21 Burst results for "Burgis"

"burgis" Discussed on Beyond Atheism

Beyond Atheism

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"burgis" Discussed on Beyond Atheism

"It is available for pre order, it officially it officially comes out on New Year's Eve. So if so, you know, you can't you can't wrap it up and put it under the tree for you. But you can pre order it and print out your receipt and use it as a stocking stuffer. That would actually shows up on New Year's Eve you can take a look at the nice cover art that had to drew at that go out and celebrate New Year's Eve and then with your and then when you're like kind of sluggish, should hug over the next day. Right? Yeah. Anything else you want to plug aside from your book? No, no, I think that's, I think that's good. So yeah, I think you mentioned GTA and ejaculate and all that at the beginning. I don't know, watch the Charlie Kirk to bed it's fun. Right. Yes, all right. All right. Yeah, thanks again for coming on, Ben. Yeah, thank you, good friend. Well, that was fantastic. That was doctor Ben Burgess. Nathan, what's your takeaway from Ben Burgess? Yeah, many things, I guess. Just to sort of pick up on the cancel culture thing we were talking about at the end. But I appreciate his perspective sort of acknowledging this is like a real phenomenon. And it is harmful. But at the same time not remaining on the left about it and not kind of descending into right-wing lunacy or whatever. Yeah, sort of exaggerating how widespread this isn't so on and yeah. So I think that was valuable. Yeah, he had a lot of nuance to it. A lot of the pieces connecting technology to attitudes to working conditions and how all these things are the factor into it. So it's not just. And there's multiple layers, wow, that was that it came on Fast & Furious like most of what he does. What was your takeaway from the Hitchens book? And his discussion of it. I think the really useful thing. I mean, in addition to being a good overview of Hitchens career and stuff, it's also just a good introduction in general to many other topics like one thing I learned more about is sort of the difference between Trotsky eats. Which hitched in the sort of claim to be and stalinists. Which this division goes back to the start of the Soviet Union. And yeah, I think and other things like he said in our conversation about religion and morality and stuff and there's a part about reparations reparations. Just the clintons. Because obviously Hitchens wrote about that. So it's about many of the topics like Hitchens touches on. But then you actually get a sort of introduction to all these different topics as well. Because even in the discussion, we barely touched on Hitchens atheism, which is intense in its long and it's throughout his at least 40 years.

Ben Burgess Charlie Kirk Hitchens Nathan Ben Trotsky Soviet Union clintons
Charlie Kirk and Professor Ben Burgis Debate Medicare For All

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:23 min | 1 year ago

Charlie Kirk and Professor Ben Burgis Debate Medicare For All

"So you want Medicare for All. Yeah. Yet HHS is the largest civilian branch of our government. So as we have expanded Medicare as we've expanded Medicaid, it hasn't been means tested as you want. We have hundreds of thousands of desk workers that are doing the means testing. Are you qualified Medicare reimbursements? And so under your example idealistic the point is that Medicaid is a test can not have a generous social program without a massive bureaucratic and dare I say corrupt administrative state. Well, I think Woodrow Wilson would even say that. Well, you need the industry. You think I like Woodrow Wilson? The guy who probably got college professors. Well, okay. And a college president. So he's kind of in your truck world. Okay, trust me, neither of those things weren't any points for me. But I think that. That's fair. But I did Woodrow Wilson as the guy who resegregated the federal law at the federal bureaucracy after trust me. Integrated speech. Dabs in jail, nobody on the left is going to say Woodrow Wilson is a hero. Liberals. Nobody on the left. But I was just going to say I know plenty of people that would, but that's fine. I don't think you're going to find a lot of LBJ. All these people believed in a strong administration. Well, maybe you're rattled off a bunch of liberals, but that's okay. We don't need to argue about historical figures. Let's just say this. If you're talking about administrative state, bureaucracy. Well, your example is Medicaid, which is a means tested program. And even at that, even despite the means testing, which is the part that gives the bureaucrats their power, which is also the part of objected to, even despite that, we're talking about bureaucracies as I think you mentioned earlier, bureaucracy, the government has no monopoly of bureaucracy as plenty of bureaucracies in the private sector. And if you want to know which programs have the smallest overhead, right? Even Medicaid, even despite the needs tested, Medicaid, Medicare, all of those have much smaller administrative overhead that any of the private insurance companies because the private insurance companies one, they have to plan out their strategy for competing with each other. And two, the private insurance companies have a vast bureaucracy that is dedicated to finding ways to deny people's claims because they've always got one eye on the bottom line for

Woodrow Wilson Medicare HHS Dabs Government
Charlie Describes the Main Tenants of Conservative Populism

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:50 min | 1 year ago

Charlie Describes the Main Tenants of Conservative Populism

"So let me just first kind of tell you what I believe and why we believe it. It's kind of framed as conservative populism, put simply, we believe in the natural law. We believe as the declaration independence says the laws of nature and nature's God, we believe in limitations on human beings, and we should either limitations on power, both government power, and yes, of course, corporate power as Barry Goldwater said in the 1960s. We also believe America is strongest when families are flourishing when there's a strong moral center when middle class work is respected and appreciated. And the populist components of this is we need to be aware of what's happening around us. C one core institutions are failing like the family, which has been failing over the last 60 years in America, which can be attributed to many different things. I would attribute it to the rise of an aggressive social welfare state and an overindulgence in neoliberalism that we must be willing to do something about it when the family starts to disintegrate when our nation starts to fall apart when our borders remain wide open. And so we pair those two things together. Conservative populism. And the kind of philosophical basis for a lot of this is the willingness to act with prudence and wisdom to try and fix things that matter. Things that objectively matter. And I've been really looking forward to this discussion. I think I hope it's more of a discussion than a debate because we will disagree on plenty, but when you talk about a untouchable oligarchy, I completely agree. I think that there is an untouchable oligarchy in this country, both corporate and governmental scientific and technological that is crushing the everyday common man, where I think we're going to disagree is that I think the end goal, the thing that we must strive to is family formation, family protection, and that strong moral

Barry Goldwater America
"burgis" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"burgis" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"With us tonight is Ben or doctor Burgess or Ben Burgess, however you want to say it. We're going to be debating and we'll see where it leads us. Democrat socialism versus conservative populism, super thrilled, that Ben is here tonight to have this discussion. It'll start with some opening statements. And then we'll take it from there. The two minutes is yours? Doctor bridges. Thank you, mister Kirk. Thank you to town circle for setting this up. So I'm a democratic socialist because I don't think anybody deserves to have less power or dramatically worse life because of factors that are outside of their control. So that's the first part. That's the philosophical basis. Concretely, I think it's obscene. The way we have an economic system where workers at Amazon warehouses skip bathroom breaks because they're worried about falling behind in their quotas and their boss literally owns his own spaceship. Now we can argue about what a fairer society would look like. I can contrast what I would see as utopia with what you would, and I'm always up for that kind of thing. I'm sure we'll get into some of it later. But what I really like to start out with is not so much that end point as the baby steps towards justice that we could take right now. Things like raising taxes and rich people to pay for social programs that would benefit the rest of us, things like raising the minimum wage for the working poor. Things like make it easier for ordinary people to organize unions so they can have at least a little bit of a say at what happens in the workplaces where they spend half their waking lives, and I got to say, what I was confused with me about you, Charlie, is that I see you say that you're not like an old style kind of corporate Republican and the rigging Bush William F. Buckley kind of mold and certainly the politicians who seem to be most enthusiastic about people like Donald Trump or JD Vance now, make a big deal saying they're populists. They really want to help struggling people in the heartland. And if that's true, I don't really get why you don't support any of those things that I just

Ben Burgess mister Kirk Ben Bush William F. Buckley JD Vance Burgess Jeff Bezos Donald Trump Amazon Barry Goldwater Charlie America Harvey Weinstein Walmart
Professor Ben Burgis on His Proposed 'Baby Steps Toward Justice' in America

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:06 min | 1 year ago

Professor Ben Burgis on His Proposed 'Baby Steps Toward Justice' in America

"With us tonight is Ben or doctor Burgess or Ben Burgess, however you want to say it. We're going to be debating and we'll see where it leads us. Democrat socialism versus conservative populism, super thrilled, that Ben is here tonight to have this discussion. It'll start with some opening statements. And then we'll take it from there. The two minutes is yours? Doctor bridges. Thank you, mister Kirk. Thank you to town circle for setting this up. So I'm a democratic socialist because I don't think anybody deserves to have less power or dramatically worse life because of factors that are outside of their control. So that's the first part. That's the philosophical basis. Concretely, I think it's obscene. The way we have an economic system where workers at Amazon warehouses skip bathroom breaks because they're worried about falling behind in their quotas and their boss literally owns his own spaceship. Now we can argue about what a fairer society would look like. I can contrast what I would see as utopia with what you would, and I'm always up for that kind of thing. I'm sure we'll get into some of it later. But what I really like to start out with is not so much that end point as the baby steps towards justice that we could take right now. Things like raising taxes and rich people to pay for social programs that would benefit the rest of us, things like raising the minimum wage for the working poor. Things like make it easier for ordinary people to organize unions so they can have at least a little bit of a say at what happens in the workplaces where they spend half their waking lives, and I got to say, what I was confused with me about you, Charlie, is that I see you say that you're not like an old style kind of corporate Republican and the rigging Bush William F. Buckley kind of mold and certainly the politicians who seem to be most enthusiastic about people like Donald Trump or JD Vance now, make a big deal saying they're populists. They really want to help struggling people in the heartland. And if that's true, I don't really get why you don't support any of those things that I just

Ben Burgess Mister Kirk BEN Burgess Amazon Bush William F. Buckley Jd Vance Charlie Donald Trump
"burgis" Discussed on The One You Feed

The One You Feed

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"burgis" Discussed on The One You Feed

"I think of maturing and understanding the way this works is being able to see that and calling it for what it is and being able to exercise a little more freedom in what we desire. So it's not to say like we can just do away with this altogether because we're social creatures but what we can do is have the self possession and the agency and the freedom to make these things more or less our own rather than just sort of unconsciously accepting these things as the things that i'm supposed to want at grew up in a home to doctors. I'm supposed to be a doctor or whatever and this is a really important thing. it's maybe. I do adopt the desire to be recognized in a certain way for my book but if i do at least i'm doing it with intentionally at least i'm realizing what i'm doing rather than just following And we have a lot of followers in our culture. We have a lot of people. I think uncritically accept both thinking and ideas and desires and then five ten fifteen years later it might be that they're in a career that they're miserable in the relationship that they're miserable and they don't realize how they got to be in that place in the first place and chances are If we if we dig deep enough it may be that there was a a desire or desire for some object that they you know they had pursued without really ever having made it their own and chosen to pursue that thing. Turn.

"burgis" Discussed on The One You Feed

The One You Feed

04:26 min | 1 year ago

"burgis" Discussed on The One You Feed

"If you think you're enlightened go spend a week with your family that's what the spiritual teacher ramdas said and it strikes accord with so many of us combine that with the inherently stressful holiday season. And it's no wonder that the last few months of the year are some of the most difficult for so many people..

"burgis" Discussed on The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"burgis" Discussed on The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

"Something you took some action. So it can't be passive right You acted to accomplish something or take on some project and it brought you a deep sense of satisfaction and fulfilment after you accomplished whatever that thing is and it was enduring so it lasted to the point. Where you know your fulfil fee I don't know a football game in high school and it still brings you joy to think about it today and that satisfaction was enduring. It lasted And i encouraged readers. Because this is something i've been doing for ten years when i was introduced to this exercise that went back through my life and i found a dozen of these fulfilment stories and it took me a while to even remember some of them right shocking like had forgotten something that happened to me early in my life that were deeply important to me. And isn't it strange that something that was deeply important to me was covered up through the noise and the mimetic noise in my daily life but i recovered them and it was almost like recovering part of myself and as i thought about these fulfilment stories in i began to think like also. What was it in particular that seems to be so satisfying to you luke about achieving these particular kinds of things and by the way they don't have to be impressive. Anybody else right The first time. I did this like my most successful company wasn't even on my list. It was literally a fifth grade science project. A couple of games. They had when i was an athlete. You know things like that. And i tried to put my finger on what it was. That was really driving me and what it was. That was so fulfilling to me and i began to see some patterns and promise anybody that does this. You know. you'll begin to see some patterns in your life to and the reason that's important and i think You know having read a little bit of your book right. I mean i. I would imagine surfing would be probably one of those right and You know the patterns begin to emerge and it's an indication it's almost like a fingerprint begins to form like a fingerprint of your identity of your what i call in the book. Thick desires as opposed to thin desires and thin desires. Highly mimetic change on a dime..

football luke
"burgis" Discussed on The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

05:33 min | 1 year ago

"burgis" Discussed on The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

"I you know everybody from tony robinson down seems to so how do you deal with that because we also did a series on colts which kind of goes back into of mimicry and mimetic. Desire people often end up in colts. Because they're trying to improve some aspect of their life and then instead of improving some aspect of their life the cult itself becomes their life. Like i went through this. I know you alluded to pickup artists. I went through the city. Section community Only to realize like wait a minute. This whole thing is my life. But i'm not actually any better off than i was before Yeah so you lose the self-improvement community i think is is rampant with unrecognized manassas and in fact kind of often runs off of the medic desire. there's a whole section. The book about goal setting right like walton. Walk by right. Like how often do we question why we've chosen certain goals in the first place. I mean there's a lot of books written and a lot of money made by people that will try to help you achieve all of your goals but not a lot of people talking about why we choose those goals in the first place and and whether those goals are actually just like helping other people sell books and whatever so you know this discussion that we're not having because this is almost too it's almost It's uncomfortable right. It's it's almost like a a layer deeper than what i think. People are are talking about So for me. Self-improvement is i mean. Obviously we all want to develop and improve. I don't really like the term though an i i've found that the less i focus on my self improvement in the more i focus on you know helping other people like oddly. You know my life is better So there's kind of a you know were were other regarding creatures or social creatures and for me like the paradox of of self-improvement is like the more i the less. I'm concerned about myself The more i'm concerned about you know the people. I love The the better better goes and usually i like indirectly and up Reaching those goals. That i you know i would have taken a more direct route towards you know. Had i not taken that stance so yeah just think. It's something to be aware of absolutely well. I think that you know. That's a perfect way to talking about these two distinctions. The you make between what you call celebrity and freshman on so i. Can you explain what those are. But the reason i wanted to talk about that as you said that people exaggerate the qualities of their models constantly whether the models are in freshman stan or stone and i think the one i wanna make sure that our listeners have a background on what those two things are. But i realized how easy it is to exaggerate the qualities of people on the internet simply based on potentially manufactured perception.

colts tony robinson manassas walton stan
"burgis" Discussed on The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

05:45 min | 1 year ago

"burgis" Discussed on The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

"And Romantic relationship and a lot of things that forced me to just settle down and ask myself some hard questions I don't know if i would have been able to do it. You know sometimes it. It's almost like take something outside of you to kind of force you into to to do the things that you need to do Whatever that is sometimes unfortunately it's like a tragedy You know a health scare whatever you know for me. It was just having my sense of identity really really shaken up by by some events like i didn't think that i could I didn't think that i could do anything wrong. At a certain period of time right like just revenue increases month over month. And that's the way it goes got myself into too much debt and ended up taking a little sabbatical from everything and it started out as a few weeks and it turned into a few months and then it turned into over a year where i stepped away from a company that i was absolutely miserable running. As like i guess luke you could fight and scrap and you know you could save this company but is that really the way that you want to spend the next year. Why don't you just cut your losses. And take some time. I didn't i. I was lucky that i didn't have to work During that period. So i had enough to to be able to to travel and to read and to just explore some things. And that's what i did. And i i i i wish i ten years earlier in i just never. There's things that they don't teach you in school like they don't teach you how to discern you know which of your desires illusory and driven by your ego and which of them are a little more genuine and are gonna lead to fulfilment What's you know who. Who are you right like. What what project are you gonna work on. What creative thing are you gonna make. That's a reflection of kind of who you are. And what's important to you versus what the market wants and often. There's a real disconnect there between what the market wants and what you wanna do. I mean this is classic artist's.

luke
"burgis" Discussed on The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"burgis" Discussed on The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

"Would i understand as an entrepreneur and a startup guide the importance of being able to scale things. But there's a real tension there with the way that i think we learn best the way that we learn to be in relationship with other people and in on my wife and i have talked about this with our kids. I think we're going to want to have them in kind of a a a smaller environment where they can be nurtured and Were they can just be exposed to a lot of different kinds of people with with with different ideas. And and get some hands on work and also the physicality i think is important too. I think the education also happens in through the body and then. I think that's really really important. I realized that we're in a knowledge economy in that. You know stems very prominent right now. But there's really something to be said about you. Know kind of a healthy mind in a healthy body and we we learn many things through doing. I think i'm a particular doing kind of learner And there's like a tacit knowledge. That comes with that. That is impossible to describe. It's like if you ask me. You know luke how you ride a bike and i tried to describe to you how to write a if you've followed my instructions. I mean first. Of all i probably wouldn't even be able to articulate in any kind of coherent way how to ride bike. And if you if you followed my instructions you you would never be able to ride a bike You'd be better off just kind of like learning by doing it. Because that's like an example of something that we have task now tacit knowledge about through that that sort of physical action reminds me of learning how to surf. Because i can't teach somebody how to learn how to surf anymore. Because i did it for so long that even if i deconstruct the the new process. Step-by-step it's so unconscious to me at this point. It's useless when somebody gets water and it's funny because that's literally what a surf lesson has like. The instructor basically teaches you how to stand up on sand and then moving water is a very different beast than sand so the land lesson they teach you on how to pop up. There comes completely useless. The minute you get in the water and one of my friends had. How do you actually figure out the timing. I told him. I said just come to the beach every day. I've had the same experience. I tried to learn how to surf. It was one of the hardest things i've ever done. And i just i just had to just i was out there all day and you know i ended up being able to stand up and right away then for ten seconds i was stoked and i thought i was going to be a lot better than i was because i know how to snowboard. And then you know. I've had a very similar experience with snowboarding as like you can only tell somebody so much when i tried to teach my wife my then my girlfriend how to snowboard..

luke
"burgis" Discussed on The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

05:16 min | 1 year ago

"burgis" Discussed on The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

"I think that affected my perception. And the way that i now it dealt with everything my read on it now on what was happening for me and what i think happens for most people is that we have models in our life from the moment that were born in the first one usually being our mother. You know we look into our mothers is of course. Father Our parents are models for us in many different ways. Right there models of speaking you know like we learn language from them They're models of lifestyle and their models of desire. So what our parents want. What they think is valuable. We assimilate that into our own understanding of what's wonderful and what's not at political stuff career stuff you know if your parents are both doctors and they feel very strongly that you should be a doctor. That's going to do one of two things it could really make you obsessively focused on that For the right reasons for the wrong reasons or it could make you totally rebel. I'll get to that in a second. So we have these models A few models in our life. We have older siblings their models or us as well. I didn't and what adolescence is. Is we get to this stage where we're just kind of like let loose. We've stopped believing our parents are gods and you know we. We've stopped like looking to them as our as our models of like what we wanna be. We're trying to differentiate individual at that point and all the sudden specially in junior high and high school or just thrust into this environment with a bunch of other kids that are our age leeson our class and we have more in common with them than than we don't in in a certain sense. And what do i mean by that. I mean you're fourteen years old everybody else's roughly fourteen years old in your classes freshmen. You i mean you don't have any money you know like you're all i mean. Even though you might come from families of different degrees of wealth you still have to ask for money. She wanted right Unless you have a job And you're all kind of in the same boat you know you're all thrust into the situation where you all have to figure everything out everybody's insecure like you know but nobody thinks that anybody else's accept them usually and nobody's really talking about it everybody's kind of forming their sense of identity against everybody else and this is why the different little groups form The classic you know archetypal school categories they form and people kind of migrate into those.

"burgis" Discussed on The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

03:55 min | 1 year ago

"burgis" Discussed on The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

"Com. Luke welcomed the unmistakable. Thanks for taking the time to join us as training. Really good to be with you man. It is my pleasure. Have you here. So i found out about your work. By way of your publicist and right. When i saw the title of your book wanting i just was immediately intrigued by it because it felt like your book was the answer to so many questions. I've had that. I've never been able to get answers to by talking to people on this show But before we get into all that. I wanna start by asking what i think is very fitting question given this subject matter of your book and that is what social group. You're part of in high school. And what impacted that end up having on the choices that you've made through your life and where you ended up. Man is a great question. I i mean. I don't know if i knew then and i still don't know if i know now i was. I'd really weird high school experience. I'd got kicked out of one high school at the end of my sophomore year. For just getting in a fight like defending somebody else and You know broke my femur. My freshman year doesn't crutches for most of that year. So i went from being a star quarterback to being depressed due to hobbled around needed people. The curious books for him the whole year really rough starts my high school Which made my identity formation all the more difficult like am i jock. Imai a nerd. I'm kinda smart. But i don't know how much i should show it all much effort i should put in Kinda like theater. So i i had. I had a real identity crisis And i like as a pretty much. I think everybody does when they're in high school No so it's super hard for me to like put my finger on it. But if i was to try to describe like who i was i was just a guy who was thinking to critically about the environment that he was in like from like i. I kind of extracted myself..

Luke Imai
"burgis" Discussed on The Accidental Creative

The Accidental Creative

05:49 min | 1 year ago

"burgis" Discussed on The Accidental Creative

"I think they just worked towards this idea of retirement their whole lives and then once they finally got it. It was like okay. Like what do we do now. So that that kind of idea of retirement it is perhaps a thin one. It's like well. What do you actually desire right Like when when you have that sort of state of life like what is it that you really. It wasn't retirement itself right. It's actually the activities that you're going to be doing and a lot of us. Think a lot more about just kind of the state that we wanna get to without thinking seriously about what that even means and what will be doing when we get it so we have a lot of creators who listened to the shows people who are making things every day inventing value trying to solve problems. Can you give a couple of examples of how the medic desire might play out in the lives of creative professional day-to-day basis sure. I want to be really clear. That mimetic desire is not not a negative thing. It's not just so the medic desire gerard would say you know is fundamentally a very positive right. It's it's how all learning happens and frankly how creativity even happens you know. We innovation often comes out of imitation. We learn language through imitation You know we wouldn't have culture if we didn't have a tation so i think for creators. It's a matter of finding positive models of desire people you know to to to imitate that inspire you and the funny thing about that is that innovation just kind of often arises. Very naturally of that. It's kind of like a great athlete. I think kobe bryant had described really model his game off of.

gerard kobe bryant
"burgis" Discussed on The Accidental Creative

The Accidental Creative

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"burgis" Discussed on The Accidental Creative

"Host and here on the talk about you your creative process and what it means to go to work. Every day to have to solve problems to have to be creative under pressure to have to collaborate with people you may disagree with and just how to navigate toward doing brilliant work together and on today's show. We're gonna talk about something that is may seem like an end around to the creative process but it's a very important topic as we consider the creative process and that is the subject of what is it that you and the people that you serve really want. Today's guest is bridges and his written a groundbreaking exploration of why we want what we want and a toolkit for freeing ourselves from chasing unfulfilling desires just like gravity affects every aspect of our physical being. There's a psychological force that's just as powerful yet almost nobody has heard of it. It's responsible for bringing groups of people together and pulling them apart making certain goals attractive to some people and not others and fuelling cycles of anxiety in conflict in his book. Wanting luke burgess draws on the work of french polymath rene girard to bring this hidden force to light and he reveals how it shapes our lives and society so today we are going to explore why we want what we want with. Luke burgess before we jump into that. I wanna you know. Today's episode is brought to you by bambi when running a business. Hr issues can kill you. Wrongful termination suits minimum wage requirements labor regulations and hr manager salaries aren't cheap an average of seventy thousand dollars a year. Bambi spelled b..

Luke Today today rene girard luke burgess seventy thousand dollars a yea bambi french Bambi
"burgis" Discussed on The Astral Hustle with Cory Allen

The Astral Hustle with Cory Allen

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"burgis" Discussed on The Astral Hustle with Cory Allen

"I think the first thing to do is really just to actually intentionally take some time to self reflect and name your models naming things gives you tremendous amount of power over them. Psychology wanna ones being able to name emotions but being able to name models positive. Negative is is really a first step and it's not easy to to identify them. you know. sometimes we need help. We need a friend. We need somebody to be in dialogue with for those models to emerge especially the negative ones. So it's pretty easy for most people to sort of name their positive models of desire people they aspire to be like some kind of virtue they want to develop some kind of career success somebody that's really motivating them but if you ask people like what are negative models of desire in your life People really won't have a whole lot to say Because we don't think of those kinds of models gerard calls them like internal models. They're sort of people that perhaps are in our world and they're so close to us that we don't think of them as models that are influencing the things that we want so that that's really a first step is to actually turns some critical focus to those kinds in particular And to name them and one one way in one little distinction in any way to do this is to you know. Ask yourself you know. The book has kind of a whole process to go through. It's it's a long one just doesn't happen overnight One of the first steps is to kind of. Just ask yourself seriously what these what is paying attention to a certain model. What's doing inside if you if there was somebody that you are like you obsessively follow on social media all the time because you wanna know what they're up to The kind of a rival to you and if they have some kind of success they put out a book like you constantly measuring yourself against it and if you pay close enough attention to that it might just be stressing you out and making you absolutely miserable. But it's like you have to feed this need. It's like checking up on an extra something like that. Like probably shouldn't be doing. It is a part of this really is doing some work. Some meditative work of just like understand what's going on inside of you Some of these things. We don't like to talk a lot about in our culture. We don't like to talk about envy. You almost never hear that word mentioned But like actually just identifying the difference because some models give you sense of inspiration they motivate you sense of joy when you when you see their success others actually you know. We don't like to see some of their success. That is definitely the first sign of somebody that might be a negative medic model on the definition of envy. When you see somebody achieve something. And it's not that one of the ways that i differentiate jealousy and envy. Jealousy is not necessarily a bad thing. 'cause i'm jealous of somebody that is achieved something good and i want the same thing. Well there's nothing wrong with that. But if i if i wish that they didn't have that thing now then you've moved into a realm of kind of some toxic kind of envious Imitation and probably a very negative model. So you mention away to put desires to the test. Can people sort of find their desires. And then see what's going on under the surface with them has so desires are another not things that we can calculate the very different than the way that we make a lot of decisions So the criteria through which we can sift through desires has to involve discernment and when i say discernment in other words..

first gerard first step one One first sign first steps one of one little distinction ways one way
"burgis" Discussed on The Astral Hustle with Cory Allen

The Astral Hustle with Cory Allen

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"burgis" Discussed on The Astral Hustle with Cory Allen

"Yeah totally and you know the the less we know about something The that mama's comes into play so take wine drinking for example. I don't know many people that know enough about wine to kind of actually make objective choices when someone is apparently girardi. You've got a line that actually like and he's like we drink our wine with other men's pallets or something like them you know are are we see what we desire or we taste what we desire so I don't know a lot about wine. And i don't i just like to drink a lot of it I don't. I don't know a ton about it You you you wonder like how much the like somebody else. This wine is just phenomenal. it's so subtle and scott these tannin's and i hear this beautiful description from somebody that you know would report to know a lot about wine All of a sudden that wine you know perhaps maybe starts tasting better to me than it did before. I knew that he thought it was so great. Totally it's i think that a great example is orange swift like because orange is kind of a hip wine and their their design on their labels is interesting and different than they kind of have Just a whole different sort of unique vibe going on in the wiser. they're good. You know some of them are really good. But i think that there's is predicated so much more upon the packaging and the kind of social components of people wanting to be associated with the kind of edginess of some of the designs in the vibe of them more than the actual wine themselves. Yeah absolutely i mean by buying wine by the labels Yeah yeah totally. Yeah absolutely Okay so how is this different than or more more deep than mirror neurons. Well let me start by explaining what mere neurons are for anybody. That's not familiar iheart. I didn't know what they were before. I started writing this book But i have them and apparently the pretty active. I'm probably a pretty mimetic person So mir neurons were discovered in parma. Win some Monkeys were hooked up to a machine that Basically showed what parts of the brain were being activated which neurons are being activated when certain things were when they did certain things when they did certain things was the original study but one day This is probably myth. But the story goes that one of the researchers walked into the lab eating a gelato and he observed that the monkey in the lab. Who's hooked up to this machine. All of a sudden the neurons in his brain started firing. That would have been the same neurons that would have fired. If you're eating a gelato himself. So it's like the very act of of looking at somebody eating it. Fires the mirror neurons like the monkey seen himself doing the same thing so strong. Kind of basis for our imitative. Nature's on i just neurological level. So you know what. Aristotle said twenty five hundred years ago and what gerard articulated in the late fifties Science kind of beginning to back it up more and more as we learn more about the brain and more about the way that we're wired so you know you have to wonder with social media You know especially with the emergence of instagram looking at these pictures to what extent this firing are mirror neurons. I mean maybe this is just happening. All the time is something to be really careful about I met with a dr. Andrew melts off is at an institute for learning and brain sciences at the university of washington..

Aristotle twenty five hundred years ago Andrew instagram late fifties one dr. gerard university of washington one day learning and brain sciences researchers
"burgis" Discussed on The Astral Hustle with Cory Allen

The Astral Hustle with Cory Allen

04:53 min | 1 year ago

"burgis" Discussed on The Astral Hustle with Cory Allen

"Because i had all kinds of people around me that i didn't realize remodeling behaviors in a certain lifestyle never totally influencing mile and ended up making me pretty miserable and by the way the reason i left wall street in the first place was because i had a mimetic model so somebody who is a couple of years ahead of me in that process that i looked up to greatly and you know he kind of deeply sort of wanted to just go the full wall street route. Become a managing director Make a lot of money and then quit and moved to asia something. I can't remember exactly what he wanted to do. The funny thing is man is like pretty much the day that he changed his mind and he decided to leave wall street and moved to california and joined the start up world. I did too. Because i didn't realize this guy was really modeling. Shaping my desires. But when i left i convinced myself that this was this kind of change in desire that i had was entirely my own and gerard calls that the romantic lie. You said you know. It's kind of this romantic idea of desire that we have like you fall in love or or something happens in you kind of romanticize the process through which happens and you kind of conveniently forget about the different influences or the different models that have affected your relationship with whatever the object of desire is Yeah and it's fascinating to you. Mentioned your your friend that planning on making a lot of money on wall street and moving to asia retire. You know that's such a. That's a common kind of seem in. The people tend to fantasize about and funny. I really totally missing. The point now loves it work. You're doing i think is is directing people back to the ground floor of that. Which is the desire to go to make a bunch of money and then moved to asia. Has nothing really to do being rich or to being somewhere exotic or indifferent pacing of of lifestyle or whatever it has to do with the notion of not wanting any more of not feeling that need to be on this treadmill and keep going going. You think if. I'll be if i'm rich bill to buy anything i want so i'll be free of desire not realizing that of course the second that you get to that place a new different level and dimension of suffering and attachment arises. Yeah they'll always be another model for sure and he run and the on the hamster wheel long enough in the hamster wheel starts to run. You and the funny thing is having done a good amount of traveling..

california asia gerard first place wall street second lot of money of money couple of years street
"burgis" Discussed on The Astral Hustle with Cory Allen

The Astral Hustle with Cory Allen

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"burgis" Discussed on The Astral Hustle with Cory Allen

"Of give me some time of silence and meditation or for the very first time i was able to get underneath the surface of why i been pursuing some of the things that i was so passionately and what was driving me and i'd never really done that and it was around that time that i took this little force sabbatical which i thought was just going to be a few months but ended up turning into a lot longer than that That i was introduced to gerard and understanding the medic desire. I think was very helpful in helping me understand bit of my own history To kind of give me like a a way of understanding that. Gps behind my ambition. I've always been super ambitious. And i've always strive for certain goals but i had never really taken the time to understand why i adopted those goals in the first place. Yeah that's interesting to me just as an outsider listening to that going from the the wall street to the grind of silicon valley. It's really just the exact same thing in extreme extrinsic distraction that keeps you displaced from any potential for self reflection because you have so many fragments that you're trying to kind of manicure that are outside of yourself so much that you're just sort of lost once again in that pinball machine of absorbing external factors trying to replicate them. It's so fascinating to me. How i love that. You mentioned that example in high school but sort of just falling into this pattern you know man and like the momentum of our lives is something that is so interesting to me because we all court of course are these kind of causal shockwaves of happening. Of course we observe our surroundings nine environment And i use that as as information to make future decisions and so on and were influenced in ways we don't really realize and so forth but it's crazy how that can get so deep in the waves of that can get so high. I think it does with most people. I mean it's not fair for me to make that assumption. I suppose just observing the general population. It seems like most people just sort.

first time first place gerard fragments
"burgis" Discussed on The Astral Hustle with Cory Allen

The Astral Hustle with Cory Allen

07:02 min | 1 year ago

"burgis" Discussed on The Astral Hustle with Cory Allen

"Hey what's going on my friend. Welcome to the aso. So i'm cory on your you. And i am really grateful. Be speaking with you today. In fact say. I desire to speak with you today and hope that you desire to listen up that you're having a good day and speaking of desire my guest on the show is luke burgas. Luke is entrepreneur and author. His new book called wanting. That is all about the power of mimetic desire in everyday life. It's a really fascinating topic and we get into all sorts interesting stuff around medic desire. I know you're gonna dig it when i look for fine fabrics to cover my meat suit. Which is the suit. That i'm always wearing whether i like it or not most is i'm anyway. I look for good quality good timeless style comfort and smart. Minimalist design and cuts clothing. Has that in spades. They take classic. Men's fashion staples like the plane..

Ben Burgis on His Book 'Canceling Comedians While the World Burns

Blocked and Reported

02:07 min | 1 year ago

Ben Burgis on His Book 'Canceling Comedians While the World Burns

"Then i know. I know that we could because of your burning hatred of bernie sanders. We could talk about this for hours. But instead you have a new book out. Called cancelling comedians while the world burns a critique of the contemporary left. The only reason. I could come up with that. You would critique the left is that you are a reactionary. Is this true now. More or less i think. Yeah that's that's my main criticism of the left in the in the book That they advocate things that That i don't want you know that that i would that i would prefer we continue to have private health care. And you know that the united states continue to fight wars all around the world and so on and And my by criticism. The left is that their way to effective. Read about so this goals as we've seen so i mean i did feel slightly attacked by your book because if people laughed stopped paying attention and obsessing over dumb bullshit online that would really hurt blocking reporter. Did you consider that at all. No no i didn't. I guess should actually be like one of those health care. Plans that includes like transition job retraining for people who worked for private insurance trainers to become like coal miners in west. Virginia that's right. Well it's a really good book and obviously tied into a lot of teams. We talk about on this show to me. One of the most important themes is this idea of like a leftism or the left as like a mass movement versus clubhouse when you mean when you talk about people seem to treat it as a clubhouse so in thinking about a lot of the different pathologies the left that i'm criticizing in the book which you know which would certainly includes an extreme eagerness to For for people to denounce each other over trivial differences like certain kinds of strange performative radicalism.

Bernie Sanders United States Virginia