35 Burst results for "Burnham"

How to Grow Your Business by Replacing Yourself

Run Your Day

09:06 min | 3 weeks ago

How to Grow Your Business by Replacing Yourself

"Today we're gonna have a little bit of a conversation about Taking things to the next level right so if any of you have experienced a something just some level of growth inside of your personal life or career or business you start to realize you get to this point that you can't do it all right like there's there's a million different things going on every single day whether you're a manager at you know where you work or ura you're actually business owner or you run a family with five different kids or you run a local group or a team or anything like that. Like there's there's a nine jillian different things you have going on at all points of the day the week the month year like planning things like it's just it's it's too much it's a lot right and the thing to remember. Is that whether you have your own small business or a job or your oprah winfrey or whoever the hell you are you have the same amount of time as i do like. We all have one hundred and sixty eight hours in a week. Like bill gates the president. Like the bump down the street like we all have the same amount of time right. So how is it that we all like. There's certain people that achieve that seemed to achieve so much more like you're just standing there and all of them like how do you get so much done right. And then there's people that are just seemed to be in the same position day after day week after week year after year and just like just kind of tread water like how right you know you know probably different people along the spectrum but there's there's ways there's just so many different examples i can think of that. There's it's it's you can either go down this path of super productivity and be burn out as hell or you can go down this path of not doing anything and hating your life right. But there's a third option that not a lot of people think of and there's this option of actually doing the productive ineffective things well not burning out while not actually making yourself feel more stress and anxiety while actually living a happier in. I don't wanna say carefree life but just a less stressful existence right and that's kind of where the title of this show comes in into this concept in this procedure of finding ways to replace yourself right finding ways to systematize yourself. Now there are many of you have a business or you have a high level job or whatever it might be like. You're familiar with system. You're familiar with the processes in place that needs be consistent to achieve a similar outcome for every person every time every time a sale comes through every time a fulfilment task needs handled like whatever the case might be. But have you ever stop to think about how you can make that happen in your own life in your day to day existence. Right i was actually. I've been reading a book For the second time again called high-performance habits by brennan bouchart. highly highly. recommend this book It's it's a life changing book and we got it for like seven bucks on like it was super cheap to But burnham short. He's he's like man he's the personal development guru. He's like i would love to have him on the show one day. If you ever listen to this brendan like hit me up. Let let's make this happen. It'd be it'd be awesome But just to kind of synthesize. What kind of taking away. From that. As i go through the second time. Is this idea that you as a person or a system right you as a being not only inside of your Physical being but inside of your business inside of your career inside of your relationships right like the more you can become a system and become consistent. The better things are going to get for you right now. When we take this conversation. I really want to apply it into production inside of business careers making money that type of conversation right because one one thing i noticed I went through my journey right with building the the runway wage app with building. The run. your day podcast here with building. Run your day app with with doing other client apps for other people in clients that i brought on in my in my other business like there are so many menial repetitive tasks that come in with stuff whether it comes down to sales whether it comes down to lead generation when it comes down to social media posting content like there's so many things and then people start this business is oh i thought it was gonna be so easy and you're like but i have all these different things to do and now i gotta get sales now. I gotta do all this and it's like dude. You understand that like you're you don't have time for all this stuff like you don't have time for all this stuff. When it finally came to that realization my life changed forever right in in in in tandem with the performance habits. You know philosophy in book. I started to realize okay like if i can figure out ways to replace myself or systematize myself i can then take that menial task that takes me ten minutes to do every single day and get rid of that ten minutes in offloaded onto something else or a bought or a machine or an automated process in that ten minutes every single day right and this is hard like this is. This is a really hard concept mentally to grasp especially for people like me. Maybe like you. If you have your own business you started your own business because you want control of everything right like you i. I used to always think that i would. I would let control like release control of things. But i find myself being that typical type of entrepreneur mindset of like. I can't let this go like. I need to do everything i need to make. It's my baby right and it. It's hard it's hard especially maybe it might be easier if if you're in like a career type job or your manager or something like that where it's not really your your ass on the line right but when you find ways to automate things when you find ways to systematize things. I'm telling you like there are. There's such of level of freedom and efficiency that comes into your life and not only that but like your mental wellbeing right and a couple of examples. I'll share with you. Here are a couple of pieces of software that i use in my own personal life. That have really really helped me one is called. You might be familiar with this or or you might not be. But it's called. If this then that right i f t t t If this then that in it's an app that you can actually download in. I'm telling you like it. It is really really cool. You can get automated Spreadsheet entries you can do you know. Save money automatically you can do like. There's a whole bunch of things that i don't even know it can do that. It can do right. I do think like it used to be mostly free. I think now they have a paid subscription where you can only get so many of these things free but like basically right like if you get a response in g mail from a new person. It automatically saves their contact information. A spreadsheet or. There's like things to just help. You live easier in actually save those menial tasks that suck up your day all day every day right because it kind of goes back to that i matrix. I've talked about before. On the show. With stephen covey being sucked into that black hole of the knot important. Not urgent stuff right. The facebook stuff. The email filtering Scrolling through social media just like all this different shit right and another piece of software. That i've actually really really started to use in like is called zap ear It's pretty popular one. You probably are familiar with if you do any kind of online business or anything like that Maybe you're not so really if you're not familiar with zap here it's kind of the same type of thing if this then that But man even that like it is. It saves me so much time in my business for automation and sending automatic emails and collecting lead information. Letting letting me know. When i got a sale you know through The various channels my businesses and Just automating stuff like it really It really comes down to because like you gotta think like okay okay so some of these are paid subscriptions right like you pay. I think if this that's like five dollars a month and you get so many tasks to be able to do this right and you see you be sitting there like well. Is that really worth. You know the one thing. I use it for whatever but you got also think like is the five dollars or ten dollars a month whatever. It might be worth the time that you are sacrificing. Doing those things

Brennan Bouchart Oprah Winfrey Bill Gates Brendan Stephen Covey Facebook
The 19-year evolution of a retail florist with Kelly Marie Thompson of Chicago-based Fleur Inc.

Slow Flowers with Debra Prinzing

05:13 min | Last month

The 19-year evolution of a retail florist with Kelly Marie Thompson of Chicago-based Fleur Inc.

"I open to flourish in two thousand and two. So that means we're just about to approach our nineteen th anniversary so we're really excited about that It won't be a normal celebration obviously but We're still really excited Yeah i opened. You know back then. I was twenty two years old fresh out of college and studied history. And i had worked in a grocery store So that's where. I really learned my background on floral. And you know. I learned just things like how to pronounce l. strom area or burnham you but i didn't have a huge training or background on. It came to design outside of my art history degree and painting degree. That's just be influencing you all the time just that discipline just cover different medium. Now i do exactly and it's It's really shaped my understanding for color and depth and texture. And i've i bring that with me every every single design Yes i opened up I had a small storefront. I really thought we were going to be a bucket flower shop on because you know boutique florist. Were really thing that long ago at least not in chicago. There were a few but it wasn't as popular of business as it has certainly grown into. No i and i do want to ask you. What do you mean by boutique because Would you know that's a term that means probably a lot different you know definition than what it is today so yeah. That's a great great question. So when i when. I came up with the idea of opening our retail boutique. I knew i wanted us all bucket flowers sort of just hand ties. Ready to go But i definitely wanted to include. Heavy selection of gifts lifestyle goods Even back you know eight nineteen years ago. I always knew that it wasn't just about flowers for me. It was always about bringing people together and gatherings and parties so as we've grown throughout the years our collections have grown and our offerings have grown. And when i'm when i'm purchasing for our retail. I always have in the back of my mind. Like how can this assist in a gathering. How can this assist in communicating and being a part of. You know the other person that i'm inviting into my life. You know Every day so it's it's really You know obviously weddings and special events or celebrations. That bring people together but are boutique is equally as important for that experience as well. So in your product mix you have a more lifestyle items that you think kind of support your flowers and vice versa. Exactly yeah lots of serving pieces for dinner parties A couple of years ago brought in fine jewelry so we now sell engagement rings which is really special part of the process. Wow oh my gosh. That's a that's an endeavor was a scary thing. It was a goal for a very long time of mine. But it's always been a dream to have somebody start their entire process of getting engaged in having flair as part of that story All the way through the last dance when we're able to help service their floral to for their wedding. Oh my goodness so. Are you in the same retail space when you first opened nineteen years ago or have you found expanded on. Come out front. Yeah we've moved twice actually Our first location the building had sold so we had to shift out. That was after. I believe three years and then we moved. We were in our second location for ten And then the landlord actually had just kind of decided they were going to move into a different direction. And honestly at that time. I really thought about closing. It was not my decision to move and there was not a lot of Opportunity in the neighborhood that we were in that i saw that was the right fit for us so i had to make a really big decision of kind of go bigger. Go home If we wanted to continue our retail and special events. And i'm really glad that i kept going with it i. It came very close to say goodbye and to the retail side thing. Oh yeah i was really just. I had a big heart to heart and I drove up to michigan for the night. I'm not too far from us in chicago and drink a little too much wine one night and wrote down all the pros and cons idea. I woke up the next morning. Just ready to go just ready to sign the new lease. I'm so we've actually. We started out with eighteen hundred square feet and we now are between both are retail and our studio. We are thirty three hundred square feet. They're kind of adjacent to each other. Exactly what is it in chicago. The logan square neighborhood on and we've always been in that neighborhood. I was really drawn. I lived in the time when we opened and i was always drawn to it because events cultural diversity and very strong artistic community that both of those still

Strom Burnham Chicago Michigan Logan Square
"burnham" Discussed on Happy Sad Confused

Happy Sad Confused

04:03 min | 2 months ago

"burnham" Discussed on Happy Sad Confused

"I don't know. I also get a certain age. It's like all right guys like cool off. We're like we're too old to be doing this. Let let the kids have the internet now. Like they should be the ones like making all the stuff i think like at a certain point. I just feel like now. I'm getting to the age. And just like i work and i present stuff. I'm not like out there spinning around every day. Well it must be relief in some ways. Having turned thirty. That like as somebody. That's been the narrative of your life has been about how young he was. Young is the exactly. You're a legit adult like it's over. Yeah exactly it's like. It's not impressive anymore. But i mean nobody i mean it's like it is it is it's like a total relief to be like okay now i can just and i've always wanted to do. I mean that's what i to do. I just the guy that pops up every two years and releases something and also like. I'm genuinely very happy with my level of recognition which is very minimal and would not want any more of it like. I don't want to be any more known than i am. Which i know is very stupid. As i'm like promoting a film than i'm in but but like i just mean that is not something i need to. I feel like i've built enough whatever That i can like justify making my next thing. And that's all i really care about is just the ability to make things and January i yeah. It's just like what. What does engaging with the cult. What does engaging on twitter all that stuff do other than just like i don't know i don't know what it does for me Well y- also makes me sick to my stomach. It makes me wanna yeah. Well you're nothing if not an engaging set of paradoxes. burnham it's part of why enjoyed chatting with you appreciate it and it's also it's important for me to like i wanna kinda in the corner give like a roadmap to our potential version of a roadmap to younger people right knowing up because i would go like man if i was young trying to make stuff i would be so confused and i wanna tell them you know people like you know it's not just about self promotion and isn't just about having to be out there all the time selling yourself you know like you also can take the time to just work and not worry about. Just i don't know. I would know how to how to start now. I feel very guilt. I feel i feel bad for people coming up now and i in case unhappy to say that. Maybe it'll be two years before we catch up again you can you can suffer and create your art in silence the horrors of twitter. Like i do because i'm a fool and But i do look forward to you know but but but the thing is truly the. You're doing the right thing. I mean it's like there should be people like there should be commentators. There should be that should. It's just like it's not everyone's job to job. That's my point. Like i particular type of people that do your job. It shouldn't be the thing. Everyone does enough fair enough. Well happy to say that a promising young woman has brought us together. And not once but twice in the sincere congratulations on it. Man honestly it is one of the best films. I've seen in quite some time. Your excellence in it and I hope everybody checks it out. And i hope we can keep talking as the years go by. Is you know i'm excited. I i love your career in that as openly said route. Like you're not going to be in stasis certainly is going to be mixing it up trying stuff and And that's an exciting exciting path to be on. So thanks for your time dude. I appreciate it thanks. Josh will help you live and so ends and other edition. Happy side confused. Remember to review right and subscribe to the show on itunes or wherever you get your focus on the big focus awesome. I'm daisy ridley and definitely both despite you..

twitter burnham Josh daisy ridley
Must Have Shrubs With Ken Druse

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

05:59 min | 4 months ago

Must Have Shrubs With Ken Druse

"This time to try to narrow down our list of must have shrubs to the real standouts and tell us why i can margaret. I know you'll never get it to three. It's funny you said that because when we first started talking about it you said one and both of us that we can't pick one. Can we even pick three right So which of your books. We always give copy of what looks only talk on the show at with the transcript of the show. What do you think i mean. Is this one for shade gardeners this one for. What's this one for a cheat garden shade garden would be a good a good one. That's always a huge hit so good good. Good good So we're at you. And i in our lives are at what a another expert friend says is the shrub season of our lives which is sort of rather than crawling around dealing with lots of fussy high maintenance perennials. It's kinda great to have some big fillers like mature shrubs to do a lot of showing off and yet not ask a lot of us. So where do we begin. What's a shroud. i guess. Well a strobe is a multi stemmed plant of woody plant and i guess that's sort of describes a tree would have one trunk one stem herbaceous plants die down to the ground soft tissues and shrub is a woody plant. That is bushy bush. I don't like that word for describing his trip but it's rub can be bushy. Okay okay and we should say before we start naming our desert island trump's that we didn't include khanna first because really that can that's a whole other conversation So many shapes and colors and textures among those so Do you remember your first. Trump been is still there and is it a favourite or it didn't make the list. Well i get. I get to pick three right okay. You want me to tell you. My first well you said conifers. And i'm not going to talk about converse but my one of my favorites shrubs is. Evergreen is a what is called a broad lead evergreen and it's a bucks it's a kind of boxwood. I have too many of them. And it's a box with semper barons. Graham blondie yes and it is one of the most colome ner plants i've ever seen really but It's a shrub and it's minor. There's probably i have some. That are like seven feet tall and fifteen inches. Wanted if you can imagine that. They're they're like punctuation marks. You know they're like exclamation marks in the garden. And as i said. I have too many because when i first got i always wanted them and then a nursery not too far from here a lot of them. Nobody bought them and the price kept going lower and lower and lower. I think i have made. I may have twentieth them when they were eight dollars a piece. Wow that's a lot of exclamations. A long time. I know and i i also keep moving them. I just moved three boy Son they want son you know. I'm sure they would love son. But i have all my box with. I don't have any full sun. But i have some of my boxwoods in quite a bit of shade and they stay calendar. Sometimes i tie them up because the snow might split them a little bit or you know splayed them. They don't break. But i do. I do tai the ones that are floppy up for the winter. And i love it if you says boxwood called graham. Landy columbia okay. I don't actually have any evergreen things at all on my list whether broadleaf or coniferous And i was thinking when we started this conversation today on the phone that my first trump passion was the genus vibe burnham. In back in the day we had a lot of divi burnham's like the double file and so forth that turned out to be kind of invasive and a lot of areas of the country. So i don't grow those anymore. But lately i've been cultivating more and more native ones like the maple leaf a full liam then tatum the arrow would and so forth So that was kind of where my shrub journey began. But the thing. I have the most of you said you have a lot of grand. Blondie is winter. Barry holly speaking of things. And i don't know what came over me. I mean it was the birds that came over me early on here in this rural place having been grown up in the city. You know coming here meeting all the birds and knowing that learning that they liked some of them liked fruit and that the native hollies were one of the ways to fuel the migration in the wintertime. And i planted about forty five or fifty of them in three very large groups in different directions toward the perimeter of the property but in different directions where i can see them from key windows in the house at a distance in the winter and all different varieties and Big ones small ones. I got a lot of fruit and birds a like very much. And yeah so waxwings and robins like in you know hunt flocks at one hundred or whatever at a time will come in right around now november ish and again to pick over at At the first snowfall and so forth and they'll strip them all pretty early on but one trick with winterbourne. Hollies if you want some that will last longer for your visual interest. The non red varieties they. The birds leave them longer. They're not as interested in them. So many yellowish orange ones and so the lighter colored ones and the winter

Khanna Margaret Donald Trump Evergreen Barry Holly Bush Graham Boxwood Blondie Winterbourne Hollies
"burnham" Discussed on FT Politics

FT Politics

03:37 min | 4 months ago

"burnham" Discussed on FT Politics

"Directly elected man's having much greater prominence and powers than ever before but also the devolved administrations in Edinburgh and in co death that have really taken a different approach to England here what struck me in your? Piece. Was You into your Michael, Govan he said the government would do more to work with these institutions and repair relations. Do you think they actually mean to do that or they just pay lip service to that idea I think they mean to do it in a forest it coincides with the things they already believe in there are lots of things have been exposed by the crisis. One of them is the actual institutions, the mechanisms of the Union. As well as they should a lot of meetings ad hoc but this quite good cooperation for example, between health ministers, chief medical officers, all departments that no, they really have to what knows. This is developing it has to work properly Wales was gotten. Their voss parts of the UK. Government over the don't really have to sink about evolution very much Michael the devolve forget, and so when they suddenly have think about it, they make mistakes they get data Tony from England they don't have the right sensibilities about Michael things with some institutional fiddling you could make a difference now sending more civil servants of London would help. To that extent, I think they all serious. The problem will fundamentally is dilution is is a one way stream. Once you give power away the people who have their own, you won't more of them and there's no the British come actually really wants to this but if you look at the entire nature of this. It's very keen to take sovereignty back from the European Union is not gained to share it with anybody else in his policies. It's often removing checks and balances from Woolsey Canoe and the devolved administrations significant check as we've seen over the crisis although I think they would like to make the union stronger ado question whether they've really got the stomach for the things they would have to do to deliver that and of course it from. Scottish. Point of view if the country's run by separatists, not tweak is going to be good enough people want independence finally it was George Osborne. The chancellor who was a big advocate of directly elected mass. He said this week that they had come of age during the coronavirus pandemic but he lamented they still lacked a lot of powers jobs do think they shouldn't is it likely to will get more powers because we know that constitutional reform more evolution was something that was on dominic coming does agenda when looking to shake up the state. But doing that also means that you may be handing power to Labor masters was workout out well for the government the government's survey good game about devolving power Cowan's AS Roma's mentioning there. The instincts the revealed preference of this administration so far as been to try to hold power the center as far as possible. So yes, there are discussions about giving Mas- further powers, and I think the one thing will be useful will be proposed shape of local governments in England despite all the moves, you the truth authorities getting rid this patchwork of two tier councils me I think that's a very sensible thing if they can force it through. But again, that's like he's a face opposition from Tory MP's counselors. So we'll see I mean I'm not sure that Boris Johnson has. This really in deny I, think one of the key point is the it's about finance is very easy for Mas-, and for first ministers to say, we got into deep lockdown, we won't more support because all of the bill is being picked up a London is a major disconnect there on I think one of the issues is going to have to the extent to which more financial palace I'll given to all these different bodies have tax-raising powers. They have very limited borrowing powers. The mayors have even less. So that's something you're GonNa have to look at seriously if you commission.

England European Union Michael Mas London Govan Edinburgh George Osborne Woolsey Canoe Wales UK Boris Johnson chancellor dominic Tony Cowan Tory MP Roma
Star Trek: Discovery: What to expect from the new season

The 3:59

17:33 min | 5 months ago

Star Trek: Discovery: What to expect from the new season

"With. Michelle. Paradise Co Executive Producer and Co show runner of Discovery Welcome. Michelle, thank you. Thanks for having me. Excited to be here. So after two seasons of exploring the nooks and crannies of the Kirk, era star Trek discovery catapults nine hundred years into the future season three. It's a huge departure for the show. What can we expect to see from this big shake? A. Lot of new things. The world, the world that they come into is very, very different than the one they left there it's actually nine hundred and thirty years ahead. So what that does is it takes us a just beyond all established cannon. So really in terms of storytelling, it's fresh snow it's. We have whatever the world is that we that we wanna make of it so. I think people will be excited to see. We've got some new technologies that we're going to be introducing the season. We've got new characters that will be introducing the world as I mentioned is in is an Kinda different state and we can get into that in a second. But the thing I wanNA highlight is even as we're going nine hundred and thirty years ahead even as we're going beyond established cannon What is what was super important to us throughout the development of season three s make sure that we're honoring existing cannon. So the species, their relationships, all of those sorts of things that have been established on all of the series that came before us are things that we are continuing to honor. technology were continuing to honor even as we push it forward. The Federation. STARFLEET. All of these things that mean so much to everyone who loves track we continue honor those but going into the future allows us to look at these things in a new way and so. One of the things that people may find is That's species that we know from a series past maybe we interact with them in a different way. This season may be alliances shifted of folks are friends who didn't used to be friends or enemies who didn't use to be enemies. Going so far into the future allows us to do all of those sorts of things. And the new kosher honor show runner and congrats on the promotion What changes would you bring to the show? Oh Well I don't necessarily bringing changes. It's really I mean I I started in season two when I joined the show joined about halfway through season two. And toward the back of the season started working very closely with Alex Anyway as we were finishing up season two. So you know I feel like I've gained a good understanding of what he wants from discovery and you know as a group in season two, we are still finding. Really. What is the what is the right tonal mix for this show Because you know any season, one of the show is still kind of finding itself in that way and I feel like in season two, we really hit our stride with that. In terms of we've got the action adventure in via fax. We've got the character moments the emotion we've got you know fighting in. All sorts of mystery in all of the elements of the show I feel like in season to found the right balance. So for me coming in and working with him, it's really about maintaining that kind of balance in every given episode doing what this show does. So well, which is letting are actors, directors and everyone in Toronto shine in the way that they do and You know really just continuing to to try and. Make. The best possible version of tracker we we Cam Michelle. So well, let's get to the show. You you sort of teased trailers have shown and teased a grimmer future one where the federation doesn't necessarily exist or isn't around anymore hats that changed the show and I know you talked about how you want to stay faithful to the spirit of Star Trek. But we'll talk about the differences in how you're. able to play around with that. Sure. So to be clear, the federation is still there it's just It's been diminished in that something that are characters will come to discover as they go through the season and they'll They'll begin to learn the reasons why that happened and the the why of that, and then the drive to bring the federation together again, really becomes their main drive of the entire season. Ends when we looked at going so far ahead into the future We thought well, what what is what are the big things that could have about this world and that seemed like a natural place to go and. It seems like you know if we are going that far ahead, what what do our characters have? What do they bring to this new future that makes them uniquely able to have a significant impact on this new future and when you talk about a world where the federation has been diminished in some way, it's it's still out there just so everyone is clear. It's still out there. It hasn't gone away but but if it's not as strong as it used to be you have you have Burnham in Seru and all of our heroes. On discovery coming from a time when the federation was strong when it was the bedrock of everything and they grew up with that and they grew up with that feeling of security and optimism and hope and if they're coming into a world in which those things are are struggle for people, then our heroes are uniquely poised to help bring that kind of hope and bring that kind of optimism into this new future and inspire others around them, and so it it just felt like a great opportunity to be able to position them from center with all of that gun. The show has last two seasons wrestled with Continuity Canon, and making sure everything's working out in instep with previous series but hell freeing is it to get out of the constraints of cannon and really. Kind of go go out, go free with with what you really want to explore with star trek dare. I, say to go boldly where no one has gone before I did that I totally did sorry. it is. It has been very freeing. You know when? I when I joined the show in season two, we were right in the middle of that. The middle part of how do we answer these questions about hike that we knew from the original series? How do we answer some of these questions about spock widened stock never mentioned having a sister, all of these sorts of things and so that by the way that was really fun figuring out how all of that was going to work and how it fit into what was existing was really a lot of fun from story perspective. And now being beyond that is also fun and one of the really cool things that we've gotten to do is taken. We've gotten to take relationships that had been established previously, and then kind of change those up a little bit So the. You know the species you might expect to be friends may not necessarily be friends in this new future or vice versa It allows us to explore those new relationships explore species in new way explore worlds in new ways. So an into an again I, do want to say that that with all of that, we are definitely honoring the cannon that came before we're not just. To sticking things lender and tossing them all our place where we've been, we've been really thoughtful about If we're going to play with something, how do we play with? How do we adjust it? How do we shift those relationships? And do it in a way that will feel both familiar and new same time for audience Gotcha. Your Star Trek has always been a reflection of modern society, the avast this from season to season. But given the fact that there's a pandemic going on. There's a discussion about the role of race in America there's climate change field disasters take your pick of issues right now. Unfortunately but it turns discovery and season three. How does discovery reflect what's going on today? Well I can answer that in a couple of ways. In terms of just the the pandemic itself Alex I've talked about this. We could not have imagined when we wrote and shot season three of the show how much it would resonate today because obviously no one could have. Seen this coming a year year and a half ago when we were first working on all of this thematically in season three where we're looking at a lot about connection and disconnection, and that's very much where the world is right now. So I think it it resonates quite unexpectedly just just in terms of the stories that we're telling the thematic residents of those stories. And then in terms of things like are characters You Know Star Trek. has always always valued diversity and know gene roddenberry started it back on the original series having a diverse cast at a time when diversity was not the thing one did on television so. Making sure that we honor that continue that we're continuing that with the introduction of some new characters this season. and. Making sure that that we honor those characters, those voices and that we represent those on the show is super important to us. At C, Net, we've always asked now what? So that's what we call our new series of conversations about the future that is shaping up as we speak I'm Brian Cullin everyone has an interview series, but we try to be different posing a problem driving toward a concise answer and doing it all in about fifteen minutes that we don't waste your time. Check it out at senior dot com slash now what? And speaking of those characters gave update on where some of the crew Michael Berman's through what are they as the season begins. Sure. So when we begin the season or characters have are just coming through the Wormhole, which is where we left them. In episode two, Fourteen last year so they will they will come through land somewhere. I. Can't tell you where they will land or what they'll do. They'll get their or or will spoil that but I I can tell you that one of the first things they'll be looking for is did they achieve their goal because going through the wormhole was about saving life from season to? And, making sure that there is sentient life in this in this new future that they ventured is is the first question Alaska of course, the answer is, yes that's not a spoiler or we wouldn't have season three because there would be no people So they did achieve their goal. I can tell you that and and then it's a question of. Who are they now and what what this new season gives us opportunity to do is really explore all of our characters in a in a much deeper way. You know when they left season two, they left everything behind anyone who was not on this ship that was in their orbit their family, their friends everything that was familiar to them. They left behind and so they are very much a they're a family unit and connected in. A really new and much deeper way when they come into this new future because they are all they have and. Everything else was left behind so. They're kind of strangers in a strange land figuring out this new world as they go and and that gives us choices to learn a lot more about about who they are to challenge them in new ways to see how each of these characters individually will grow. And some of that will come out with a new characters we introduce You know this is not a spoiler he's in the trailer. Everybody knows David Jolla is joining us this season as as book, and you know here's a character who has grown up in this new world who's going to become a kind of a guide for Burnham once she lands and she's in this new future. and. Seeing him challenge her. We will get to learn new things about her and as our characters face unique challenges. Over the course of the season we'll get to learn new things about all of them. Great. We saw Harry Mudd we saw Sarah saw a bunch of figures from past star. Trek shows in previous uses discovery are can you tease or can we expect any other release cameos or you just sort of breaking free from can completely in just starting with something completely new? Well, I can't. I can't give anything away 'cause. Away but you know a lot of this season really is about. Seeing what this new future is all about and seeing what new characters come in So you know in nine hundred, thirty years ahead so There's a there's quite a time gap there I do WANNA mention I I don't know if you. Earlier of saying about the new characters, we also have the characters of. Deer Gray who are in the season Bluto Barrio Alexander. Tremendous and speaking to diversity of all when we talk about diversey on camera that's They are also representative of that as a non binary and transgender in real life, and then also being a non binary and a transgender character on cameras, well with these characters that they represent. So. that. All of that has been very, very important to us. Great in terms of the tech obviously seen at the tech site talk with. You. That's that's great. We love that you love seeing A. A little bit about that. What what are some of the if interesting fats of? This 'cause there are a lot of fascinating concepts you played with the previous using network time travel was a big deal last year what what what tech we serve guys embrace for this next season. There is some new tax that we will explore the season. I hesitate to say only because I don't WanNa give it away but but I will say that again in the tradition of honoring what has come before and then also pushing that forward. There are there are some new tech, the elements that we will see the season You know the the ways in which people interact with their ships might be a little bit different You know certainly there would have pollution in the the technology we use the things we hold the things we interact with on ships, all of those sorts of things and you'll start to see. Some of those things right away in the premiere episode of Season Three. So there have been a wave of Scifi shows that you know ground themselves in hard science I'm scared that something you consider star trek which Kinda plays a little bit fast loose with tack at like how real some that check is that is this something you guys are considering or you thought about a four season three already beyond it's something that we have absolutely done. And I I can't speak to. A to the season's when I wasn't here. But we have we have a science consultant Dr Aaron McDonald's She is fabulous. She is an astrophysicist and some Some audience members might be familiar with her she's She does a lot of star trek events and things like that where she talks about the science of Star Trek and we work very very closely with her on all of these things, and so if we have a science or tech thing that we wanna do you know as as writers will make it up and play in the sci-fi realm and we rely on her to help us. Tailor that to make something that obviously these things are not possible right now but we want to get them as close to future possible as we can. So she helps us with all of that. She gives us you know how many kilometers per second is something going? You know all of these sorts of things she helps with So yeah, for sure we we know that a lot of actual scientists watch the show and. We don't want anyone watching the show and going up man that's insane. So Aaron helps us with that guy well I ask this for most of the folks who deal the show I haven't had a chance to ask you. So I'll ask him in terms of the tech that's available in Star Trek. What which which bit of tech would you like to see in real life which would you could actually see yourself using own my gosh? Transporter. I would love to have a transport but I would I would want it to be a transporter that wouldn't just take me from here to the grocery store, but I wanNA transport could take me to to visit my loved ones or to go someplace else especially. Now since we you know it's very tricky to get on planes and. Do things like that I I would. I would want to I would want to transporter yet that that's a good one especially nowadays transport. Yeah. He can get around TSA airplanes in general totally like that Yeah I just need that pad built living room just walk into it. You go where you WANNA go. Yeah, that's that's it. For me. I would just say cheers of guest stars and notes it's nine hundred years in the but a Q. is not you know he doesn't age is pretty much more. Sane. Just out there for you kids shows up. Okay now. Awesome. Okay. Wow Michelle thank you for your time. Really appreciate season three of star trek discovery premiers on, Thursday yeah. So much and thank you everyone for watching. Hope you enjoy the show. It's

Federation Cam Michelle Alex Burnham Executive Producer Kirk Starfleet Alaska Gene Roddenberry Seru Pandemic Toronto Dr Aaron Mcdonald Bluto Barrio Alexander Spock America TSA Brian Cullin Michael Berman
UK government under pressure for COVID-19 strategy

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

05:56 min | 5 months ago

UK government under pressure for COVID-19 strategy

"Emergency covid downs across the north of England to put the division between Westminster and the rest made Steph into shot relief. Mass journalists voters across the North voicing their anger being dictated to as city leaders discovered happening towns through front pages, twitter blogs. According to Lisa Nanday, the government doesn't even know where weakness and a new report by End Child poverty was just came out says that even before the pandemic child poverty was rocketing in the north and Midlands eight of the ten. Hardest hit areas is England less the union fracturing. Alex Scotland Wales Northern Ireland each have their own approaches to covert the government is trying to centralize control of England even though English, cities and regions were desperate for the more path more local strategies has that approach failed? Is it going to have to be more more regional? I think I don't think it's a one ONS official question. For instance, when it comes to things like testing trays I, think to have a national overarching. Sort of strategy is a disaster because obviously local people will know how to do that better. But when it comes to for instance. You know. Contagion rules. I think collaboratively in simplicity of the message is so key to their success that having a sort of different set of rules complicated rules depending on one postcode or another I think that will fall down I. I can't see that looking. I'm Scott this perceived as doing much better than England, and Cave in Wales to the extent. Are. They really doing better. Do they just have? To they have better messaging that Nicholas Sturgeon is just somebody is more trustworthy Boris Johnson. Better messaging is part of doing better. Possibly one of the key banks. I had to look at a fairly comprehensive study by the Center for Constitutional Change that looked at the totality of what we loosely termed as the first wave and found a covert destroyed trajectories peaked sooner in both Scotland and Wales and came down foster. So one could say that national OAKTON, which came too late for England came even more disastrously nights from Scotland and Wales. But death rates were significantly above national average for England and consistently. Wales and Scotland so I, think yes they have objectively done better. I had Frank Cultural Boys on the Today program saying he actually missed springs national lockdown lockdown gold because the whole country was in the same boat. Matt downs are driven by local infection rates but they all currently in the north I'm is this crisis sort of making the relationship between national local government, the north and the south worse or at least more more strained yeah. Undoubtedly I mean he's also contains enormous opportunities in some ways for Metro Mas- in the North it's interesting that you've seen. You've seen the London Meh. Saudi con his authority has really diminished because he's been basically take files funding in which he greatly depends is being held. So tightly in could be manipulated so much by central government that he doesn't have as much leeway as he used to. Conversely in the north, they know that they can They can basically demand certain things in exchange for cooperation about Kobe measures. So this puts the whole metro messing I mean previously, they were seen as you know, a Nice Democrat Nice Democratic Nice to have but not something that had genuine power, and now of course, because of covid they do it's also worth. Mentioning that Johnson himself has no real idea think of how to hold north-and-south together. If you read his conference speech last week, the only mention of the North was north London in the context of a cultural jibe, the only mention of Scotland and Wales where in the context of wind, power. he really doesn't think about this stuff any session he hasn't given any attention to how to negotiate this new difficult and fragile relationship a rope, the prominence of some of these regional mez Andy Burnham Steve. Rotherham. that. Make the case for a larger. Merrill based system in this country when you labor introduced mayors lately took on in some places and then and then Nelson others. But you think they'll be more appetite for these figures. I mean it's it's it's hard to say because there wasn't a great dealer appetite for them when they were introduced I suspect because of their dynamics that was thought to see here the sort of purchase pull dynamics with the man's the big regional setting themselves up as defenders of particular cities or city regions against the hostile government. That's a great dynamic building, your legitimacy with voices building a profile, and it may well be the other places. Look at this and think well, I'd rather like to have an undefined and in my case, my sanity or Steve Rotherham because at the Reimann way rose again knocks I've by government, but there's no one in our corner as I think he could. Well. Stimulate that kind of demand the difficulty is no everywhere has like an obvious relation sensitive build a city region around. So I wonder what will happen for the places you know those rather I was towns That was so crucial in the twenty nine election How would this kind of system worked for them?

England Wales Scotland Alex Scotland Wales Northern I Boris Johnson London Twitter Lisa Nanday Steve Rotherham Matt Downs Steph Official Metro Mas Nicholas Sturgeon Center For Constitutional Chan Reimann Scott Kobe Oakton Andy Burnham Steve
Some Plants That Give Red Color in the Fall

Your Gardening Questions

02:53 min | 6 months ago

Some Plants That Give Red Color in the Fall

"There are a great number of plant well, almost every plant has some sort of fall color. The ones that would give her read though starting with a fairly sizable vibe Burnham called Winter Third W. I n. t.. E. R. T. H.. U. R.. It's a maroon dark. Maroon Leaf. It has then what's called a droop fruita believe is correct and it's it's half the size of a grape and just about the color of a of a green purple grape. Fragrant SUPERMAC is Grollo Samak. I happen to have that around the base of a tree toughest nails it. It is putting up at the tree, the root system of the tree. Is a few weeds and keeps on keeping on. It has a good looking fall colored female spice Bush is bright yellow. Now, that's not going to be the color she's after, but we come then to common witch Hazel, which is again a little off of the the norm as far as getting into reds, but it's usually a rusty orange type of thing then well, June Berry or service Berry, and the reason is called both is that June berry the fruit has developed turns from green to bless green to more red to purple you have to fight the birds. Then it has a wonderful rusty red fall color in most cases. Father Guilt well, and there are many varieties of service berry from probably only head height who will. Six. Foot or so on up to about fifteen twenty feet then there's a plant called Father Guillot. SHRUB I have seen it whether it's a giant one, our standard when if you will. Ask for the Standard Planet is probably your best bet because the the big old fashioned one, I've seen. UNMANAGED period over it does I've seen it eight or more feet wide in probably eight feet tall. So it it and at the same time, I know where there are a dozen of them on each side of a major walkway into a business building facing south. Hot Dry miserable on sloped ground it still holds up and when it comes fall, it goes into red orange rid and when you're off, Oh, a hundred or more feet from that entrance almost looks like a fire burning on both sides of the entrance. A good one. There's another plant that goes into the burgundy color. There's a dwarf of it and a standard size. It is called it. It EA It has a white flower in the spring not unattractive but not real big and showy however in the fall all things being equal it's a very deep burgundy.

Berry Grollo Samak June Berry Burnham Father Guillot E. R. T. H
A violent protest in Chicago leads to 2 dozen people arrested and 17 officers injured

Steve Cochran

01:08 min | 7 months ago

A violent protest in Chicago leads to 2 dozen people arrested and 17 officers injured

"People set to appear in court today after weekend classes with Chicago police WG ends Judy Wang is at police headquarters this morning. 25 year old Jeremy Johnson is charged with felony battery to an officer. Police say he is the one with the skateboard. Who hit an officer several times. He is set to appear in bond court this afternoon. Also appearing in court this afternoon. Sean Drink Man of Burnham, Illinois. Police say he broke through a line of police officers and hit One police officer with a bulls. Chicago police arrested arrested a a total total of of 24 24 people people over over the the weekend. weekend. 17 17 officers officers were were injured. injured. Activists Activists are are demanding demanding an an apology apology from from Chicago Chicago police police and and mayor mayor like like foot foot after after those those clashes. clashes. This activist says the police came ready for a fight. The police showed up right The police showed up with shields but terms and pepper spraying and so called us and kettle dust in last night, those organizer is claiming police instigated the violence and protesters were pepper sprayed and beaten with batons. Some activists and outside the Wentworth District Police station yesterday, calling for the release of people arrested during Saturday's protest. Five people

Wentworth District Police Chicago Officer Jeremy Johnson Sean Drink Man Felony Battery Judy Wang Burnham Illinois
What's Killing My Tomato Plants?

Your Gardening Questions

04:33 min | 7 months ago

What's Killing My Tomato Plants?

"David is having some real trouble with tomatoes. He says, his tomato leaves are wilting at the very top of the leaf and then a few days later they start turning a botchy blotchy black, and then about a week after that, they start dying altogether he's lost forty tomato plants this way and he wants to know what you think he can do about it. Now his problem and mine are very different. And I I laugh only because the difference mine were just flat out eating they were perfectly healthy. Not a spot on them. Numb David's problem is very different and it sounds like he may have a problem with them called Sept. Oria leaf spot I kinda wish I could talk to David at this point. But at the same time I have to make some assumptions I'm going to guess. That in you have to deal with prophylactic in considering containing many many diseases you have to prevent it. That's the big word. Prevention starts by buying plants have been what's called indexed for V F and that's virus cerium, wilt and Nematodes, and that on top of those three comes one called sectorial leaf spot. And it's a plant where I'm going to Bet David got a busy started his seedlings either indoors or planted the seeds early they grew like topsy. We had plenty of moisture in sunshine this spring for them to just have really rebelled now then. That makes for a plant has softer skin. So to speak, which is good in many ways, however, it allows or organic disease germs. If you will to jump onto them, start to grow enter through the softer skin or or flashier leaf if you will and away they go when he's lost that many I'm going to bet he's using the same spot in the garden. For them more than one year that could leave Satori spores right there. Waiting to get into a new plant each year I have to guess 'cause it can't ask. But with that kind of loss which which is now significant when you have that many plants gone he he will probably have to. Say shelter in place as the rest of us are doing ovid for right now I don't think there's anything you can do at this point other than to spray the plants that are healthy with a fun side. Now, Mark was head of the game here with it being an email, he was able to look up on his electronic skills of a new material for me. It's it's a fund, your side called serenade something I don't know a thing about, but that is the Mamie found then we go. Back to I do know about and that is material hang on now called Chloro- Fallon Nil C. H. L. O. R. O., T. H. A. O., and I along name for a good good funchess is however with all fungal materials you have to prevent them if you can't really do much once they have gotten going. So right now I am afraid his forty plants are probably shop period. The best thing to do would be jerk him outta there Burnham or or get them in the trash and off the property. Then year by all means plant the tomatoes in a new spot even if you have to repair the area because it can carry over into soil splash backup on the young tender new leaves and start the process. So it's going to go into a then once he gets them planted hopefully in a new spot or better spot that he will then start as soon as there are significant leaves. Now, by that, let's just say the seedling is six inches tall eight inches tall it's out in the garden at. This point then is when you start spraying, you put a fund aside on the leaves up under the leaves down the stem, the whole that so that you can keep the spores from this disease from getting started in the first place. Then because the material does weaken with time sunlight, we ended a cetera he's GonNa have to spray every seven to ten days to keep a fresh coating of close. Ellendale et Cetera eating good common fund side we'll help. But at the same time, that's one of the better ones.

David Burnham Ellendale Chloro- Fallon Nil C. H. L. O. Mark Mamie
Restoring the American Chestnut

In Defense of Plants Podcast

04:56 min | 8 months ago

Restoring the American Chestnut

"Things got yeah. This novel pathogen ideas terrifying especially when it comes to like with covert. It's got some twenty billion people to work its way through. And the chestnut, almost being jack-of-all-trades in being widespread was probably one of the perfect recipe. Check boxes to say like okay. This is how you have. An invasion meltdown caused the collapse of species. It's scary and it's so sad, but at the same time. Is Much as I've never seen a large chestnut tree, or been able to appreciate them, for what they were were lucky and very fortunate that there are still sprouts there are these these trees are still on the landscape in some capacity. I mean it is kinda functionally extinct. I. Don't know if that's the proper scientific way of putting it, but. There's chestnuts still out there today. Where did the American Chestnut Foundation kind of say? We have to do something. What was the impetus for that and kind of winded it happen, and what was those early stages Kinda like for it? Sure so so functionally extinct. That's that's the term I think for for the American, just not in words Aso a lot of people think it's extinct or endangered or threatened. It's none of those things it doesn't fit any of those categories, because there are so many sprouts out the wild, so it was estimated before billion in the eighteen hundreds at the height of the species population. The blight swept through reduce them to basically sprouts, and the under story so most hardwoods. If you've got them down, they die of the blight bill re sprout. Sprout burn readily just not does that, so they sprout. They get the blake usually by age seven fifteen. They Divac, they re sprout. They get the blame back. They re sprout so so that's what you see in the forest today, the eastern us on their an estimated four, hundred thirty five million trees, so so lot still a lot, but most of them do not reach flowering stage. We think about two million, or so are probably still flowering on somewhere around point, five percent of the population is probably still flowering and producing knots. And that's what's been used at a lot of different breeding programs and eastern us when the blight I went through the USDA's stepped in a sense implant explorers to China to say hey, finding replacement for the great American Chestnut, and so they brought over. Chinese chestnut, so that's about Chinese just nuts on the landscape. They are all over the place. You see them on farms. The USDA real big push for people to plant Chinese chestnuts. My popol planted them on his farm, but they they couldn't replace the just the American chestnut, because they typically they have been bred for Russian. Typically don't grow as tall as the American chestnut. They are very branchy, so the timber isn't as of high quality all as America's. And so that was one of the first attempts to try and save the American chestnut, or restore it or replace it, and then, since then since the thirties on through, people have tried various breeding techniques. They've tried spraying. The fungus was something they've tried systemic fungicides in the fifties when nuclear radiation Israel real huge people were taking chestnuts and throwing them in nuclear reactors to get them to mutate totally serious. And, so you've got plantations of irradiated ulmer radiated chestnuts. Most of them are in Maryland. Okay up ground where a lot of that defense. Stuff was happening, so makes us. That might be another podcast, but but there's this uranium question to try and find resistance within native. American chestnuts and people went pretty much given hope in the seventies and eighties stuff still going on, but at a much lower rate, and in the early eighties there was a corn geneticist Charles Burnham. He said Hey. Trees or plants? Why don't we use plant breeding the we using corn and things like that and use that for trees as well to impart resistance. So, that was the start of the American nomination. Arkham Burnham and some other founders I got together they the various, all nonprofit, scientifically minded organizations and say hey, let's try something called back crossbreeding to get a light resistance, and who the American chestnut and when they started, they thought that blight resistance was very simple traits that it was only two or three genes that controlled this trade, and therefore back crossing would work after you get above three genes back. Crossing really isn't active. The the numbers required too high and astronomical talk about exponential. You need exponentially large. Populations as you increase the number of genes for traits, so it was a it was a noble thought and would that it that be that resistance was only controlled by three. We know now that light resistance is controlled by many martines than three so a while back crossing itself isn't the end all be all American chestnut restoration, TCI the American Chestnut Foundation has embarked on other avenues to try and restore the American chestnut, and but but that was what what began the foundation

American Chestnut Foundation Charles Burnham Usda Maryland Divac TCI China America Israel
How Hard Can I Prune Mature Bushes This Time of Year?

Your Gardening Questions

03:21 min | 8 months ago

How Hard Can I Prune Mature Bushes This Time of Year?

"I've got several huge bushes. Their Expire Bushes HYDRANGEA VI- burn. And for Cynthia and they're about eight to ten foot, tall and huge in size and I'm wondering. When's the best time to trim those? And how short can I cut him to get him back in shape to look good around the house? Talk about when and I'm GONNA come back with that. Basically food ruled now when you say fire, Bush thinking probably mean burning Bush. Yellowish doesn't have a flower that we're really concerned about you. Can Almost Rooney at any time then when we come to the Hyde ranchers that by Burnham and we have two different categories of plants. Let's just go with the by Burnham and Pacific for civil right. And Lilac et Cetera have to be pruned soon after bloom, which means now. Not Today but at the same time very shortly because they set flower buds very soon after the middle of June or first of July for the following year. And therefore you should prune them now. to to keep them well in balancing whatever you need to do, as as a matter of fact that the hydrogen and hide ranchers are one example they flower some on last year stems on this year stems, and some kind of as they wish. Now. Let me try to explain that when you prune following the bloom. On a vibe Burnham, which most finished, but let me now before Cynthia. You can prune them. Anytime should really be doing it very shortly on the Hydrangea, you. have to go with the kind of plants it is and and you'd have to go back to the tag and see whether it blooms on new or old would, as it's called, stated I I generally, and they're so darn many. Well, anyhow, it's enough to drive you nuts knowing what a hydro-engineers on other things though. That for example rose of Sharon that won't bloom now until probably September or soon thereafter or before. They have bloomed last year. They are now growing out. They will set the flower bud soon. And blew on this fall spy rea-. Another group of plants is going to be one that has well. It has come up hopefully getting going strongly. Then it s flower buds on the new stems. So as soon as it blooms, you would finish pruning it. Now hopefully that answers the when now the how much. When you talk about what are apparently big old plants, I'm going to go back to a general rule now. Usually I'd say. Don't remove more than twenty or twenty five percent. I know that on big old plants. When you're doing the right time and so on, you can take as much as a third of them, and that's just your you know your judgement. You stand back before you start burning you kind of look at the body of it. The number of stems at the bottom and so on, and you try then to take out the oldest stems, which will probably have the darkest bark. The perhaps any dead stems that are down in the crown of the planet, the ground, and get those out of their first. Then you prune for shape and size

Cynthia Bush Burnham Hyde Sharon
Viz Agencies: CLEVERFRANKE and Interactive Things

Data Stories

09:14 min | 1 year ago

Viz Agencies: CLEVERFRANKE and Interactive Things

"Saw the sovereign in. Let's get started so we have a special topic today. We decided to make even a two episode feature maybe even more episodes to come because actually this huge blind spot so whenever we review our trailer board with episode. We realized sometimes. Oh we've been so many but we never talked to somebody from field X. or from that area and it's been like this really with for years. Small to medium data visualization agencies. Which is insane because some of the best data is obviously comes from these types of companies and we talked to a lot of practitioners and researchers and whatnot but never really people. Running data visualization studios. Huge Blind. Spot happens but now we're catching up quick and we're inviting to even guests today and and we record another episode with two guests and this will be the next month so hopefully we're back to a good ratio of data agency folks and going and I'm personally super interested. I'VE KNOWN THE FOLKS. We'll talk to you for many many years. In fact I realized last year at encode conference that a lot of these agencies have been around for ten years longer and so it's really now fastening to hear of their long-term Perspective on how the field has evolved. How the field has changed if there is even a viable business and making high end. Crafted data visualization. Or if we will all be unemployed soon so curious to learn more about all this so as I said we have two guests the first one is Thomas. Clever I Thomas High Thomas Highmore. It's I echo. Thanks for joining us. And we have Benjamin Vita Benjamin Haven. Hi Maurice Ionescu great to have you on so Thomas. Maybe I could you briefly introduce yourself and your company and then Benjamin can take. Oh yeah absolutely so as you said. I'm Thomas Flavor or clever co-founder of Flavor Franca or clever Frankie. Most people call us these days. We're data design and Technology Company and we create anything from one of data visualizations to data driven products and tools. As we like to call it we have. We have our headquarters here in the Netherlands and we have another office in Chicago and Dubai. Yeah how many people are working for you right now around thirty two. I think if I'm correct thirty two now great Benjamin Harvard. You all right. I'm an interaction designer with sort of like a focus on information Shirley station and interface design from the beginning and then back in two thousand eight. I started writing a blog on data virtualization whereas publish my work and my research. It's also how we met I think. Also that's how I stumbled over an earlier and like a year later. I co founded interactive things which fairly similar to clever Frankie is a designer development studio with a focus on data driven products. We are a team of seventeen people. We're sort of like a slightly weird beast as we are five equal partners in the company. I think today's like my main focus is leading the company as the managing director. I have a few teaching assignments at universities on data visualization and and sort of organizing database. Sirak meet up here in sick right. So Benjamin there maybe just two people get a sense of okay. What type of product elected do or what? What's your approach is there? Maybe one quintessential project where you could say okay. This is really quintessential almost inactive things project where you could say. That's that's really good example of the type of work we do and we like to. Yeah that's you know like picking your favorite child right. So I think the project that sort of comes to mind is is actually two one two projects and that's education inequalities and education progress so these two websites that we have built for UNESCO and they are sister products in a way even though they're seven years apart so education inequalities already seven years old now and education progress was just released. The first was an exploratory tool our allies in disparities in quality of education and to second is Dan an explanatory publication summarizing the key facts and trends and so in a way they present to coins of the data. Visually say are two sides of the data. Visualization Coin Servic exploration for discovery and explanation for understanding and besides being interesting from data visualization perspective. I think the project also rank very high in our in our view because of the purpose they both advance to sustainable development goal for forward which I think is an important aspect so inclusive and equitable quality of Education. For All the second is the client. Unesco has been a long term and very very committed clients to the success of each of their project and then in terms of craft brew bows challenged in design. Antidevelopment went we work on these projects. And and typically we've seen iskoe. We are allowed to pursue a very iterative process instead of Servic fixed scope waterfall type of process. And I think sort of these Su- yes bex or for aspects purpose client crafting process are important to us and I think they are. Well reflected in those two projects. Great Tell us how about you is a similar example like Ben set. That's always very hard and I think if you look back over over the years that we've been running the business. There's always some quintessential project some lighthouse projects that I think really define you as a company to take a next step in where you are if I have to choose then. I think the the Mobility Index website that we created for the Chicago Metropolitan Agency of Planning is is one of my personal favorites really because it brings together a lot of lot of things dear to my heart. Dear to our companies hearts in the sense that it's it's a mix of experimental data viz with an important message behind it. The CMAP approached us because they had written a new mobility plan or a new urban planning plan so to speak for the city of Chicago which was pretty much. The first comprehensive urban planning plan since Daniel Burman Burnham which was about one hundred years ago and really outlined around economy mobility and liveability where the city should be heading and also the challenges that they face so mobility is a very important topic to the city of Chicago. Think Twenty five percent of the workforce is somehow tied to freight transportation. All those type of things and you know the the investment that needs to be done in the infrastructure there is about thirteen trillion dollars To really convey that message they asked us. Can you can concise. Can you digest plan of six hundred sixty pages into one interactive websites? And of course we said yes remembering that on the way there on the plane. I was reading through that plan and thinking. I'm not sure how we're going to do it. But it was really it was. It's a really nice project in in how we did a lot of editorial stuff on on understanding the plan and thinking how can we explain this plan to you know anybody down in the street but also to business policy makers journalists politicians and? There's a whole editorial sort of structure that you know. There's a bird's eye view over Chicago. And then as you dive into the topics you'd literally dive down into street level. There's different types of visualizations from charts to. We were using new technologies at the time. This twenty fourteen so yeah a lot of a lot of boxes that are ticked in that project and I think you know looking back. I just realized when I heard Ben talk that that was the first time that we set foot in Chicago and here. We are six seven years later right here. We have the office in Chicago so really. It's also the moment in time. I fell in love with that city

Chicago Thomas High Thomas Highmore Benjamin Benjamin Vita Benjamin Haven Frankie BEN Benjamin Harvard Thomas Flavor Unesco Mobility Index Maurice Ionescu Chicago Metropolitan Agency Of Cmap Shirley Station Managing Director Daniel Burman Burnham Netherlands Antidevelopment DAN
Walter Rodney Was Way Ahead of His Time

This Day in History Class

03:35 min | 1 year ago

Walter Rodney Was Way Ahead of His Time

"Day was March twenty third nineteen forty two Guyanese historian and activist. Walter Rodney was born. He's remembered for his scholarship and activism concerning the working class and black people around the world. Rodney was born to Edward in Pauline Rodney in Georgetown British Guyana or Present Day Guyana British. Guyana was a colony that was part of the British West indies after World War. Two there were increasing demands for political independence in Guyana. The People's Progressive Party a left wing political party formed in the early nineteen fifties in the colony. Rodney's perspective developed in the midst of this rising anti colonial sentiment during that decade rotten distributed people's Progressive Party manifestos began attending Queens College. A high school in Guyana. There he edited the school's newspaper and participated in the debate society. He graduated in Nineteen Sixty and won a scholarship to the university. College of the West indies. He graduated with a degree in history in nineteen sixty three. He went on to attend the University of London where he got a doctorate in African history. His thesis was called a history of the Upper Guinea coast. Fifteen forty five to eighteen hundred in England. Rodney continued to recognize how scholarship divorced history from politics brought and he took a job as a lecturer in Tanzania but he left to teach at the University of the West indies in Jamaica there he taught African history highlighting the importance of Africa and Caribbean history and the impact of historical resistance against slavery and colonialism. He advocated for the Working Class and criticized the government's policies he gave lectures to marginalized groups in Jamaica and became a key figure in the black power movement after he went to the black riders conference in Montreal. In nineteen sixty eight Rodney was declared persona non grata by the Jamaican government and banned from returning to the country. People protested his banning but he continued to speak out on the repression of darker. Jamaicans he taught in Tanzania for a few years publishing his best known work. How Europe underdeveloped Africa but in one thousand nine hundred eighty four? He returned to Guyana which had gained independence in nineteen sixty six to take a position as a professor of history at the University of Guyana. Though his appointment to the university was revoked he stayed in Guyana and he became a leader of the working people. A political group formed in the nineteen seventies and opposition to the regime of Prime Minister Forbes Burnham Rodney gave lectures in Jamaica Europe and the US and he continued his vocal resistance to burn them as the government proceeded to sponsor police rates and beatings and July of Nineteen seventy-nine. He and seven other people were arrested after two government offices were burned down. He faced charges of arson but was acquitted though he and his peers faced persecution. He maintained his criticism of the government and the Constitution but on June thirteenth nineteen eighty. Rodney died in a bomb explosion. The bomb was allegedly given to him by someone and the guy in a defense force is suspected that the assassination was orchestrated by Burnham. Rodney was survived by his wife and three children. Some of his works were published

Forbes Burnham Rodney Guyana Jamaican Government West Indies University Of Guyana Jamaica Progressive Party Queens College Tanzania Africa Georgetown Upper Guinea University Of London England Europe University Of Jamaica Europe Caribbean Professor Of History
Fiji Queasy!

The Radio Adventures of Dr. Floyd

04:57 min | 1 year ago

Fiji Queasy!

"It's time once again for America's favorite show the Radio Adventures of third blowing. Brought to you by TECH FLOYD DOT com as you recall last time we were. We're in New York City in the eighteen. Forty two Dr Steven taken. The very odd job of Boeing bricks for Barnum in exchange for free entry into the American Museum where he planned to steal the infamous sideshow hoax. The Fiji Mermaid it would done now to cross the street with this last brick and we're home free. Let's all you talking about. What fidgeted noticed that decker? Stephen not is that in his forty five minutes brick rick moving he had attracted a crowd of about one hundred Astra have been watching him. But we're now following into the door the American museum where P t barnum now stood on soapbox. That's right folks. Step right into the American Museum and find the answer to all your questions inside for fifty cents you can find out the answer to your brick moving queries. You can see the Fiji Mermaid and much much more at Barnum's American Museum. The crowd surged past the dump truck and they were all clamoring pay fifty cents to find out what wonders the museum contained. This was your plan. All along wasn't exotic Ma'am right this way. Hey listen in my friend in this business you do what you can do to draw crowd and you're the perfect one to do it. Antastic now look we moved. You'll bricks and drew you out. Can we get into the museum. Deal is a deal you earned my friend enter away come on featured. It's going to take us an hour to find a way through this crowd and get to the Mermaid. You're trying to get up close and personal with the Fiji Mermaid. Let's check in with our hero. He wrote Dr Floyd who when we last left secured an exhibit spot right next to the fever made in the museum. This is humiliating. Dr Grant. Imagine me the world's most brilliant scientists nothing more than a sideshow exhibiting P T barnum's museum. We'll look at it this way Dr Floyd. There's no way that Dr Steve Can swept the Mermaid standing right next to it. I know I know you're comes the crowd Dr Floyd. You're on these. These chips isn't here to witness my humiliation faithful robot companionship's as you remember was currently undertaken the task of walking. Dr Floyd's Mother's Pomeranian puppy Mr Brady Jen's around New York. Dr Grothe Trust regained control. Mr tastebuds return to the main Exhibit Hall of the American Museum which is now packed with patrons eager to see the Fiji Mermaid. The museums newest attraction floyd. The man was a small ted in the world. is gross throw should bidder be. We're Dr Steve was hitting. I'm going to be very upset. And there's no reason to be upset because at that very moment Dr Steven Pitcher. We're at the very back of the line line to view the exhibits. What's right up there? FIDGET I can just see the top of it in this something else up there too that people looking at I can't see what it is though it's too small lab. There's nothing we can do but just by time fidget. Let Soon that Fiji Mermaid will be mine as people in line. It's like almost an hour and a half dot just even fidget to finally reached the front into the room and stand before the Fiji Mermaid fidget. There it is the Fiji Mermaid. Berlin you keep an eye out for bottom and as soon as the last visit leaves I'll grab the Mermaid. I wouldn't do that if I were you. Dr Steven what Dr Floyd. What are you doing here? I'm here to make sure you don't make off with the Fiji Mermaid puts how did you get in. It was easy. None of Your Business. Dr Steve What's important is that I'm here to stop you over the floor here. Is that dryer lint. That was featured his stomach upset at the site of the settle down. I'll take you outside in a moment and you can eat some grass. Well lookie here. My two newest employees of met each other. You both did a fine job today. I made. I mean we made a ton of money. Mr Barnum Sir. This guy was just about to Swipe The Fiji Mermaid what is true. I only took this job to make sure he didn't. Is this true. No it's not I would never Levi. Just think this former employees of my needs to be escorted out your thing imports because there's no need to get hasty here. I'm sure we could work something out. How about a lot of my sock shape? Frontier wielded run FIDGET. Wrong Taylor Museum running back down the street to their very own species as they exit Dr Floyd steps down off the exhibit platform. He was standing on Floyd. We sure are glad you could help. Ensure that the Fiji Mermaid it didn't get stolen Mr Barnum that charge Dr Floyd chips just called us on the handy communicate a ring areas you well. Apparently Mr Beardie chins spotted an alley cat and has dragged chips chips about twelve blocks west of here. Doug where we go get him. Here's your ninety nine dollars back. Mr Burnham officially resigned as a museum exhibit. This was too much of a circus for me. That gives me an idea. Levi sent a letter to James Bailey. I have an offer to make him serve boss Oh and then new kanye machine excellent. It's the new high-speed model right. The boxes oxyde will make a new suite every sixty seconds perfect. That means there'll be a sucker made every minute thought you said P.T. Barnum didn't say that you didn't think the writers would let this episode in without without a horribly bad joke did you. I guess you're right. RANDOM DOT of loyd leave to go find chips and Mr Barrington hop back in time and space free after dodger. Steve where will our intrepid heroes go next. Will they ever be able to put an conductor speeds villainous ways and just win will they be able to drop off Mr Bertie. Jin's back at home by down this week on the radio. Mentors Abductor Lloyd.

Fiji Mermaid Dr Floyd American Museum Dr Steven Dr Steve Mr Barnum P.T. Barnum Dr Steve Can Dr Steve What Dr Steven Pitcher Fiji Dr Grothe Trust Dr Grant New York City Levi Mr Bertie Mr Barrington Wrong Taylor Museum Mr Brady Jen Mr Beardie
When to prune butterfly bush to keep it bushy?

Your Gardening Questions

04:19 min | 1 year ago

When to prune butterfly bush to keep it bushy?

"Bush frequently will die back to near the ground in. Well we call it Ohio So and and even if it doesn't die back that far it's usually coming out the second year or subsequent years pretty shaggy looking so when I talk about the butterfly Bush specifically I actually take those down to around three inches above the ground I wanted well. I want to avoid messing with dead wood in the spring. I want to get that job done. I also want the plant to come up. Bushy not not tall all in leggings and butterfly Bush in various sizes and shapes. But I would like to have a full plant. It also is a plant that sends up its tissue And and then sets flower buds after growth in the early spring so that it flowers a little later in the spring or into summer so therefore you can cut it back real hard even to the extent then. I probably have been mentioning that sometimes. Butterfly Bush actually dies into into the ground now a winter like we've had so far certainly that wouldn't be the case but in a nasty winter down toward zero run and so on no snow it can be killed clear down into the ground inch or more I than wait and wait and wait I. I'm really comfortable. That more butterfly live bushes are thrown away alive than dead People don't wait long enough because it can be June before they even show growth above ground so in that at depending depending on terminology. And how you look at it Caroline You can almost call it butchery because I just I just take a pair. Loppers and in the whole plant comes down to about three inches tall brush off and and carried away I cut him so low. That if there's a late spring snow I wanNA have a tag by that plant so I don't step in and crushed the branches. I did leave because it'll be so darn short. Now we come into other plants spy RIA. There's another plant. You can cut pretty hard. That way. I I usually. Don't be quite as callous with it. there are little tiny spy RIAs and then some little hit above our head height and so on they all most all set their flower buds after growth in the spring at Cetera. So when when we talk about the Lilac just as an example it and the vibe Burnham's and so on have set. Their flower buds this past June or thereabouts. So Oh any pruning of a do on those I would go into the bottom cut out a big or the biggest old stems get them out of the way and then cater to the regrowth growth or continuing growth of the smaller younger stems which are probably going to flower better and so on anyhow then we have a variation from there. The rose of Sharon is kind of an anomaly to some people it also sets flower buds after spring growth but it flowers late in the season and it kind of leaves people in in will in all what to do I have pruned it very hard. Just because it was getting out Out of size and kind along an alleyway in a community That hanging out over scrubbing the trees and the cars and so on so it can be pruned in the late fall after bloom. And that is backed into a rule of blooming prune following the bloom so the Lilac by Burnham et Cetera in the Spring Prune soon after they finished flowering. Then the things that floor on what's called new would the butterfly Bush by Korea and so on you trim well now or any decent day from here on or clear into I'M GONNA say mid March before they start to grow because you're gonNa cut him pretty hard you don't want them to expend energy starting to grow in the spring then cutting hard. Because they'll have well they'll have to come up with extra energy to re grow in the spring so Butterfly Bush could be trimmed well last week when it was decent or in March. When it's decent anytime like I? I hope that helps you some.

Butterfly Bush Burnham Ohio Bloom Loppers Korea Sharon
Several Shrubs That Attract Birds

Your Gardening Questions

05:26 min | 1 year ago

Several Shrubs That Attract Birds

"A little bit about some of the shrubs that you can plant. It also are favored by the birds. Well there are for many and and a whole bunch of them that I won't get dimension but let's just start with one of my favorites because it is a shrub. It's it's it's scrub in the woods. It is a native as being scrubbing the woods. But then it can be a wonderful small tree when it's out of the woods and standing in the sunshine. The song called Nanny Berry or era would vibe Burnham now the vibe Burnham is a large family of plants there are short round ones there are medium round ones there are call ones. They're they're mostly white flowering or light pink etc A tremendous addition to any landscape using even several of the same species but different names. This one happens to be the nanny berry. Nanny Berry is a native Norwood's it's Fall fruiting the some of the fruit are are wieder persistent. I I suppose if I were to go out and look around now if I knew where to look I would find some of of the nanny berries that have probably been already a deep-rooted if you will However they they have been a big thing there also a big thing in terms of the thickness of the branches? NEIDL mean Well unruly but they're thick enough that a cardinal for example can harbor harbor inside one of them and Build a nest and feel free to fly into the back side of the planet come across internally to the sit there their nest and so on all of which is again fund its food also during some of the year but it's also fun to find plants that Birds Birds will actually live in now. The berries are not well. Let's just go back to the the fact that the berry comes from a a white flowering plant not overwhelmingly exciting and flowers but it does produce berries that are again cranberry size there here. The blue black if you will of a grape there I've bitten into them. They're nothing I'm going to make pie. But at the same time they they are generally of fruit laden plant Robbins and BLUEBIRDS and thrashes cat. Birds Catbird by the way I heard good one. I'm going to call it midsummer for about a three week period now. I think it's a little shorter than the nesting period. But I haven't heard or seen cat birds for many a year and I remember my grandparents farm In the summertime. You you would look around to see where that can't is and you find it to be a burden it does actually meow the same as a cat. But it's just well it's one of those things now. The the nesting sites is another thing going to think about in all of these plants mentioned And then especially into the Nanny Berry as as I spoke I happen to Well grew grew up in a town home but The the circumstances were such that there was a a Shrub of this right outside my bedroom window and each of several years in a row while I was. I don't know anywhere from five to eight or nine years old somewhere there There the would build in in this plant at just about window sill height so a standing inside being careful to peek through the curtains or at least not move them rapidly and scare. You're off the parents. We could watch cardinal nest develop in that trump watch them come to fruition and then all of a sudden in Some three or or so weeks the the parents are pushing the babies out and You hold well in that case you call the neighbors until them to keep their cats inside little little birds could get going and so on so there. There's all kinds of benefits to the bird and then to us because observations. Something like that as a kid. Probably Help Ben me toward a natural oil. We'll call it profession overtime mark and I were talking about profession's taking in some side courses in geology and soils and things like that that seemed like Mickey Mouse Cork compliments to our main in studies. No no not a Mickey Mouse. Course at all we found that out the hard way Tan some other shrubs and might might might be good. Well there are some others and the plain old staghorn supermac which you gotta be careful. Because it'll send out runners up to a considerable distance and pop up new plants Lance you can chop them off. And it's not a big deal the plant itself handle some rugged sites Son Is Best of course and then to the well to the fall. fruiting eating needs of the winter birds and so on is fantastic. But we're for. That is the brilliant red foliage in the fall I don't even know how to describe that read not quite like a stop light but darn close and then it also is forage in terms of fruit for them. Robbins bluebirds thrashes catbird again. Those things will have it in that plant.

Nanny Berry Robbins Burnham Bluebirds Norwood TAN
"burnham" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"burnham" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"Backed up to Burnham next traffic report at five thirty eight on newsradio seven eight AM one of five point nine FM bookstore do good day today was so in China and maybe a couple of clouds high of forty three clear skies around town now partly cloudy tonight with a low of thirty four than tomorrow mainly cloudy and breezy we'll see temperature about forty six before the day's over some rain or drizzle likely tomorrow night Monday clouds with a few spotty showers five forty eight but temperatures will fall late in the day the Tuesday blustery and much much colder of clouds giving way to some sun and high and Tuesday just twenty six so just about half of what it's going to be today so right now at here we have twenty five at midway twenty seven twenty two degrees in Lansing thirty degrees at the at northerly island the winds are very calm southeast about three miles an hour come a lot of places the withdrawal out there again sunshine a few clouds at a height of forty three today but the bottom falls out later this upcoming week Tuesday we see temperatures in the twenties and then on Wednesday will be in the teens hi five now here WVVA news top five thirty this is your call goes all news station radios seven and one oh five point nine FM and WBBM newsradio dot com good morning I'm Dave burner thanks for joining us this morning these are the top stories in news radio authorities trying to determine a motive for the shooting at the naval base in Florida it's coming up from CBS news in a moment the only state police.

China Lansing Florida Burnham Dave CBS twenty seven twenty two degree thirty degrees
Debating the Movie 'American Beauty'

Filmspotting

10:07 min | 1 year ago

Debating the Movie 'American Beauty'

"And you're going to prove to us how much you rule with your list of what I'm certain will be perfectly legitimate criticisms there is no way I'm older than Lester Burnham I don't care how old I get it the hard truly cow that did hit quite hard when he announces that at the beginning I think of course it it alters my perception of this movie I would say not in a good way this isn't fun I mean I'm I'm glad you included Brian's thoughts because when you don't like a movie even if you know you have some a fair amount of critical support in your side I also know in this case there are people love this movie loved it then love it now and I can see why it would be something of a formative film because it is daring in a Lotta ways it'll make you sit up in your seat if you've mostly been watching what Brian described as entertainment and has ideas on on its mind right absolutely so I get all that understands that and can see why someone might still like American beauty I gave it a shot and hoped I could move in that direction but I am afraid being this age has not helped I think in a couple of ways I thought the decks were stacked in this movie when I saw it as a twenty something I must have been and you know was not living in the suburbs or experiencing anything like what Lester Burnham has expired danced now having lived in the suburbs for a while being a middle-class father teenage daughters yes you you see you know how the the decks are stacked even higher in this movie again in its favor against this family against and I'm not saying yes the suburbs can incredibly stifling I understand that marriage is difficult family life is difficult there are low points but from the very beginning of this film no one movie has a shot of making out we're on a clear trajectory toward a tragic air quotes tragic miserable ism finale yeah and there are two hypocrisies at work here because of that one of them I recognized in one thousand nine hundred nine and it has to do with the Angela character and how that's handled maybe we can return to that well I recognize some hypocrisy there before I had any idea about Kevin Spacey's offscreen life that's still bothers me today and it would no matter what has happened with spacey but the secondary hypocrisy does have to do with the depth element here and the idea element and this film American beauty does seem the deeper tries to get the shallower it appears to me and it has to do with that beauty element I really liked the plastic bag I'm not GonNa make fun of the plastic bag it's the most Rodney though moment in this movie where Ricky fit it's shows this video of a bag dancing in the wind for fifteen minutes and he describes how there's beauty there and finding beauty in the mundane is something he does that that is a very profound idea of being able to find glory in the Gutter let's say and I think it's a complete red herring in American beauty I think you get instances of it in the Ricky Fitts character but the movie is mostly interested in the gutter it's mostly interested in the misery and punishing all of these characters except perhaps lester in really even though it tries to tack on tries to connect him to Lester isn't punished at the end of this film as much as a murder is punished I don't think he's nearly punished as much as caroline is I want to spend some time on how the Caroline Care to continue her life and make choices lester is a martyr here he's a glorified martyr there's a more liberal Hi Danielle limit for the choices that he's made and I think that's different than the sort of punishment and I'm not saying I need what I'm saying is there's too much punishment in this movie it's curious to me that Lester is the one who does not get any of it to my mind and all the other characters essentially are punished but they do they try to make this connection in the script tries to make this connection in the epilogue with the beauty and Leicester's experience yet that completely falls flat to me it's not there it wasn't there else in the movie I would much I would have preferred you know two hours of a dancing plastic in the wind

Lester Burnham Fifteen Minutes Two Hours
'Eighth Grade' and the vagaries of awards season

The Frame

08:58 min | 2 years ago

'Eighth Grade' and the vagaries of awards season

"From the broadcast center at K P, C C. This is the frame I'm John horn on today's show could future Academy Award ceremonies honor the best screenplay written by an algorithm. Then why Bo Burnham the writer director of eighth grade channeled his feelings about the internet into the character of a thirteen year old girl, I I was very interested in young people flogging about their own life. And I watched hundreds and hundreds of videos and not to be cruel to the boys. But on average, the boys of this age talked about XBox and the girls this age talked about their souls and musician and photographer Anthony Wilson combines both disciplines for his latest release all that coming up on the frame. Welcome to the frame. I'm John horn. This Sunday, they'll be an Oscar for best original screenplay and for best adapted screenplay. But could there soon be a trophy for best screenplay written by an algorithm? We've known for years that technology is radically changing the way that movies are made. But what's remained fairly constant is the human screenwriter after all you can't make a movie without someone writing the script. Or can you if one artificial intelligence company has its way there's an algorithm out there that might be fighting for a share of the writing credit on the next studio blockbuster. We now revisit our peace with frame contributor, Colin freezing. Who explains it all if Robert Altman's movie, the player taught us anything it's that making a hit movie takes a lot of creativity. And frankly, guesswork psychic political thriller comedy with a heart with a heart and not unlike ghost meets entry and candidate conventional wisdom has it that no one ever knows exactly. Audiences want or what will get butts in the seats? But screenwriter William Goldman's aphorism that in Hollywood, no one knows anything may be changing. Here at the American film market in Santa Monica where the world comes to buy and sell movies. There's a company that thinks it can answer that question William Santer, Jack, Jan or with productivity media, and they're here to introduce an artificial intelligence program that will read your script analyze it for forty thousand data points or attributes then we'll tell you how to change it to make it more successful a horror film that features a ghost and the child imperilled has a eighty seven percent probability of overperforming. The benchmark the other day we actually had a conversation on. What kind of weapon with the youth in action film? We have all the kind of what kinds of breakdowns if you use a pistol compared to a handgun compared to a machine gun. We have all these planning or details of of these attributes you put all of that in and you go, you know, what if we changed the handgun to a bazooka this should outperform. We can we can see how it would into the program draws on a database of three thousand eight hundred films going back to the nineties it tracks what elements were in a movie, and how well that film did in any number of demographic groups computer will do a first run and say hope these are the potential elements, and you know, and we have recently started working on getting another layer people looking at those attributes and see, you know, how how actual relevant they are the story. So it's to stop. It's definitely a when you think about it. It's a complex problem solving. Right. The comedy drama or. Thriller. Their gold is to help any genre pitcher become the most successful version of itself. It can be they call it over performing the market or making sure you're cross generational buddy cop comedy with a dog does better than any other cross generational buddy cop comedy with a dog. It's like getting studio notes, but not from some slick executive with a gut feeling but from a coldly calculating cyborg. So it's just a tool set to I always say do one of two fundamental things. Number one is going to confirm what you believe to be true about your project or two it's going to give you an opportunity to ask another question. It all started just a couple of years ago. Jan an engineering student at the university of Waterloo in Canada, cold called the company called productivity media amid sized film. Finance firm Jiang was selling an algorithm that would predict how well a studio would do based on the movies. They were releasing. He. Intrigue the company decided to conduct an experiment using Jiang's database. They paid a film student. Make a trailer with all the key elements of a successful horror film impossible things a movie that doesn't really exist. Features of equestrian house in bath tub and a ghost in child in peril. It's honestly not much to look at. But the response on social media two point four million views was enough to tell them they were on the right track. But this feels like something we should resist to keep creativity alive. Monica Levinson is the president of production at shift Hans pitchers, the company has produced trombone and captain fantastic. And a ton of other. Well, reviewed dramas Levinson is not only skeptical, but worries that drawing on films that were successful sometimes formulaic retreads with mostly white actors might mean, there's no place at the table for new voices and diverse casting choices other things that we're trying to deal with now having more women characters and having better representation. And diversity and better representation of you know, just how characters behave all of that will be continued because that bias will continue from what worked in the past. That's not what works today, but productivity media says there's room in their analytics for all kinds of creative progressive choices take the gay coming of age drama and Oscar winner moonlight. When they ran that script through the algorithm. It determine the film would definitely find an audience before you also made tell based on two essential element in the film to have about eighty percent chance to before in the marketplace. And what was it about the movie that made you think we're made the algorithm think that it was going to do? Well, when we plugging, you know, a drama film with LGBT Salomonsson features African American. Essential elements, those the combination of those three already has a very significant influence on the outcome. But it does beg the question. If everyone is making a movie with the same elements won't that result him. Well, the same kind of movies coming out Santer says you need to think of it like music, if we said to heal whole bunch of musicians that we wanna song that's written in four four time in the key of c with this progression etcetera etcetera, etcetera, we're we're going to get you know, twenty different songs as for how screenwriters will react when. And if they're script feedback comes from an algorithm, maybe nNcholas cage playing version of screenwriter, Charlie Kaufman in adept Haitian, summed it up best sex or guns or car chases. I or characters you know. Learning profound life lessons or growing or coming to like each other or overcoming obstacles to succeed in the end. You know? I feel very strongly about this or the frame. I'm pollen freezing. Coming up on the frame our conversation with Bo Burnham the filmmaker behind eighth grade. He won the best original screenplay prize from the writers guild of America this past weekend. And he's nominated for best feature and best first screenplay at tomorrow's independent spirit awards. Welcome back to the frame. I'm John horn. Thanks for joining us tomorrow, independent filmmakers will gather under a massive tent set up in the parking lot next to the Santa Monica. Pier. To celebrate the spirit awards they honor movies typically made outside the studio system. Among the nominated movies is eighth grade. It's in the running for four awards including best feature. The comedian. Bo Burnham who made it big on the internet as a teenager with YouTube videos wrote and directed eighth grade. And earlier this month, he won the directors guild of America award for first feature film, eighth grade is about a thirteen year old girl named Kayla who makes self help videos from her bedroom. Kayla's played by the newcomer Elsie Fisher, and the movie immerses you in her point of view in one scene. She's lying in bed scrolling through social media while an NGO song plays in the background when I met. Bo. Burnham after eighth grade premiered at last year Sundance film. Festival. He told me how he was able to reach Enya to license. Her song for his movie was like do. I write a note on like a salmon and put it new Fridays. Like, how do you contact like, how do you? Like like, a smokes they go on the air.

Bo Burnham John Horn Oscar Monica Levinson William Santer Santa Monica Anthony Wilson Robert Altman William Goldman Kayla Colin Freezing University Of Waterloo Writers Guild Of America Charlie Kaufman Canada Jiang
Shock as Eighth Grade wins best original screenplay at the WGA Awards

The Frame

01:42 min | 2 years ago

Shock as Eighth Grade wins best original screenplay at the WGA Awards

"This past weekend, the writers guild of America announced its winners for the best screenplays of the last year and WGN voters ordered best original screenplay to a movie that wasn't even nominated for an Oscar Bo Burnham's eighth grade. Claudia Puig is the president of the L A. A film critics association and she joined me in studio today to discuss the WG, prizes and other trophies handed up by Hollywood's big guilds, we started by talking about eighth grade. It's such a terrific script. And it was such an oversight that it wasn't. I dominated that. And many of us have been upset about it. So it was really great to see this get the love it deserves. And I it doesn't surprise me that it's the writers because the writers a are used to being overlooked. So no. So of course, they you know, they were trying to correct that wrong. And I also think there's, you know, comedies of always kind of gotten short shrift, and it's not really a comedy per se, but it has comic elements and then films that are about about tweens and teens are kind of overlooked. I mean, I was thinking about like the movie to hate you give which was at least as good as bohemian rhapsody or green book or some of the others do get nominee for best pitcher completely overlooked because it has the Waie taint. And I think that in this case, right? You know, you hear the title eighth grade. And you just assume that maybe she was improvising. You don't realize how tightly scripted it was by Bo Burnham talk with Bo Burnham about his lead. Actress Elsie Fisher about a year ago when the film premiered at the Sundance film festival. So there was a long rehearsal process, which was mostly for the script mostly just to make sure that it sounded right? And if things didn't sound, right. It was always the scripts fault. What I was trying to capture what she was in many ways. So to have the real thing there. It's just you know, just completely subjugate myself to it.

Oscar Bo Burnham Elsie Fisher Writers Guild Of America Claudia Puig WGN President Trump Hollywood
"burnham" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"burnham" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"And I'm not willing to work enough for that you play a scientist on television. We'll see Fisher MD veterinarians run CBS. Yeah. Exactly. And speaking of podcasts, I understand that you like dungeons and dragons and even have a podcast about that. I do I play dungeons and dragons with my friends, and we record it, and we recently had special person guest patent ause while on our podcast. And that was very cool was running what else cool on it reasonably here episodes not out yet. Okay. But it's coming up. Yeah. So we can tell you how to play. It was fun. We had fun. That's That's all all that that matters. matters. But I read that you try not to think of your future career. But I'd really love to know. Do you enjoy working as a director any plans for a love of your? I would love to do it again. I mean, it was most feeling thing I've ever done in my life for sure will you continue with anymore, standout. I hope so I hope to get back. I have to want to write stuff like field. And it's like right now, I don't feel urgently like I wanna get up and talk to everybody. It just feels like it's a time. Where a lot of people are getting up and talking, and I it was so much more exciting to collaborate with people. So yeah. But maybe maybe I'll go back. I've been writing stuff and Ben enjoying reading and just for my own sake. Bo Burnham and Elsie Fisher. Thank you for bringing the world one of the most best and most powerful films. I've seen in a long long time. And thank you so much for joining me today for this very special live at soda to matters here to be maxed in Los Angeles, California. This is the fourteenth year, I've been doing design matters. And I'd like to thank you for listening. And remember we could talk about making a difference. We can make a difference. What we can do.

Elsie Fisher Fisher MD scientist Bo Burnham director Ben Los Angeles California
"burnham" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"burnham" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Week, we're featuring favourite interviews of the year as chosen by listeners, and our producers today's interview is with Bo Burnham who wrote and directed eighth grade. His first feature film. It's in part about the generation gap created by social media. The digital gap used to be between those people who grew up before computers and smartphones. And those who were digital natives. Now, there's a gap between those who grew up with Facebook. And those who grew up with Snapchat and Instagram Burnham became one of the first YouTube stars when he was in high school after he performed some of his own satirical songs put them on YouTube for his family to see and they went viral after high school he had his own MTV series, which satirized the compulsion to record an upload every aspect of your life, hoping it will make you famous. He said to net flicks comedy specials, and he directed the Chris rock comedy special released earlier this year, all that and Burnham is still in his twenties. The main character in his movie eighth grade is Kayla a girl who's about to graduate from middle school. She's incredibly shy and socially awkward, but has her own YouTube series in which she gives advice as if she's confident in experienced enough to know how to help girls with the same problem. She has the kinds of problems that give her panic attacks. She. Has only a few followers. Here's a scene from early. In the film when Kayla is recording one of her videos. Okay. So yeah, I hope that. Basically, you know, like be yourself and don't care about like, whatever one other people think about you. And just like, you know, ignore them if they're being mean to you about it and everything will work out if you're just being yourself. Okay. Thank you watching this video. I hope some of you guys found it helpful make sure to subscribe to my channel. And yeah, thank you for watching Gucci. Bopha and welcome to fresh air. Thanks for me, Terry. It's an honor. Thanks for saying that I love your film, by the way. I just think it's great. You are in high school when you started posting songs on YouTube junior in high school. Yeah. Yeah. So your songs on YouTube found a u you audience, you're a guy. So what did you want to make this movie from the point of view of an eighth grade girl? I mean, you've been through a big YouTube experience much bigger than than your character has why make it from an eighth grade girls point of view, I really set out to just make a story about how he was feeling at the time that I was writing it, which was nervous and sort of wanting to talk about the internet, and how it felt to sort of be alive right now. And I kind of quickly found the world of kids expressing themselves online..

YouTube Kayla Instagram Burnham Facebook middle school Chris rock Terry Snapchat MTV
"burnham" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"burnham" Discussed on KTOK

"You say vibe Burnham? Conway. See, in a wide You answered yes well and then I love that and, I can't find it I think I got my original one Markham's bow need? To more so if, anybody. Knows where I can, get, a, Conway by Burnham please Facebook or Email me, okay and? Mahone. Also, wants to know will sweet autumn Clem Addis claiming to. A brick wall planted one late in spring and it is a climber but I don't know if it's not it's Twining and so, two Got to put, it scouts okay there's your, answer but you can do you can do cross fine cross fine Young on across on a client when you mix them that they've worked. It was on a trellis and they it was actually the amethyst falls with Syria and the cross out in you had to tell them that the North. American Condit's it's not the horror-com base of Chinese are. Native North American one that. Doesn't take over the universe appreciate the fact, that. It goes right up my, bamboo that's what I'm. Appreciating today we're going to have to take. A break Josh Campbell is joining Bella Julia, and Jamie, and, me, I'm Falkiner Lippert this at the garden party we are broadcasting live from the Oklahoma count t fair, Oklahoma free fair free at. Last clock and the ice cream is on your giving away. Ice cream and salsa and all kinds, of stuff but it will be. Gone here in just a few. Minutes you're listening to one. Thousand. T. okay this, is your chance to. Eat it believes underground for half off Yeah..

Conway Burnham Condit Clem Addis Twining Oklahoma Mahone Syria Josh Campbell Jamie Falkiner Lippert Bella Julia
"burnham" Discussed on Just a Tip with Megan Batoon

Just a Tip with Megan Batoon

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"burnham" Discussed on Just a Tip with Megan Batoon

"Like gripping these. Like I'm making so much noise and it was quieter than like any move ever been just not dripping down my face and I'm just trying to not cry because it just burns and then you're all fall out. Is that what you're eighth grade was like, oh my God. Wait. So have you seen it? I have. Okay. So not only was that metoo t really just throw on some transition lenses, and that's what I looked like. Also, like if you've ever seen any traditionalism, they never get fully dark. Sure. Mine not Nunnelee didn't fully dark, got them. So they got dark pink, like not even like black slash gray, and I dressed even weirder than her. I was so much weirder than her like I didn't make videos at that time, but I started making videos when I was like fifteen sixteen. So even that aspect of her making all these advice videos, and how do you confident was literally the first video I ever made was all these, like giving people advice to feel good about yourself as I'm like, literally being I hate everything just like it was so close. I felt my into my friends, they're like, did you feel personally victimized. That's interesting. I love Burnham and I washed the movie. I thought it was a great film, but I also I just couldn't relate all that so so funny because it does seem it's exactly like your store. And I went with one of my best friends in her, and I wrote this is just like, I feel personally victimized both. This fucked out this is. So this feels like I feel attacked and it was like, it was so good, but it was like that was the hardest part to watch because there's so many at least two other friends. And one of our friends was like, yeah, no, I'd like relate to in some aspects than her and I like this was me literally me. It was hurt my whole like my whole soul, but I loved it. Yeah, but there's the things that I hate every moment of this and I feel so terrible, but this movie. What was your first video that you made? Gosh. Well, I think the first technical when I made was like an introduction to my channel like people are obviously watching like, wanted to know what they were going to say, let us know..

Burnham Nunnelee
"burnham" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

03:02 min | 2 years ago

"burnham" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"I mean, that's how I felt as performer, like I didn't wanna birthday party anymore because I'm like, I don't need to special day every day's special day on tour. I want when I'm off. My mother would be like a party for your special. I'm like, the party would be not. It being about show was the part I want. I want my life to be less about me, you know. And I think people that's when people in the courtroom go like a what we're gonna thousand pictures taken the day again. Yeah. Version of that. I'm not saying there aren't good vulnerable ceremonies that maybe people are avoiding, but I also think I think it's wedding that version of weddings that are incredibly performance and I hear that could've everything awful. And I feel like I'm in a walking wedding. I feel like everyone is like a bridezilla groom zone. I'm like. It's sunny. I get that down. I get that it is a little bit more vulnerable though to do the wedding where you invite the people, you're talking to somebody that talks about it with Al both ways. And fuck everything. And then sometimes we should have like a weather which get married a for the people in the crowd, we don't give fuck. Yeah, that's about it. We don't give a fuck, but it speaking about the ritual of marriage. It's about those people supposedly giving. I know I don't care like cool. Good for you. So on immediate family, like when my sister's married, I was like, this is beautiful. Yeah, I do really care about this. Yeah, sure. I'm like my friend get married like cool, like right this. This is your. I feel like weird. Like I feel like I'm like, voyeuristic. Why am I watching? Yeah, I think it's for you know who it's for bibles here. Fucking bibles here Jesus Christ. We. I know you don't like any. Why is there fucking bible here? Why is your father giving you away? Yeah, shit. Yeah. Okay. No, I agree. You made me think about a billion things and now I can't think of any of them. We've gone. We've gone hard at it. Okay. We saw some people now. I don't think so. What time we allowed to go to cut the shit down. We're Thomas. You mentioned he's the best. He should do the podcast. See, that's how we what I really. What if anyone's made it to this point they've made it. I want to emphasise Burnham talk show is proof that they've made it one half assize a couple of things that. I feel again, like people are doing this. I'm not saying like, I've figured it out. Why is no one else doing this? Yeah, I'm saying everyone's doing it, and I feel. There's a to hit it guest that there's there's powerful famous people in the way that need to be kicked down. So the good people like behind me can make room. And I feel like I'm a weird person when I feel like I got in right when the internet started, and I'm sort of at the I been at. I was one of the starting of the new paradigm, and I want to let..

Al Burnham
"burnham" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

03:37 min | 2 years ago

"burnham" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"You have on stage. So much so that when I heard Bo Burnham is directing a movie. I was like, would obviously not the same over who's leaping over pianos and running new a Mike, and then darting around stage. And so I was surprised to see an actually that whole outlook. I was obviously very incorrect. This you same right? Directing a film, but I can this men sit behind in internet ending studio, sit still, you know, but it's an interesting story, man it. It actually adds to this entire story. You have a huge audience for your comedy, even written a best selling book. What was it that you wanted to do with this film that you couldn't do yourself as a performer? Yeah, I felt like that version of hopping over pianos and that hyper onstage persona was not me, you know, or was definitely not people that have seen this movie that don't know me think it's a real left turn or whatever people that know me know that this is probably true or the way I am. I think I did theater all my life. I really loved working with people working with actors. Stand up. It's so insular, you're just looking yourself for inspiration. I got really tired of myself. I got really tired of my own face and like having express anything I wanted to through myself with my voice. So I would just desperate to collaborate with people and to try to do something that was not clever and ironic and satirical. I done that for so long and tried to talk about the current moment through the lens of satire jokes, and I was just sorta reached the end of that rope and wanted to do something different something a little more natural and human, too. If I was being honest with myself, I was more confused than I was certain and you kind of have to be certain in stand up. I started when I was sixteen now I'm twenty seven. So at a certain point, I sorta take inventory of things and go like hard. I've been doing Stanford ten years, but this is something I started when I was sixteen and is this really what I'd want to do if I started fresh right now. So yeah, that was part of it. All right. Diving into eighth grade a little bit. This movie feels like a very fresh take on how teens are portrayed in film. What do you think most movie. Get wrong about young people. I think a lot of movies. I think the way we remember that age is in the same as it was to be that age. I like nostalgic movies. I like movies that feel like memories, but I didn't wanna make one wanted to make one that was visceral, not nostalgic. I think kids are generally overly way to articulate that you often see young kids and movies, and they tend to express themselves with an ability that is suspiciously similar to screenwriters ability to articulate themselves. You know, and like the truth of being a kid is like, it's like you just drank a glass of milk at you're talking like this. Do you like all the story of being young as being in articulate? I think the story of being anyone is being inarticulate. So that was important to me was to to have the film live in the world of the kids, but also have the film to think like kids think into express themselves like kids express themselves, which is just not perfectly and it's actually their their failure to articulate themselves and their failure to sound. Like the people in movies that they wish they sounded like and the movies they watch in a part of this movie is you can tell what her favorite movies are. And she's trying to be like the girls in the movies that she sees, but she can't. And she's because none of us can. Right. We know you're talking about the kids may not be articulate, but in fact. The situations that they find themselves in feel so dire. So. You know, life and death when you're that age, and I feel like the musicality of this film really was able to highlight that and you have these simultaneously. Funny and very serious situations..

Bo Burnham Mike Stanford ten years milk
"burnham" Discussed on Relevant Podcast

Relevant Podcast

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"burnham" Discussed on Relevant Podcast

"But they said you gotta work really hard to continue to have new music. Do they feel that way? Would I go get the same haircut. It wasn't in the study, but I would. I would imagine, which is why joking. I like almost never turn on. I won't turn on date Matthews a lot. We joke about it, but I'm like, I could Gets get. guy. He don't wanna. The sign is. Stuck in a loose of listening because they've always listen to a lot of music. I just wanna get stuck in a loop of listening to those same twenty over and then never here, which also apple music has been awesome because I can just tell it to play me new things, and it will just do that. Apple music live show beats. One live show around dinnertime is like charting now in new stuff, and it's a great discovery. Yeah, but but I like push hard. I'm like, all right. All right. I'm listening like why? Why push heart is there a fear surrounded by adults that were laying or kind of back to that opening story? I was like, I don't wanna like nirvana was objectively really good music. But if I feel like if you don't work on expanding that muscle, you're going to not think, oh, you your dad's reaction was like you made a conscious decision. I don't ever wanna be like that. Right. And it's, yeah, it's like I want to be able to still. They're still music that I just won't like there's albums that I've heard recently. I'm like, I do not. That is not hitting with me like everyone else there, but like the new Drake album. I know everybody loves it, but it's. Doesn't. It's background music. Yeah, just doesn't doesn't get, doesn't get Royal. I think is interesting that the if you look at the items charts right now, literally of the top twenty songs eighteen of or Drake songs from that album tasting, if you're not into like trap or something like that, you're not gonna Drake out still. All right, they'll do for slices. Stay tuned up. Next Bo. Burnham joins us. Three..

apple Drake Matthews Burnham
"burnham" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

03:50 min | 2 years ago

"burnham" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Let's get back to my interview with comic and satirical songwriter bo burnham who's just written and directed his first feature film called eighth grade it's about a girl on the verge of graduating from middle school she suffering from social anxiety but she has a youtube blog which she records in her bedroom giving advice to other teens about how to be confident and be yourself her log has very few followers you are an early youtube star you started making videos of you singing your original satirical songs in i think your bedroom what was the state of youtube when you started and how old did you say you are fifteen i was sixteen yeah it was two thousand six it was just when it started and i had written some little silly songs and wanted to show them to my brother who was a college and someone said you should posted on youtube it's the site that you can post videos and share them and i was like oh cool and really it was like you too i was just a place where it was like he got a funny skit or something posted here it was like that in my space were sort of things people used and they were asking very shallow questions my space was sort of just like make a little website for yourself put your profile picture up and tell us your top friends and list your interests and now kids are using twitter and instagram which is basically what do you look like what do you think what do you look like what do you think asking base deep deep questions of you all the time so the internet felt like when i was sixteen felt like you know digital bulletin board and now it feels like really a place to exist and reflect yourself so when you started posting videos of your songs for your family how did they end up going viral they were posted on the site break dot com and it got like two hundred and fifty thousand views in a day just sort of happened it was a website that sort of featured popular videos and they just snagged it and it kind of went crazy and it was it was very strange because you know i saw this giant number and then i you know went to school in nothing was different i think it just sort of started a lifelong journey of these two separate sort of narratives being sort of absolutely incoherent but overlaid on top of each other why don't we hear what i think is the first song that you posted which is which is my checking out for this part my whole family's at the first one i sure so it's it's it's called my whole family or my whole family thinks i'm gay and you posted this in two thousand six but you're making technique wasn't great so i would say basically all of my technique was in great my technique for subtlety or writing or perform but yeah let's go with the mike technique okay we'll go with the mike so the piano is like drowning out your voice and i'm afraid our listeners won't be able to hear the lyrics so instead of going with the original wait wait no is it it's going to be bad again instead of going with the original youtube video we're gonna go with two thousand eight recording that you made because it's just it's just clear and thank god and the lyrics are funny and i think our out in should be able to hear them so this is my guest bobino every time i go to danner seems like a bit thin and sit down at the breakfast table i can talk and we'll they're not able i look at them there's a single christian on their mind could go back to the way it was it's not easy now mall family thinks i'm gay i guess it's always been away the way i want makes them think high like boys.

bo burnham
"burnham" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"burnham" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Weird to put yourself out there isn't it yeah i struggle with that to this movie is going to be seen by people it's going to be super weird right yeah totally well at least we have each other at least we can look each other during this and that's right tell elsie and all the kids you know is like he had this is weird and strange and i hope we can keep our feet on the ground and if you feel weird you can always reach out to me to talk about it but my you know the belief really is is that as much as we have things to teach children and as much as we can guide them part of the problem that kids are enduring is just the human condition like they have access to the problems we have access to so the only thing i encourage her to do is like don't worry about the momentum of your career like do whatever you wanted to you're still a kid you still have all the forks in the road still ahead of you so just like you know you don't have to deliver anything you can turn sixteen and wanna be fed who cares my guess is bo burnham he wrote and directed the new film eighth grade after a break we'll talk about how he became an early youtube star when he was in his teens and have that altered his life i'm terry gross and this is fresh air before you to too skinny white kid thought he was funnier and cooler than he actually was now well not much has changed but i a note of money youtube is a place for people to share their ideas in my people you mean thirteen year old girls by you mean how they love the jonas brothers i'm just getting but let's be honest that's majority did you know you can ask siri to play npr podcast for you it's easy just ask like play the fresh air podcast use your phone or home pod to connect with your favorite shows anytime.

elsie youtube bo burnham terry gross npr thirteen year
"burnham" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"burnham" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Episodes of inside pop every other week or an even deeper dive inside the world of pop culture and there we're still bringing your brilliant insight always on the nose opinions and insider inside information on the most interesting pop culture stories of the week and we'll also have interviews with the pop culture professionals who create the culture you crave for example we'll speak to casting directors about how they find the right talent for the right roll we'll talk to music supervisors about how they choose the music to create the right mood and we'll grow producers we'll discuss what exactly a producer does home an sean how many times someone said to you oh your producers so what do you actually do so many times the same year so make sure to catch inside bob every other wednesday on maximum fun to indulge your pop culture obsessions and to hear in depth interviews from the movers and the shakers in tv music film and more since bullseye for jesse thorn i may per wolf let's get back to my conversation with bo burnham creator of the new film eighth grade it's out now you mentioned the idea that you know we can all see ourselves in elsie and i also feel like may me younger people can potentially see themselves in the father and maybe understand where that's coming from an i think it'd be great if we could play a clip from one of their conversations it's from the part where the father is dropping off kayla and she's wrapping up her last week of middle school and it is it's just so beautiful kind of it almost feels off the cuff it feels so real and let's just listen to her dad dropping kayla off can you know look like that please like what she's like the way you're looking looking at the road you can look to throw doubt i obviously didn't mean that just like don't be weird and quietly you do it sorry hey how is the shadow and you were being quiet which is fine just like don't be weird and quiet because like i look over at you and i think you're about to drive us nutri or something and then i really freaked out and then i can't talk to my friends so just like be quiet and drive and don't dead please.

producer jesse thorn kayla bob bo burnham
"burnham" Discussed on Cinephile: The Adnan Virk Movie Podcast

Cinephile: The Adnan Virk Movie Podcast

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"burnham" Discussed on Cinephile: The Adnan Virk Movie Podcast

"Theaters them to release also available on demand so videoondemand check it out ideal home i'm giving it three believes because it's a good comedy and it runs a scant eighty five minutes so three movies this time we're reviewing all ninety minutes and under so this is really an emblem of brevity this time here in sinophile eighth grade three and a half maple leafs won't you be my neighbor three maple leafs an ideal home for me believes coming up lately there will be no maple leafs i'm guessing for godley courtesy ajay cto more a friend of sinophile but now it's time for bowe burnham a real pleasure welcome in bo burnham you heard of eighth grade was absolutely terrific i was at the sundance film festival this year did not get a chance to eighth grade but hurt all the buzz about at bozo i'm thrilled to see the movie before we get into it though i mentioned to one of my producers rick pass but we're going to have you on sinophile this podcast and he said oh you love shandling i said of course the only guy i've been raving about this end dyers gary schilling should appetizers documentary larry sanders shows favorite comedic show and he shows me the clip of you which is similar admist on the green room with paul prevents a and you were hysterical it's you and garry shandling and judd app ital and it's amazing tell me about that whole story because i politics i did not know you were on that show and had that experience with those guys yeah no i was nineteen at the time and yeah it was like a one or two season show on showtime where there's got a bunch of comedians together to talk and it was like yeah it was me as a nineteen year old and judd and gary and ray romano marc maron so i was like the token like young person that hadn't done anything yet but it was great i mean it was a really good conversation i got along with gary really well that was the first time i met him and then yeah we were able to spend some time together alone like over the following years in gary actually read the screenplay to this movie like way before even tried getting it made because he was just he was just such an open caring and amazing attentive person creatively so i shared a lot of things with him including the germ of this idea of the best things about judge documentaries he shows gerry's billions of mentor now that was so important to him and of the names we knew like appetite silverman but i didn't know what kind of relates to be sasha baron cohen the likes of disease in story and now yourself what were those conversations like with.

bowe burnham bo burnham gary schilling larry sanders judd gerry silverman godley ajay cto rick pass paul garry shandling ray romano marc maron sasha baron eighty five minutes ninety minutes nineteen year
"burnham" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"burnham" Discussed on WJR 760

"Woman off they finally calmer down but she's still in cents and of course she's asking for everybody's name she wants to in the flight attendance she's she will because she's going to wait but he ended the lady next to me who is delightful in the eye of the keep her name out of it because she wealth because she bought me a cocktail but that's the point no she she saying you know the problem we have now is that anybody and everybody can get a goofball online to sign off burnham arsenal support taught juicers absolutely no regulation of this at all did you notice in the terminal that uh at that they now have designated areas for the dog to go and do its business right and it looks like almost like a little putting green it's that astroturf in it's got its own little room and you can go and take your european dogan if it has to to use the restroom it can actually if you don't mind stinky hazards it is a putting grain while there you go yell off it's it's essentially what it is it's a nice little astra trip similar to what they do in la bunker on la you know they're heavy grass in la so they felt these astroturf things rent trees or the dutchman relieved himself but i wondered if you run into this there were at least three dogs on that flight the one that was right next to me that i never knew about who is an adorable little teacup poodle hype hypoallergenic wasn't in the harm anybody in that way and the owner couldn't have been more responsible in the way she handled the dog side just curious as to whether or not this has been a problem for you when you fly and whether or not we've got to reevaluate is because it's causing so much trouble on these flights with people who have legitimate allergies so one eight hundred eight five nine zero nine five five seven one eight hundred eight five nine zero wjr what do you think should be done about this especially when you can print off things online.

burnham
"burnham" Discussed on Post Show Recaps

Post Show Recaps

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"burnham" Discussed on Post Show Recaps

"The great message from the mirror universe i think i guess like that's the one good thing we're getting from the mir universe and that was som killer lingerie that michael burnham had um he yup good for michael burnham i where ash tyler was during that yeah well it's got a like a go away later this year she is like do they just like go through all of like captain michael burnham's stuff andrew like wow this looks pretty cool i'm going to try it on yeah why not why not why not somewhere in the regular universe we talked about this in previous episode are you more or less convinced that the mirror discovery is hanging out in our universe i i'm sure that is where the mirror discovery is will we see in episode wear mirror discovery is trying to figure out what is going on a we just don't care about them i feel like maybe enterprise already did that yeah so i i would guess like we probably meet i if that's mere stand that's that he's meeting with probably meet that guy but i don't think we go too deeply into what's going on over there just what's next for michael burnham here in the mirror universe says she's talking with lorca a lawyer because he's like he's getting cold feet in terms of all what they they wanted to do in his mission well we had some feedback about lorca somewhere in all the different places we get feedback people were positing that maybe lorca was in a special torture chamber that wasn't really torturing him and he was pretending to be tortured but seeing lorca this week i'm going to say that was not the case because that dude look shook he did not seem like himself at all and the agonizers booth has a broke many a person the way that it works is that it just like keeps shifting the like parts of your brain that it's attacking so you never get used to the pain the agonizers roff jess yeah yeah it does seem like they were a little bit cavalier about the fact they were throwing lurk in the agonize or when they were discussing how this plan was going to go down like ariel gone the agonize earn ain't no thing and and is here to tell you that it is kind of a thing we.

ash tyler michael burnham lorca captain michael burnham agonizers
"burnham" Discussed on Post Show Recaps

Post Show Recaps

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"burnham" Discussed on Post Show Recaps

"Yeah probably has so many characters that you can have all of alice in wonderland in one tweet exactly lewis carroll all over the place yeah so we end up seeing michael burnham as she gets sent to the quarters and michael burnham it has to go to like her shift and then is confined her quarters by not really she also can just leave the quarters like you would think you'll be the kind of thing where she would like the door would not open when she wanted to because she's being confined her quarters but it wasn't like she was locked in there no and not only that she can harvest drool from her roommate which they gave her randomly and use that drool to get into the restricted area that shows her exactly will captain orcas plans are yeah so you know seemed like a gap insecurity i don't know what the security woman was doing other than calling people human trash wasn't doing a very good job of making sure things yeah well we find out of the the episode that maybe captain lorca wanted her to see what was going on on the shipyard i did have an issue with that but i loved the roommate of michael barr now again why on earth we viewer why in any planet in the federation would you have this person who is a mutineer why would you give them a roommate you have this dangerous a loose cannon person.

alice michael burnham michael barr lewis carroll captain lorca