9 Burst results for "Burne Jones"

"burne jones" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

07:04 min | 10 months ago

"burne jones" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"They were as noted in his biography, disinfected beforehand. So good to know. So after the death of his wife, he leads to Tudor house at 16 chain walk in Chelsea, where he lived for 20 years surrounded by extravagant furnishings and a parade of exotic birds and animals. He was fascinated with wombats, who isn't their adorable. He asked friends to meet him at the quote wombats lair at the London zoo in regent's park and spent hours there looking at the wombats. Oh my gosh. In 1869, he acquired the first of two pet wombats, which he named top. I guess they were both names top. Top and top. The wombats were brought to the dinner table, and they were allowed to sleep in a large centerpiece in the center of the table during meals. Oh my gosh. His fascination with exotic animals can do throughout his life culminating in the purchase of a Llama and a toucan, which he dressed in a little cowboy hat and he trained to ride the Llama around the dining table for his amusement. So the savage reaction of critics to rosetti's first collection of poetry contributed to a mental breakdown in June of 1872, which subsequently kicked off his addiction to chloral. And on Easter Sunday, 1882, he died the country house of a friend where he had gone in a vain attempt to recover his health, which had been destroyed by chloral as his wife's headband destroyed by laudanum. He died of bright's disease, a disease of the kidneys from which he had been suffering for some time. So aside from all that hot gossip, what future elements were inspired by the pre afterlights. So one follower who developed his own distinct style was Aubrey Beardsley, who was preeminently influenced by Edward Byrne Jones, Arbery Beardsley did these very strange kind of very dark kind of 20s ask usually like late teens, early 20s, drawings. A very sharp faced women. There were a lot of kind of vaguely erotic drawings as well. Aubrey Beardsley drawings are very distinctive. They're usually just kind of like black and white and have like a single line drawing quality to them. They're very strange. For something that was like, you know, early 20th century you would not think something so. Like kind of modern surrealist would be during this time period. Rossetti's work influenced his friend William Morris. In whose firm Morris Marshall faulkner and co, he became a partner. And with whose wife, Jane, he may have had an affair, who knows. Ford Maddox Brown and Edward burne Jones also became partners in the firm and through Morris company, the ideals of the pre raphaelite brotherhood influenced many interior designers and architects arousing interest in medieval designs and other crafts leading to the arts and crafts movement headed by William Morris. So if you know anything about Morris, we see a lot of Morris prince in wallpaper. There's a big one. That's a very British arts and crafts style of design. And it's still popular today. I mean, I think just a couple of years ago, H and M did a William Morris line. And it sold out in like 30 seconds. It was crazy. Holman hunt was involved with the movement to reform designs for the Della robbia pottery company, so Delia robia pottery is also kind of influenced by the pre raphaelites and arts and crafts in general. The Birmingham museum and art gallery has a world renowned collection of works by burne Jones and the pre raphaelites that some claim strongly influenced the young J.R.R. Tolkien. Wrote The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. With influences taken from the same mythological scenes portrayed by the pre raphaelites. Tolkien considered his own group of school friends and artistic associates as a group in the vein of the pre raphaelite. So again, like this continued on and on and on, it just kind of keeps morphing and turning into other things. Unfortunately, the 20th century artistic ideals changed, art moved away from representing reality, especially after the First World War, pre I feel like art was devalued for its literary qualities. And was scorned by critics as sentimental and concocted artistic BRIC a brac. Of course, everything old is new again. So in the 60s, there was a major revival of pre raphaelitism. In the 60s, there was also a huge revival of Tolkien, right? Writings and books. Exhibitions and catalogs of works culminating in a 1984 exhibition in London's Tate gallery, reestablished a canon of pre raphaelite work. And our good buddy, Andrew Lloyd Webber, Andy L dubbs, is also an avid collector of pre raphaelite works and a selection of 300 items from his collection were shown at an exhibition at the Royal Academy in London in 2003. One of his 18 sitting rooms, full of photography light stuff. So that is my brief overview of the pre raphaelites a little bit of like fun hot awesome. They're so interesting. I think especially because the name doesn't necessarily make you think of the 19th century. No, I mean, they knew what they were talking about. Like, oh yeah, we're pre raphaelite, but it's not indicative of the style or their philosophy or anything. So, you know, you wouldn't know it to look at it. I mean, relatedly, when was Raphael working? When was he working? Raphael 5th the painting. So he so it's early 16th century. Okay. So he was kind of a baroque artist. So high renaissance, so a lot of a lot of gesture and soft kind of like kind of bright pastels was kind of his color palette and that kind of thing. Raphael also really loved a voluptuous woman. Rafael loved loved a curvy Gale and a guy with a lot of really broad shoulders and a lot of abs that don't exist in real life. Yeah, Raphael's men tend to be very, very hugely square in like a non realistic way. And the pre raphaelites were like snore, so they went with stuff earlier than they asked. Awesome. Thank you, Warren. You're welcome. So speaking of the romantics, I decided that my quiz today is going to be about the 80s new romantics and acts associated with the new romantics. Oh boy. Question number one, one of the most famous of the 80s new romantics was Boy George, who still is considered one of the most influential members of the UK LGBTQ+ community. He shot to stardom with the song karma chameleon and do you really want to hurt me alongside his band whose.

Edward burne Jones Aubrey Beardsley William Morris rosetti chloral Edward Byrne Jones Arbery Beardsley Tudor house Morris Marshall faulkner Maddox Brown Morris company London zoo Morris prince Delia robia Birmingham museum regent Chelsea Tolkien Rossetti Holman hunt
"burne jones" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

07:34 min | 10 months ago

"burne jones" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"Particular way was inauthentic and frankly, really boring. Right. And so the brotherhood's early doctrines, which as defined by William Michael rossetti, were expressed in four declarations. So the first was to have genuine ideas to express. All right. Number two, to study nature attentively, so as to know how to express them. Okay. Great. Number three to sympathize with what is direct and serious and heartfelt and previous art to the exclusion of what is conventional and self parading and learned by rote. Okay, all right. And number four, most indispensable of all to produce thoroughly good pictures and statutes. All right, that's good. I was waiting for like number four for you to pull the rug under me and be like, something like and English people are the best people in the whole world. Everybody else has to be paid in a double horns. No, it's basically like make sure you have an honest idea to express to make sure that you portray nature accurately to be heartfelt and direct and serious and then just make sure what you're doing is good. It's really not too bad. And the principles were deliberately non dogmatic. This was just kind of like a series of loose guidelines. Since the brotherhood wished to empathize the personal responsibility of individual artists to determine their own ideas and methods of depiction. There were also very influenced by romanticism, which is the artistic and literary movement that actually I might do an entire episode on this. It was like a precursor to nationalism. You can draw a direct line from German romanticism to the Nazis. Because romanticism and not to say that like caspar David Friedrich was a knots was like a secret Nazi because that wasn't a thing. But romanticism has a lot to do with like going back to, you know, like the ancient traditions of your country. Okay. So in love with the land and the history of the people and also this concept of the sublime where there's a fear and a love of God through nature through storms through violence, so it's a very dramatic kind of artistic movement. All right. So they were influenced by that in a certain way. And the members thought freedom and responsibility were inseparable. They were also really fascinated by medieval culture, believing it to possess a spiritual and creative integrity that had been lost in later eras. And this would continue through the arts and crafts movement. So the arts that I talked about the arts and crafts movement was very good. Yes, thank you. The arts and crafts movement comes out of the pre raphaelites, which came out of romanticism. Oh, okay. Yeah. So this emphasis on medieval culture kind of clashed with the principles of realism. That was part of the pre raphaelites. And in its early stages, the pre raphaelite brotherhood believed its two interests were consistent with one another, but in later years the movement kind of divided and moved into two directions. So it could either be realistic or it could be kind of medieval. A medieval being a little bit more flattened and kind of pose. Very medieval looking, but we'll get to that. So the realists were led specifically by hunt and Malay, while the medievalists were led by rossetti and his followers, Edward burne Jones and William Morris. So the PRB was greatly influenced by nature and its members used a lot of detail to show the natural world using bright and kind of really sharp focus techniques on a white canvas. When you look at a pre raphaelite painting, everything is in focus. There isn't like a depth of field really of fuzziness in the background to kind of create some three dimensionality to the space. Everything like every leaf is in perfectly sharp focus every pedal is painted beautifully and it creates this kind of jewel like quality to the artwork. So in attempts to revive this brilliance of color found in quatre central art, hunt and Malay developed a technique of painting in thin glazes of pigment over a wet white ground in the hope that the colors would retain jewel like transparency and clarity. So they're emphasis on brilliance of color was a reaction to the excessive use of bitumen by early British artists, such as what did you just call me? Bitumen. Sorry. No, that was a good joke. That was a good job. That was a good job. So earlier British artists used Benjamin it's like a really white pigment. And bitumen produced unstable areas of kind of muddy darkness. Which was an effect that the pre raphaelites kind of really despised. So examples of pre raphaelites that you might recognize include ophelia by John Everett millais from 1851 to two. Okay. That's the one of the woman kind of half in the water. Flowers all around her and her face is kind of like looks like she's about to die. Proserpine from 1874 by Dante Gabriel rossetti. The lady of shalott from 1888 and la Belle dame sans merci, both by John Williams waterhouse in the mid 80s. Also flaming June by sir Frederick Layton, it's that image of a woman kind of sleeping in a chair and she's wearing this bright orange dress. I don't know that one. It's very beautiful. I'll add some images to this, but all these pictures are characterized by beautiful women, high detail, especially in the flora, and then in the landscape, bright colors, somewhat flat perspective later, especially in rossetti's work. And subject matter based on religious and medieval stories, chivalry, King Arthur and related poems. So the first exhibitions of pre raphaelite work occurred in 1849, which was just a year after they started. So both malays Isabella and Holman hunt's rienzi were exhibited at the Royal Academy and rosetti's girlhood of Mary virgin was shown at free exhibition on Hyde Park corner. And they all had agreed that all members of the brotherhood signed their work with their name, and then the initials PRB. Okay. So that's like the earlier stuff you can really identify a pre raphaelite because they make sure that you know it. So between January and April 1850, which is you might know is only four months. The group published a literary magazine called the germ. It was edited by William rossetti, which published poetry by the rossetti's woolner and collinson and essays on art and literature by associates of the brotherhood such as a very British man who has a very British name of Coventry patmore. So obviously a scene by the magazine's run, it didn't fit last very long at all. It ran for four months for issues. Which is very typical of a bunch of artists because they probably were like, are you in charge? No, are you in charge? Ugh, I don't want to do it. You know what? I don't fine, forget it. I just want to paint, leave me alone. So in 1850, two years after they started the pre raphaelite brotherhood became the subject of controversy after the exhibition of millais painting, which is called Christ in the house of his parents. It was considered to be blasphemous by many reviewers, notably Charles Dickens, who hated everything. I mean, let's be honest. Dickens considered malaise Mary to be ugly. He actually said, quote, so hideous in her ugliness that she would stand out from.

William rossetti caspar David Friedrich rossetti Edward burne Jones John Everett millais John Williams waterhouse William Morris sir Frederick Layton Dante Gabriel rossetti rienzi rosetti Mary virgin la Belle Benjamin Holman hunt woolner Hyde Park corner King Arthur Royal Academy Coventry patmore
"burne jones" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

09:11 min | 1 year ago

"burne jones" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"After issue, the consciousness of the American people is not the problem. The problem is how often the will of the American people because of gerrymandering because of the corporatized forces within both political parties, the peripheral lies in a non corporate backed candidates. Now voter suppression, right? And first and foremost, the money, the undue influence of money on our politics. So democracy is the answer. The problem is that our democracy is not now functioning as old school democracy, democracy as originally perfect, but yeah, at this point, our system is so corrupt. It's become a system of legalized bribery. And people know it. It's not like people are not aware. And it's not like people are not upset. But we're all living with this conundrum. What do we do? Yeah, the distinction between the voters and the systemic ills of a democratic system that's been co opted by corporate interests. So in looking at that problem or that dilemma, like how do we untangle that knot and get the democratic system back on the rails so that it can function in the manner in which it was originally conceived and not be held hostage by the corporations that seem to dictate policy on every level? Well, with the current Supreme Court, make up of the Supreme Court. We certainly can assume that citizens united will not be overturned anytime soon. In letters to a young poet, I'm sure a book that you're well aware of by rocca. He says there are times when you don't know the answer, but you live with the question. And that is a question, the one you just posed that every thinking person that I know is dealing with right now, what are we doing in 2024? We have seen the way I look at it. The Republican Party as it now stands represents a nosedive for our democracy. And the Democratic Party is that now stand certainly under the leadership of its corporatized forces, represents a managed decline of American democracy. We all know the risk you go third party and you could risk helping Neil fashion forces get back into power. You work within the Democratic Party and you see what they did to Bernie twice. I know what they did to me. What is the way forward? I'm living with the question of my heart and most people I know are living with the question in their hearts. And I think that the answers are going to emerge because I think the anguish of that question exists in enough of us and very serious people are doing very serious thinking. And reflection on this question. Yeah, I mean, there's many ways to dissect this. We could just look at the two party duopoly and have an exploration of the possibility of a third party, like Andrew Yang is doing right now. And he was in here recently talking about that. And he's got a series of ideas about how to untie this, not. We can look at incremental policy decisions, but ultimately, I think the conversation that I want to have and where I think you are uniquely suited to speak to is the broader conversation about the crisis of consciousness that we're experiencing right now, a situation in which materialism and consumerism drive priorities. It's all buttressed by this government industrial complex. That's propped up by corporate interests that places accumulation and comfort. Above community and conservation all at the cost of our well-being, of course, and it's all being denigrated by social media and these algorithms that foment division and hate. Ultimately, dividing us from each other and from ourselves and distancing ourselves from the shared fabric that kind of unites us and creates the cohesion that's required to function as a healthy society. I think that there are two points of demarcation that are worth noting. One the advent of the industrial revolution and second the advent of trickle down economics. It was in the late 1800s that the industrial revolution exploded onto the scene in England than in the United States. And there were quite a few artists and philosophers, writers, thinkers, both in Europe and in the United States, who tried to sound an alarm a warning that we were becoming as a civilization, so mesmerized by externalities that we were losing the balance between the outer and the inner self. We were losing the balance with internal issues that were just as important as what we could see with our physical eyes. When I was in college, I had these huge posters on my wall. Remember when we used to have like from an art museum on art posters, right? And I had these huge angels. And it said, you know, burn Jones, but I didn't know who burn Jones was. I just knew I loved these huge pictures of angels. Many years later, I was walking down Fifth Avenue in New York City, passing the Metropolitan Museum. And they have these big flags. This is what our exhibit is. And there were these huge angels by, you know, ever burn chance. So I was so excited. I was going to see them. And I took one of those, you know, you have a little machine, a little earphone that tell you things. Right. And I had already started writing my book healing the soul of America and I knew about the transcendentalist and I knew about the industrial revolution and all of this. I had no idea that his paintings were part of this and this is what burne Jones said. Every time they build a machine, I will paint an angel. Painting a lot of angels. This was the beginning of this horrifying split within human consciousness and then by the 20th century. It climaxed with this. The industrial revolution and this idea that we would solve all of humanity's problems through this mechanistic paradigm, the Newtonian idea that the world is just a machine. And if you want to fix it, you just tweak the machine. Well, obviously, that has turned out to not be true, but the damage has been done in terms of so much of particularly the western mind being drawn so far into the material world. That it is almost withered our spiritual musculature. Nothing is more of an example of this than what happened in 1980. Now, I'm not romanticizing American capitalism before 1980. I'm not romanticizing or why washing the behavior of a corporate interest in this country before 1980. But I can tell you, I'm old enough to be able to tell you that there was a time in my lifetime. Not that we were perfect, not that our democracy was perfect, not that corporate ethics were. So exemplary. But the social consensus was, we were supposed to try. With the advent of trickle down economics, this propaganda this horrifying cunard was like, wool, pulled over the eyes of the American people, where if we just increase the stockholder value, if we just increase the profits, the short term profits of your stockholders, even if at the expense of the other stakeholders at the expense of workers at the expense of the community at the expense of the environment, this will be good, see. Because it lift all boats, those people, those new corporate aristocrats will just create so many jobs that money will just trickle down left all boats will obviously after 40 years we can see. It did not lift all boats. It left millions and millions of people without even a life vest. You know, in the 1970s, I think a lot of people don't realize in the 1970s, the average American worker at a decent job with decent benefits could afford a car. Could afford a home could afford a yearly vacation and could afford to send their kids to college. This is aberrational. This massive transfer of wealth that began with Ronald Reagan began with the Republicans, but no democratic president has stopped it. And we're now at a point where as I said earlier, the status quo will not disrupt itself. It's no different than, you know, it's interesting that because you and I are coming from the sort of wellness community, et cetera there is very sophisticated thinking within that community regarding drugs and alcohol. And it's very sophisticated because people have known so many people who died. And we know that if it goes too far, you know, most of us have had this situation in our lives, either we've made the call or had someone else make the call to us. You think we ought to do something. Because if we don't intervene, this person could die. We need to stop our magical thinking about democracy and about the survival of the human race. You continue like this. You could die. We will lose our democracy. So at this point, we need to stage an intervention. And as John F. Kennedy said those who make peaceful revolution impossible make violent revolution inevitable and that to me is the point where we are..

Democratic Party Andrew Yang Supreme Court rocca Metropolitan Museum America burne Jones Republican Party Bernie Jones Neil England New York City Europe Ronald Reagan John F. Kennedy
"burne jones" Discussed on Classic Ghost Stories

Classic Ghost Stories

08:04 min | 1 year ago

"burne jones" Discussed on Classic Ghost Stories

"He raised a bit of a rebel even though she mixed with the upper-class artists and bohemians so she didn't slim it but it wasn't respectable. Yeah and in nineteen twenty. She married the man who was the head of the reuters news. Agency ser rodrick jones and became lady jones and they had a big house there in rotting day near brighton. In a house that had belonged to edward burne jones of the pre rough lights. And she had the proper. You know gardeners chauffeurs to gardens. A groom strapper nine. Indoor servants she had housing london detrick by lotions in hyde park gate. You gave grand parties and her neighbors. There were winston churchill and jacob epstein the sculptor. So you know she had a bit of a dino at quite exciting life. I would thought i'm actually working my way through a book of ghost stories from the nineteen while published in the nineteen eighties called sixty five. Great spine chillers. The editor of this is mary danby and married base. I did a lot of our story books. And this is a terrible terrible review on amazon of the fifth. Fontana book of great horror stories says this is a typical amazon review. I've had a few like this. Absolutely the worst horror anthology book. I've read so far. And i wish mary danby include their own awful stories in these books but actually i think the mary danby is made some very good Selections of stories in this particular anthology on probably reading on the two of them out for the next six to eight weeks. I'm going back to edinburgh next week for a week. But then i'm going to be living with my mother six weeks or so until new houses ready and all our stuff in storage. So what i'm doing at. The moment is driving down the road with coffers of boxes. Which in a bizarre way. I am quite enjoying. My daughter's helped me move into this storage place and it's an old warehouse and you know catcher and said to me. This would be fantastic place to write a horror story. Thought julia right. Imagine what you've got. Is this empty in mostly. It's empty with these. All these doors corridors fuller does with locks on them and it goes on and on and on and there's nobody there that's gotta be a good that has got to be a good idea so if you if you come across the story in later months and years that features storage you know that was the inspiration and often when you write a story it just comes from an idea like that picture seen and then you do develop the rest out of that full uniform. The comments on the youtube channel was did. I have any tips for writing a story. This nuclear segues into the amorous coast. Because i think this is a little gem you know. It's his tongue in cheek. This time the ghosts story at gone from its gothic origins in the late. Seventeen hundreds and almost run out of the ability to take itself seriously. It was later revivify. If that's the word by people. I can aikman in the fifties. I'm leaving lovecraft. All we tell sing to one side them talking about the classic english ghost story which had become become almost written with a wry smile and this is what this is as well. It's not particularly scary. Although there's a little chill at the end so how would you write. A story will first of all you is. Set it up first of all and either a little clues throughout such as the nightgowns anew you twist. It's evening you create misinterpretation so The interpretation of course is that he's been having an affair may it's a short story so that doesn't last long but that is introduced everything aha and then at the end you do a twist. This is it. This is really one idea that you take through the setup for the twist and at the end and we know this is kind of coming but she does it well in that we're led to believe the wife's come home and then we you know she's very cold. That's almost like what big teeth you have. Grandmother what you know will be guys. You have grandmoth- it's she's very cold. It must be the the chill from the drive to the station. And he doesn't realize but we do realize and then his wife comes still holding this cold wrist of a corpse and so it's kind of funny blithe spirit top you know coward's blithe spirit. The funny funny ghost. Charming ghost even ghostbusters. Suppose and then we just from that idea that she's chilling the bad we get the idea. How unpleasant it must be to wake up to reach under the covers and find a corpse and then you know so. I think that is a genuine. Chill was for me anyway and i think it's very neatly constructed story so basically that there's some misleading in that. Oh yes he's having an affair but it doesn't last long and there's a twist at the end and that's how you right one. The whole thing is about withholding information so the author knows everything and withholds information and presents it through different lenses so there are three main types of this so first of all the reader and the character no the same amount of information both pretty much in the dark anything of Like something like lost. The tv series lost whereby am nobody had a clue what was going on neither the characters nor the the viewers then. So that's when the reader and the character know exactly the same night but the but the author knows more and his withholding it they see offer his withholding it then the next bit is where the reader knows more than the character knows an e. Aw i would say the reader guesses more than the character no so in this case. This is what we've got about him lying in bed and the he leans reaches out his wife's cold wrist and he goes on and he still is the depending still doesn't drop for him but we've already tweaked it. We we absolutely know what's going on. So that is the case in this. We know more than the reader knows. And then sometimes the character knows more than the reader knows and that might well be the unreliable narrator because you know the narrator maybe withholding information from the reader so those are the three men types but the key is to withhold and then at the end revealed if you don't if you don't reveal think and this is probably what happened for me with lost eventually will i don't care anymore. I mean you. Just don't care you've just dragged on for too long so i think it's really important that in the end all the danza tied up. And when you don't tell the ends of people very dissatisfied and that's you know this the the open ended story when we had one or two of them but then they do not satisfy readers in the same way you know we like everything tied opinion okay so that we are so. That's me very briefly this time. It's not long. When this time indulge me. I'll be back soon back when account packing the microphone up because i'm going to be living out of boxes but i'm hoping to get it out again. All right okay. Anyway take care at. Oh yeah so you can become a patron swat. The show and a lot of people have been doing that on the. I is totally great. You can sign up the sub stock which is a kind of similar idea. Why have got to. It's a long story. I thought i was going to replace. Patron with sub stuck and just have all streamline but it didn't work out like that so two ways you can sign up. You can become a member on the youtube channel. All of those three get extra stories. Some of which Some of which can get away with narrating to a club but if i was doing it.

mary danby rodrick jones lady jones edward burne jones hyde park gate jacob epstein amazon winston churchill Fontana brighton reuters aikman edinburgh fuller julia london youtube coward
"burne jones" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

06:00 min | 1 year ago

"burne jones" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"As we've talked about on the show before diagnosing people from the past can be tricky when they are not here to be examined. But we will end on a quote from rudyard kipling which was written in a letter to miss margaret burne jones in eighteen eighty six and this is pretty specific and detailed. He wrote quote. Do you know what him a. Cranium means a half headache. I've been having it for a few days. And it's a lovely thing one half of my head and a mathematical line from the top of my skull to the cleft of my jaw throbs and hammers and sizzles and bangs and swears while the other half calm and collected takes notes of the agonies. next door. my disgusting doctor says it's over work again. And i'm equally certain that it arose from my suddenly and violently discarding tobacco for three days. Anyhow it hurts awfully feels like petrifaction in sections and makes one right. abject drivel. Hi this is in horrible. Yeah it's the one of the world health organization statistics that i didn't site with in terms of years lived with disability. Migraine is like the sixth. Most disabling condition everybody who has experienced migrants. Which is like some. I gotta spectrum bec- between folks that have had like a cluster of several migraines then sort of went away to fix that have been dealing with recurring migraine attacks throughout their whole entire life as generally been something that has just profoundly affected their lives through all of that time. So if you want to know more about. The medical history of migraine particularly in the west migraine. A history by catherine fox from johns hopkins university. Press was one of the sources for this episode. It's from an academic press but it's pretty widely available. There are open access copies of it that you can without having to purchase one or get it from the library. If that's not an option for you. So i read that as one of the sources for this and it is pretty accessible in terms of more academic writing with lots and lots of details and specifics that we didn't really get into as much here too. You have some listener mail to get into okay. I do have listener mail. It is from kelsey who writes pest control in new zealand and kelsey writes cure rua. Hey holly tracy. I've been an avid listener of your podcast for years and i really enjoy it. So thank you very much for that. I just listened to the kudzu vine episode and it brought to mind all the predator and pest control that has gone on in new zealand because new zealand was isolated from larger landmasses for such a long time after the breakup of gondwana are flora and fauna are really unique our native land mammals bats and most of our birds prefer to wander about on the ground because we used to have the host eagle which was a major predator before it went extinct marry arrived in about twelve hundred eighty we brought rats and dogs that devastated the bird population and we also burned lots of forest but what really set our native populations back was when the pocket Europeans showed up with worse. Rats pigs cats and other animals. Some plants were introduced by farmers that had worked really well in britain..

Migraine margaret burne jones migraine attacks rudyard kipling catherine fox headache kelsey holly tracy johns hopkins university new zealand britain
"burne jones" Discussed on Classic Ghost Stories

Classic Ghost Stories

04:37 min | 1 year ago

"burne jones" Discussed on Classic Ghost Stories

"There is a hint that he had a nervous breakdown so i wonder whether it was an anxiety related disorder. He's first job was working for jam berry and he worked as a set designer in the london theater and jam berry peter pan. And i think we've done a story. Tim barry's before at the ghost of christmas present. I think the ghost of christmas eve forget. Anyway it'll be around christmas maceio. Dentist mikhail although his family pretty wealthy he himself seems to have had to write for a living so whether he's income whether he wasn't left enough money not sure he's dr would have been that rich really being an academic but certainly mother coming from burne jones. But you don't know what it's like in families do you really don't know. He had any very prolific writer and he wrote in novel every year from nineteen twenty to nineteen sixty eight in the very well regarded. He's most famous nepalese greenery street which is about a young upper middle class family setting up home in london in green restrict. They call this walpole street. And when you do your research you see that in the book which apparently i haven't read actually people say it's delightful very light and comic and from reading. I just read a couple of excerpts from it. they're very brief experts and the sort of characters are like the. Pj woodhouse type thing jeeves. Wooster type life that they're not as overtly comic that but you know he was actually Mikhail was friends with. pj would house an aa mill. who wrote winnie the pooh and cost so that circle jam berry. All of these people were all around in london at the time and he moved though circles. He actually wrote the biography of james berry. And there's an a nice audio clip about how they told him to cut it down..

jam berry london theater Tim barry burne jones peter pan mikhail Pj woodhouse london Wooster Mikhail pj winnie james berry
"burne jones" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

The Erick Erickson Show

05:09 min | 1 year ago

"burne jones" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

"The lies is truth that he really wanted the state and it was stolen that they're going after. Brian kip. who all of them. Supported in twenty eighteen against abrahams. But they won't. Brian punished for not violating his oath of office in georgia. The governor of the state of georgia's precluded from being involved in elections. And because brian kemp didn't throughout the election and violated constitutional office for which you would have been stopped by court of law. Suit trump supporters have found this virgils now vernon jones for those of you don't know around the country. Burdened jones was a democrat until a few months ago burden jones was not a beloved democrat. He's got a history with a dubious history. with women my goodness women are coming out of the woodwork. to say he he did various things to them. You shouldn't have done. He was a democrat in the legislature. And he loyally backed the democrats. In fact burne jones even opposed the pro-life fetal heartbeat legislation that galvanized republicans around the country and nell jones. Coming out having denounced the fetal heartbeat legislation from the floor of the legislatures would voted for it. I would have supported. i'm pro-life now. I i i. I'm pro-life in the trump scores. Don't care about the truth. They just care about beating. Brian kemp and the the the level of. I'm sorry i've got a. And i have people reach out to will. He disrespected us. How did he disrespect you because he lie to you and stroke your ego. There's a petulance there with this in cnn. In texas as well allen west to a bigger than vernon jones became the chairman of the party in texas and then dropped it the moment he could get a chance to run against Greg abbott over there. Now i'm not an avid fan. I think abbott should be beaten. And there's actually a guy running in the primary who could beat out abbott. But it's not allen west but you got some trump supporters because west tells them what they want here who's going to challenge them if republicans can't gain some level of discernment around the country like herschel walker in georgia herschel. Walker is a texas resident. He votes in the state of texas. He does not live in georgia and yet donald trump has apparently persuaded the man to come back to georgia where half the people who live in the suburbs weren't even georgia residents or borne when hershel walker was the thing and trump's convinced the guy allegedly to come back. He says he's still talking about it to come back. He's never run for office before he's got mental health issues here voices in his head and they wanting to run for for the senate herschel. Walker is beloved georgia. As an athlete the moment he becomes a partisan half the state's gonna hate him and he's probably not going to be able to beat raphael warnock. I i gotta tell you if the trump team wants to win. They've got to find better candidates. They've got to find good candidates you've got. You've got a guy in georgia former navy seal. It actually worked donald trump. Who's running who actually on on paper late them stadler's his name is compelling or kelvin king. Who ran black voters.

Brian kemp vernon jones georgia Brian kip burne jones nell jones allen west jones abrahams texas court of law abbott Brian Greg abbott legislature hershel walker herschel walker cnn Walker herschel
"burne jones" Discussed on Harvard Classics

Harvard Classics

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"burne jones" Discussed on Harvard Classics

"Win acceptance of socialism in fantasy echo. Great britain morris was born in walthamstow essex to a wealthy middle class family. He came under the strong influence of medieval ism. While studying classics at oxford university. There joining the birmingham set after university. Mary jane burden and developed close friendships with pre raphaelite artists edward burne jones and dante gabriel rossetti and with neo gothic architect philip webb weapon morris designed red house in kent where morris lived from eighteen fifty nine to eighteen sixty five before moving to bloomsbury central london in eighteen sixty one. Morris founded the morris marshall faulkner and co decorative arts firm with burne jones rosetti web and others which became highly fashionable and much in demand. The firm profoundly influenced interior decoration throughout the victorian period with morris designing tapestries wallpaper fabrics furniture and stained glass windows in eighteen. seventy five. He assumed total control of the company. Which was renamed morris enco morris rented the rural retreat of kansas scott manor oxfordshire from eighteen. Seventy one while also retaining a main home in london. He was greatly influenced by visits to iceland with eric magnusson and he produced a series of english language translations of icelandic sagas. He also achieved success with the publication of his epic poems and novels namely the earthly paradise. Eighteen sixty eight to eighteen seventy a dream of john ball. Eighteen eighty eight the utopian news from nowhere eighteen ninety and the fantasy romance the well at the world's end eighteen ninety six in eighteen seventy seven. He founded the society for the protection of ancient buildings to campaign against the damage caused by architectural restoration. He embraced marxism and was influenced by anarchism in the eighteen eighties and became a committed. Revolutionary socialist activist. He founded the socialist league in eighteen. Eighty four after an involvement in the social democratic federation. But he broke with that organization in eighteen ninety in eighteen ninety one. He founded the count. Scott press to publish limited edition eliminated style print books a cause to which he devoted his final years. Morris has recognized as one of the most significant cultural figures of victorian britain. He was best known in his lifetime as poet although he posthumously became better known for his designs. The william morris society founded in nineteen fifty five is devoted to his legacy while multiple biographies and studies of his work have been published. Many of the buildings associated with his life are open to visitors. Much of his work can be found in art galleries and museums and his designs are still in production..

eric magnusson london eighteen Morris dante gabriel rossetti eighteen eighties eighteen sixty one Mary jane eighteen fifty nine philip webb eighteen sixty five iceland english seventy five morris Eighty four kansas scott manor oxfordshire eighteen seventy victorian period kent
Cowboys may use both tags on Dak Prescott, Amari Cooper

Blogging the Boys

08:34 min | 3 years ago

Cowboys may use both tags on Dak Prescott, Amari Cooper

"The final year specifies that each of the NFL's thirty two teams can use both the franchise and transition tags this particular offseason that historic guarantee. If you don't know what that is you know franchise in transition tags in general I mean we. We have all sorts of information if you really want to understand the depths of them but in general the franchise and transition tag are ways that NFL teams can protect players that are set to be free agents. If you don't WanNA player to hit free agency you don't want me hit the open market. Bam you slapped a franchise or transition tag on them and typically generally only one is available to each NFL team so you have to pick which player you want to place a franchise tag on right or transition. Whatever the movie and so the fact that all. Nfl teams would be able to utilize both of them. This offseason really served as an incredible asset for the cowboys wrote about this last year. We wrote about this in March. Nineteen how we talked about then. Hey next offseason. The cowboys could have this really awesome tidbit in the that was the title of the article. That could really help them. Because of the cowboys find themselves in a position and we we kind of forecast this year ago where they have three big players that new contract extensions that are set to be true free agents Dak Prescott Amari Cooper and Byron Jones. You knew that and so while you can shake combination however you want in all likelihood the Dallas cowboys were going to Franchise Tag Prescott because it seems incredibly unlikely that deal done before that happens. Before the franchise tag deadline and then they were going to place the transition tag on either Amari Cooper or Byron Jones. Whoever you believe more likely personally I believe it was Amari Cooper but that would prevent both of those players from hitting the open market. Which means the cowboys could protect them. That's a big deal in. It seems like in this again. My personal opinion and and other people it'd be to share these thoughts and certainly a lot of our readers and commenters and listeners but a lot of people had kind of sort of made the assumption that the cowboys have accepted that they're going to lose Byron Jones. And you know what I think. I think I speak for all of us. That are listening. Here we're all gathered around the campfire. You know what if the cowboys is Byron? Jones not ideal but at least they have Dakhil these they have. They can figure this out. Maybe they spend their first round. Pick on cornerback. Whatever not trying to get to far into those weeds but the ability to keep both deck and Amari was and is a gigantic advantage. That the cowboys have going for them. How ever if a new collective bargaining agreement is reached in so far again at the time of this recording. We have the half that the owners have to comply with if a new collective bargaining agreement is reached it will essentially rendered the ability for teams to use both tags moot and they will revert to normal circumstances where there can only place one tag on one player. Now if you have not out by now you need to know that this hypothetical world which is I would say somewhat imminent in somewhat inevitable based on the rates that the collective bargaining agreement is happening and again as we sit on Thursday night. There's so many players kind of tweeting that they don't like the new. Cba proposal and whatnot so there could be some back and forth but if this is finalized before free agency and there's still a couple of weeks and those are going to be very important weeks then. Dak Prescott has all of the leverage in the world and all of the leverage in the world and we touched on this at the end of Thursday's episode because if that's the case and you and I were representing Dak Prescott. Then guess. What our point in our proposal to Jerry Jones Stephen Jones in the cowboys organization? Hey Dude if you don't if you don't get a deal done with us if you don't give deck all the money's basically you're going to have to tag them we all know that and if you tag back guess what you cannot tag anybody else if you tag back. Guess what. Amari Cooper and Byron Jones are going to be true free agents. You're going to be competing with the market for them. That is not ideal and other cowboys went from a world where they were probably going to lose one of the two. Probably going to be Byron Jones right to now that could potentially lose both of them which which would be a complete and utter disaster. And you know you can. You can play hindsight's twenty twenty but if the cowboys had just up to their contract offer to Dak Prescott Uruguay. I mean. We're talking thirty. Three thirty four million dollars per year. Everybody freaked out about that last year. That would look like such a bargain out. That's what happens with these deals. We've talked about that Matt Ryan to use thirty million dollars annually. Everybody freaked out now. That looks super cheap. And if the cowboys had done that they would have the ability to use the franchise tag on either Amari Cooper or Byron Jones win this ultimate sort of hypothetical becomes a reality and they would theoretically only lose one. Maybe not even either. So now the cowboys win till the eleventh hour is going to cost them in a literal financial sense where they're gonNA have to pay Dak Prescott more money and it could cost them in the capacity that they are now going to lose Byron Jones. And maybe even Amari Cooper now I should say that there is a a ray of hope. I suppose because you know look you may think this and I don't mean new but I mean I mean other person the other person here my think Jerry Jones is just. You know the cowboys. They don't know what they're doing. They're messing up. But there is a possibility. Because Jerry Jones is typically a big proponent for things like this the specialty. Nfl adding another wildcard round and round and other wildcard teams. A seventeenth game that is upping the value for every NFL owner. Jerry Jones is obviously very involved when I was on. Espn San Antonio on Thursday. We head John Maclean from the Houston Chronicle legendary. Nfl reporter one of the best. Ever do it and I John. I said look you know. Is it possible? The Jerry Jones kind of knew that this was coming that he was going to lose his ability to use both tags and somewhat prepared. Here's John Maclean said on. Espn Antonio John. You mentioned the The franchise transition tag loophole. That may be filled up and unavailable to the cowboys. Now maybe I'm giving Jerry Jones and co a little bit too much of the benefit of the doubt here. But in your estimation do you think that they you know Jerry Jones at least and we don't know the way the votes win but that he would seemingly be at the very least somewhat in support of this which would negate the ability to tag to players if he did not have a plan in place to at the very least keep one or two of these. You know high price three free agents. They have Adak Amari. I'm Byron Jones before the Franchise. Tag deadline that that's a great point. Jerry Jones. One of the movers and shakers in driving this agreement and even though it could hurt him. But I think Jerry all along you can't keep everybody I expect them to Cape Prescott and probably Cooper if Byron Jones those on the market. He's got a chance to be is defensive defensive back in yesterday I think teams are going to line up to give him a record-breaking deal. I don't think they would do that. With the Mario Cooper. There's too many good receivers. It's a great year for receivers coming out the draft. It's a good year for corners. If you don't mean Horn and the top after the first round so say they let Burne Jones go say the replacing with a cheaper free agent or they go after a corner in the draft and they can even train them they might have their pick of all of them no big deal John Maclean said it was a great point no big deal deal no big deal but anyway I think that if you're looking again if you're trying to be positive trying to be optimistic. I think there are two things to note one is that this is not probably not a surprise to cut the cowboys. Brass right like they had to have known that the collective bargaining agreement could be You know a a new one could be struck and therefore the ability that they were potentially leaning on to utilize both tags would be rendered moods and so they had to potentially be prepared for that. Maybe they all prepared for that. Maybe the preparedness is the preparedness to lose both Byron Jones in Amari Cooper. Who knows the other thing is that Adam schefter head tweet about this where he said Some something to the effect of if there's a new CBA expect a flurry of roster moves. And it's possible that you know we. We've heard so much about how different players in different guys and especially quarterbacks are awaiting the new CBA strike new contracts because they want a piece of whatever. The new percentages that players are going to get and whatnot and so we'll see so it also is possible that maybe the deal lanes right after the new. Cba struck because maybe DAX team is waiting for a new CBA to all to make their move. So who knows? But that's the positive side of things if you're trying to be positive so it is what it

Cowboys Byron Jones Amari Cooper Stephen Jones Jerry Jones NFL Dak Prescott Amari Cooper Dallas Cowboys Burne Jones CBA Dak Prescott John Maclean Adak Amari Dak Prescott Uruguay Mario Cooper Adam Schefter Matt Ryan