29 Burst results for "Burson"

Online Learning and the Ed Tech Debate

a16z

04:16 min | 3 months ago

Online Learning and the Ed Tech Debate

"So. Much of the discourse attack online education is often posed any stark terms. Much of the discussion seems to be on the education was abject failure in the spring. Now, kids are doomed to lose another year if we don't go back and person so I think what I'd like to post the group is what are some of the most common misconceptions you see in the discourse around online education? Well first of all, we didn't really have online education in the spring, right? That wasn't anything that any of us who've been in online education for a long time would recognize his minded Asian. So I think we I have to completely move away from. Making any conclusions about online education from this emergency pivot to learning to cove it? Right in and out argued that we should also make sure that we aren't just judging the concept of online education by what we see today. There's so much potential for further innovation around the platform around the median that I. Think we just don't see. We already seen other countries around the world. I think one common misconception is more of a conflicting of two things. One is the medium by which education happens is it online or in person or some mix of the two, and in the pedagogical approach lecture base is a discussion based. How much of it is students facing? What is the size of the class? What in taught in what way I think what you see for most of the brief history online education is the classes that are online tend to be a one type that is often quite different than lacey, Burson until people say online education, they often have this idea. Maybe it's superstar lecturing. Broadcast all over the web or it's a for profit college that people perceive as being predatory on some types of students or whatever. But there's nothing that is intrinsic about online. It makes it better worse at its core online is a mode of delivery for education that has tremendous potential to reach people that couldn't be reached with person education models with far better curriculum. Than They could've afforded potentially potentially although I don't think that's a guarantee I think we should get into that I. think there's a question of whether it gives the education can be better and under what conditions is true that you see a lot of education innovators in the online space but a lot of what they're doing could just as easily be done in. Earth. What I would like to hear his more discussion of what should education look like, and then we decide whether it's easiest best to deliver it online versus in person rather than debating about online merson person only later talking about or actually teaching at Howard. I agree that. One of the challenges we have when we talk about all this definitions. People often talk about online education when they're talking about a lot of different things and very different things and I think to that point some people are thinking of this as strictly k. through twelve k. through college and reality. You can also clump in things like masterclass things like lifelong learning things like worker training things like extra curricular classes have been already online while before cove it. So one of the confusion too often here is to conflate online education at scale, which kind of started with nukes and now have moved onto to what? Does what addicts does with what's been going on with online education. Now, for a couple of decades, which it looks very different than that, which is about very small classes. Of active learning lots of engagement between students and faculty a lot of work with instructional designers they happen to be in the same medium. They happened to be education that done with technology, but they're completely different things. Do you mention the precedent of mooks which is massive online courses? So those have been hyped for a decade or so and have had limited success in disrupting education it's pretty commonly agreed. So what has changed? Why do you see this newfound optimism? Now? What specifically are we seeing that we haven't seen in the past? I? Think you judge most historically it's done really targeted for college students and Post College. Graduates. And I think the effectiveness of books varies dramatically based off the age group and the kind of content you're trying to teach

Post College Lacey Burson
"burson" Discussed on Chapo Trap House

Chapo Trap House

06:09 min | 5 months ago

"burson" Discussed on Chapo Trap House

"Though is that she she keeps things so elastic in that in that way that like horoscopes are elastic, so that everything in your life can be filtered through it and found to be. Descriptive of it. It's so broad a brush I one point she's. She's talking about the need for white people to acknowledge their privilege, and how white people resist acknowledging their privilege, because they don't imagine themselves to have privilege. And that, but that that's not true and that and then she rejects the idea that privileges something that white people have, but aren't aware of. She Says No. No, you are aware of it. She says she quotes some other race theorist to say that white people saying that they're unaware of racism. or of their privilege, it's like if someone walked by them and just stuffed money into their pockets. They wouldn't be able to notice that. which is an insane comparison, because otherwise she stresses that these things that these notions of white superiority are embedded from childhood, and the people get each three, and then at the same a in the same breath says no, you should be hyper. Hyper aware of them at all moment, and if you aren't, it's because you're you are being selfish and you're being racist. Even though by her own architecture, these things are deeply embedded psychological concepts, but in her mind it's as obvious as someone literally putting money in your pocket, which does not make sense at all. It's what it is in the moment that justifies like we've said. Reading the book and going to the seminars and Using the new tropics that I'm sure she the antiracism new tropic. She's going to start selling. I would not be surprised if she started selling anti-racism tropics off this shit like my new stack will reduce the racism lobe in your brain by twenty percent an increase your your anti-racist of folds in your cerebral. Well you know what I think it's. It's going to end up being and I wait for it because I I WANNA see Vegas odds on this in order right now. This is like scientology where you abuse people into saying that they're bad, and then they. And they come out of compliance, and you can do whatever you want with them. But what I think she's going to do is sell racist training workshops where it's like like Yoga in America is not lucrative, but you know what is lucrative some. Yoga teacher like like you have like a personal client. Pace you five hundred dollars a session. What is? Lucrative is the schools to teach yoga. T shirts so I think she is probably going to branch out from this by training more anti-racist traitors and make it a full multilevel marketing scheme. Little marketing both multi MLM good model. I like to think that our next move is. To. Sell DVD's was where. You do the anti-racism moves at home while watching. And something like an anti-racism bowflex. I'm kind of picturing as a crash test dummy. That's like a person of color that you know it and you. Do you put in the DVD? And you know you follow along with your your crash test dummy. Figuring out how to talk to them how to use human language. MLM is a good model to though yeah, for sure I mean. That's all this left. Everyone selling each other MLM's. That's it. That's the only growth energy and the economy now amber like of the brilliant thing. Is that like even her own writing sort of acknowledged a doing these things also actually does perpetuate racism and white fragility, even like being aware talking about them, so it's like a totally vertically integrated system. Yeah, where it's like you create the racism in America I. You create the racist. Racism! The money then you got the power. What is that not synergy? Vertical integration. Yes, she's making people more racist that they have to buy their anti-racism Shit, guy and use. Honestly, we have no choice but to stand yeah, an entrepreneurial legend. We'll visual. Were there any any anything from your section of note a? Few interesting things so which we already talked about because Peppers. Her tax in Texas very slim with these anecdotes about doing the workshop and people being indignant about it, which I thought was just my section, but the the whole book is. You know if this if she if she had taken a single screenwriting class, she know that this is where the rising action should be. Chapters seven through nine. But yeah, I mean I. I just couldn't get over the fact that she's not making this connection that. Everyone she talks to is like fuck off where they're attending. These paid mandatory services. If everyone you meet is an asshole turns out. You're the ASSHOLE. And it's like. She kept rock the idea that you might be indignant about getting written up because you did racism and that. Why wouldn't you be indignant? It's literally a punishment having to talk to this person. This isn't a punishment is precisely what someone says are punishing? Version! You gotTa stateroom all afternoon. Okay, so there's two interesting things for my my section. I I just I. This pair, which is funny to me, Capital can shift with the field for example when the Custodian of this is in the context of this mangled discussion of Borgia. Can, shift with the field for example. When the custodian comes upstairs to speak to the receptionist, the custodian workloads in the receptionist and business attire office worker has more capital than does the maintenance Burson, but when the receptionist goes down, that's in quotation marks to the supply room, which the Custodian controls to request more whiteboard markers, those power lines shift. This is the domain of.

America Burson Borgia Texas
What's Your Miracle?

Recovery Happy Hour

09:05 min | 6 months ago

What's Your Miracle?

"Today's episode is a Doozy Greg and I cried to quite a bit, and some of that had to be edited out for time. We chatted for for a while, but this is one of my favorite episodes because we talk about neural. A miracle is defined as a surprising and welcome event that is not explicable by natural scientific laws and is therefore considered to be a work of divine agency. A highly improbable or extraordinary event, development or accomplishment that brings very welcome consequences. Greg story is full of miracles, but that's not unique. You know I think. The miracles of recovery are widely talked about in our community. Don't stop before the miracle happens is a typical a ISM. Hey, that's because it's true. There are miracles in your sober future. To happen when you least expect them, and they're rarely, if ever explainable. Greg spent the last of his drinking and drug use career as across country drug dealer. In his twenty five years of Sobriety Yeah Twenty five years. He's accomplished some crazy successful feats, but most recently he has founded an runs startup recovery in southern California. He's attack speaker and he has a beautiful healthy family. That's a freaking miracle. Friends being able to turn your life from that into this is miraculous, and it's possible for you to even if a miracle just means making it one day without drinking. So go grab some Kleenex Hunker Down Let's talk to Greg Champion. Hi Greg. How are you I'm doing well. Trish good afternoon. Happy Happy Hour to you! Happy Happy Hour! Thanks so much for Burson, down with me for a little recovery. Happy Tonight and for sharing your story I'm thrilled to get to know in. Learn about the past twenty five years real quick. If you just want to give us a a brief introduction, and I'll ask you the same thing I asked everybody else. What is your name? Your sobriety date, and would you have described yourself as a high or low functioning drinker? Our well first of all. I just want to thank you for the opportunity. My name is Greg Champion on my sobriety Dayton's eleven seven, nineteen, ninety-four. I can tell you that I was facing five years in prison so. This was a nice kid from a nice city with private school college degree, and my disease took me on the brink of facing five years in prison, so I would consider myself. A low bottom got an. We'll get into that here in just a minute real quick. If you would just tell us just about you right now, you know where you live. How old you are! What you do for a living married kids hobbies anything like that name's Greg Champion of fifty one years old. I live in Pacific Palisades California which is just a suburb of Los Angeles. I work in a recovery business and I. Have a wife named Jennifer. A nine year, old daughter, a lease, and a seven year, old daughter name Annabel and some of my hobbies. It's funny I do some of the same hobbies as a kid I body sir. I skateboard and I'm obsessed with mint chocolate chip milkshakes from Baskin Rob's. I love that milkshakes her a hobby. My minor oreos right now so. Comfortable, well, let's get into your story and here in ten minutes or less. Tell us how long you drank cal long it was a problem and why you decided to stop you know. My story begins at four and a half years old. My father was killed in a drunk on your car crash. and I felt different. A mealy filled different because I was gonNA have a dad I. everybody else had two cars in a garage two incomes their DADS were there soccer coaches at our liberty coaches. And so from four and a half to two nine years old when my mom remarried I definitely feel different. And my alcoholism showed up before you even took a drink. A Trish, I I I, I did three things very very well. I got great grades I was a superb athlete. And I was also bowling and I use violence as my first way to medicate my. My mom remarried when I was nine. She married an old World War Two. Vet, a guy who was there on d day, the great thing about this man was that he taught me at a Thai Thai. Shave my face, open doors or women. Really old school ways I think lost in a generation or two, and I'm grateful to them and most mostly unbreathable that he was seventeen years a sobriety. And is exactly what my mother needed and in many ways exactly what I needed, misstep misstep. but what happened was for me was puberty. Right around twelve or thirteen right his cougars kicking and I was entering my freshman year of high school. I found a solution alcohol, marijuana and cocaine I also wanted to show off in front of the girls, and so between the peer pressure of school, looking at pretty girls, and the availability of drugs and alcohol I was well on my way to find my new solution to my inner pane. Did that for a few years might pattern. High School was that I would drink on Friday. Nights drove on Saturday mornings I would again drink on Saturday nights throat on Sunday mornings in the insanity of that going on for four years straight still not hitting square in the is. when all my friends were. Being talked to about school counselor colleges to go the Trish. They were going to cal and Stanford and Michigan Texas Nice Schools in my career counselors, talking about trade schools eventually ended up at a trade school. Arizona State University. and as many no, let's Party School and my alcoholism. Just blew up from there I began doing ecstasy lots of cocaine. In I got out into the real world. And light, actually the day I graduated I got my first you is. Six months later I got arrested for assault. In a bar. A few months later. I got arrested twice in twenty four hours in Mardi Gras. And here's the sicknesses disease stretches I was. There Bourbon Street my first night and went up to speak Irish combination. This is new rules what? What can I do and he says don't piston the streets and don't fight and streets. and. So Trish I'm GonNa have you guess what two things I got arrested for? Did you see while you were fighting with somebody or I'm not that multitalented. So the happened I and less than eighteen hours later, I was led out got back on the streets. got drunk and high again it could not find a bathroom, so I decided in the streets and got caught one more time and so. I have a nice arrest record there in the lovely speakeasy of Louisiana got to be the most eventful twenty four hours I've ever heard of by the way, but I don't WanNa. Take, I. Don't want to interrupt too much. Go ahead, but no, it's crazy. I was real resentful for a lot of years that hey you guys took away my Mardi Gras. You guys, you guys room. I buzz. You know for years. Even sober years in a one old-timer pulls me aside goes. Let me tell you how. How God works God put you in those paddy wagons to save your ass. Because what would happen if he would've stayed out there, you would have been stabbed. Shot would hooked up with some girl and probably got S. t you don't know what would happen, but both those times. He puts you in a paddy wagon because he did for you. What you do yourself and it hit me right between the eyes young. He was right. He's absolutely right. Then I went back to the San. Diego Start Working and I had some resentments. I was promised to a high paying job at a college. I. Was only making nineteen thousand dollars a year and I was working overnight, said the TV station. I don't know about you, Trish when I would get out of work at three o'clock am. There's certain people that are out at three am right. And those lower companions I found these he's lower companions were were girls. You can't bring home to mom and some drug dealers. and. They asked me if If I had any friends on the east coast I, did and we began shipping large amounts of marijuana out to the east coast. and I was part of that process. Eventually I got arrested. In an airport with fifty pounds of pot.

Greg Champion Trish Mardi Gras High School Marijuana Cocaine California Soccer School Counselor Thai Thai Burson Los Angeles Annabel Pacific Palisades California Jennifer Assault Diego SAN
Dream Big

Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

04:01 min | 7 months ago

Dream Big

"Now me dreaming big has never been about money or fame. I just happened to get it along the way. It's about the process of continually seeking to be better and my prayer. From the time I was a little girl was God. Use Me use me. Guide us me and it just so happens that God chose to use me in the world on a platform that caused me to have money and fame. I see that very clearly in my life. Yeah it's so important and what a great job you've done but that's that's the way. God is his dream our life big many times. We limit him. Because we think we'LL OPRAH I don't have the Education Ronald have the money I don't know the right people but what God never tells you to figure everything out. He says if you believe all things are possible and so I think that's a big part of it is just yes. Yeah taking the limits off him so I would have to say. We talked about this when I came to your house and interviewed you and Victoria that from a little girl I was looking at. What did I really believed? I believe I would sit on the on the second pew from the Front on the right every Sunday. That was my spot. I was baptized when I was eight years old and I really did believe when I look back at my life. I believed I was God's child and I believe that because I was God's child being born in Mississippi being born in the segregated South They Wanna. I really did believe that anything was possible for me. And that's what is carried me to the space and that's what we want to offer you all. You become what you believe and to believe that you are created by the power that's greater than yourself and that to live in that space means anything's possible and what you want in your life. What you really want is not your little piddly dreams for yourself. Because I had some piddly dreams. What you want to do is to be able to live in the space. That Beautiful Bible Burson Accident Says in God I move and breathe and have my being. You want to be able to live in that space of God's dream for you so the question I think is what is God's dream for you. We want to talk about. What is the difference between dreaming and wishing for something? I think most people spend their life. They wish for things they want things. I want a new car. I WANNA different than talking about. What is the big dream for yourself? I think the big dream for yourself is tied onto your purpose. It's bigger than just you. Meaning that your dream should be connected to helping other people as well. When it's when it's just like you said it just got a lot of money. I want to do this. But it's very different when you say I want to fulfill my purpose so I can be a blessing to others as well. Of course you're going to take care of your family. But it's it's about fulfilling your purpose which is believed. God's dream is always tops in some way to helping other people. Yes some way to making the world of whatever we have. We're here as a part of the human family to offer to ourselves and to the rest of the human family all right. So how would you save? I Love Kristen Miller said on facebook. I've never really known how to have a dream. I just existed hoping for the best but now I know dreams are important and I'm working toward realizing my dreams and obtaining them as dozen God meet you where where wherever you are with the dream he meets you in expands it. Yeah I think he does. I. I'd like to say godel super size going into the fast food restaurant. Your dream God's going to super size anything dream to tweet tweet. God will superstar the super size me. Jesus okay that's good. That's just I feel super size me. Jesus

Kristen Miller Mississippi Victoria Facebook
Caroline Flack of 'Love Island UK' dies at 40

BBC World Service

00:53 sec | 10 months ago

Caroline Flack of 'Love Island UK' dies at 40

"The suicide of a well known television presenter has filed shocking Britain with thousands of people paying tribute to her on social media Caroline Flack hosted several popular reality programs including love island the next night Elena Wilkinson reports the last few months for the forty year old had seen her a step away from presenting love islands after being charged with assaulting her boyfriend's Louis Batson she did not I did such a hearing before Christmas and was released on bail ahead of her trial next month on the condition she didn't contact him Mister Burson didn't supports the prosecution's case and wanted it drops Caroline sucks management team has no criticize the crown prosecution service for pursuing what it called a show trial also any without merits but also not in the public

Britain Caroline Flack Elena Wilkinson Louis Batson Mister Burson
Karen Hughes Discuss Clarity, Conviction, and Compassion

The Strategerist

10:13 min | 1 year ago

Karen Hughes Discuss Clarity, Conviction, and Compassion

"On the strategic today as our co host we have Hannah Abney the vice president of External Affairs joining us again Hannah thank you for doing this Sandra and our guest is the Great Karen Hughes who the New York Times famously said the rule of thumb in any White House is that nobody is indispensable except the president but Karen Hughes comes close to that description as any recent presidential aide Karen what do you think of that well it's a it's interest I think that that was said the day or two after I announced that I was leaving the White House so I remember thinking how ironic it took me announcing I'm leaving for the New York Times to finally say something Nice about me but you know part of it was I agree that no one is indispensable and it just was so different from the way that we operated in President Bush's White House and has when he was governor of Texas because it was so much a team environment it was really not about any individual it was about a team of the people who were there to serve the president and that's how I felt when I left and I told reporters in the press room they were like well you know but but you're leaving and I said well they're great people here continue to do the work I'm Dan Bartlett Mary Madeline and took rescue and we had a great team in place and they said but you're the leader the team and I said no the president's the leader of the team and he staying so doing anyway he's not going anywhere well thank you for being here welcome back to the Bush Center and Joaquin awesome you always great to be here always great to see the great things happening at my Alma Mater yes it is it really is Karen you have had a remarkable career you've senator analyst you've been addressed today and the executive director of the Texas Republican Party you've been President Bush's Communications Guru as you talked about in the White House but also when he was the governor of Texas you're under Secretary of State for public diplomacy the Global Vice Chair of Burson Marsteller is your current Gig and of course most important he probably is your mom and an career mother and a wife and really fortunately for us at the Bush Center an incredibly trusted adviser membership of our sorry member of our Advisory Committee continuous advocate for women around the world so how have you had the time to do it all well you know it's interesting I when people ask me now about Alan I'm not sure there such a thing as balance what I what I say to to women and men today is that that you can have both a career and a family you'll have to make choices along the way but you don't have to choose one or the other and at different times in your life one may have to be more important than the other and so I made the decision that I had to leave the White House I realized that I was no longer relevant to my family and I was missing a very important time I thought in in my son's life but you know I also was able to have wonderful experiences and when he went to college I went back to the State Department and had a great experience there in a very challenging and interesting role representing our country with in public S- across the world so I feel looking back I was able to bring my son with me on the on the presidential campaign I will never forget asking President Bush about that how was he then he was thirteen and it was born out of his interest during Christmas break during one of the days off school he came with me to New Hampshire and he loved it and he was fast naty by it and so that that sort of started the seat of an idea and then he came to New Hampshire during the actual election and spend a couple of days there and one day in the spring I went to President Bush and said you know what would you think about me taking Robert Out of school this fall and having him travel with us and you know most I think most leaders one of their key people said came to them and said amidst this really intense presidential campaign how I bring my kid along I mean most of them would have said no way to President Bush credit he looked at me and said that's a great idea and my son told me he's now thirty two lawyer in Houston and he told me not too long ago that rarely a day goes by that he doesn't think of something he learned during that great experience traveling on the presidential campaign and you know he did everything from participate in debate preparation to to traveling on the road with bus tours and watched the President I'm so grateful that he was able to see President Bush's leadership firsthand I feel that's been a big part of developing ham and so we have been able to have both wonderful your experiences and wonderful family experiences and so I would encourage everyone. UK Undo it it'll be hard sometime and but and you'll have to make choices time there were times when I had to step back on one or the other but you don't have to choose one or the other yeah you had a great line in your book about how how you felt when your son it's just make some brownies with you and you tired to make brownies and I was like what does that say about my life something must change here so I think it's also fascinating that it doesn't have to be finite I think talk about work life balance I think particularly with women because I don't think we have this conversation as often with men but when we talk about work life balance which I agree with you I'm not sure that there is a balance we talk about it like you can either be a mom or you can have a career and I think you've done a really interesting Job of having both and also even when you left the White House he worked totally gone I mean you were still helping you're still informing even when you are in Texas while promise President Bush would I left that I would stay in that was the first thing he said to me when I when I told him that you know I I remember saying you know Mr President I think the world of you but I have to move my family home to Texas and and you can imagine again he's the hardest job in the world the highest pressure imaginable one of his key people is is telling him I'm leaving and he turned to me looked and he said well you stay involved and it was the nicest thing he could have said and I said of course I'll stay involved and I told him that I would not only stay involved but that would come back and travel with him during his two thousand four reelection campaign because that's a model we hit established when he first ran for governor I I went to work for him and two things the first day I worked for him I've been the executive director of the Republican Party and so I was in the headquarters and I was getting all these calls about George Bush his positions and I realized I didn't know him well enough to speak for him so I told the campaign manager I need to go on the road with with then towards Bush because he hadn't been elected anything yet and to get oh and better and so I went on the road with them and we had a wonderful time and and I realized how much I believed in him and got to know him and we we called it the campaign of joy because we it was crazy by pager was always going off it was always bad news but we were running for all the right reasons and against all the odds that we forged a great great friendships there and that that's how I sort of got to know him was over the course of that campaign but I and that's how I realized that I could learn to speak for him was by being with him but the second part of that is I also learned that you really drive what I call the offense of the campaign from the road when you're at the headquarters are sort of naturally on defense you're responding to whatever the incoming nations are you may not want to answer but on the on the road you're with the candidate you can take advantage of opportunities you can see a moment when the candidate could speak out and make news and so I promised him when I left that I would come back in two thousand four and travel with them on the reelection campaign did which was a wonderful experience to it's been awhile since you've been on the road with him and in your book ten minutes from normal you've talked about some of those experiences on the road are there any memories now looking back that really stand out I remember visiting eighth based programs across the country where people were just I mean this one woman who washed the feet of the homeless I think it was in Minneapolis and just seeing you know what Americans doing to love their neighbors in need and President Bush always talked about the armies of compassion that the government could hand out money but it couldn't put hope in your heart or a sense of purpose in your lives and and during the campaign I remember witnessing that firsthand and then later the State Department I saw around the world where Americans were giving of themselves to help other people we'll have a better life and it was very inspiring to that point I mean you helped President Bush obviously coined the phrase compassionate conservatism which is I think perfect articulation of the kind of leader he is and the kind of president he was actually grew out of an interview if you want to hear the view there was an international reporter Cath dick I think he was from Europe who was in President Bush's office and he was pressing him about his political philosophy and and President Bush said well I'm a conservative and the reporter I said well but when you talk about single moms making ends meet and when you talk about you know parents wanting to bring their children to a better life about children you know that reading being the right for children and you don't sound like a conservative and President Bush looked at him and said well then call me a conservative with a heart and so we turn that into compassionate conservative and I think it really it does describe his his philosophy his optimism and his his concern for people and he always felt that government should be limited but the government also had a role because it could do certain things that would help but others such as those armies of compassion had an important role as well well it's something we think is so important here at the center we try to spend a lot of time talking about it I think some people feel like maybe we've lost a little bit of that compassion as a country thought about politics is not about policy but that perhaps in an age of where we're able to sort of hide behind a computer a lot of times that maybe we've lost a little bit of that compassion what do you think about that why I say we we drive into our automatic door garages and we shut the door and we don't get to see our neighbors as much and we sent emails rather than talking face to face and so I do think that's I think that's something we need to think about I mean technology has improved our lives in so many ways I'll never forget the first time I was able to edit a presidential speech on my device from the dressing room happen so technology has been very liberating but I also think we need to make sure that we don't use it to replace our human connections that we don't spend hours on you know social media on our phones as opposed to talking with our next door neighbor or you know face to face spending time with our

Vice President Of External Aff Hannah Abney UK Sandra Ten Minutes One Day
Turning Carbon Dioxide Into Plastic Dashboards

The Science Show

04:09 min | 1 year ago

Turning Carbon Dioxide Into Plastic Dashboards

"And so we end as we began with climate and c._o. Two here is professor. Geoffrey coates at cornell who's both making plastics from come dockside died and designing new and better batteries. I that recaptured c._o. Two so we've developed a catalyst catalyst is an agent that helps a chemical reaction. Take place and with another molecule. We've been able to make plastics directly from the carbon dioxide plastics like are they thin like a bag or are they solid so we can make a range of plastic season carbon dioxide. It depends on this other molecule that we add in one case he said up to fifty percent carbon dioxide and those materials are relatively soft at room temperature in fact their main uses to be used as a foam in a in in a urethane. Obviously you've done this labar trae but has it been developed practically so that it's working now somewhere with a one of my former students and a local businessperson burson we founded a company called novermber back about a decade ago and after many years of development we now have a commercial variety of this polymer which has now been licensed by large company called aramco. I'm what do you make these are materials that are called polyols and they're used in making things like foam mattresses. Who says maybe the soft material. The dashboard of your car can also be used in coatings and adhesives. Does it use much c._o. Two again it depends on the material. The two main classes material are either fifty percent carbon dioxide or about forty three percent carbon dioxide so it does use a lot of c._o. Into a lot of c._o. Two so if you look over the years the experiments you've done they develop she made you've taken a fair amount of c._o. Two out of the atmosphere. I mean obviously if we've commercialized that we've done this on on multi scale. The hope is that the material becomes commercially very successful and a great to be able to capture even more c._o. Two so so how many people are copying you well there. There's a few companies. Few companies were from the point of view of the world wants to have c._o. Two used up it would be encouraging if they had been people emulating example yeah as you can imagine we have a very strong patent portfolio that restricts the use of this only two companies license. It is their encouragement from say washington d._c. Or what you're doing is shaking his head. That's very interesting. I should add that the the u._s. Funding agencies have been incredibly generous. Both the national science foundation and the department of energy provided the funding that allow this work to happen one imagine men who is carbon so ubiquitous that there would be. This kind of effort made my turn you now to batteries this and i'll give you an example of the kind of work. That's been going on in australia this professor tom mash meyer who's professor of chemistry from the university of sydney developing epping a kind of jail. 'cause we think of batteries having liquids acid liquids which are hard to handle with a jail. You can build into <hes> houses. You can have in buildings so the fabric of the building is actually a giant battery. Is this sort of thing that you're trying to work towards so we work on a part of the battery. That's called the electrolyte and then as you just mentioned often this is made from a liquid that causes potential safety hazards if the battery artery ruptures and it's hot organic burst into flames and so what we're trying to do is instead of a gel. We're replacing it with a polymer. Given the polymers have no vapor for pressure there quite a bit safer and also can help in some of the fundamental operations of the battery and can you have scale as i mentioned you know in buildings so one of the big advantages of polymers the ways to process summer very well worked out and so to be able to make thin films of these as the electrolyte is actually pretty the easy on just imagine there being on tops of buildings and solar rays and the storage is built into the fabric of the building itself.

Professor Geoffrey Coates Aramco Cornell Washington Burson National Science Foundation Australia Professor Of Chemistry Tom Mash Meyer University Of Sydney Epping Fifty Percent Forty Three Percent
Philip Green fashion empire crumbles

FT News

06:28 min | 1 year ago

Philip Green fashion empire crumbles

"The high street fashion. Empire of Philip green is on the rocks. The UK retail I king has secured creditor support for three overhaul that's involve rent reductions store, closures, and to having of the company's pension deficit reduction payments, but will this be enough to save the business? Mafia Vinson discusses this question with Jonathan Ford and Jonathan Ely. Tell us a bit about Philip green and his fashion empire. How many stores all there in which are the best known brands? So the empire was put together from two big acquisitions that have Sears in one thousand nine hundred nine and nuts of Arcadia in two thousand and two Arcadia is, of course, the one that gives its name still to surf Phillips fashion empire four fifths of the revenues a made in the UK and Ireland from about five hundred sixty stores and they're all so concessions in department stores like Dem's and in some branches of Tesco now by far the best known of the Browns is top shop which counts for more than half of the sales, but there are also a series of smaller brands Burton, Wallis Dorothy Perkins, miss Selfridge Evans, being the main ones if my memory of back issues of vogue serves me talk shop was until. Recently regarded as something of a success, celebrities plumber into be associated with it gained to catwalk shows, and green was the person who is credited with getting it. But high profile on that level of success knighted for it. How is this managed to go wrong? So there are many causes a knife fits early into two buckets, if you like one is the sort of external factors over which Philip had relatively little control. And the other is the things that he did have influence and control over now outside his control was quite, simply the competition, much better. So back in two thousand and five when he was knighted, boo. A fashion retailer sells online and we'll turn over over a billion pounds this year did not even exist. And there's a whole series of those types of businesses have emerged who misguided, they sauce, people like that prime has really up to his game, h and. Am has opened hundreds of stores in the UK Zara has expanded quite aggressively in the UK. And also consumes have become much more kind to dispose to ordering clothing online something that seems a long time ago now but if you go back to the early noughties people were saying, oh, people will never order clothing, on my because they'll want to try it on. Well, they do try on. They try on at home and send back the bits they don't want, and then the things that he has done wrong. I think he basically took a lot of money out of Arcadia in the early noughties then famously paid his wife for one point two billion pound dividend didn't really invest enough act into the businesses that week online websites in their whole logistics, regarded as behind competitors and along with many other retailers from the sort of pre incidents era, they're finding now that they've simply got too many shops. So now so Philip finds himself as you say, with shops needing to close some of them leading to. Have the rent reduced on the others. Under the so-called company, voluntary arrangement. Can you just explain exactly what a VA is? And why he needed Sarah CVA is a peculiarly British form of insolvency that basically gives the company a window of opportunity to reach an agreement with its creditors to reduce its payments, and his overheads, and therefore is obligated, and actually any credits can be compromised under a CVA. But when it comes to retailers, it's almost invariably the landlords. That's are they face cuts to rents of between twenty five and fifty percents on about one hundred ninety four out of the five hundred also stores. They are the very significant aspects of this sceviour is that there is an agreement with a pension regulator Arkadiusz pension fund is about five hundred million pounds in deficit and the company had been making annual payments. To try and close that gap miss reached an agreement with the regulators, where it will reduce the payments, and so Philip, and his family will make good the difference, and that agreement with the pension regulates. The has very important political and legal ramifications should anything wrong with Arcadia further down the line, they still have to close certain outlets which talks about top shop, earlier, which other stores are going to be affected, or the CVA all of them all the chain. So twenty three stores will shots within the next year and that seems like quite low number out of five hundred sixty six but the reality, according to people in the commercial property world is the final number will be many more than not possibly into three figures that's because lots of stores are coming off lease anyway, and because over the three appeared of the CVA, there are lots of opportunities sort of written into the terms for either the landlords author Arcadia to end Elise early enclose a store. And that has raised questions really over the future of some of the other brands, we know already, the Evans miss Selfridge are going to move to a more wholesale type business model. So most of their stores will close one wonders how long things like Dorothy Perkins Wallis and Burson might lust because there's one marketing expert said to me last week if these stores didn't exist, would you go out of your way to invent them to have turn this round, if east Browns are not long for this world, even if he's able to have a little bit more success with top shop is there really a turnaround strategy Novus, while it's fair to say that many people think there isn't that what there is is too, vague into threadbare. So we know that he's basically plan to invest hundred thirty five million pounds over three years, roughly split half and half into improving the stores and improving the website and the online. Logistics the problem with that smaller a to really hundred thirty five million over three years

Philip Green Arcadia UK Evans Miss Selfridge Dorothy Perkins Wallis Sarah Cva Jonathan Ford Mafia Vinson Wallis Dorothy Perkins Browns Selfridge Evans Sears VA Uk Zara Jonathan Ely Tesco Elise Burson Phillips Ireland
"burson" Discussed on Oh No Ross and Carrie

Oh No Ross and Carrie

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"burson" Discussed on Oh No Ross and Carrie

"Yes. She had just bright is there's just a an excitement to her expression and she had glasses, and they amplified those is a little bit. And and she had that kind of wild curly hair graying a little bit. And she's pulled it back just to keep it at bay very clean shade all white clothes on. Yeah. White flowing shirt and white flowing pants all flowing, and she has had that kind of colo- about her. It's just a healthy, vibrant, happy Burson instantly instantly liked her. Yeah. Anyway, we're in love with her pretty much in a relationship that you go there just you can meet that Sinn fallen over there. And also fall in love with her. So we waited for a bit because she wanted to see if other people were coming turn to just pay the three well the four of us with her. And so she said, okay. Well, you guys can go on into the main room, and I'll meet chin. They're so funny because she said, I think I think today let's hold up stairs because it's a fun room. And so I'm picturing they've got a variety of rooms. And there's one that's just kind of cooler looking like a multipurpose room paper. Yeah. Cool cool, wallpaper, whatever. So there's these narrow staircases on either side you walk in. There's a whole it's beautiful tile on the ground would everywhere. It looks really nice. But you walk up these little staircases, and you're inside this massive dome. That's I don't know somewhere between like one hundred fifty to two hundred feet tall. Maybe. Yeah. It was very tall. I would not be able to guess the height. I would've been like eight hundred feet seven hundred feet. Thousand feet. I'm glad she was down. There waiting for whoever supposed to come next because that gave us time to just drink in this room, this cavernous room around us in take some photos knows. Oh, yeah. Beautiful windows, predominantly, lavender color, beautiful with the light coming in the post photos. I took some panorama photos. We'll share them with you on Facebook. Check him out Facebook dot com forward slash on. Rocco? NRA see and there were pews there. We were kind of sitting in the pews at first and later on best told us that it could see thousand people in there. So big room. That's too many people with a lot of people. We only had three people. Yeah. There's three of is. She Finally, I guess gives up comes up to join Corrales nine hundred ninety seven other people on the street brings them in at some point. It was a few minutes later, we were already into another conversation, but you could hear like someone trying to Br..

Sinn Facebook Burson NRA Corrales Rocco eight hundred feet seven hundred feet two hundred feet Thousand feet
"burson" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"burson" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Lived Burson still unsurpassed twenty two years twenty two years old. He's one of those things where they're not quite sure because she's so old they weren't keeping exact records kind of thing. Well, Brian McDaniel. She said she used to joke that God must have forgotten about her. However, there's a rush a Russian mathematician Nikolai Zack he's not convinced by her story. She thinks that he she pulled. He thinks that she pulled off the long con the long. Yes. Yeah. So in collaboration with a gerontologist, he spent months analyzing biographies of her as well as her interviews and photos witness testimony in public records of the city of our lease in southern France, where she lived analyzing all these materials told me to conclude that Janine daughter, Yvonne, assumed her mother's identity. Uh-huh. Tax fraud. He's a member of the Moscow society of naturalists and Moscow State University recently published a report called Janine climate the secret of longevity on research gate, a portal, connecting scientists around the world while you know, not just scientists, right? I mean, we're we're on their almost daily. I liked it in this case, it research gates sounds like it should be like a conspiracy theory, right or or a scandal about research, right? Key suggests that in nineteen thirty four it was not Clements daughter, Yvonne, who died as official records say, but it was Janine climate herself. Yvonne, Connor mother's identity in order to avoid paying tax paying inheritance tax good. Good call Brian. Then you you know, what that's one point Brian fair enough. I'll accept. That was the first what? You know, it's funny because I my wife got very mad at me the other day when during an argument is that she was assuming her mother's identity..

Yvonne Brian McDaniel Nikolai Zack Janine Burson Moscow State University Moscow France fraud Clements Connor official twenty two years
"burson" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"burson" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"To Burson thirty fifty. When was it tattle toes-to-toes you when when he discovered time travel, how did he do this? Well, he's a scientist. So he's like the Davinci of his time. He's like an astrophysicist. He's a medical nosy trains. He's a philosopher, so he just as they have a laboratory a laboratory, and he's his laboratories the government was actually working on the principle. They say, hey, your best duty here. Give us some time travel. You know, you give them enough money and enough elementary and enough associates help him, and they he came up with it. He was he was the man who to develop it as a matter of fact in the future, he's actually memorialize because in in the future, they have these anti gravity amuse. Newsman parks, and they call that the land of Tatas it's about several. Earth. And there's a force field around this. So people don't fall off the edge. And when you go to the anti gravity amusement talk. You actually can go back in time. You know, it's like, let's take the kids through the renaissance the afternoon, but they dedicated to tostados by calling it the land of tostados, that's how famous he is. And that's how well respected. He is in the future. Let's go to Barry in rock hill. South Carolina bury their George great to talk. A doctor. You know, hurt I argued Canada rube Goldberg say kangaroo are you related to move rube Goldberg Mugabe? No, no. If you go to New York City where I am from. And you look up a yellow white pages. There's about ten thousand Goldberg's in there. Okay. Okay. This is because of Ellis Island. They just gave the names, you know, my parents when they came over, you know, things like this run over was okay. But but I'm sure he's a nice guy. Go ahead berry. Listen, I tell you what body fascinating show tonight in great subject. Not to go work. I'm very curious just myself, and I want to know everything and every book ever laprairie underworld, and how can I earned a b a tan travel rock yourself and be able to learn the things you do so far in the future. All right to make it simple. This is a very complicated field. But again to make it simple. I would suggest you order. My time travels from our future book, which will give you allow this eerie, and then my time travelers training program CD album, which will guide you step by step into the future and allow you to access time travel's and to actually be able to be a time traveler, you know, in a sense, you yourself is it a mental series of time, traveling burst. Well what I'm doing? Here is obviously mentally in the sense that we're accessing the higher self and hypnosis which is an alpha brain wave. So you could call that a mental exercise. There are I don't develop time time machines as some people have in the past at least a theoretical models. Like, you know, Kip sewing device or or tipplers from New Orleans back in the seventies. Or you know, or from from Princeton. These are what you would call a mental exercises or visual exercise, but you can actually do teleportation and out of body experience, which is heavy stuff. You're actually doing something not just visualizing something. Let's go to Joe in Long Island, New York Joseph. Go ahead. Hi, bruce. You think time travel is are influencing our media, you know, Mandela stock maybe into some of the animals travel back like planet can I travel back in time. Okay. Well, you can actually let me give you let me give you the animals that were good example, what they can do is they can actually do holograms. So let me give you an example of a few question with a documentation of evidence of time travel minute to gophers. There is a temple in Cambodia called ta Prohm P R O H M, you can Google. It was built in eleven eighty six and there was a stegosaurus in the front of it. So we had to the Cambodian get the idea of a sticker service. We haven't discovered dinosaurs until the nineteenth century because the time traveler's most likely showed him a hologram and gave him the inspiration. Yes. You can put time animals back in time. Humans back in time objects back in time or forward in time. It's been done. And that's how the time travellers exterminated by. Using objects and lower animals before they send people back in time. It's it's it's dramatic. It's it's fun to is lightning. Remember, the purpose of the bottom line of all this, folks. I know very entertaining. And believe me, that's why I love my work. You can tell my passion on that voice. But it's also spiritually enhancing. And that's the bottom line to me burst memorial quick time for the the book offer. If you want to get the free CD fifty mental travel, which guide you into the fifth dimension, you have to order the book.

Goldberg scientist Newsman parks rube Goldberg berry rube Goldberg Mugabe Ellis Island tostados New York City South Carolina rock hill New Orleans Cambodia Barry Google Long Island Mandela Princeton Canada
"burson" Discussed on Answer Me This!

Answer Me This!

03:28 min | 2 years ago

"burson" Discussed on Answer Me This!

"Satan. Wouldn't it from the trilogy Batman pissing on his wings from Karen from Bedford who raises several interesting points? Just in the first phrase, he says uncommonly watching the classic Charlie's angles. Brackets Cameron Diaz Burson. That's the classic. Gee classic. Karen says this film got him thinking all of us thinking is the classic Charlie's angles obtuse or acute cont decide. All I know is I want them to be right angles. Joked got high Potter news for you. And. Does he get a chair as well? When he doesn't MARTINI. Shaken not stirred by very coming. You do actually. So it cuts to him getting receiving the drink from pretty lady. And then saying that's absolutely perfect something along those lines excuse me. It didn't ask for an apple teeny. So you see the Bom may till shape. And can I call rebel made is in like, glamorous mccown location mixologist? Thank you you. See the mixologist shaking. It not staring it and giving it to me says that's absolutely perfect. You might see him say the line. I would imagine a lot mix all of this would not allow multi need to be shaken not stirred because the elites the multi agency. Which is worse. The point gin martinis. The customer's always ROY moten, particularly if the customers Jay fucking bone going to give him what he wants look a little bit ketchup in the token horseradish he think he'd have similar radical ways of ordering the conventional. Guitar but with code. Look book and wave to the whole thing. Plate Bloody Mary three bucks Tabasco. I remember being guy on the street and fellow Iraqi came up to me saying it's rubbish and either don't do pizza could participate. Just recently holiday. Yeah. You went you said on either I'm going to be very keen on swim out ball. Did you enjoy? It was concerned about is exposing my moves and getting cold. Same time is drinking them on the ball. Well, actually was fined because everyone else that was me. Because we went off season. So we were the youngest people at the hotel twenty years. So it didn't feel a tool embarrassed. Like there were people around me that they testicles by their ankles. This holiday over different sorts. I was confused for someone who was in a boots adverse women in boots. Yeah. I know. I didn't. I've never seen the advent they were referring to but I was on holiday with my family and someone came on. This is in Turkey and someone came up to me and mama's and said, you're on the telephone. And I never know what to say when people say that because yes, I am on the teddy. But teddy very late at night very early in the morning. They probably haven't convinced me for someone. They know nonetheless you start reaching fuel sharpie toward growth their breasts. So I didn't want to say yes, you've seen meals Ayman hopes his knee that he's. So I said, well, I don't know. What it what did you think? You've seen me is what I said. And she said you're in the you're You're in in the. the Doris. He's in the for and she called over her family to come and meet me because I was in the booth and I said, no, I'm sorry. I'm not in the boots advanced you wouldn't have a real celebrity would say undercover research feed experts character. Turkey's the need tomorrow to some isn't it you play. It may be. The you'll missing as well. From the history of Brighton that's made it an attractive place. It was the Linda Lapland miniseries killer met with teenage only man watched in one thousand nine hundred ninety..

Charlie Ayman Turkey Cameron Diaz Burson Jay Karen Satan. ROY moten apple Bedford mccown Potter Brighton twenty years
"burson" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"burson" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Well, I'll tell you one thing. You know, we in the weather. Profession. All of us are great at conceptualizing how nature's putting our weather together. We have to do that in order to be able to forecast it. So in in terms of my television presentations, I always was frustrated by the plexiglas boards and the magnetic the blinking highs and lows. You know, which constituted a weather show years ago. I thought this so much more in this story to put a cross. So we were among the first stations in this market to computerize our weather graphics, I always felt that was the way to go as well as accessing the amazing satellite imagery and putting this across. We've been excited to put the model data that all of us in meteorology in broadcast meteorology can put across and share with our viewers today in terms of the newspaper weather page. I was always frustrated at how poor a lot of these weather pages were. They've improved a great deal since then, but I always thought. What the Tribune weather page would be a success. If it was hanging on the wall of the classrooms around the area, and if we could use not only the page is a means to communicate tomorrow's weather in the weather and the, you know the days ahead but also to educate somehow. So we incorporate a little vignette every day which tries to describe how and conceptualized graphically how the weather's going to be put together. I always thought that Dr Ted Fujita and his ability to visualize tornadoes and micro Burson down person on the work he did over the years, you go through his catalog of papers and and the visuals he produced..

Dr Ted Fujita Tribune Burson
"burson" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:22 min | 2 years ago

"burson" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Barry ritholtz on Bloomberg radio. My special guest today is Rex sore GATS is somebody I have been reading for several centuries. Now, he is the author of the encyclopedia of misinformation. See what I did there slipped a little misinformation, and he has quite a quite a bio in addition to being a product designer a creative technologist, he's the founder of the New York media consultancy kinda sort of media, and he is the author of the encyclopedia of misinformation wrecks or GATS. Welcome to Bloomberg. It is wonderful to be here. So I have to start with your bio which begins Rex orbits is a professional Orson Welles and Burson eater. And a third generation liken throw who is responsible reform rebranding contrails as Chem trails. Obviously, none of that is true. Tell us about your. Your background? I wrote that bio for my it's on Amazon page because I start I started reading traditional bio, and then it was like, well, this is a book about misinformation, I should really just make a spoof of the whole idea. And I have to point out that having read you over the years, I the from Oculus then at wired you're very much into recurs of France. And regressions where there's an element of a reflection on the underlying subject, for example, you many people do your urine lists that doesn't work for you. You do a list of lists. So we'll talk about that later, but the your self description as a hoax is perfectly consistent with not just the book, but your own brand of recurrence of writing statement. Yeah, for sure there's a there's even an element in the book, where I do I returned to this trope a lot where I stayed of fact, and then throw a footnote in there, and then and then undermine the fact itself have this tendency to kind of I don't trust writing that asserts itself in some sort of like overly unbiased intellectual way that just so firm and has no sense of doubt about itself. Right. So I think that I'm always I think everything I write is expressing is making a point. But is like willing to say. Say not really sure about this. And I think that that's gonna media climate wear. That's I think an especially important trait. The certitude amongst people who have no basis for certitude seems to be the model on the twenty four hour news channels, regardless of political leaning there. Yeah. I mean, I I I don't know if I had last time I saw somebody on cable news, and we will include all networks there say get asked a question and say, I don't know. That this never happens. And I I always start with. I don't know where I am not sure let me try to work. This problem out. I've got a few ideas here different opposing ways to think about it. And I think that that that whole notion is really disappeared from media climate, it get said, very rarely, and it's really hilarious to watch the anchor. Just suddenly it looks like a fast drive in car that suddenly hits a patch of oil. It's been all over the place. It's all over the ice. They don't know how to deal with someone who says, oh that's outside of my expertise. I really have nothing to add on that their heads explode. Yes. And writing a book about misinformation, which is not exactly a topic that like I had known a ton about the least the social science part of it. I I know the cultural part about it like the part of the kind of Pt Barnum esque qualities of our society and culture, but I had to do an immense amount of research into. All the research. That's going on right now around ho fake news. And what trusting the media and all of that stuff? I was all brand new to me. We'll talk a little bit about fake news. And we'll talk about how the media has kind of painted itself into this corner. Let's stay with your background a little bit. You you do a lot of different things you're a designer, and you were part of a team that won the Pulitzer prize, assuming that that's not misinformation tell us tell us about that. This is a straight from a long time ago. He's twenty one years ago. I think we do our homework here. So in one thousand nine hundred ninety seven I was living in North Dakota Grand Forks, North Dakota. And this little town of fifty thousand people suffered the greatest. Disaster of the twentieth century for really American city. Well, in the quantified in the sense of people evacuated entire town had to be about one hundred percent of the town out. And it was a flood and Clinton was still president. And he actually came to town and cried on national television. It was like it was kind of a Katrina before its time not as severe as Katrina, obviously. But it was so all fifty thousand people are out whether any fatalities or there's interestingly zero zero fatalities. But the the reason it became such a strange national story is that in the middle of this flood in which like six feet of water in downtown underwater in the middle of this flood a fire starts, and it seems like the alternate sort of reckoning of how big. Yes. And it creates this paradox where there's all of this water. But there's a fire in the fire. Can't be put out because the fire hydrants are water. And so there there are pictures out. There a fireman ten diving into the water to try to connect their hoses to the fire hydrants. And then they finally get them connected in there, the the there's no water pressure, and none of it works. And the reason I kind of became a notable person around the event was I was a person who decided not to leave, and I was staying in my apartment because I live next door to the Grand Forks herald, the newspaper in Grand Forks, which back then was owned by Knight Ridder, Honey that is no longer around and it was working on the newspaper and trying to get it out. We managed the eventually that newspaper burned down coming up..

Bloomberg Katrina Barry ritholtz Grand Forks North Dakota Grand Forks Orson Welles Rex France New York Pulitzer prize founder North Dakota Amazon Burson Knight Ridder Clinton president one hundred percent twenty four hour twenty one years
Daily Nerd Brief

Talk Nerdy to Me

01:09 min | 2 years ago

Daily Nerd Brief

Burson Youtube Dibble
Daily Nerd Brief

Talk Nerdy to Me

01:09 min | 2 years ago

Daily Nerd Brief

"Streaming service. I'm not sure if you can help you wash besides getting the streaming service. I don't know how many people have that. I don't even know if they charge for the streaming service, but I'm sure they do. So care bears, care bears are coming back. We'll see the cousins are gonna be there regardless. We're gonna. They're gonna at least one new pet little pet. Puppy named Dibble. Maybe introduce your kids to it. Let's your fan of care Burson you can watch it and let me know if you like it. Like I said, that was the last article. Please subscribe as YouTube channel. Give this video like leave comments on this video. Please tell me what you think about what we covered, what you know why I'm wrong, where I'm right. remake. If you like podcast instead of video, we got you covered, talk nerdy podcast comic listed in the browser or download directly from there or any podcast platform we should be available. If we're not let me know and I will make us be available on it. That is all I have for you. I will see you tomorrow later. Nerds.

Burson Youtube Dibble
"burson" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:37 min | 2 years ago

"burson" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Know, I've got three children and nine grandchildren. That's. Puts you in a in a context where a lot. Lot to be appreciate a lot to worry about. And they worry don't crowd out the lorries. Got to give ourselves permission to do that. I just want to ask you two or three more questions. You're holding that phone. I wonder what once you wrote people ask, how do you mature a spiritual life? And you said the one thing you do is you eliminate the world words, spiritual, it's your life that's being matured. It's not part of your life. The words spiritual much more than when you first became a pastor is everywhere now, and I wanna know how you hear that respond to it, what you think of it. Cheap. You're, you're taking a something, putting a name on it, spiritual, which means is defined. The whole world is spiritual. And it's and the word spirit is wind breath. Well, people are breathing all over the place. They're all spiritual beings. But they have a name for it. You can come are mental? Is it and and that that just wrecks happen with the whole thing. Spirituality is, and that's why I don't like the word because it's so easy to just say what he's such a spiritual person. She such a spiritual Burson well nonsense you're too, and. I think. That's, I guess that's where I think the church has a place which is maybe more important than ever been, but it's. Done? Well, there's no spirituality did you can define because it is in everything you do. That's right. And if you don't, if you don't recognize that, that's possible. You just subtract a whole part of your life. So I. I think that's those of us who are teachers. Preachers pastors. We. We don't do people. He could trying to make them more spiritual. You have always balanced. What I'm going to inadequately call your spiritual life with. With with a very robust intellectual life, a love of ideas, love of the rigor of the text and the teachings. Has that been something you felt you had to balance has been a creative tension and you know that also makes you different than the way a lot of people live with this part of their lives. And in fact, our equipped people aren't really given tools to live with this part of their lives with that rigor. Oh, I don't know. I just always loved books. I always love good books. Loved riders. It's not been as made an effort for me as a discipline. It's been. It's been a spirituality. There you go contradicted yourself. I wonder. You're eighty three. You know, I think actually, this last exchanges kind of pointed out the the complexity of dealing with words, even though they are so precious. And I just wonder if if other words if words themselves even the word God become too small after eighty three years of pondering, grappling with the immensity of the reality and who God might be. Zoo become too small. But. If we could. The word spirit. In both Hebrew and agree is wind. So why don't we talk about wind. Because we kind of know it wind is, but spirit. I didn't know what you're talking about. Becomes an abstraction. You mean. Do does the word God feel too small to with this point. What do you do about that? Pretty much. I'm very circumspect about using it..

Burson eighty three years
"burson" Discussed on Rooster Teeth Podcast

Rooster Teeth Podcast

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"burson" Discussed on Rooster Teeth Podcast

"Yes, I did chat on the cattle. She'd never sleep in a hotel bed. Hundreds of people that have fucked in every hotel that you've ever been. There's always doesn't smell like sex. There's always terrible. Remember we talked about this years ago on the podcast. I think, where is it lost? Yeah. What's wanted one of the loss podcast? I think where there was a hotel that found someone dead under the mattress. What is it that a rubber or we get there when it was like in four rooms? Yeah, it was. It was that scenario happened where they found a dead body under the mattress in the mattress under it. Maybe it was in. It had to be like the hallowed it out. Yeah, that it hasn't been a couple of weeks. Guests had stayed in that room grounded because people were complaining about the smell. I remember this now so they would just complaining about Hong comfortable. It was. I think it was like living on a dead Burson carved out or something. Yeah, that's on the dirtiest thing. The thing I was freak out about a lot of freak out about a lot of things in hotel, but who bunny bathroom floor it the remote. The remote? Yeah. Why they don't clean that who the fuck uses the down. You've ever touched the TV remote hotel when someone's stuck that up, there s a guaranteed promoters been up a butthole. Oh, that I thought it'd be like semen on something that to anybody else ever had that thought in hotel. You see that video. Who'd eating a foot, how no people will do anything. Normally, I would say, Gus, don't record Eric in private moments, but they were very traffic traffic. Yeah, they were in the street moment. It was significant. It was a significant guy was saying it was deeply voting favorite part. Interesting. The latest on her phone like, yeah, this part of it right. Like the part about it is when they realized that someone was watching that like do a foot deep throat throwing in another car, and then someone's filming for the next car over. They look at them like hub. Dare you pull away..

Burson Hong Gus Eric
Video of worm crawling in fish dinner catches the ire of popular Asbury Park restaurant

New Jersey First News With Eric Scott

05:11 min | 2 years ago

Video of worm crawling in fish dinner catches the ire of popular Asbury Park restaurant

"Jersey's, first news five seven Dan arrows commuter weather we have temperatures that are. In the sixties and seventies the seventies and eighties, and we, do have, the possibility, of some showers popping up this afternoon thunderstorms could roll through. In parts of the state tonight this off and on showery weather pattern will continue for a couple of days Dan will have more on that coming up in just a couple. Of minutes the lawyer for four women who, accused Stockton university of failing to protect them from, getting raped in an off campus frat house expects more women to come forward Robert. Fuji says he's getting calls and emails, from other victims all alleged doctor turned a blind eye to what. Was going on at the PHI Kappa PHI house a non sanctioned fraternity with a reputation for plying young coeds with. Alcohol university posted a statement saying they're taking steps to increase student, security but did not address the lawsuits directly The go fund me account has. Been set up to help pay funeral expenses for tika Justice the Hamilton, township woman who died almost, instantly, when, her house, suddenly collapsed. From decades of water damage to the foundation pastor Joseph woods the Saint Philip's, Baptist church says in addition to the go fund me account we are. Accepting donations in the form of cash visa gift cards. Not specific to a particular store as well as money orders and checks Hamilton. Mayor Kelly eighty says what happened is a horrible tragedy and she supporting efforts. To collect money for the woman's funeral everyone particularly in times of tragedy times of trauma he the support to be. Able to lay a family member to rest. With grace with dignity in Hamilton David Matthau New Jersey mono. One point five news a child is in critical condition this morning after stopping breathing at a Central, Jersey waterpark paramedics were called the crystal springs water park in East Brunswick Monday afternoon but it is still not clear this morning what happened, the town owned at waterpark has pool Tubing water slides jury selection sent to begin of the trial of President Trump's. Former campaign chairman Paul Manafort will appear in federal court in Virginia today for the first trial arising from special counsel Robert. Muller's investigation Manafort is accused of concealing tens, of millions of dollars in income from the, IRS and fraudulently obtaining millions more Bank loans trial comes as Trump, and his lawyers have dialed up the intensity of the attacks on Muller. Where us, governor Murphy his, office confirms he's on vacation but, won't say where perhaps Italy Murphy bought a Twenty-three room multimillion. Dollar, mansion on the side of a hill and. A small talion village you pay just over seven million for the sprawling property in two thousand four but, his office would not say. If that's, where the families headed for the next eleven days when smoking is banned on all public jersey beaches next summer who will enforce it the police lifeguards the law, the governor, Murphy signed this month doesn't specify who will. Be responsible? The governor says it should not be Up to the lifeguards to decide enforcement but in Harvey cedars that's exactly who. Is enforcing the local law beach, patrols spokesman Brian Devlin says currently there's a local ordinance that prohibits smoking between the flag during lifeguard hours from ten AM to five PM. He says most people abide by the law but it'd beachgoers ignore the lifeguards, he says police could be called into hand at a summons which lifeguards cannot do meantime in long branch the first community bend smoking on the beach acting business administrator Kevin Hayes says police have been responsible, for enforcing the smoke band since two thousand three jenner's alone New. Jersey one zero one point five news New Jersey one oh one point five news time five ten a New Jersey woman got taken for, a hundred thousand dollars catfish on a dating app, by a man she thought she was dating the Hoboken woman, says they met online she believed that he was. Her boyfriend they talked often online never in person. He said he lived in New York. But had to move back to Turkey he asked her for money several times over a six month. Period each time she, wired money to different Bank accounts with different names but only. When they stopped, talking, did she think to call police prosecutors and police are warning New Jersey residents about the dangers of Vigilanteism. After Manchu, a resident set up his own, version of to catch a predator. Filming his interactions with a suspect state police sergeant Jeff Flynn says that when you see any kind of. Crime you should never follow a suspect or get involved that includes robberies, fights and out of control vehicles you may pass on the highway traffic violation person can, get pertinent information and. Pullover over, one safe Dial nine. Wander pound seventy seven vigilantes can make. Things worse by inserting themselves into a. Situation and risking their, lives you never. Know if a suspect is armed Daniella, Burson New Jersey one of one point. Five news popular Asbury park restaurant is blaming patron for trying to. Ruin their, reputation after the patron posted video of a parasitic worm, crawling out of a piece of fish they just been served for the one hundred thousand have viewed the video on Jim Guineas Facebook page Stella marina made its own Facebook posts calling Guineas post callous irresponsible a squiggling, worm on your plate they suggest could have happened, to anyone whether cooking at home or at a restaurant timeout, New Jersey's first news five twelve Dan says we. Still have the threat of some rain for the. Next few days we'll have an extended..

New Jersey Governor Murphy DAN Jersey Robert Burson New Jersey Phi Kappa Phi Fuji Joseph Woods Stockton University Muller Paul Manafort Harvey Cedars Hamilton Asbury Park Turkey Kelly Eighty David Matthau
"burson" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"burson" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"Starts now Seven o'clock Burson topping our report this hour Manchester police say a. Father had to be airlifted to the hospital yesterday after his son stabbed. Him twenty year old sage Kenny allegedly pulled, a knife on forty six year, old Christopher Kenny while the two, were, arguing about property damage Christopher's. Injuries are not life threatening but is charged with tempted murder assault making threats and weapons possession governor Murphy has signed a law requiring. All candidates running for state and local offices in New Jersey to provide a working Email address Jessie burns executive director of the league of women voters of New Jersey, says this will make it easier for voters to contact candidates and ask they're staying on issues but, even just, to be able to invite candidates to things like house parties are coffee or to you. Know the senior centers to come and talk to them about the issues in their. Particular community, they need, to be able to get in touch with, them to send those invites she says right now voters can only contact candidates. Through snail mail which can be frustrating since many peo-, boxes go on checked Bank robbers, are still, taking place in jersey but the. Numbers are, trending downward dramatically while there were one hundred two Bank robberies in the Garden State in two thousand sixteen. That total drop to fifty four last year Brad Cohen assistant special agent. In charge of the FBI in jersey says, so far this year we've had, only eighteen Bank robberies we've got, better, faster we use modern technology. To help us immensely the add some people who rob banks are drug addicts desperate for money but in other cases it can be. Your next door neighbor so it's not just a somebody of low socio economical challenges it could be anybody these days David Matthau New Jersey wanna one point five news, Monmouth county prosecutors are looking for whoever put a dog in a cage and place the cage in, the rising, tide this morning the grain white male dog was discovered by highlands resident at Veterans Memorial. Park the dog was still alive but had the tide been higher he would have. Drowned anyone with more, information is encouraged to call highlands police are, we starting are we starting the week off with more store Terms the complete New Jersey one. To one point five forecast is coming up New Jersey fast. Traffic in one minute on New, Jersey one, zero one point five.

New Jersey Christopher Kenny Jessie Manchester Brad Cohen FBI governor Murphy David Matthau assistant special agent Monmouth county executive director murder Veterans Memorial assault forty six year twenty year one minute
Cambodians vote in polls with main opposition party silenced

ABC News Perspective

02:38 min | 2 years ago

Cambodians vote in polls with main opposition party silenced

"NBC News, Radio, I'm AP herald to northern California. Communities are left in ruin as the core fire rages burning Eighty-one thousand acres and destroying five hundred structures since Monday. A San Diego, federal judge considers slapping the US government with the restraining order that would disallow deportation of newly reunified illegal immigrant families at the southern border. Meanwhile, President Trump lists litany of immigration and border issues. We must enforce the rules against visa fraud illegal, overstay illegal entry and other immigration violations and crimes and crimes. They are believed nine family members who drowned when a Missouri duck boat capsized are laid to rest for yesterday and five today. Seventeen people died in the nineteen July tragedy, police mcallen, Texas reports of shots fired at a shopping mall. We're false. AP herald, NBC News, Radio, special counsel, Robert Muller plans on. A bunch of witnesses in the. Trial of President Trump's former campaign manager Muller submitted a witness. List with thirty five, names for the trial of Paul Manafort that begins Tuesday in Virginia Manafort. Pleaded, not guilty to, eighteen counts of Bank and tax fraud, and failure to file reports of foreign banks and financial accounts the witness list includes Richard gates who pled guilty to Bank and tax fraud and worked, closely with Manafort, it also includes five financial professionals who were granted immunity in exchange for their testimony against Manafort the trial is expected to last three weeks. Brian, shook NBC News Radio Newark mayor RAs Baraka proposes. Year round homeless shelters right now there are shelter, services available to the homeless but pretty much only during the. Extreme heat and cold and that's where the city pays to have private shelters open and may arise Brocker he wants to make. Them available year round to the homeless now, under this, proposal the city would help provide numerous sheltering organizations. With the. Resources for, that meanwhile, the, mayor says, the temporary shelters taking The homeless right now during this heat will remain available to them. Through August and that's thanks to, donations from companies in Newark Scott Pringle NBC News Radio New jersey voters soon head to the polls in Cambodia but many are. Already questioning the election the balloting will take place on Sunday but critics say democracy in Cambodia is already. Dead the Burson expected to win Prime Minister Hun Sen. who has been in power for thirty. Three years his detractors say he is moving, more toward authoritarian rule, and has, eliminated, his competition in the last two years he has, disbanded the main opposition party jailed its leaders, and forced the.

Virginia Manafort Nbc News President Trump AP Robert Muller Cambodia NBC Visa Fraud Fraud San Diego Newark United States California Ras Baraka Missouri Texas Burson Brocker
"burson" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"burson" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"It's eight o'clock i'm the yellow burson topping our report this hour the teaneck woman who lost her husband and four daughters in a fatal crashing delaware on friday is recovering from shoulder surgery mary rose balacano is is the only family member to survive the accident which occurred while they were on their way home from ocean city maryland delaware state police say alvin hubbard junior lost control of his pickup truck and slammed into the ballot connex suv pushing it into a ditch he does not face any charges so far in less than an hour president trump is expected to announce his picture replace justice anthony kennedy on the us supreme court kennedy is a conservative with a history of centrist rulings he announced his retirement from the court last month this week the president interviewed several potential replacements and narrow them down a state senate appointed working group that's been studying government reforms is expected to issue final recommendations within three weeks i have dozen of the initial suggestions focused on health coverage for public workers and if there's going to be common ground with governor murphy that's where it might be the holy grail space where you save money for the individual you save money for the state and you get the individual with the same level of coverage not even better at the end of may murphy announced the task force that would study ways to save money on healthcare both for public workers and the state its initial report is due in october have you given any blood lately anytime is a good time and the red cross says blood is urgently needed right now there is a blood emergency right out i mean is it is very critical we're at the point where we are sending blood to hospitals faster than the only coming in and and we're we're in a really critical place right now what is us not only for car accidents and other traumas but it's also needed for ongoing.

delaware trump anthony kennedy us kennedy president senate governor murphy teaneck maryland alvin hubbard three weeks
"burson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"burson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Left office we will always have milk because milk would be affordable i'm we will always have flour so my mom will make basham that beautiful beshir mel will go into these aluminium trae beautiful the my mom had but the bishop will have to call them and usually my mom will put it in the refrigerator so next day she could draw the croquettes him flour egg wash umbrella crumbs well that night after my mom made the crooked as something happen every single time you will hear a door like a squeaking noise opening and you will hear panel burson making this sound that will be probably one of my brothers dave were doing exactly what i did twenty minutes before going to the kitchen in silence opened the door of the refrigerator and we the thickness of that benjamin so my mom began making to trace one that we were allowed to do that and the other one that we will have to promise the nobody will put their finger in you know i never remember any of the dishes the my mom or dad made at the beginning of the month when usually they were buying better quality ingredients and the stake or i remember many of the dishes of the end of the month of the leftovers.

basham burson benjamin dave milk twenty minutes
"burson" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"burson" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"About it they can attract other people to also care about it and and then the fly will kind of starts working you also say create business plans one is an execution plan one is an aspirational plan yeah this is look i mean costs are fixed right and revenues are are are a dream and the idea's really unique you always need to manage your costs very carefully and in an ideal world you have a plan that actually works based on your goals that you can drive and then really the ideal is there anything else that you can do on top of that then can you actually aspire to achieve more with the limited resources you currently have and so you really need to manager expand expenses do like an actual plan and then really work and motivate your staff to a motivational blam what's interesting to you say another rule has done accept money from strangers and i know as a lead into this i talked about the amount of money from venture capitalists that have got into us startups it's billions and billions of dollars so i'm assuming know if you're not bootstrapping it you know providing all you all the money yourself or from friends and family you're gonna have to go out to an angel investor or someone in the venture capital world so how they can be strangers or you're saying what get to know the venture capitalist before you accept some this is like in in in in any in any type of relationship you're building so you need to know your counterpart right you're going to build you're going to take a long relationships with the person you're gonna go through ups and downs you're going to have setbacks you're gonna have operational issues and you're going to need to know how to burson deals with these setbacks you're gonna have to do a lot of background research so it's not just knowing the person really having a a personal connection to the person but also doing due diligence on those people.

burson
"burson" Discussed on Cinephile: The Adnan Virk Movie Podcast

Cinephile: The Adnan Virk Movie Podcast

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"burson" Discussed on Cinephile: The Adnan Virk Movie Podcast

"They prided themselves on being a speed team and nobody could beat me so they kept me around because it's like well we've gotta figure something do with this guy you know you can't feel i though dude you gotta get there before you still basis and i started picking up hitting pretty well and you know i really should've played the outfield because that's all i really knew but i was a little intimidated by some of the arms some of these kids arms were really really good i just played winter ball season and then i had to get 'cause i was twenty one i there was nobody floating me i i had to get a job and you know the luxury of playing going you know after school at one o'clock and playing till five or five thirty every day was so beautiful but i i had to get a job so i i i walked in and told mardi burson who was the coach that i i can't stay and he said listen if i were you i just go straight to the track coach you know but i didn't i just had to get a job so you know i wasn't acting pretty regularly at that point i just would get a job you know here and there but so i had to walk away so that would go rico moment you know it's the the the interesting part about that story to me too is sport has scape you father and you know you have some that you needed something to lean on you needed something to emotionally buoy you and you found it true that group of guys in ball it it really was it was pure catharsis and the thing is growing up my father loved baseball i mean i grew up listening to will when we were living in new york it was what's his name new.

new york mardi burson
"burson" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"burson" Discussed on Science for the People

"Mostly historian so i guess because there was not much much day to work reads except the historical records but when ancient dna thickness became more more fine tunes at people actually managed to get dna from the bacteria from corpses from the middle ages so that sort of settled it's okay it was plagued with the same plate we have today so but then we still at this problem of explaining why was plagued back then so much more lethal than blake now and one of the suggestions that people made twisted said several historians of mehta's notes was spread by lice or human freeze its it is something we thought okay let's try muddle this let's try compared to different models one where we let's play cut by rats one we were let flakes by fleas and for good measure also one where we lift blake from human to human trudy air right so in your particular study you did not go in grab plague bacteria from old victims instead you did create this model and it's called a susceptible infectious recovered model sl our model can you describe how exactly that model works yet so it is easier than it actually looks if you look in favor cu set of equations what you're doing to categorize your population into different groups and at the beginning of an outbreak you would get greis everybody as being elsie susceptible and then you sort of let the clock tick in an everyday you say okay i'm many people from this assessable group do we expect to being become ill now given that we know how many people ill people we already had so if we start with one ill burson then we have ninetynine elsie persons give a calculation on what is the rate with which held to people will convert into ill people and we also have a rating which health ed speech with which infants infected people conferred into debt people or into recover people and so every day in the middle east of recalculate where everybody should be in which compartments.

blake mehta elsie burson
"burson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"burson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"So i i i consider myself to be prolife maybe not the prolife everyone's looking you know hold on hold on i heard that born free american woman got and and i believe that a woman's right to choose is is there is there a way to go so i kinda wanna put it out to the pro burgers because that's what they are i was reading an article that bernie sanders that was talking about healthcare and pretty much as a child when you're born you're being charged exuberance amount of money you know just be born you know and sometimes people can't financially do that you know so i challenge the program hey if you wanna if you wanna be pro bird then you should be you know pro healthcare you know healthcare for everybody this if you're prolife that means you've got to be pro life for the whole life as a republican chris christie yes absolutely you said again but you can't be pro burson and immediately abandoned a newborn baby exactly it's it's not it's it's the double standards it is a double standard and jeff i love you i appreciate it here's the way i'm doing prolife these days i just say guns ammo because if you're going to be prolife then you're going to be anti gun you're going to be pro gun reform you're going to be pro gun safety and if you can't deal with that and if you're going to tell me no and guns then i i don't take seriously but one company that i would like you to take very seriously is a precursor yes they sponsor our show but this is a very high quality sponsor that's who i reserve my reeds for and so i am happy to recommend to you ziprecruiter they have sponsored our show they went away but hey there backing i'm glad they're back because oop recruiter is a great way in fact the best way.

chris christie burson bernie sanders
Comey's new tell all book out for just one day

24 Hour News

00:35 sec | 2 years ago

Comey's new tell all book out for just one day

"Former fbi director james comey's new tell all book about president trump has been out for one day kobe sites in his book what he calls some evidence of obstruction of justice marian burson bought the book in new york i think it's undignified i like what he says about trump but not how he describes trump mary ferraro wants to buy the book she's not happy with the subject me put the nail in the coffin and this whole administration getting in is his pool president trump has struck back brandon komi a criminal wendy mud in georgia finds the president's comments.

Director Donald Trump Marian Burson New York Mary Ferraro Brandon Komi Georgia President Trump FBI James Comey One Day
"burson" Discussed on The New Media Show (Audio)

The New Media Show (Audio)

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"burson" Discussed on The New Media Show (Audio)

"The first thing we're building out before you before we get to the servicing those analytics is kind of all the you know the foundational elements so you know a from the meditated about description podcast to even than going in and saying looking at burson saying removing adding editing to the to your point of the earlier about some of these tools in the audio editing tools we have a beta platform working on now that allows people to go in look at the clips that the has has has put into repository and siebel to make some to expand or contract change the point slightly add certain keywords that may have been overlooked that's that whole consult service tool will start will be rolling out in the next couple of months the again it's sort of thing that if you have the vandals in the time to go in there and play around with it fully able to you is honesty sharing tools that are also part of the whole process you can share their on on social networks download the clips in use them as as as you see fit you know all of that that whole publish report photo really important part of what i've been doing in terms of working with content creators getting a sense of what sort of what sort of tools as they would like to see something like this annex was consistently mentioned across the board i think that's one of the bigger problems right now in on ios people don't really get a good sense of what's getting listen to apple just recently rolled out some enhanced analytics for for for their podcasting app.

burson siebel apple