23 Burst results for "Burstein"

Sin is Spiritual Adultery (Hosea 14:9)

Pray the Word with David Platt

04:54 min | 4 months ago

Sin is Spiritual Adultery (Hosea 14:9)

"Hosea chapter fourteen verse. Nine whoever is wise led him understand these things whoever's discerning let him know them for the ways of the lord or right and the upright walk in them but transgressors stumble in them and thus ends the book of jose. This is the last verse in the book. Whoever is wise let him understand these things. Think about what is what are these things you've got all that god has said in the book of hosea about the seriousness of sin sin islamic spiritual adultery. I picture a husband who loves his wife and his wife deliberately turns from him and his love and goes running after many other men and he continues to love her still and to the point of purchasing to bring her back. It's this picture of sen as spiritual adultery and yet that is deserving of god's sin warrants the wrath the judgment the discipline of god's santa's end finitely serious before a holy god and yet god is loving god is merciful toward centers who will turn from their sin and trust in him. Whoever's wise let him understand these things whoever's discerning let him know them for the ways of the lord our right and the upright walk in them but transgressors stumble in them. So god we we pray straight based on jose chapter fourteen verse. Burstein help us to be wise and to understand these things gallery prayed. You'd help us to understand god. We prayed you'd help us to see san for the horror that it is god. Help us to hate sin. We pray just like the thought of being unfaithful to someone. We love god in supreme way. You are supremely loving toward us. We don't want to be unfaithful to you. Want to faithfully walk with you so help us to hate sin to run from it to cling to you. We praise you for your love for us your faithfulness to us even when we have been unfaithful to you and thank you for loving us when we don't deserve it. Jesus thank you for paying the price for our san on the cross. So how ourselves to walk with enjoy deep intimacy with you god. This is wisdom understanding that we're created for a relationship with you like a husband and a wife for a father and a child like to walk in love for you enjoying your love for us to help us to understand these things to be wise not to be foolish not to run up to the things of this world would decline to you. Knowing your ways are right so make us upright. Help us to walk in your way so to walk. According to your word help us to meditate on your word day and night in a do according to what is ended to walk in your ways and not to be counted among transgressors. Who stumble in your ways. God keep us from transgression. We pray pray. Jose fourteen nine over every single person listening right now. Give them wisdom guard. Them from foolishness helped them to understand your love. The sirius' them sand and the beauty of what we've been called to in relationship with you and help them to be upright to walk in your ways that are right and not to stumble in them through transgression. God i pray that over them. I pray that over my life that we might fully enjoy you and your ways you and your love and your ways. That are right and good best for us. We pre jose fourteen nine. Jesus name amen.

Hosea Jose Burstein Santa Jesus
"burstein" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:13 min | 5 months ago

"burstein" Discussed on Fresh Air

"And. That things just her that they had occur and no one. To blame. But now. That, they are not the same. That love is somewhere. A. Anxious, he should here being. Always asked me worried and in trouble when he's near. Keyboard near be now cheer be. I used to. That was my guest. Rebecca.

"burstein" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:34 min | 5 months ago

"burstein" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Revival of the show and there is such a beautiful recording and. Grateful to have it. On my talk. Show. Yeah. I always think it must be so hard to have something that you're so gifted at that. You can't. You can't do anymore. Right Yes. Yeah it's been especially hard. On on on. On on on all of a Su Know Rebecca. And But I will say that she there's some days she has actually no voice all. And, then it comes back she fights hard. And and she Perseveres. There are many. Different things that we have to. Mourn. Along the way. A way also, it also teaches us something and we adapt. Because it seems like every few weeks where adapting to a new reality with this illness. You know everybody says, it's very, very hard to be a patient, but it's also very hard to be a caregiver. And it can also what when in in a couple one person needs care and the and the spouse is the caregiver it can be a very loving tender thing can also create a lot of impatience with each other and if if you're comfortable talking about a CA- so many people are going through or have gone through or we'll go through this kind of thing if there's anything you're comfortable sharing about. The. Tenderness and the pressures. When Somebody is sick and the spouse becomes the caregiver. While I feel like I haven't really slept in the seven or eight months. Laugh but I honest I say that in all honesty it's exhausting. And not easy and I've been helping take care of Becca out for a year and a half. Since the onset of the illness. Having, said that, of course, there are the beautiful things that this kind of situation. Presents you with the the the closeness, the the friendship, the the deep understanding. The Trust. And it's a privilege and I mean that that it is a great great privilege to share this time together having said that. It's exhausting. Sometimes we are at at at at each other because you know we're still a normal married couple just going through this kind of a awful bizarre situation. But you know we still bicker and and latch and laugh and kiss and all the normal things that everybody else goes through just that everything is. Heightened because of the situation because the oldest and the and the sheer exhaustion of it all as harnesses. For me I sometimes INC that Danny has ardor job. Should tell you something. It's tough is tough. You're constantly on the phone with. With doctors with Ot's with GT with the reflexologist with insurance companies and a you know your home health aid and We're so grateful to everybody who has stepped up break. This out you are we love you. Just just a few months ago in June when when you had a little more breath. Before the ELE- S had advanced to the point where it is. Now you did Zoom. event. To raise awareness about AOL as in you saying Jerome Kern Song called not you that's also on your Jerome Kern album. And I thought since we're talking about your voice that we might hear a little bit of that and so if you could maybe compare for us the. What the song means in context in the context of the show that it's from but where the song with with what the song means personally to you now. All I just think it's one of the most beautiful early turn songs ever. Sean Times that he liked to. So that's good What needs to me. I just think as long as beautiful. Kern. Ballads. Ever. At. Current to speaks to me. So. Well, you know, I feel like it's not always met to sing.

Jerome Kern Sean Times CA Danny Ot AOL
"burstein" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

03:06 min | 5 months ago

"burstein" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Yeah. Is a type of immortality that we were talking about the other day that Bekker's recordings give her? And she was expressing how crowd cheetahs of those recordings. So and they are they're glorious. They are I agree. Let's why don't we pause in listen to one? So. I'd like you back to choose one that you particularly like to hear especially if I turn visit song that has special meaning for you know or that's taken on a new meaning for you. I was GONNA. Suggest. My White Knight. Say A few words about why you love the song and then we'll hear it. I was just all. I was just GonNa say that He's my White Knight. So..

Bekker
"burstein" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:06 min | 5 months ago

"burstein" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Interview with Broadway stars Rebecca Luker and Danny Burstein, who are a married couple he was starring in Moulin Rouge. When it went dark because of Cove. It He came down with a severe case. Luca had a relatively mild case soon after, but she had been diagnosed just a few months earlier with the progressive disease unless Lou Gehrig's disease Which interferes with the brain's ability to initiate movement and control muscles. So that the Tony nominations were postponed in June because of covert and other nominations will be announced tomorrow was Roman ruins the first show to go dark because there was a case of suspected Cove it in the production. Actually, it wass way were we had on an unusual schedule. We had Thursday matinee and we knew that that people were getting sick all around us. But we didn't know in the company that anyone was sick or anyone in the building was sick. Or suspected of being ill. And we all got a text at around. 12 30. Normal time for show to start for Matt native started two o'clock. And we got a text from our producers that's and come to the house. On and we're going to have an emergency meeting at one o'clock, and so literally, everybody in the building had to be there. Stagehands Thie, Usher's house manager, and they said one of our cast members has taken ill. And he said the doctor right now and it was it was suspected that he might have covet and so to be proactive and to make sure nobody else got sick. They were going to cancel the matinee and evening show and they were going to sterilize everything that they could And I really applaud our producers for taking that step before any other show did on day cancel the show and nobody knew that they were going to cancel the show. Even the House manager said. There's a whole line of people waiting outside to come in the line goes around the block, and he was just told to tell them that an emergency is calm. Mama come up. And we're very sorry, but the show is canceled today. And later on that afternoon, Governor Cuomo actually cancelled all of the Broadway shows today that very day that evening for a month. And how soon after that, did you get covert? Danny? Uh, I think a week later. I was a little over, like nine days later, I was in the hospital. We're afraid to go to the hospital thinking like, well, maybe I don't have cove it but I'll be exposed to it if I do go. Well, I had a feeling I might have it. But, Andi, I gotta try to get a test and that took a week and a half to finally come through. But I felt ill, and my doctors kept telling me if you don't feel if you don't have trouble breathing. Don't go to the hospital because right now the hospitals are dangerous places to actually go. So I was holding on. I was sick and I had fever and I was trying Teo stay away from back as much as I could. And our son Zack was here with us at the time. And I wasn't feeling good. And I decided to take a shower in the evening one evening and I went into the shower and I couldn't breathe and I fell to my needs in the shower. And a voice just came out of me That said, Guys, I need to go to the hospital, and it just literally came out of me. And that voice that decision saved my life. Because my lungs were so bad if I hadn't gone, you know, probably because I just kept any worse on Ben. My son, Zack walked me. To the hospital ST. Luke's, which has been a block and a half away. And he was looking back at me the whole time, you know, so worried about me and you know, it's apparently all you want to do is take care of your Children. You know, desperately take care of your Children and not have him worry. And to see that look in his eyes that worry for me and him. Walking me to the hospital was going reversal and quite emotional for me. Yeah, but they took me in right away. And I got great care there and I'm very grateful to everybody in that. You wrote in your articles that were times you thought you were going to die. Were you reflecting on your life during that time during those times when you thought like I might be dying right now. Sure I was reflecting on everyone in my life that I love. My Children. My wife, my friends, My parents, um leaving my you know. Not being there for my Children not being there for my wife, who was home. In wheelchair. And I just knew that this was not going to be the way and I just did. I was so focused on not letting that happen. Now you know, if circumstances were different in my lungs were little worse. You know, I would have left us left the world, of course. But I was lucky enough that I was able to turn things around. And I mean that I was lucky. I know it was lucky, Um and I just kept my attitude. And they were strong. I was strong enough. Jenny and you're in your articles about having covert You wrote about strength in stillness and trying to find that strength in stillness. What does what does that mean? It had to do with the conservation of my movement. During that time, I knew that anything extraneous took a lot of energy and took the wind out of me. And I knew I had to just find the strength in just being In the bed there and just concentrating on breathing. That that's all the energy my body had strength to do at that particular time. And one of the nurses told me that she gave me a little thing to remember. She said that I should smell the roses. In other words, breathe in through my nose. And then breathe out through my mouth and she's so she said, Smell the roses and blow out the candles. And I thought those were those two phrases were kind of wonderful and they helped get me through because that's what I thought about while I was lying in bed there trying to be a still is possible. That I would one day smell the roses again and then one day I would blow out the candles and move forward. If you're just joining us, my guest or Broadway stars Rebecca Luker and Danny Burstein. We'll talk more about Cove in a.

Danny Burstein Rebecca Luker Zack Um house manager Lou Gehrig Moulin Rouge Luca Governor Cuomo Matt Mama Stagehands Thie Teo Andi ST. Luke Jenny Usher
"burstein" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:20 min | 5 months ago

"burstein" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Let's get back to my interview with Broadway stars Danny Burstein and Rebecca Luker. They've been married since 2000. He was one of the stars of Moulin Rouge when it went dark in March because someone in the production was suspected of having cove. It. Soon after bursting got a severe case of Cove it after he was released from the hospital, Rebecca Luker came down with a relatively mild case. But that was just months after she'd been diagnosed with a L S Lou Gehrig's disease, a progressive disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and spinal card, causing loss of muscle control, which can make it increasingly difficult to move. Speak. Or breathe. Danny, do you think you have A better understanding of what it's like. To have an illness because you had cove. It And had such a bad case of it like there might be a level of understanding of the sense of What it's like to feel dependent what it's like to feel. Ah, loss of control. Yeah, there is. There is a loneliness. To having an illness. Andi, I It's but it's hard. I still can't imagine how difficult it is for someone with a less because you're trapped inside your own body. Your mind is is soaring and free and On DH wants to be happy and on move your limbs and unfortunately your becomes more and more Uh, claustrophobic for you. So it's it's been difficult to watch her go through it, but I understand part of the loneliness of of having an illness and coming close to Having to make peace with your own mortality. And, um, and feeling that that maybe this was enough. And maybe this has to be enough. And ah, and being proud of all that I have accomplished in my life thus far. And you know if if one of us did pass away could you know I had like one of us, meaning anybody who's listening to this? You know, you hope that you feel like that You've lived a productive life and then you've given back when they've done good things for other people. Do you feel? Similarly? I really I really do. Other times when I think I may have made peace with Dying. And then I In other times I reject that. Serious strongly because, you know, I just always thought I'd be an old lady. Some I still plan on that. Being old. You know, everybody says it's very, very hard to be a patient, but it's also very hard to be a caregiver. And it can also what When, in a couple of 11 person needs care, and the spouse is the caregiver. It can be a very loving tender thing. It can also create a lot of Impatience with each other. And if you're comfortable talking about it cause so many people are going through or have gone through or will go through this kind of thing. If there's anything you're comfortable sharing about The Tenderness and the pressures When Somebody is sick and the spouse becomes thie caregiver. Well, I feel like I haven't really slept the seven or eight months I laugh, but I honestly I say that in all honesty It's exhausting. And and not easy, and I've been helping to take care of Beck enough for a year and a half since the onset of the illness. You know, having said that? Of course, there are the beautiful things that this kind of a situation Present this U F the the closeness the friendship, the deep Understanding the trust. Andi. It's a privilege and I mean that that it is a great great privilege to share this time together. Having said that, it's an exhausting Yes, it is exhausting. And sometimes we are at at each other because we're still a normal married couples just going through this. Kind of awful bizarre situation from But you know, we still you know, bicker and and and laugh and kiss And you know a ll the normal things that everybody else goes to. It's just that everything is Heightened because of the situation because of the illness and the and the sheer exhaustion of it all. As hard as this is for me, I sometimes think that Danny has the harder job. It's a pleasure to tell you something. This stuff is tough. You're constantly on the phone with with doctors with bowties with deities with reflexology with insurance companies, and you know your home health aide and we're so grateful to everybody who has stepped up and you know you are we love you. I guess, or Broadway stars Rebecca Luker and Danny Burstein, who've been married for 20 years. We'll talk more after a break. This is fresh air. Support for WN Y C comes from Craig Newmark Philanthropies who is providing the first Big day Challenge for W. Y. C's Fault pledge drive. This is fresh air. Let's get back to my interview with Broadway stars Rebecca Luker and Danny Burstein, who've been married 20 years he was starring in Moulin Rouge. When it went dark because of Cove. It he came down with a severe case. Luca had a relatively mild case soon after, but she had been diagnosed just a few months earlier with the progressive disease, a less Lou Gehrig's disease, which interferes with the brain's ability to initiate movement and control muscles. You both have received Tony nominations for your performances in musicals back. It seems like you are just such a natural singer. I can't imagine it. No one could learn to sing like you unless they had a gift that they just had, you know, and Danny, you've said you'd you'd never really thought of yourself as a singer and that you had to work at it. Um, although I think you're a terrific singer. I've heard you in several musicals, but Compare. Compare. Your approach is Tio How you developed into Singer's Wel Beck opens her mouth and her heart falls out. It's just a gift. That, you know, just, uh it's just a gift. You know that that she had from birth, She opened her mouth and this beautiful sound came out. And I know she worked like crazy at it, but it's It's something that is innate in her. This beauty and goodness that comes out of her when she sings. I never had that. Also, I had to concentrate on the lyric and putting the lyric over and storytelling more than anything, and that got me by and I was good enough. Good enough musician to make it work. But that's how I have to work twice as hard on a song. Maybe 10 times and Becca will pick up and she's also an amazing musician. So she'll pick up the song and be able to read it down, You know, and then just say it, and I don't read music that well, I read some And and it takes me forever, But I learned a lot from Danny because he's such a great actor. Said. It made me better. Over the years..

Danny Burstein Rebecca Luker Lou Gehrig Moulin Rouge Wel Beck loss of muscle control Broadway Andi Craig Newmark Philanthropies Becca Luca Tony W. Y. C
Niecy Nash gets married to longtime female friend in surprise wedding

If These Ovaries Could Talk

01:26 min | 6 months ago

Niecy Nash gets married to longtime female friend in surprise wedding

"With a new member of the tribe Jamie? Yeah and it's a good one niece e Nash announced that she married lady a lady. And she was married to a man and he's he's like a pastor too much. She was like that's dumb I wanNA lady but she wasn't just married for like a year this thirteen years. Yeah. Like a long time and then all of a sudden now she's married she married lady and then she came out and all of it it's amazing. She's Hilarious does she I don't know what I know about Nash is one from getting on. I loved her so much on that show. If you haven't seen it, it's HBO immediately or else you're dead to me near not at all I. So I'm very, very very agro this morning. I haven't seen any negative press wool from the gays around this, but everybody seems to have really just embrace this. S. nece-. Are just so happy when anyone comes under our umbrella run to it here. It's dry under here. Come on. She's so funny I've ever on you know I love her, I'm telling you please watch her getting on. It's like she's I think what movie? Series it was based on a British series, and of course, because we have no new ideas, we remade it as an American the series we do it all the time. She S British Maury mccafe's also in it and Alex. Burstein it is a killer cast. It is so well written. So funny but what needs Nash doesn't I think she's so underrated as as an actress

Jamie E Nash HBO Alex Burstein Maury Mccafe S. Nece
"burstein" Discussed on Family Secrets

Family Secrets

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"burstein" Discussed on Family Secrets

"So and his that experience part of your decision to go to social work school you know it was part totally part of my decision and I I have and I had a great therapist who administered it and helped me through so much of it but also I think when I found Peter and I was kneeling by his body. It it may sound odd but at the time that I saw that I realized that he was dead. I thought I can't keep doing what I'm doing anymore. Like I just felt like I'm going to have to change my life. I was writing a lot about startups and technology for the times and other publications and I just thought this doesn't feel meaningful to me. I think I need to write about other things and I think I need to be more involved with end of life things and I just I kept thinking you know ex husbands and ex wives. There's a lot of. It's hard to be divorced and Peter was my friend and also sometimes my biggest nemesis but I loved him and seeing your friend there like that and thinking was he scared we see in pain was you know was regretful. Like I thought I couldn't have saved him at that point but I could have held his hand so he wasn't alone and I've always been an activist and so I thought I'm going to go back to work for social work and think about end of life care. I guess as a way to make up for what I couldn't give Peter. Because I didn't see what was happening. I didn't know his secret and I have but I wound up my first year. They said you know. Where would you like to do your fieldwork and I said anywhere but the dish? I don't WanNa do addiction. That's exactly what I did and it was actually remarkable and rewarding and I learned a lot so that was where I made that pivot. I think we all know we're GONNA die. I've never seen someone dead. I was like this is GonNa Happen. May Not happen this way and it may not happen tomorrow. But it's like this is really going to happen and so. I have to think really carefully. What do I want the rest of my time? The look like my friend. Sylvia Burstein who was my guest during season. One of this podcast. If you haven't heard her episode go back to season. One and listen to her episode called. Don't duck you'll thank me later. Anyway Sylvia who is one of the most beloved teachers of mindfulness. Meditation in this country recently told me a Buddhist parable.

Peter Sylvia Burstein
How Studio 360 Got Started

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

07:38 min | 1 year ago

How Studio 360 Got Started

"Hosting studio three sixty Kurt. Anderson Co founded. Spy magazine was a writer editor. Columnist design and architecture critic and playwright. He'd also just written a novel turn of the century which came out in nineteen ninety nine. The Britain plays. He worked for television. I mean he just was a renaissance person in the arts and in journalism and that was exactly the kind of person we were looking for. That's Melinda Ward the former chief content officer for Public Radio International and creative studio three sixty. And here's Julie Bursting again. I remember that lunch that I had with him when I was interviewing for the job. And he said you know. I've been working with a vocal coach to try to get me to not sound like I grew up in Omaha. That didn't work. Well I said to him. We're firing that person because you need to sound like you if you sound like just yet. Another announcer with a announcer voice. This show is GonNa fail so you gotta sound like yourself. Good Morning. I have realized over the years that I am always. I think much better at this. If I've worked out for Sunday off my super villain name. I speak Spanish. I'M CISCO I need. This is a child to crew. I had a forty five this record in. Oh this is the end and I'm curt Anderson. Thanks very much for listening so for me I was. I would always record Kurt in his sessions and I was in some of his first sessions. And you know he was brand new at doing it. He wasn't sure what P popping was. He didn't know how close to sit to the microphone. He didn't know what a pickup was. It was fun to help someone figure all that stuff out in the interviews. I felt like it took them awhile. Loosen up I'm just GONNA say that. Pairing Him with interesting people felt like the best way to use him so in those early days we just looked for really cool funny interesting people for him to sit down with and that got him excited to come into the office and into the studio and do that and I still remember the day that season Santana came in people do feel a turned off or or indifferent. two images of horror and and war and suffering that they see in that they feel indignant about I think it's comes not because they're blase but because they feel impotent or powerless and I think that's perfectly understandable reaction and I saw Kurt in our conference room and the look on his face of sort of terror was really powerful but I knew he would do a great job but I could see that. This was like the first person we've ever had in the studio that he was a bit in awe of it was just this powerful show about how artists have looked at war since homer and she was phenomenal and he did a great job. Do you feel okay about the new. Whatever you say okay. We show him how current into a lot of different situations that require lots of different levels of sort of being alert to possibilities. We just through so much stuff at him and you know it's a different kind of show in that. He didn't generate ideas but he would rarely say no. I remember doing this segment on sky. Come up with this talk show within the video game halo and we had. Kurt like go and be like an Avatar in the game. They're shooting I'm trying to defend us here. Your need to move faster Kurt. I'm sorry I mean it seems funny to think about it now but like at the time it was super crazy and cutting edge at this guy had figured out how. Sorta hack the game and had this whole virtual reality six months after Katrina. We planned a trip to go to New Orleans. Really figuring out how they were going to try to solve this problem of of how to. Kinda rebuild the city and what the design questions were around at all. The water is gone now of course but the wreckage. That remains is absolutely shocking. Presumably the people in this neighborhood are among those who a great many of them majority perhaps didn't have that's right. They didn't have a choice. I think that's one of the great travesties of Katrina went on a trip to New Orleans for a few days to kind of produce it and get all the different voices together. But you know he's always been really passionate about design and kind of see him step up and really tap into the the human element of what was going on there. It wasn't just like an architecture is it was about people's homes and lives. It was really interesting to see him in that element because so often he is just in a studio and actually one of a favorite memories of working with them in the studio was a program that we did In two thousand fourteen and it was our nineteen fourteen episode and we produce the whole thing as though we had been on the air in nineteen fourteen and today's program we present to you through the medium of radio some singular developments taking place in the arts today in literature drama music and the media. Moving pictures new technologies and new ideas are changing. What we the American people create and how we are entertained. He delivered it in the crazy. Old Timey Voice. That people use stood us for broadcast announcing and our technical director at that time. John Galore. Who brought in a megaphone? Like a troll off Warne and had Kurt record threw it into the mic to compress everything down. I mean I've seen Kurt Geek out on many wonderful occasions but I have never seen him geek out that joyfully. It may not be too old to speculate that later. Generations will look back upon nineteen fourteen as a remarkable year perhaps as a year in which the twentieth century cruelly began. This week on the PODCASTS. Were looking back at the early years of studio three sixty which is drawing to a close after two decades of covering arts and culture on the radio after the first year on the air the show was finding its groove and its audience but then in the fall of two thousand one. The unthinkable happened. There has been an explosion at the World Trade Center in Lower Manhattan. The upper floors of northern tower at the World Trade Center has experienced an explosion studio three sixties original offices were at wnyc in the municipal building at the base of the Brooklyn Bridge just blocks away from the World Trade Center. I remember coming into work in. Minneapolis and hearing on the radio about the the hit on the towers and then coming into PRI and of course the WNYC studios were right under. The twin towers are right next to them and the that a lot of people took came up under the twin tower so we were horrified and terrified didn't terribly worried about a whole. Wnyc staff and studio three sixty staff you know found out later that Julia Burstein had been in the office and she had had she'd left. Wnyc had to walk all the way up the west side of Manhattan to think it was her brother's apartment or something to call day and coughing and choking and nobody knew what was going on.

Kurt New Orleans World Trade Center Wnyc Public Radio International Anderson Co Britain Curt Anderson Spy Magazine Melinda Ward Julie Bursting Chief Content Officer Omaha Julia Burstein Manhattan Cisco Writer Santana
Studio 360 Extra: Aural History: How Studio 360 Got Started

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

09:43 min | 1 year ago

Studio 360 Extra: Aural History: How Studio 360 Got Started

"Invited the rock the World Wrestling Federation champion to speak at the Republican National Convention. Pupil sock it to me. I became an official painter. I don't express political desires in my novels. I just tell story. Hello I'm Chris Anderson and this is studio three six. That's how studio three sixty began. Its first episode on November. Four two thousand just before we elected George W Bush and we all learned what a hanging Chad was my special guest today in Studio. Three sixty is the artist. Barbara Kruger. Who will talk with us about politics and power in movies and music and even in her own art? I make art about the collision of my days and nights with the culture that has constructed and contains me all that and more coming up in studio three sixty from WNYC and PRI public radio international originally produced out of WNYC. Here in New York. The show is all about the cool but complicated and sometimes strange ways that art touches our lives two decades later. That mission hasn't changed. Even if the people making the show have come and gone I'm Jocelyn Gonzalez executive producer of studio three sixty but I was still wet behind the ears associate producer when the show debuted two decades ago. I was away from the show for about ten years before returning to the staff in two thousand seventeen so as the show draws to a close sadly after twenty years I turned to some of my friends from the formative years of studio three sixty for their impressions. Could we create these beautiful stories that represent all sorts of interesting things that are going on in the country in terms of arts and then have Kurt sit with some of that? He was comfortable with and talk about them. That's Julie Bursting who was executive producer of studio three sixty when the show launched and who wrote the studio three sixty book called spark in two thousand eleven and this is Carrie Hillman who was our first senior producer and is now the executive producer at story car. At the time there had been a lot of magazines shows and it was a way for us to sort of do something different and fresh and it was like a a really creative solution to like a lot of really boring magazine. Formatted programming so I was like really game to try to figure it out. We also had two assistant producers. I'm Michelle Seagull. I started at studio three sixty as a assistant producer. In September of two thousand. I stayed through twenty thirteen as a pretty Sir and I'm now the managing producer of Sleet Studios I'm Tall Milad and I started at St Three Sixty as an intern in the year. Two Thousand and I was there until two thousand fifteen When I left I was senior producer of the show for about ten years before that and I now work at Pushkin Industries Heading up development also on staff during the early days of the show was producer and technical director. Steve Nelson Steve's now a programming executive at NPR Johnson. Do you remember what the working title was when we got there? Oh yeah hot ticket right which is first of all a terrible name and doesn't get to any of the big ideas that studio three sixty does as a name but secondly this is sort of in the relatively this was during the post dotcom boom and someone typed in hot ticket dot com into a website and it was an adult site for general audiences for sure. That was the end of hot ticket as a name every week. Studio three sixty we explore. One big idea in-depth. Today we look at the intersections of art and medicine. The idea of studio three sixty or an art show for public radio had been kind of kicking around for a long time. People were on the ground producing pieces. Trying to sort of see what would stick Eventually they brought Julie Burstein and she had this idea of like putting on pieces that sort of built on one another in having an artist or somebody else react to each piece. We started calling it a through line which was just an idea that we would carry through the show and I think the idea of having a theme came from we have to have some structure in order inside it to be able to play. The idea was that Kurt would open the show with a monologue is always delightful to look back and see that exotic bits of civilization. John Ashcroft was a senator his most celebrated crusade a failed crusade for some years. Now one of my hobby horses has been the blurring lines between news politics crime or and entertainment and then he would have a person in the studio with him and then we would present pre recorded pieces to play for this person. I try in my work to speak to the human in US and That human end to bear kind of witness and in enabled react to it. That's really fascinating That makes me think of this. Yes we looked a lot at the degeneration of people's memories and one of the pieces of research we discovered is precisely why I found listening to that piece so fascinating so it would give us an opportunity. Say something that took them off of their typical talking points that gave us an insight into the way they think their personality It also added some depth. I think to the the pieces themselves because you can't do everything in five minutes and so maybe you have to like leave something on the cutting room floor but you can resurrect it a little bit with with the like well-placed Kirk question so I thought it was really cool. I loved gathering stories from really disparate places and putting them next to each other and then talking about them. It was just so much fun. Do you remember a point when you realize it was working? I have to say. I think that first Shakespeare show because it was a whole show bringing Shakespeare up-to-date but we had Neil Gaiman Willie's just grumbling about the fact that he's a crappy writer and the San man the eponymous Lord of the rings who happens to be in this up goes over to will and offices deal are you will shakespeare. I have we met. We have but men forget in waking hours. And you and Steve or maybe it was Steve. That incredible intro He started it with Scharzenegger's hang on not to be not to be tied in the phase of man when in disgrace with fortune and men's on have we hear. Hello I'm curt Anderson and Mrs Studio Three six. It was so hilarious and it was just. It was like okay. We got it this works. I'm Peter Clowney and I was studio three six I Adler and these days I live in Saint Paul and I'm vp of content strategy for stitcher. It's a struggle sometimes to do a show. That has a theme I approach. That idea would caution now if someone wants to do a show that theme like to say like remember. It's got multiple pieces in it. You're going to have the fifth favourite piece about Gardens in this episode. But it's true that like building on the ideas across an hour is like really meaningful. My name is Eric Linski. I started as an intern. In two thousand four became assistant producer and then decided to become a contributing reporter of which I was to studio three sixty through the beginning of two thousand sixteen and I am now the host and creator of the podcast imaginary worlds. Yeah I remember this one episode where they had Madeleine Albright the through line theme was democracy and so she's sitting in the studio with Kurt and then one of the pieces was about American idol. Which was the hottest thing back? Then and they were talking about how people were taking American idol democracy far more seriously than actual presidential elections. Have you ever had a chance to see American idol? Well I actually have and I've been pretty depressed As I am by television generally these days which seems to be going to the lowest common denominator and I. I don't like the word Elitism as we kind of lost me on this last segment of him and it was really funny here. Man Albright come out of that piece. And what do you think of that? She was not too thrilled with the peace to quality that piece but what she was hearing in the piece. I'm Derek John. I was a producer and editor on the show from about two thousand four to two thousand twelve ish and since then I've done a whole bunch of work in the podcast world but I am now currently an executive producer of the how to with Charles Duhig podcasts. At slate when the theme through line shows worked man they were amazing. I mean it was like we had set this high bar and they were so hard to pull up when they clicked and everything fit together. It was truly fantastic radio and it was hard I would say we had some shows that weren't successful and that's actually what led to having to change one. Really terrible through line. Thematic show was fish the fish just literal fish in the sea. Animals really jumped the shark on that one

Producer Executive Producer Kurt Steve Nelson Steve Madeleine Albright Intern World Wrestling Federation George W Bush Chris Anderson Wnyc Barbara Kruger Official Republican National Convention Mrs Studio United States Chad John Ashcroft Julie Burstein Michelle Seagull Jocelyn Gonzalez
"burstein" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"burstein" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"A joke you pursue immorality I don't care if it's physically or on the internet or in a movie or on television and you lose your rewards and the point of this passage by the way was to try to get believers in court the stop that lifestyle all is writing this to get these Corinthians off of a lifestyle that will cost them rewards and to start living a lifestyle that will earn them rewards and if you're involved in something immoral get it out of your life and get it out right now separate yourself from anything that the moral whether it be people places internet movies videos books magazines get rid of that or you're going to get before the lord and lose just like his work the fourth rebellious act was some were given over to unbelief Burstein says nor let us try in the lord and some of them did and were destroyed by the serpent now many from the nation Israel were destroyed by surprise because when Moses and Aaron told them what god's word said they didn't believe and as a result god sends us for prince to destroy those people see god sent his gifted men to communicate his word and the people just took it lightly when god sends gift gifted men to proclaim the word of god gods people need to take it seriously people hear it and don't believe it I love to obey it are going to cost them solve reward you see god's word is no game when you hear the word you must respond to the word or you will disqualify yourself from laying up treasures in heaven and there are some people who are quick to be given over to unbelief some golf so I'm not case in the year two thousand seven says iPhone Jesus body in a grave and there are people willing to follow that not and believe that I think all stick with the Bible and I think I'll stick with the eye witnesses that I actually saw the resurrected Christ rather than to believe some lunatic who's making up some story you see some people are drawn to unbelief and Paul says I.

Burstein Israel Moses Aaron Paul
Ebola Doctors in the Congo Threaten Strike After a Health Worker Was Killed

All Things Considered

03:26 min | 2 years ago

Ebola Doctors in the Congo Threaten Strike After a Health Worker Was Killed

"Now to the Democratic Republic of Congo where for months health workers have been struggling to contain any bull outbreak. Despite the fact that more than one hundred thousand people have been vaccinated. There's been a surge of new cases and more than thirteen hundred people have been infected so far the biggest obstacle to stopping the outbreak armed groups who keep attacking health workers in just the last few days. They were two assaults here to tell us. More is NPR's and read is in and welcome to the studio. Hi outy. Give us the latest on these attacks. I well the first one was on Friday afternoon. It was at a local hospital in a city called Mutombo. That's one of the current epicenters of the outbreak and about twenty members of one of the local Ebola response teams were having a meeting in witnesses say two gunmen Burstein, they took everyone's cell phones and other they started shooting injured two people and they killed the team leader. His name was. Dr Richard Valerie was Oko. He was an epidemiologist from Cameron had been deployed by the World Health Organization to help fight Ebola. And then just a few hours later there was an attack on another local command center, this one was at a hospital in a nearby. Suburb called Koch wa it's one of the worst hot spots in the outbreak zone. And this one was around three AM Saturday morning. Four people tried to set fire to that command center. Police fought them off they killed one assailant, and they captured the rest are these centers being targeted on purpose in if so how come it seems so yes, and it's not clear exactly who was behind each of these attacks. But I spoke with Dr Michel Yow who is leading the response for the World Health Organization, and he says witnesses in that first attack told him that the gunmen were shouting Ebola doesn't exist. You're just here to make money off of us and it fits into a larger problem of mistrust in the local population. There have been years of armed. Conflict in this part of Congo and people feel victimized by the government. So they don't trust authorities and by extension health workers. What does this mean for the effort to try and contain the outbreak? Well, there's a lot of concern because this is just the latest in a series of violent incidents that directly target health workers since February two Ebola treatment centers have been attacked Dr Masuku the doctor who was killed on Friday. He had only arrived four weeks ago. And he apparently told colleagues that he was really worried he's left behind a wife and four children in Cameroon. And so each time there's been an attack the health workers need to regroup. They slow down their efforts to vaccinate people who've been exposed, and then you see the effect in the outbreak. It gets worse. Basically more people start to get sick. And you know to give you an example in February just before these attacks on the bullet treatment centers started. They were saying about thirty new cases a week. And then this month, we're already up. To seventy new cases every week even as high as one hundred new cases every week. If this violence continues is there a chance at the outbreak could grow into a catastrophe similar to what we saw in twenty fourteen in some west African countries there are some really important differences, first of all the WHO and the government have been on this from the beginning. There's also a vaccine now which has been a game changer as you noted they've managed to get more than one hundred thousand people to take it and the evidence is highly effective. So there are still reasons to be hopeful despite this latest

World Health Organization Dr Richard Valerie Dr Michel Yow Democratic Republic Of Congo Ebola Dr Masuku Congo NPR Mutombo Burstein OKO Koch Team Leader Cameroon Cameron Four Weeks
"burstein" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

04:32 min | 2 years ago

"burstein" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"So we create a nondiscriminatory society, but it is not anti semitic to be critical of white wing government in Israel. So the thing that you missed the beginning the beginning of the question, he actually explicitly said Ilhan Oma is not an anti Semite. And then he goes on to say, hey, it's anti semitic to criticize Israel. What is Bernie Sanders missing Burstein everything? I'm back that little piece Bernie Sanders is somebody who spent his honeymoon in the former Soviet Union this over at union when it was in the Soviet Union. Right, right. This'll be correct. It's former now back then he got married us. He spent his honeymoon. They are I will tell you. We're Jewish refugees from Russia the point, but I will tell you that the Soviet Union was an anti-semitic state state, right? There was a cap on with what about that? Bernie Sanders as an American Jew right went. I mean, it was bad enough to think that he's going to come in a state for his honeymoon. But he's going to communist state that has systematically oppressed Jewish runs since the beginning of the book, Paul Graham is originally Russian word is it not. So here's here's the quick story of that right now under the SARS Jews were prosperous. We're not allowed to come into the city. That's that's the pale of settlement. They beyond the pale. That's where that comes from the pale of settlement. Then the union still deep anti-semitism a cap on. How many? Juice. There could be universities and colleges. Kaplan. How how many naked Denia so antisemitic organized, antisemitic state birdie centers goes there for his honeymoon to celebrate sing songs and has a good time. That tells you about everything you need to know, and what how much he cares for does not care for the plight of Jews around the world. Okay. So Bernie Sanders is obviously not that concerned with how Jewish Americans or Jewish people in general fair. He's more concerned with allowing them are who. And that's the medic. Yes. But also we've talked about this before does not seem to be a huge fan of the United States of America as well. Right. A place that has taken her in has given her refuge. But now she says it's oppressive one dismisses the worst attack on our soil nine eleven is just something. Well, what what did she say? What did no say some people did something some people did something is nine eleven on that issue. So let's we know she's anti Semite, and we can say it because she is us, you know, making a slick offering spins this, isn't what the president had to say about this just last night. Totally unrehearsed a local correspondent from KTBS being min- Minneapolis behind stage two stage of a town hall. Just walks up to the president. You know, what he's like he's just says. Okay. You want an interview he starts talking. Let's listen to nine. Congresswoman Omar sent out a release last night saying that your tweet from a couple of days ago has led to direct threats on her life. Any second thoughts about that tweet and the way it was produced and put together. No, not at all. Look he's been very disrespectful to this country. She's been very disrespectful, frankly to Israel. She is somebody that doesn't really understand. I think life real life. What it's all about. It's fortunate. She's got a away about her. That's very very bad. I think for our country. I think he's extremely unpatriotic and extremely disrespectful to our country. That's the president isn't Boris. He says how he sees it. That's why he's likely the best communicator in the history of this country. He's he sees it. He says it, and that's why the American public can connect with him that often testing that you heard in that statement, he's saying what people who are in the right mind seemingly unlike Bernie Sanders, but those who are in their right mind are thinking. Talking point, no rehearsed. No, it's what he believes. It's the truth. And that's what red blooded Americans. Right. That's what America if you take a cross section of America. And you take out the folks who who's liberalism has blinded them. And if you go out to Minnesota to Michigan to this concept, the Pennsylvania to Florida to parts of New York and California. Remember, New York is a lot more than island of Manhattan, New York's huge in California's not just LA. That's what Americans are thinking. Why is there someone in our country?.

Bernie Sanders Soviet Union America Israel president Ilhan Oma Paul Graham Denia New York Russia Congresswoman Omar KTBS Burstein United States Kaplan California Manhattan Minneapolis Minnesota LA
"burstein" Discussed on Collider Movie Talk

Collider Movie Talk

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"burstein" Discussed on Collider Movie Talk

"You have been and were heartbroken for for from that moment till now, and I will go one further even it's not that we think that the person necessarily should've beaten who won. It's not even necessarily the person was nominated. It's a single performance movie director that just to you deserve to win an award that year, no matter who was up against it's not about who lost her one. It's just that for you. This is the one that you would have willed to an Oscar, and I'm gonna go first. And if you if you know me well enough, you know, this is my pick. And it's always my pick. And it will be till the day. I'd I two thousand one Julia Roberts. Erin Brockovich beats out Ellen Burstein for requiem for a dream. Maybe maybe the greatest female performance have ever seen onscreen. She's pretty amazing. She is absolutely wonderful. She is she does everything from gaining and losing weight. She looks absolutely crazy. I mean, they did this wide shot where aaronow ski step back, and he took a wall off a house, essentially, and she does that cleaning scene. She just goes. And she cleans the set for like hours, and then they speed it up. And she does this and you see at the end of the movie, and she's so crazy like from the from the first time you see her to the last time you see her. And then there's also the scene in the middle with her Jared Leto where you see that she starts to take the pills, and you kind of see their brain starting go like, yeah, it is horrifying it is haunting it's just I have I've never seen a performance in a movie where I've just watched. And I've been like that is the definition that is truly what maybe the greatest and highest caliber of acting is her in that movie isn't the talk show host shooter mcgavin, it is it is it we got to win..

Ellen Burstein Erin Brockovich Julia Roberts Jared Leto Oscar director
"burstein" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"burstein" Discussed on KCRW

"Doug, north will be terminated the twenty twenty show today. He's on the show floor watching preparations. What you see right now is by fifteen hundred workers that are working gonna put this together, and then seventeen hundred semi trailer trucks that brought Whitman north says delays and overtime from Christmas and New Year's increased labor costs a summer show will cost a lot less automakers can also expand their displays outside many of these displays out here two stories, and they have escalators and they have vehicles hanging on the side of walls. If car companies come back organizers trust media will to media attendance was about half, its usual number this year auto journalist, Laura Burstein was among those who decided to skip to trite because of what we consider to be kind of a dearth of news as far as new vehicles. Go Burstein says the trend isn't encouraging for Detroit or. Any auto show for that matter. Car companies are finding cheaper more exclusive ways to create buzz for new cars, take BMW, which rented an airplane hangar a few years back. So then over several days, they invited dealers media VIP's, and even the public to come see all of its cars, so they eventually had a captive audience immersed in a single brand for as long as they wanted to stay instead of having to worry about what's the other guy doing across the aisle on the other hand, many consumers still like car shows and want to compare different cars side by side in the long run to try it self could benefit from a summer show because ten dis could also check out that hip new restaurant downtown or taking a baseball game though. I'm going to bet the old timers will still swap stories about the show.

Laura Burstein Doug baseball Whitman Detroit BMW twenty twenty
Officials Hope Date Change Will Drive More Visitors To Detroit Auto Show

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:15 min | 2 years ago

Officials Hope Date Change Will Drive More Visitors To Detroit Auto Show

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from a sauna Asana is work management software to help teams organize everything they do. So they can focus on the work. That matters most dry us on free for thirty days. Get started at a Asana dot com slash NPR. So it is the start of the thirtieth annual North American International auto show in Detroit. It is also the last time that show will be held in January. But once can't miss a vent is moving to the summer next year in hopes of regaining some of its lost glory. Here's Michigan radio. Tracey samuelson. The North American International auto show used to be a really big deal drawing almost every automaker big or small, but in recent years, it's often been snubbed especially by luxury car companies choosing to display in L A or the consumer electronic show in Vegas. Instead, it's tempting to blame the weather and Detroit and January dark depressing. Clouds, often, hide the sun, the cold his finger numbing and snowstorms can be. Just around the corner. The Monday of the auto show press days was always one of the worst days of my life. That's Tom Krisher. He's a veteran auto beat reporter for the Associated Press. He's driven to Detroit through black ice snowdrifts. And then you can't find your car when you come out at night because it's covered with snow and a bunch of other cars come in. So I'm extremely happy that it's going to be in the summertime, but it's not just the weather. It's the cost for automakers to display Detroit. Doug, north will be chairman of the twenty twenty show today. He's on the show floor watching preparations. What you see right now is by fifteen hundred workers that are working going to put this together, and then seventeen hundred semi trailer trucks that brought Whitman north says delays and overtime from Christmas and New Year's increased labor costs a summer show will cost a lot less automakers can also expand their displays outside many of these displays out here. Two stories have escalators, and they have vehicles hanging on the side of walls, car companies come back organizers trust media will to media attendance was about half, its usual number this year auto journalist, Laura Burstein was among those who decided to skip Detroit. Because of what we consider to be kind of a dearth of news as far as new vehicles go bursting says, the trend isn't encouraging for Detroit or any auto show for that matter. Car companies are finding cheaper more exclusive ways to create buzz for new cars, take the m w which rented an airplane hangar a few years back. So then over several days, they invited dealers media VIP's and even to public to come see all of its cars, so they eventually had a captive audience immersed in a single brand for as long as they wanted to stay instead of having to worry about what's the other guy doing across the aisle on the other hand, many consumers still like car shows. And want to compare different cars side by side in the long run Detroit itself could benefit from a summer show because attendees could also check out that hip new restaurant downtown or taking a baseball game though. I'm going to bet the old timers will still swap stories about the show being snowed. In back in the day for NPR news. I'm Tracey Samuelson.

Detroit Tracey Samuelson Tom Krisher NPR North American International Michigan Associated Press Doug Baseball Vegas Laura Burstein Whitman Chairman Twenty Twenty
"burstein" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

WCBS Newsradio 880

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"burstein" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

"But first here are some stories. We are following for you, you're on WCBS NewsRadio. Eight eighty suspected gunman Robert Bowers is accused of the deadliest attack on Jews in US history. The accused Pittsburgh synagogue shooter. We'll be in court tomorrow facing twenty nine federal charges twenty two punishable by death. Authorities say Bowers was armed with three handguns a rifle, and he shouted anti semitic statements when he opened fire killing eleven people at the tree of life synagogue yesterday. The victims ranging in age from ninety seven to fifty four the Anti-Defamation League says it has been warning that this day was coming here. Sour Mike smelt spoke with the leader of that group, actually first emotion was finally happened. Evan Bernstein is the anti defamation league director for the New York and New Jersey area. Uptick in innocent semitic vandalism, and now assaults greatest fears that we were going to really see, you know. Kind of a mass casualties of Jews. The AD L says nationwide. There was a sixty percent increase in anti semitic. Acts from two thousand sixteen to two thousand seventeen Bernstein says the uptick corresponds with the two thousand sixteen presidential election in what he calls an uncapping of hate towards the people in America prone to being victims of hate. The rhetoric the political scene from from all sides of the traditions. But also what's gone on Twitter in the internet? The advent of the internet is, you know, these people to be able to communicate with one another. In a way, they wouldn't be able to do. Let's plan would ask for the Burstein. And the AD L is concerned about a similar style attack to the one in Pittsburgh happening here. He says he's always concerned because it all it takes is one person with hateful ideas, and a plan Mike's melts WCBS NewsRadio eight years extra security at synagogues in the Tri state area. WCBS Steve burns went to the park east synagogue on the upper east side rabbi, Arthur Schneier himself, a survivor of the holocaust says all this increased security is getting expensive. I think it would be very very important because of the time we live in to increase financial support both from the federal and state and city government on the upper east side, Steve burns, WCBS NewsRadio. Eight eighty ninth child has died amid an ad no virus outbreak had a pediatric long term care facility in New Jersey. The state health department says another medically fragile child died at the wanna cue center for nursing and rehabilitation last night. In sports Red Sox one game away. Away from becoming World Series champ game four in Los Angeles. Tonight. NFL giants host the Redskins jets play in Chicago both at one o'clock now back to the Rick Edelman show. Back to the Rick Edelman show. I've told you that are public.

Evan Bernstein Robert Bowers Mike smelt New Jersey Pittsburgh Rick Edelman Steve burns Anti-Defamation League US Twitter Burstein Arthur Schneier vandalism Chicago director Los Angeles New York Redskins America
"burstein" Discussed on Alice @97.3

Alice @97.3

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"burstein" Discussed on Alice @97.3

"I was thinking about the. Band's I was thinking about the. Fans we were underground loadin merch passenger van in a small club in Minnesota and the snow outside of. Burstein I look at where we asked the Power Told me Good Has gone Thank God, the. Answers gov. That glass I wish I made its. Own coming got the curse Out of myself was up with, the bottle back Meself win the worried about what are the people felt comfortable We just Told me Good Donny.

Burstein Donny Minnesota
"burstein" Discussed on Alice @97.3

Alice @97.3

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"burstein" Discussed on Alice @97.3

"I was thinking about the banks i was thinking about the band underground loadin merch passenger small club in minnesota and the snow outside of burstein star the oh me good sean the answers class i wish i made its own coming got it occurs out of myself worship with the bottle back home when the word about what other people felt comfortable myself we just told me good.

minnesota sean burstein
"burstein" Discussed on Alice @97.3

Alice @97.3

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"burstein" Discussed on Alice @97.3

"This phone survey i was thinking about the band's i was thinking about the fans underground loadin merch in that's well passenger in a small club in minnesota and the snow outside of burstein aleka where we asked the power told me donny the answers percent injuring god i wish i made its own coming got it occurs got out of myself back when the word about whether the people felt comfortable massive stars johnson sneaking told me donny.

minnesota johnson burstein donny
"burstein" Discussed on R U Talkin' R.E.M. Re: ME?

R U Talkin' R.E.M. Re: ME?

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"burstein" Discussed on R U Talkin' R.E.M. Re: ME?

"What's your next one the end of the road as we know i know it's an amazing home it's the cool version the five it's so good you think billy joel kind of ripped it off where do you not to do annoying foul on me i get it ha ha ha ha i'm really funny no but we're where do you fall on the frustrated always do this joke about we didn't start the fire where he would just sing you know the they do in this way like every the music drops out and then he sings and then we didn't start the fi but he job as children the lid i think i would frequently just sing that eleven lynn i wanted to do i don't think he ripped it off i wanted to do a performance where kind of kauffman esque where i just played the song and then then only did the letter burstein it's also in the this is this mean absolutely nothing like british listeners another song in the same vein as this that would my friend would always run these things together into we saw the five but the british sitcom only fools and horses this what's only fools and horses for like four's full fools okay very long running sitcom would have this very memorable title fame is sounds dissimilar to that we didn't start the fire i think some the who i think mainly because he's that he used to sing on only fools and horses and then going to we fellow fire new england when you say fools like that to people get it like fools and hosts know but you know what i'm eating chicken oh i don't know i have no idea.

burstein billy joel kauffman
"burstein" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

MYfm 104.3

03:48 min | 3 years ago

"burstein" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

"The mall lopez here's more music more variety with keshon macklemore good day is on fat oh awesome oh me of the good old days now these lists haulers on good i was thinking about the band i was thinking about the fans we were underground loadin merch and that's well passenger van in a small club in minnesota and the snow outside of burstein damon star alec aware we asked the james power.

lopez minnesota burstein alec james
"burstein" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"burstein" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"John brings out the point and he observes in burstein there was a lot of grass there it was a grassy meadows now that tells us this this took place in the spring it's before the heat of the summer had just withered the grass it was plush in this area this would have been springtime probably march or april when the grass is very plush in this area but the thing that i want you to see here is that before god does this it's not out of control it's not unorganized it's in perfect control and there's high organization to it the second fact is jesus took the boys lunch and gave thanks to god now i want you to realize this when we bow our heads and thank god for food we're actually following the pattern of jesus christ and i'm convinced that is one of the keys to getting more of the blessings of god be thankful for what you have thankful for what god has given to you when you bomb your head and thank the lord you're following his pattern now i personally know of a woman i know the women i verified the story with two of her children this woman had five children sent them down one night at a table and all they had to eat what's a piece of bread each and water and the mother said we're going to thank god for this food and she bowed her head and she thank god for the food that god was providing for her and she said before prayer was over there was a knock at the door and a neighbor had invited a number of people to her home for dinner that night and at the last minute they had all canceled out they had so much food prepared that they did not want it to go to waste so they took it next door to a woman who is actually thanking god for a piece of bread and water and they knock on the door at exactly that moment giving thanks for what you have is a key to seeing god give more thank god for your wife thank god for your children thank god for your home thank god for your provision bow your head and thank god for your food don't covered with somebody else has the third factor is christ had his disciples distribute as much as they want it to every man look at verse eleven.

John burstein