probability. So if you're, you're listening with your hubby. Give them loyal bones safe time to call the financial quarterback for that second review. You don't want to be going it alone in retirement because you trusted your husband too much mall for marital bliss. But make sure that you and your hunting or both in on the money. If you have questions on stocks bonds. Annuities mutual funds. Whatever question you have. No question is a dumb one James lying. Go ahead. You're on with Josh Chilean sea the financial quarterback. Okay. Thanks to our sorry about these sound say, give give give us a background description of what, what you do. I. Well, I am a CPA that attorney in a financial advisor. But the thing that probably would be most interesting to your listeners is I actually try to keep people's petite advice regarding IRAs and retirement plans, and depending on what you want to talk about today. There's some new legislation. That's pensively disastrous impact on many of the people who I suspect are listening today. Well, let's talk about what the new legislation is and why it's a disaster for some listeners for many losses. All right. So what, what you're referring to is commonly or what I called death of the stretch IRA. And if you like what I will do. I talk about what the new I is a talk about what the existing why is then what the proposal is. And what is our sure that okay? So the existing laws. Number. Let's say that one of your listeners as a million dollars for that matter a hundred thousand dollars in their IRA Merlin ks for three D te'o. Some kind of retirement plan with these plans happened on that nobody has paid income tax on this money. Someday. Somebody will when you turn seventy technically April, first of the year at deterrent, seventy and a half you have to start taking money out. Dan? I your children or grandchildren, or nieces or nephews, or whoever you easy IRA too must start. What's called a minimum required distribution of the IRA and typically the beneficiary if they are doing everything. Right. Just takes out a little bit. Every year for the rest of their life. Called the minimum required distribution of the inherited IRA. And basically, there's just you have to pay tax on to take it out, or more accurately, your beneficiary will. But you get the spur or stretch time that you have to pay taxes, and before I go any further is is that part of it clear. Sure. Yeah, I've been talking about the death of the stretch for a while. But folks, we have a great expert James Lang, author of the two hundred and fourteen thousand dollar mistake. But I love how you're breaking it down. So keep going all right to the Kristen was. So let's just again say your, your listener has uneven one hundred thousand dollars in an IRA. He their spouse die Lee, the to their child who let's say is fifty years old. And according to the tables has roughly thirty year life expectancy. The minimum required distribution the inherited IRA would be determined by taking one over thirty or roughly three percent of the inherited IRA leaving the other ninety seven percent intact. Then next year they would take one over twenty nine at separate cetera. Within the next year after that one over twenty eight see you have this enormous tax deferral and then has been the way it has been for years. And people who are planning, and I suspect it your listeners and your clients have planned for this, and then after an IRA owner dies, actually does this now late game for what are your listeners clients, who are in their sixties and seventies. And they told all along. Hey, guess what after you die your children threats or to further taxes on the IRA, we're going to change our mind because we want some more. Money now. So what the house did is they voted, I believe four hundred seventeen to three to put a ten year limit on how long your beneficiary and push out the taxes on the IRA. So instead of you know, let's say pushing them out for thirty years, or forty years for child, maybe sixty or seventy years for van child. The government says, basically where we want all our money in ten years can run the numbers that we can talk about ten how quantitative you wanna get? It comes really a financial disaster for the children of IRA owner's Anthony. Huge disappointment for people who have worked all their lives play, by the rules, put money in their IRA's. Like they were supposed to kept money in their IRA's. Many of your listeners have sacrificed, they didn't. They will harder. They didn't spend money that they could have spent now the government late in the game decides they're going to change the rules, much to the detriment of what I was called middle-class IRA in retirement plan, owners, we're going to talk about what you can do to protect yourself from the death of the stretch, but I call us for the death of the stretch. IRA review at eight eight nine at eight. Josh if you have an IRA and you don't understand the stretch, I arrive, it's one of the biggest benefits in the tax code, and it'll probably be gone by your end. I do not see any way that we can fight it not on four hundred seventeen to three vote. That means it's bipartisan, but you should be taking advantage of the a rare window of political opportunity before this law passes to revisit your. IRA holdings and your tax strategy. So call us now. Eight eight nine at a Josh and we'll give you a copy of Jim Lang's book, the two hundred and fourteen thousand dollar mistake. But call us now. Eight eight nine at eight Josh this week, will be Long Island. New York City, short hills, New Jersey, Hackensack New Jersey, Tom's river in a spot near use of call us now. Eight eight on a Josh eighty eight nine hundred eight Josh for the no-obligation second opinion on your wealth, aided eight nine hundred Josh, we'll be back after this tax deferred. Vehicles such as 4._0._1._K's and IRA's sound good upfront. But did you realize that when you retire, you'll have to pay taxes on all your earnings? You can legally minimize your taxes, when you withdraw retirement funds with tax free IRA's, and other tax favourite accounts. Call the Dolinsky advisory group now at eight eight eight nine eight eight Josh, that's eight.

IRA IRA holdings James Lang Jim Lang Josh attorney CPA Jonathan Clements New York City Long Island New Jersey Dan Farrar Kristen Hackensack New Jersey
"burton malki" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

07:28 min | 2 years ago

"burton malki" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"What about the rain? Oh. This song. Swore this song off on this program. A long time ago. One of the radio station owners didn't like helter skelter. Oh, didn't we get something from one of the? Yeah. Remember that? There's nothing wrong with a song. The birds. Yeah. That wasn't McCartney's fall. The beatles. No, it was what's his name? Dennis wilson. He's the one who invited them. Dennis wilson. Well, he's the one who. Resident his house or something? Oh, no, no. It was the folger's house. And it was rented the Sharon. What's her name? No. That was fifty years ago. Oh, lord. Yeah. Nobody knows what we're talking about early man's. Look it out. Look it up. They've done a bunch of documentary. Yeah. Very fascinating stuff. But I guess it is but anyway, they wrote all over the walls. All right. So back to you had said the worst twenty five year period of time in the stock market since nineteen fifty since one thousand nine hundred fifty so in the modern era, if you wanna call it that returned seven point nine four four Burton Malki. I'll call it. Eight percent seven point nine four. If you want to be exact rate of return over twenty five years, you're making an assumption that somebody who's going to retire at the worst possible time stock market takes a dive. There are three fifty goes down over the next couple of years, whatever it is. But over twenty five years we've backed way up what's that three hundred fifty thousand dollars worth. So I was counseling John dean when he retires in ten years with his million dollars. I said we'll John here's what I think you should do because here's what I would do. I would take a portion of it. Now John wants to annuity is at all what I was talking him down. I. I said take twenty five percent of it and annuity is it. They're safe guaranteed. You get about call it fifteen grand year for you. And Chris what kind of what are we talking? What kind of annuity for people who are just I mean, you have different types. You listen variable. Let's just say it's a life a new life. All right, guaranteed guaranteed. And maybe there's inflation. Maybe there's not. All right. What I assume not. And then I said take another two hundred and fifty thousand dollars and go out and buy a property for let's say cash like a rental home somewhere, and you should be able to get a six percent net yield on that property. Now, you've got to hire a property manager. You know, me I think it's a risky business. But it doesn't have to be. And when you buy all cash, the risk goes down quite a bit doesn't it would tend to. So if it were me because I'm a little more risk tolerant than you. I'd buy two of them and put one hundred twenty five thousand dollar mortgage on. So you would leverage though. Yes, I wouldn't pay two hundred fifty a cash for one you pay one hundred twenty five one hundred twenty five for to have two mortgages for one hundred twenty five thousand you would pay the mortgage, and you would take whatever's leftover no my tenant would pay. Well, yes, yes. And I'd still get at least fifteen thousand maybe. Here's here's the what is I don't wanna get sidetracked. It's okay. Here's what the thinking is. You gotta have some guts some of this stuff. I guess you do what if the tenant moves out? What if it goes on rented for two months? You know, you Brian an area that all of a sudden gets depressed. You know, there's certain areas like Texas or somewhere with the oil you've seen that. And all of a sudden, you can't get the rents that you want. I mean, all the stuff would go through my head. I have to show you some of the returns on the self storage facilities that my partner Carlos bought way back twenty five years. I know you too. Well, it's it's. I don't even want to bring it up. I thought of it. But you're right. There is risk. And you've got to be willing to take that risk. I would suggest to you that if you look at areas that are hot areas for rent and you've seen rents go up. And then you go back to the last two recessions and take a look at how much rents had to go down in order for you to keep your tenant because you don't usually lose tenants unless you did a bad job of looking at them up front. Or somebody else build something across the street. That's nicer for less money. Right. So so you gotta go back. This is just it's all part of the protocol. When you're buying real estate. I didn't want to get into that. But I'm getting into it. So you go back, and you look at what the rents had how much you had to take it in the shorts and for how long and you make sure that you've reserved all right up money to cover that. Because sooner or later, rents go up just go back to the housing census bureau, whatever they call it. And look at what houses sold for and rented for ten years ago fifteen years ago twenty years ago and see what the running for today, rents always go up over time sometimes intermittently they go down, and you need to be prepared for that. That's why it's an alternative investment. That's why you don't over Leverett. Now, you ask the other question. And this example, if you drained down your safe money over fifteen years, and if you had a crappy I fifteen years with your stock market money beginning in year, sixteen you needed an income stream of I think it was fifty four thousand dollars from your portfolio to buy what forty thousand dollars bought fifteen years. Earlier we had a rotten fifteen years. We get eight percent. So we don't liquidate stocks. We wait we wait. But we do liquidate those two rental houses or one rental house. Now, one rental house later houses are easy to sell and. Yeah, you may not get a huge sales price. But I only assumed what two percent growth. On an all cash property. I think that's reasonable. It'd be like two hundred and fifty thousand dollar property would be worth three hundred and twenty five thousand bucks. So now withstanding taxes we can get really technical and all that stuff. But you you'd have about an asset worth three twenty five three fifty at the end of fifteen years you sell it you need to supplement your income you needed how much then. Well in fifteen years. You two percent inflation on a forty thousand dollar income need today. That's when you need to fifty four thousand bucks, right? So fifty four thousand minus the fifteen grand you're still getting from the annuity thirty nine thirty nine thousand dollars where am I going to get that? Well, I'm going to sell the real estate I've got say after taxes three hundred and twenty-five thousand so how long will that three hundred and twenty five thousand dollars last at thirty nine thousand dollars in payments. If I can earn call it three three and a half percent of my money for a ten percent waiter withdrawal rate. That's scary. Yeah. Because you're gonna spend all the money, exactly. And it lasts eleven year say last ten years. So you now have had your stock market money and your annuity, and that's all that's left..

John dean Dennis wilson folger McCartney beatles property manager Burton Malki Chris Texas housing census bureau Brian Leverett partner Carlos fifteen years twenty five years ten years two percent
"burton malki" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"burton malki" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Murray's defranco's. And you're listening to weekend. Live with Marita Franco, we are talking about financial freedom and the passing of a an icon. Hands down Jack Bogle who founded vanguard passed away this week. And did you know the actually he had six heart attacks? His first one was at the age of thirty one. He ended up having a heart transplant. So he died at eighty nine which I still think is young there are people living into their hundreds. So it's sad that he passed this week, but he leaves a phenomenal legacy. And I want to hear from you six one seven two five four ten thirty triple eight nine two nine ten thirty because there are very few people lake Jack Bogle who really practice what they preach who come up with an idea that changes literally millions of people's lives. You can't say that by about most politicians, you can't say that about most actors you can't say that about a lot of people, but this was transformative what he did. And like many people. Who try transformative ideas, they are not met with round the rousing applause and support when they first start out. Of course, everybody's a disciple. Once they they're successful. But they're late comers. And you know, not that authentic. But you here I'm just gonna read you this bit from Bloomberg Bloomberg article. That's if you want to check it out, call Jack Bogle, change your life. Even if you don't know who he was by Ben steverman, January nineteenth of two thousand nine nineteen. So I'm just going to quote from this. And I want to hear from you six one seven two five four ten thirty triple eight nine two nine ten thirty. Now, I'm quoting people thought he was crazy practically his only allies were academics. Economists like Nobel prize winner, Paul Samuelson and Princeton university's Burton Malki. L who thought the idea of index funds made a lot of sense money managers were charging big fees for the privilege of racking up media. Okay. Returns bogus concept with simple since it was nearly impossible to consistently beat the market. Why try just by large basket of stocks or bonds?.

Jack Bogle Bloomberg Bloomberg Marita Franco Murray vanguard defranco Paul Samuelson Ben steverman Nobel prize Princeton university Burton Malki
"burton malki" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

11:07 min | 2 years ago

"burton malki" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Mcgowan group asset management a, sir. John award is after sir. John Templeton, one of the leaders in the industry that I met in the early nineteen nineties, by the way, Alex. He he took us down to the Bahamas where he didn't have pay any taxes. And you'd move he sold Templeton funds to Franklin. I guess two names that now living in famous status forever. Now. It's Franklin Templeton good manager great manager. But the other the other great manager John Bogel passing away at eighty nine. He was really a commotion. And a little bit tight there. He was proud that. He wasn't a billionaire even the vanguard manages five trillion now. Yeah. And so we use vanguard when it when it when it's the best choice, then we'll be there. Right. But anyway, Burton Malcolm was his partner. I heard Burton Malki, I'll speak and. He he said, well, I'd like to say, oh, my money is in the S and P five hundred index, but I'm going to confess to you. And he actually piled into emerging markets before a big old route just saying even being an index guy. It's hard to get it sometimes hard to get it. Right. But anyway. The index funds. So it led revolution. Because when I started people had to pay extrordinary costs right transaction based industry, and they were still delivering certificates. When I started. That's that makes me old and you had to post your book every day for your trade. You had to post it by hand. And you weren't supposed to delegate that to an assistant. So anyway, they've since loosened the rules now that we have computers, but so cost keeps coming down because the technology that we. Yeah. When went to the word and certification one thing they pointed out as bond managers high yield bond managers actually add value above the index consistently. So the debate is still raging sometimes it's better to index and sometimes it's better not to to not to. And anyway, he led a revolution in the eighties and nineties, you know, it was like relentless like the -delity now. Fidelity had this campaign. Basically, it gets bad brokers who charged too much commission, and they were right, right? And now fidelity leads the way for the registered investment advisor revolution. Right. There you go. Yeah. No transaction costs and blow management little management cost. And we're paying our management fees eight times over with our current cash flow just to let you know. I mean, if you get it in cash that that may have to sell stuff. Yeah. Okay. This is good. So that was a, sir. John award a transforming figure in the industry. Benchmarking came from that. And we certainly use that here. Mcgowan group asset management now. Bozo award we got one bozo. Award this week. Edward lampert. And what does the little company called Sears holdings, which owns Sears KMart filed for bankruptcy protection this week? A few years ago stock hit a peak of one hundred and twenty one dollars per share this week trading at seventy seven cents. From one hundred twenty one and this came from the dean he nominated Eddie Lampert for bozo award. Now, we couldn't find the returns of his hedge fund. ESL? He's he's had a hedge fund for for many, many years and only manages for a few select families. Yep. Highly concentrates is positions. Lands his other big position. So he's like pretty much all retail. Yeah. Yeah. He must. He must hate peso's at Amazon, he must hate that guy. So. The book value of the company the negative thirty six dollars a share that sounds attract. Now, it also points out that burning two billion a year that's eighteen dollars per share per year. This Bobby dean does his lead does his homework. Yeah. This is not a recommendation for your portfolio right hand. He'd Eddie Lampert. Just bought is buying a company out of bankruptcy in bankruptcy court. So you did have an agreement that if he was bitter in bankruptcy, should it? Go bankrupt. That he gets to be the one that owns assets. Okay. So one of the one of the big, thanks stocks. I have some to point out. So Sears Sears is burn in two billion dollars a year. Okay. Right. Who else had burned two billion dollars a year? That's that's a thing. I don't know you tell me net flicks. Yeah. The burning over that. Anyway, just in great content just saying so his top three holdings are retail auto nation. Lands in Sears holdings, highly should make billions our nation highly cyclical. Okay. Drum roll, please. It is time for the research up. Do it. Okay. So each week will highlight research if you wanna be on the subscription lists. You'll automatically get twice a month. The best research from a team of ten now that Harrison Smith is joined us enjoys Chang, and we will scour the universe for the research that actually does good at making affective decisions alliance. Bernstein context is the title here bond strategies that balance interest rate and credit risks. And he talks about the the balance between traditional bond strategies and high yield very good. So it it it's there. It's there on the website at NetWorth radio dot com. Better yet on the free subscription lists to one four seven to forty four hundred and we will make sure that you get your update, including if there's fast breaking news in the markets. What we're doing about it? That sometimes helps to know. Hey, those guys with thirty years experience doing. Okay. Little trouble in Mexico. Okay. I mean, Mexico it it's a bigger mess than we thought. So tell us tell us the big story is in Mexico this week. So the headline is that El Chapo is. Pretty famous drug trafficker bribe, the former Mexican president with a hundred million dollars so opinion and taking office. That's the wow president-elect yet to. Explains part of the mess right where he wanted to hundred and fifty million in and they they negotiated. Wow. Hopefully, they didn't do it by like Email that got hacked. Okay. Okay. Superior returns. We'll get to that. Right. Superior returns. And then little 4._0._1._K note. Working on an allocation strategy for guy with some legacy accounts where you can only use the mutual fund choices. Let's cover that. And then we'll cover a huge uncoordinated investment for this past year. Alpha. Okay. So if you've got a 4._0._1._K, you got to decide what am I going to how am I going to allocate that thing, right? And the target funds. We've found don't really have much relation to what the target date is. Correct. He's just like half stocks bonds. And if you retire we'll so what if the stocks are down, right, which most people are not comforted by you know, if they if they got a target return for twenty twenty because you're gonna retire. Probably not the right allocation, the twenty twenty-five because it may just be half index stocks and half index bonds and stocks go down then. Well, here's your target. Here's less money, or here's less income than you were anticipating so. What you want to go through to recommendations here. An annual at least process where we look at all the choices in the 4._0._1._K look at where you are where you wanna be. And then we choose the best choices based upon current markets. Right. Along with where you want to be the other processes, the direct rollover conference call if you've got a 4._0._1._K or you've got a lump sum pension, which are huge huge because interest rates are still low long-term. If we look at the equivalent of takes fourteen fifteen years to collect as much money as your lump sum when you could be making interest. In the meantime. Anyway, we do that analysis customized to each sometimes the pensions better sometimes rollovers better, but the direct rollover conference. Call a vital part of the process to ensure that it's done in harmony with your CPA, and you and Andrew you told me last week. You guys are equally as good at doing director rollover conference calls. Yeah. We're gonna make a equally as good conference collar out of Harrison as well. Okay. So what is what is one of the top performing asset classes over the last few years goes Legos? Yeah. You buy your little LEGO barred for four bucks at the store, and you put it in your garage, or you're safe or whatever safe-keeping, and then several years later, you sell it for thirty bucks. I just it just doesn't feel like a reliable income strategy, Alex. Six hundred and thirteen percent game four year period. I wonder how many boxes? The Darth raven had anyway. Okay. So LEGO trader makes Bloomberg news this week. All right. We'll leave it at that that worth radio bringing you the best and financial news special. Thanks to Alex toluene Harrison Smith, Steven Norris and Andrew or the or Nater standing by to help you prepare.

Edward lampert Sears holdings Mexico Harrison Smith Alex Mcgowan John John Templeton Sears Sears Franklin Templeton Bahamas Templeton John Bogel Burton Malcolm Andrew Burton Malki Franklin partner
"burton malki" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

10:22 min | 2 years ago

"burton malki" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Mcgowan that's me and Alex till lean head of trading McGown group asset management, a, sir. John award is after sir. John Templeton, one of the leaders in the industry that I met in the early nineteen nineties, by the way, Alex. Yeah. He he took us down to the Bahamas where he didn't have pay any taxes. And you'd move he sold Templeton funds to Franklin. I guess two names that now living in famous status forever. Now. It's Franklin Templeton good manager great manager. But the other the other great manager John Bogel passing away at eighty nine. He was really a commotion. And a little bit tight there. He was proud that. He wasn't a billionaire even the vanguard manages five trillion now. So we use vanguard when it when it when it's the best choice, then we'll be there. Right. Yup. Anyway, Burton molecule was his partner. I heard Burton Malki will speak, and he he said, well, I'd like to say, oh, my money's in the us and P five hundred index, but I'm going to confess to you. And he actually piled into emerging markets before a big old route just saying even being an index guy. It's hard to get it sometimes hard to get it. Right. But anyway. The index funds. So it led a revolution. Because when I started people had to pay extrordinary costs, right? Who's transaction based industry, and they were still delivering certificates. When I started. That's that. Right. That makes me old and you had to post your book every day for your trade. You had to post it by hand. And you weren't supposed to delegate that to an assistant. So anyway, they've since loosened the rules now that we have computers, but so cost keeps coming down because of technology that we know that. Yeah. When I went to the warden certification one thing they pointed out his bond managers high yield bond managers actually add value above the index consistently. So the debate is still raging sometimes it's better day index. And sometimes it's better not to to not to and anyway. He led a revolution in the eighties and nineties, you know, it was like relentless like fidelity now. Fidelity had this campaign basically against bad brokers who charged too much commission, and they were right, right? And now fidelity leads the way for the registered investment advisor revolution, right? Yeah. No transaction costs and low management low management cost, and we're paying management fees eight times over with our current cash flow just to let you know. I mean, if you get in cash that that means you have to sell stuff. Yeah. Okay. This is good. So that was a, sir. John award transforming figure in the industry. Benchmarking came from that. And we certainly use that here. Mcgowan group asset management now. Bozo award we got one bozo. Award this week. Edward lampert. And what does the little company called Sears holdings, which owns Sears KMart filed for bankruptcy protection this week a few years ago stock hit a peak of one hundred twenty one dollars per share this week trading at seventy seven cents. From one hundred twenty one and this came from poverty dean, he nominated Eddie Lampert for a bozo award. Now, we couldn't find the returns of his hedge fund. Yes. We know. He's had a hedge fund for for many, many years and only manages for a few select families. Highly concentrates is positions. Yeah. Lands in his other big position. So he's like pretty much all retail. Yeah. Yeah. He must he must hate Baso Damas on. He must hate that guy. So. The book value of of the company is a negative thirty six dollars a share that sounds attract. Now, it also points out the burning two billion a year that's eighteen dollars per share per year. Bobby dean, does his he does his homework. Yeah. This is not a recommendation for your portfolio. Right. And he Eddie Lampert. Just bought the is buying a company out of bankruptcy in bankruptcy court. So you did have an agreement that if he was bitter in bankruptcy should go bankrupt. That he gets to be the one that owns assets. Okay. So one of the one of the big thank stocks have something to point out. So Sears Sears is burn in two billion dollars a year. Okay. Who else burn two billion dollars a year? That's that's a thing. Oh, I don't know you tell me net flicks. Yeah. Burning over that. Anyway in great content, just saying so his top three holdings are retail auto nation. Landseer's, Sears, holdings pilots. She did make billions and auto nation highly cyclical. Okay. Drum roll, please. It is time for the research round up. Let's do it. Okay. So each week will highlight research if you want to be on the subscription list, you'll automatically get it twice a month. The best research from a team of ten now that Harrison Smith is joined us and Joyce Chang. And we will scour the universe for the research that actually does good at making affective decisions alliance. Bernstein context is the title here bond strategies that balance interest rate and credit risks. And he talks about the the balance between traditional bond strategies and high yield. There you go. So it it's there. It's there on the website at NetWorth radio dot com. Better yet. Get on the free subscription lists to one four seven to forty four hundred. And we will make sure that you get your update, including if there's fast breaking news in the markets. What we're doing about it that sometimes helps to know. Hey, those guys with thirty years experience doing, okay? Little trouble in Mexico. Okay. What ha- I mean? Mexico it it's a bigger mess than we thought. So. Tell us tell us the big story is in Mexico this week. So the headline is that El Chapo whose. Pretty famous drug trafficker bribe the former Mexican president with a hundred million dollars. So yet. Taking office. That's the well president-elect yet to. Explains part of the mess, right? He wanted to hundred and fifty million in and they they negotiated. Wow. Hopefully, they didn't do it by like Email that got hacked. Anyway. Okay. Superior returns. We'll get to that. Right. Superior returns. And then little 4._0._1._K note. I'm working on an allocation strategy for a guy with some legacy accounts where he can only use, you know, the mutual fund choices. Let's cover that. And then we'll cover a huge uncoordinated investment for this past year. We like to call alpha. Okay. So if you've got a 4._0._1._K, you gotta decide what am I gonna how am I going to allocate that thing, right? And the target funds. We've found don't really have much relation to what the target date is correct. He's just like half stocks bonds. And if you retire we'll so what if the stocks are down, right, which most people are not comforted by you know, if they got if they got a target return for twenty twenty because you're gonna retire. Probably not the right allocation, the twenty twenty-five because it may just be half index stocks and half index bonds and stocks go down then. Well, here's your target. Here's less money, or here's less income than you. Intimidating. So. What you want to go through to recommendations here. An annual at least process where we look at all the choices in the 4._0._1._K look at where you are where you wanna be. And then we choose the best choices based upon current markets. Right. Along with where you want to be the other processes, the direct rollover conference call if you've got a 4._0._1._K or you've got a lump sum pension, which are huge huge because interest rates are still low long-term. If we look at the equivalent, it takes fourteen fifteen years to collect as much money as your lump sum when you could be making interest. In the meantime, there anyway, we do that analysis customized to each sometimes the pensions better sometimes rollovers better, but the direct rollover conference. Call a vital part of the process to ensure that it's done in harmony with your CPA, and you and Andrew you told me last week. You guys are equally as good at doing direct rollover conference calls. Yeah. We're gonna make a an equally of good conference collar out of Harrison as well. Okay. So what is a while to get there? What is one of the top performing asset classes over the last few years? Legos legos. Yeah. You.

Edward lampert Mexico Mcgowan John Harrison Smith John Templeton Alex Burton Malki Sears Sears Franklin Templeton Sears holdings Bahamas Templeton John Bogel Sears Franklin Baso Damas Bobby dean
"burton malki" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

05:35 min | 2 years ago

"burton malki" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Indicators that suggest docs will break out to new highs as you all. Know I don't buy any of this stuff I don't I've been around the game too long because anything can happen. Anything can happen I mean. You got trade wars going on you got. Turkey and we're fighting with Russia, and China and all this stuff all at. The same time the guy in Canada can't stand Trump Scott's the guy in France can't either and it goes on and on and on so. You don't know what's going to happen But I was reading Ben Carlson, I thought this was kind of funny he wrote eight questions I've been pondering. And the one that I. Got a kick out of was this one. How hard was it to invest, in stocks in two thousand and nine and. I got thinking about that article and y'all How hard is it today to invest in stocks when you think about the fact. That we're in this nine plus year bull market according to many of? The x bar experts valuations are at nosebleed levels Think back to two thousand and nine, in March, of two thousand nine I don't think. Anybody not Kramer not me not. Anyone was jumping up on the tables and saying yeah, let's go all in we just got our butts kicked minus fifty seven percent, but let's go all in any way I don't remember anybody saying that I'm sure there were a few and if there were they ought to write a book and cash in on the book like Amoroso How, hard was it to, invest in stocks in two thousand and nine here's what he had to say Investing in stocks seems like a layup looking back at some of the prices from oh nine but for anyone who. Lived through the financial crisis investing at the point of maximum pessimism and its aftermath was anything but easy. And then he goes on to show a couple of headlines that one? Of his readers sent to him Allow. Me to read them to you March ninth two thousand and nine Rabin's said this is Nouri Al Rabin a famous economists may. Communist who's been right a lot a couple of times to this time wrong this is what he said Rabin says SNP may drop to. Six hundred as prophets fall What are we working on like three thousand now March fourteenth two thousand nine just a sucker's rally may ninth. Two. Thousand and. Nine, Meryl's as in Lynch. Rosenberg goodbye thank you yes it's a sucker's rally would? You, say Merrill Lynch is a fairly high brow well read organization with all kinds. Of technological, support. And market forecasters economists and market everything's yes yes And. They said it's a sucker's rally because the market started? To, rally this was in may starting to come back I think it was like. Sixty seventy. Percent By by the time those Christmas. Rolled around but if? Merrill, Lynch said. If they're guy as should say said it's a sucker's rally I think it'd be kind of reluctant the jump Bank. In what did you not oh come on Yes you. Would I would I? Respect, those guys December seventh Two thousand nine Eighty percent chance of a market crash in. The next year Eighty percent chance. To market. Went straight up folks. Straight up until. Twenty fifteen let's see that's two thousand. Ten eleven twelve thirteen fourteen five. Years of straight up, market then a kind of flat market and then up again Doesn't get. Much better than that Also and, looking through this his next question why it's so hard. To invest during a bear market and he quotes a vanguard research piece that I hadn't seen in a while and it reminded. Me of a couple of things let me go through the worst performing sectors, back in two, thousand and three two. Thousand three two thousand and three and then two thousand seven. To February two thousand and? Nine and why is this important it's because folks what Burton Malki l. wrote in a random walk. Down Wall, Street. Is pretty true it's. Random man it. Is so random check this out worst performing sectors in. Two thousand two. Thousand three info technology minus forty two point Three telecom.

Merrill Lynch Nouri Al Rabin Ben Carlson Turkey Trump Scott Russia Canada Kramer Burton Malki France Rosenberg China Meryl Two thousand nine Eighty perce fifty seven percent Eighty percent
"burton malki" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

05:19 min | 2 years ago

"burton malki" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"You ROY ROY checking, in you know I'll tell you, what ROY really, has the, thought there which is To run that by your financial adviser what do you think of these? Books you think as you read these books commonsense on vitual funds by John Bogle that's going to get their. Attention that's going to get their attention soon as you mentioned John Bogel We call. Him Saint John around here Random walk down Wall Street is an absolute academic classic by Burton Malki against the gods. By Peter Bernstein. And the losers game, they Charlie LSI I met Charlie Ellison Princeton University, at a seminar back in the day and while Wow what a, brilliant individual and Charlie has been a multiple time. Guest on our broadcast that's a fantastic call ROY in ROY we thank you for sharing very very much our toll free line if you'd. Like to join. Us and you know, I'd like your comments on any of those books. Books really She's the any of the books, on the recommended reading list I'd like your comments for sure But those four Thomas Edison mutual funds random walk against the gods, losers game, absolutely, fantastic books, Dave is, on the. Line listening to the great kiss EPA radio San Francisco David. Your turn hurry long-term no talk Hey you know hearing yesterday, that the was it apple reached a trillion, dollars I'm just, wondering the, expression hyperinflation, wheelbarrows full of money to get a. Loaf of bread. It really seems like the sky's the limit for some of these, stocks but, it's, not reaching, down to. The bottom What do you mean it's not reaching down. To the, bottom well I a couple of, years ago people were demanding a fifteen, dollars an hour minimum wage so now of the valuation of some of these stocks have just taken off and it. The average person, is still waiting for that fifteen dollars an hour to. Kick, in you, know if if the prices of. Goods whether it's healthcare or. Refrigerator or Christ a hamburger was twelve bucks three years ago down here near the financial. District now at seventeen bucks for a hamburger so you know the average, person can't deal with that sort of thing So what is your point David You're trying to you're trying to link the valuation of, of apple to the minimum wage and I. Don't get your point at all Let's see you're a money show right Money talk yes okay tell the average person if an average person in Oklahoma was, live listening to your show right now are you telling me that there's no, correlation between of the little guy getting you, know if. A waitress is right now Stuck in the agriculture all minimum wage, of. Three. Dollars and eighty cents an hour plus tips and I think Trump just made it easier for employers, to steal those tips and the stock market on the other hand is allowing, corporations to be valued at a trillion dollars And a year saying, that there's no correlation between that I'm asking, you what is the correlation between what investors are willing. To pay for a share of apple stock which is how you get the valuation of the company. You multiply the price of the stock times the number of shares outstanding and that's how you get the market. Capitalization which now has exceeded one? Trillion, dollars for that company those are statistical facts based on the earnings power and the potential that investors see at the company I'm asking you how you are connecting that. To what states or the federal government established as the minimum wage what is the connection between that well there might be called what's called the prevailing wage in a given area Is is. The average person going to be able to keep up with what the inflation rate. Of stocks is going? To or on the other hand if there is no correlation then why should we Klay why should we listen to the Trump bites when they claim that it's a booming economy. When the average person is not gaining and only the stock market is gaining if there's no correlation and that, means that there is no reality in in either sense. Well your point is interesting in the sense that it gets at something, I opened the program with with reference to, the employment situation where we had another good number and. With especially with reference to the fact and this is where I think it fits your point we..

ROY ROY apple John Bogle San Francisco David John Bogel Charlie LSI Charlie Ellison Princeton Univ Burton Malki Saint John Peter Bernstein Charlie Klay Trump Thomas Edison EPA Oklahoma
"burton malki" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"burton malki" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"But i haven't done that study i'm just hypothesizing there i'm sure others have but i broke my fifteen years down into the first seven years and the next eight years i seven years being i want my money pretty darn safe and the next eight years i'm okay with a tiny bit of risk but i wanna keep it pretty safe from pretty darn safe to pretty safe or safe anything beyond fifteen years can be risky because there's not been in all of history a fifteen year period where stocks haven't produced a positive rate of return and that's really all we can ask for we can't be saying you know well it's gonna average eight percent because it hasn't most of the time it does but with your locker my luck most of the time doesn't cut the mustard i also know that there hasn't been a twenty year period where stocks haven't beaten the rate of inflation according to data that i have gleaned from ibbotson and i also know with data that i have gleaned from burton malki l that since nineteen fifty the worst twenty five year period has been a seven point nine four percent return for stocks so the moral of this story is yes i think this fellow henseler is onto something here rather than trying to time your way in and out and i know right now with the volatility and potential trade wars donald trump's impeachment or pending impeach being facetious there but there are a lot of people that would like to see that for sure that could really cause the stock market to go haywire at least for a while but what this.

ibbotson donald trump fifteen years eight years seven years nine four percent twenty five year eight percent fifteen year twenty year
"burton malki" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"burton malki" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"But i haven't done that study i'm just hypothesizing there i'm sure others have but i broke my fifteen years down into the first seven years and the next eight years i seven years being i want my money pretty darn safe and the next eight years i'm okay with a tiny bit of risk but i wanna keep it pretty safe from pretty darn safe to pretty safe safe anything beyond fifteen years can be risky because there's not been in all of history a fifteen year period where stocks haven't produced a positive rate of return and that's really all we can ask for we can't be saying you know well it's gonna average eight percent because it hasn't most of the time it does but with your locker my luck most of the time doesn't cut the mustard i also know that there hasn't been a twenty year period where stocks haven't beaten the rate of inflation according to data that i have gleaned from ibbotson and i also know with data that i have gleaned from burton malki l that since nineteen fifty the worst at twenty five year period has been a seven point nine four percent return for stocks so the moral of this story is yes i think this fellow hints ler is onto something here rather than trying to time your way in and out and i know right now with the volatility and potential trade wars donald trump's impeachment or pending impeach where i'm being facetious there but there are a lot of people that would like to see that for sure that could really cause the stock market to go haywire at least for a while but what this.

ibbotson donald trump fifteen years eight years seven years nine four percent twenty five year eight percent fifteen year twenty year
"burton malki" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"burton malki" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"But i haven't done that study i'm just hypothesizing there i'm sure others have but i broke my fifteen years down into the first seven years and the next eight years i seven years being i want my money pretty darn safe and the next eight years i'm okay with a tiny bit of risk but i want to keep it pretty safe from pretty darn safe to pretty safe safe anything beyond fifteen years can be risky because there's not been in all of history a fifteen year period where stocks haven't produced a positive rate of return and that's really all we can ask for we can't be saying you know well it's gonna average eight percent because it hasn't most of the time it does but with your locker my luck most of the time doesn't cut the mustard i also know that there hasn't been a twenty year period where stocks haven't beaten the rate of inflation according to data that i have gleaned from ibbotson and i also know with data that i've gleaned from burton malki l that since one thousand nine hundred fifty the worst twenty five year period has been a seven point nine four percent return for stocks so the moral of this story is yes i think this fellow henseler is onto something here rather than trying to time your way in and out and i know right now with the volatility and potential trade wars donald trump's impeachment or pending impeach where i'm being facetious there but there are a lot of people that would like to see that for sure that could really cause the stock market to go haywire at least for a while but what this ten year rule says is don't worry about it because it will be a.

ibbotson donald trump fifteen years eight years seven years nine four percent twenty five year eight percent fifteen year twenty year ten year
"burton malki" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"burton malki" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"And i also know with data that i have gleaned from burton malki al that since one thousand nine hundred fifty the worst twenty five year period has been a seven point nine four percent return for stocks so the moral of this story is yes i think this fellow henseler is onto something here rather than trying to time your way in and out and i know right now with the volatility and potential trade wars donald trump's impeachment or pending impeach i'm being facetious there but there are a lot of people that would like to see that for sure that could really cause the stock market to go haywire at least for a while but what this ten year rule says is don't worry about it because it will be a faint memory just think about what happened ten years ago we experienced the worst bear market crash since the great depression and there was one point where it was even worse than that on an after inflation adjusted basis so so getting out of the market would have been brilliant if you've done so in two thousand and eight and gotten back in in march of two thousand and nine but how many people actually did that and then when they get back in if they missed a year they probably miss seventy eighty percent recovery so i like this rule the ten year rule minds at fifteen but i think either one works it's all about patience and not trying to beat the system by timing your way in and out because you've gotta make too correct decisions you gotta know when they get out but equally as important you need to know when to get back miss either one of them have been far better off just buying and holding for at least ten years according to handlers ten year rule shall return.

donald trump ten year ten years seventy eighty percent nine four percent twenty five year
"burton malki" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"burton malki" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"But i haven't done that study i'm just hypothesizing there i'm sure others have but i broke my fifteen years down into the first seven years and the next eight years i seven years being i want my money pretty darn safe and the next eight years i'm okay with a tiny bit of risk but i wanna keep it pretty safe so from pretty darn safe to pretty safe safe anything beyond fifteen years can be risky because there's not been in all of history a fifteen year period where stocks haven't produced a positive rate of return and that's really all we can ask for we can't be saying you know well it's gonna average eight percent because it hasn't most of the time it does but with your locker my luck most of the time doesn't cut the mustard i also know that there hasn't been a twenty year period where stocks haven't beaten the rate of inflation according to data that i have gleaned from ibbotson and i also know with data that i've gleaned from burton malki l that since nineteen fifty the worst twenty five year period has been a seven point nine four percent return for stocks so the moral of this story is yes i think this fellow henseler is onto something here rather than trying to time your way in and out and i know right now with the volatility and potential trade wars donald trump's impeachment or pending impeach i'm being facetious there but there are a lot of people that would like to see that for sure that could really cause the stock market to go haywire at least for a while but what this.

ibbotson donald trump fifteen years eight years seven years nine four percent twenty five year eight percent fifteen year twenty year
"burton malki" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:46 min | 3 years ago

"burton malki" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"So so once we got through the goals thing and in particular longterm healthcare they chose to self insure i probably would not have recommended that but it's not my money it's their money his mother is ninety seven in a facility just entered hospice his dad died at one hundred and two long jetty in the family history if they weren't as wealthy as they are they definitely would be candidates for long term care policies are some long term care solution does it bother me that with a two or three million dollar nest egg and a great job and social security and pension both have colas that they're going to self insure for healthcare i could make a strong case from an investment standpoint that's a different story then we get into the risk tolerance questions all right now i have a philosophy my philosophy is one should never take on more risk than they need to that is necessary or that they want this couple is very very risk averse very risk averse they don't like losing money most of their moneys in cash is in cds it's in money markets it sitting in the bank however they do have some retirement portfolios with stock in it and they've done well obviously in the last few years but they're nervous so i was able to communicate with them on a level that would make the stock accounts in their portfolio basically at least statistically risk free if they did two things one diversify if they have ample zion seeing their portfolio is still haven't seen it and it's not my job the financial planners gonna have to deal with this but one thing we know is a diversified portfolio can withstand big market downturns in the market always comes back over the second thing time to reach a new record high now in order for us to try to figure out what that time horizon is we have to go back and look at what we've learned from people such as burton malki l he's the genius that wrote a random walk down wall street and i took a picture of his book this morning because i've quoted from this before want to make sure that.

three million dollar
"burton malki" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"burton malki" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Welcome back to the rules so we're talking about the conversations they you need to be having with your financial advisory team and i emphasize the team because not one person can know everything uh i happen to be the quarterback of those kinds of teams i don't do financial planning anymore i don't do securities anymore i still do some corporate consulting and that's how i got involved in this particular gig but as a quarterback we talk about all of these different things and in the room there is a tax lawyer who is addressing the needs of a corporation and a defined benefit plan there's there's also the cpa who's talking about it from attacks wise perspective and it's interesting because you know we think right off the bat that the lawyer knows everything in the cpa knows everything what i'm finding in this particular meeting is the lawyer in his respect is brilliant and knows everything about what what he needs to know about and the cpa knows everything that he needs to know about but each of them don't know a lot of the stuff that the other one knows if you follow what i'm saying same thing is true i have to cfp is one with an insurance background the other with us securities an investment background that's part of that team both brilliant and both have different disciplines and so we're going through this conversation of now we've graduated to allocation as i said before the break this client wants no risk well the securities person probably would want them have waymo or stock and the insurance person would probably want them to have all of their money and fixed investments but in reality i pulled out burden mouth kills book actually a page from burton malki els book that i took a snapshot of and i explain how an investment in the stock market over a long time periods twenty five years was a seven point nine four percent worst case.

cpa nine four percent twenty five years
"burton malki" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"burton malki" Discussed on KOMO

"Any services the justify the extra money you're paying the by that stock that's really what what that's what the question ends up being okay well i guess i don't know enough to ask this intelligent leave it first off if i did with america trader of the uh what ghinwa marina those yes yeah do i have to then do my research and decide which uh what i wanna buyer did they give me advice on that like he does they can give you advice they have people who do it but let me suggest an and this i would like you to really consider this and don't just instantly react but consider the fact that your broker doesn't have any more knowledge about which stock is going to do good in our do well in the future too good do well in the future then does anyone else on the planet they have no secret knowledge their firm has no secret knowledge and please remember that for every buyer of a stock there is another person on the other side of that trade selling it because they think it's a terrible stock and they're getting out of it so buying individual stocks is a very risky speculation it is not investing and it shouldn't be done with anybody with any money except that which you can afford to lose almost in its entirety now dominion energy because it's a utility they're probably going to be around for a long time but also because they're utility they tend to be exceedingly boring and dull and no one knows what direction it's going to take there's no way to know what direction and individual stock is going to take but when you buy all of them you buy the whole market you can with relatively high confidence know that the global economy will grow over time so i'm not a big fan of individual stocks i don't think a broker adds value in their suggestions to justify a two percent commission i think you could probably do research that would be just as good as a matter of fact there is a guy by the name of burton malki he'll who wrote a random walk john wall street who believes and has data.

global economy america burton two percent
"burton malki" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"burton malki" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Example for active deviations from market cap waiting hours when you buy an end acts like the sp 500 or whatever wilshire you're you're you're buying a market capitalisation waited an index of stocks so apple gets the lion's share of the money in any all the other in the fang stocks are dominating if you will the end access so of the fangs expensive stocks get more expensive you win the expenses stocks go down you lose so far the expensive ones winning has been winning winning anyway big change in views for burton malki l a very big change in views and you know he he sits in uh on board positions on a lot of different companies to and he's made comments and written books and all this stuff and so it's it's somewhat shocking to me some on its followed him in his writings for many many years while not agreeing with everything the guy is a really really smart economist and he's got a ton of jobs but he's known primarily for the work that he's done at princeton so what's happening with burton malki oh you might ask wisey suddenly embracing this alpha chasing or this smart beta idea and the the the truth must be somewhere in the fact that this robo advisor isn't generating the revenue that they need to remember these robo advisors there it's all computerdriven and its technology driven and it's brilliant stuff i mean get don't get me wrong it is tremendous technology and they've gotten a lot of private woody money to fund them because when you're charging twenty basis points or whatever you gotta bring in all a heck of a lot of money to pay for all this tv advertising millions of dollars a tv advertising you know a quarter of 1.

princeton burton malki advisor tv advertising apple wisey