20 Episode results for "Bureau Of Prisons"

NPR News: 04-02-2020 1PM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 7 months ago

NPR News: 04-02-2020 1PM ET

"From NPR news in Washington. I'm Lakshmi Singh. The Democratic National Committee is postponing. Its nominating convention. Because of the corona virus pandemic. The convention was scheduled to be held in July. But it's being rescheduled. Now take place the week of August seventeenth we have this from. Npr's Osma Colored Convention organizers said the decision to delay. The convention comes as a result of the unprecedented health crisis facing the country. It also comes. After the leading Democratic presidential candidate. Joe Biden publicly called for a delay in interviews. On Tuesday and Wednesday. The convention is still slated to be an in person event in Milwaukee and then it's now scheduled for the week prior to the Republican convention in Charlotte but officials will continue to monitor the situation. There is no guarantee that pandemic will end by August and so in the coming weeks the Democratic Convention Committee will be assessing the possibility of adjusting the format crowd size and schedule to minimize public health. Risks US Macao with NPR news. The government says more than six and a half million. Americans applied for unemployment benefits last week far exceeding the record high set a week earlier. Job Cuts her mounting against the backdrop of economies in the United States and overseas it of sunk into severe recession in many cases with many businesses. Closing around the globe the Federal Bureau of Prisons says two more inmates have died from Kovic nineteen. Npr's Ryan Lucas reports. That brings the total number of inmates who've died from the virus in federal prison system to four all of the death so far have been at the Federal Prison Complex in Oakdale Louisiana. The facility is the hardest hit at this point among the one hundred twenty two in the Bureau of Prisons System Eleven Oakdale inmates of tested positive for the Corona Virus. So far as have four staff there. The Bureau of Prisons has not yet released the name of the latest inmate to die but it has provided details on the third fatality. It identified the inmate as James Wilson. A fifty seven year old with pre existing medical conditions. The agency says Wilson died on April first two days after being placed on a ventilator. The Bureau of prisons began a fourteen day lockdown this week at facilities to try to slow the spread of the virus Ryan Lucas. Npr News Washington. According to Pakistan has overturned the murder conviction of a man convicted of kidnapping and killing Wall Street Journal. Reporter Daniel Pearl. Npr's Diaa Hadid says Pearl disappeared in Karachi. Eighteen years ago. Local media reported that the High Court in the southern Pakistani province of Sindh found are shift guilty of kidnapping poll but not of motoring him. Three other men who were given life sentences over the killing were acquitted by the court and released failure. Shah the prosecutor general in Sindh says urgently appeal the decision and try prevent shift from being released. That's NPR's Diaa Hadid until the ruling check had been awaiting execution for Pearl's killing from Washington this is NPR news the Koran vires continues to infect some of the world's most influential political figures the latest is Iran's parliament speaker Ali Larijani Larijani is the highest ranking official in the Iranian government confirmed to have been infected. He is among more than fifty thousand people to contract corona virus in Iran which is reported to be among the top ten countries with the highest number of krona virus cases according to Johns Hopkins University figures. Iran has suffered more than thirty one hundred deaths from cove it nineteen the price of oil continues to jump after president. Trump spoke optimistically about the prospect of an international agreement to cut oil. Supply here's NPR's Camilla Yamanashi. Saudi Arabia and Russia have been quarreling for weeks. Now and driving down. The price of crude trump said he thinks the two countries will work it out and then the price of oil rose about ten percent even with that rally oil is still cheap. Prices have collapsed because most people aren't driving or flying so much demand has disappeared that even if Riyadh and Moscow do make big cuts. The world will still be awash in extra. Meanwhile trump is preparing to meet with executives from US oil companies to discuss the possibility of government aid for the fossil fuel industry but companies agree on what they would want from the White House Camille Domino ASCII NPR news. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is up more than one and a half percent at twenty one thousand two hundred ninety two the SMP has risen one point eight percent. The Nasdaq also up. One and a half percent this is NPR news.

Npr NPR Federal Bureau of Prisons Washington Daniel Pearl Npr Iran Ryan Lucas Democratic Convention Committe Democratic National Committee Trump Bureau of Prisons System Diaa Hadid Lakshmi Singh United States kidnapping Federal Prison Complex Joe Biden Sindh
Welcome to April Fooled!

Parcast Presents

01:15 min | 7 months ago

Welcome to April Fooled!

"Forgery deceit fraud in off favourite myths and folklore tricksters us there wit to wreak havoc and create dysfunction. Some do it for fame some for success others for riches and in the month of April you can hear the most incredible schemes from across the PARKAS network in podcast presents. April fooled from spycraft. Two serial murder lies us to misdirect and manipulate. Find out how conman Frank Abergnail was able to pose as an airline pilot. A lawyer a doctor and even a US Bureau of Prisons Agent. Here how Rosie? Ruiz won the Boston marathon without even breaking a sweat and learn. Why CONVICTED SERIAL KILLER HENRY? Lee Lucas confessed to hundreds of murders. He didn't even commit so. Keep a close eye on your wallet and be. Nobody's fool. Checkout podcast presents April fooled running the entire month of April. Starting April. First free on spotify. Or wherever? You listen to podcasts.

US Bureau of Prisons Agent Lee Lucas Forgery Frank Abergnail Ruiz Rosie spotify murder fraud Boston
Trump vs. Washington, DC

The Point with Chris Cillizza

03:00 min | 5 months ago

Trump vs. Washington, DC

"Welcome to the point for June fifth. I'm Lauren Danske Co author of the point. I'm here to cut through the political spin to bring you the news you need to know. As protests over the death of George, Floyd and the unequal treatment of black Americans continues in cities across America. The response in Washington DC has been starkly different. Much of that is because the nation's capital home to the White House in the seat of US federal government is a district and subject to different jurisdiction than a state. Washington. DC has a mayor and a member of Congress, but it's representation looks more like a U. S. territory. So when president trump on Monday called for governors to dominate protesters, he was uniquely situated to deploy military units in Washington DC. Since then at least five thousand eight hundred troops, agents and officers have taken to the streets of the district. Humvees rumbled down DC streets. A UH LAKOTA helicopter flew low over protesters. More and more fencing has gone up around the White House making the Executive Mansion. Look more like a fortress. The police force on the ground includes the national, Guard Secret Service Park Police FBI DA, US marshals bureau of Prisons Customs and Border Protection, ice and more. These are not exactly beat. Cops used patrolling the streets. On Thursday Washington DC, Mayor Murray thousand had. She requested that President Trump, remove all federal law enforcement and military presence from the city. She argued that the units are inflaming and adding to the grievances of people protesting. Amid the ongoing battle over the streets of Washington DC bowser shared a new image on Friday morning. Overnight local artists and city officials began painting black lives matter in massive yellow letters on Sixteenth Street right near the White House. Let's get to the point. As president trump continues to fortify the White House and pushes to dominate protesters. Washington DC's local leadership is doing what it can to push back. And that is the point for June fifth twenty twenty. For more updates throughout the week including our Sunday night campaign edition subscribe to the point newsletter at CNN dot com slash point. If you like this audio briefing, you can get every single weekday on Google home or Amazon Echo or subscribe on Stitcher for Apple, podcasts or your favorite podcast APP, so you never miss an episode.

Washington DC White House President Trump US Lauren Danske CNN president Mayor Murray FBI Congress bureau of Prisons Customs Executive Mansion Google Apple America George bowser Amazon Floyd
Best of Greed: Madoff Behind Bars

American Greed Podcast

34:19 min | 9 months ago

Best of Greed: Madoff Behind Bars

"This is the American greet podcast presented by CNBC. It's one of the greatest lies ever sold for the past decade Bernie. Madoff has been the personification of greed locked away from the world as he serves a one hundred fifty year prison sentence. But that's not the end into the story I'm CNBC special correspondent Scott. Calm and. I'm Chuck Schaffer Executive Producer of the CNBC original series American greed. For ten years. We've been investigating intimate off scandal piecing together the puzzle speaking with the key players including made off himself in this special podcast series. We're going behind bars. To uncover made made off today from the lawyers. He realized it was all over to the investigators pathological live to the victims. What he did is despicable? There's there's no other word for it. The financial ripple effect of his con in this episode life on a cell who made off today inside the mind of the world's most notorious Torius con-. This is American Greek Nadon ten years later however buddy and welcome to our American greed podcast special series aries made off ten years later. I'm truck Shay from the executive producer of the show American greed on CNBC. And I'm Scott Cone. CNBC special correspondent hard to believe that it's been a decade since Bernie madoff sixty five billion dollar scam blew up and Part one of our series is all about Bernie himself and we get a unique perspective from Scott because he he actually did visit him in behind bars in Butner North Carolina. Yeah this was in two thousand thirteen and it was the culmination of about three years of writing writing letters to them and and a little bit of correspondence back and forth with the idea of ultimately trying to get in to prison interview and we went through this very long process of setting it up. I getting his consent to do it. And then The bureau of prisons the warden at Butner had to approve it and This was January of two twenty thirteen and it was very different Bernie madoff that I met that day as compared to the last time I had seen him which was when he was in court In two two thousand and nine June of two thousand nine for his sentencing Surreal van itself but at that point he was kind of Zombie he was hit. He was skinny was wearing a business business. Suit those kind of hanging off them. I get to prison that day in that January of two thousand thirteen and it was a different Bernie. Madoff what let me go back to to just process sort of question how. How do you appeal to associated path? That I'd like to interview interesting. I mean we. I sent him melot of letters. I tried to. I guess sort of empathize with You know what what what must you be thinking right now. What do you WanNa tell the world about? And you know Bernie made off is Yes he's I think it's fair to say as a sociopath he's a man with a massive ego although he doesn't really exude that in person But he is he is to this day. I think very proud of what he did in the financial markets which is very legitimate. I I mean a lot of the markets that we know today were shaped in large part by Bernie madoff and I think he wanted to be remembered not just for his massive ponzi scheme. Obviously he wanted to be remembered for the influence that you had in the markets. So you know. We talked a lot about that. What do you want to say? And and so there were there were emails goes back and forth in the prison. Email system. about what he was thinking about the the the way that the case was playing out what his role was was always kind of tagged with. I feel great remorse and I feel I feel ashamed of what I did. And I'm sorry for my victims bought. It wasn't it didn't people were complicit in this and the the trustee Irving Picard who is rounding up the money is is getting things wrong and things like that. That's so it's so it's it's kind of talking about Those things that I knew were important to him with the idea of I want to get in and visit with you and that culminated Ah again after about three years of effort in two thousand thirteen of getting into prison and I I had two hours with him. Let's dig down into just the whole process of getting into this prison versus getting into hard core big lockdown type right. Yeah so so first. First thing they did what it was like at the club they give you a hand stamp. Yeah I mean there's so I've been to this level of federal prisoner who was a medium medium security prison. This is it's not a bad as prisons go Not Bad clean all that But yeah you go you go through security. They stamp your hand so that they they They know who's going in and coming out since this was a set visit as opposed to Just a regular visitor coming in visiting hours I was able to bring in a notebook but nothing else in notebook and a Pan No recording devices they. We obviously wanted to have him on camera. But that's next to impossible in the federal prison system. They always say it's about security but I think they're also very sensitive to this high profile. Oh file inmate Bernie made off and not not making him so much getting a shot for them exactly so yes so you go you go through security and and I remember thinking you know as prisons go not horrible had more the feel of a college campus terrace school building than than what you would think of as a prison and I wouldn't I wouldn't call it a club fat country club kind of thing but It was not it was not a old rundown building or a place where you were scared it to be. And there were considerations of why he went to that. Prison was health one of them. The health is one of them. I mean you know. Even at the time he was in his seventies And so it's The Butner prison complex has a couple of medium security units. I believe it has a higher security unit for the violent offenders Bernie is in the medium security unit one But also Butler has one of the better medical centers in the Federal Prison System And so uh-huh because he had some health issues going in because he was older because he's high profile that probably has something to do with why he was assigned there. It's kind of interesting. What was the first thing you I said to him? And where did that come from. I I don't know exactly where it came from. The first thing I said to him was you'll look good and as I said when when I saw him in court in in two thousand nine the last time I saw him in court and I was you know probably fifteen feet away from him sitting in the jury box it is at his sentencing. He looked horrible This had obviously taken toll on him. At that point he had been in the he'd been combination of either under house arrest or in the metropolitan correction the detention facility which is not a happy place to be And I think the weight of all of this at least at that point at come down on him so he looked. He looked like a shell of himself. When I saw him in prison prison he looked more? Like the Bernie Madoff of all. There's a famous video of him. Two Thousand Seven doing a seminar on on Regulation Round Table title. And you see Bernie sitting around this kind of a round a round table and looking very sure of himself talking about the future of markets and things like that this this was more of what. What Bernie Madoff? Twenty thirteen looked like Bernie. Madoff was never a very charismatic guy in prison he just looked like a regular kind of grandfatherly. weatherly guy did he. So we didn't come across with any special aura. He didn't light up a room he didn't is that not very so not in the least bit and I you know from the people who met him in years past when he was running his his Ponzi scheme and when he was a a Wall Street luminary. He wasn't a larger than life personality now that he did not have any sort of aura. Certainly not not when I saw him in court and certainly not when I saw him When I saw him in person first thing I said to him you you look good and I'm like well that's Kinda weird thing to say? I just blurted it out but we started out with it and and you do really feel like you're just talking to a regular guy so the allure was the money dealer was the money absolutely You know the the allure was I got a guy you know. I got this guy on wall. Australia beats the market all the time. And you know and not everyone can get in with him and It's it's his performance. It's as as we've heard when we talked to two victims then in now they all talk about he was the the head of the Nasdaq was the non executive chairman of the Nasdaq. You know he was somebody who who who was a name on Wall Street wasn't nest wasn't a household name even at CNBC. He wasn't somebody that we covered all the time. And there was one interview from from Nineteen Ninety Nine and you look back on that and You know this was a guy who was really on the cutting edge of markets in nineteen ninety nine nine talking about how all we're all going to be able to trade online someday people of injurious about they've said we've been quiet. You know made up. It's been very quiet. You know no recently and people. Since we've always been in the forefront of a lot of these technological changes people were Sort of wondering what we were doing but his allure lure was canoe he had some stature. You knew he was in the business and he can make you'll extra money even when the market's down any wars tailored suits from London right. Yeah yeah I mean he was. He was put together when he was His his watches his suits has his office. Was He insisted on a certain kind of aura around the office So he he had he certainly had that sort of sense of style Sue but it wasn't I I would. I would say he never was exactly somebody with with an aura with an mystique beyond I can make some money. And that was the impression that I got when I finally met him in person and spent that time with them was that This guy is not polished. He's not you know no. He's he's just a guy. Were you looking for wisdom or were you looking for all the money. Where where are we women? Look for when you met him it was just just who is this guy. WHAT DOES HE WANNA say? What is he what is his? Take on all of this because at this point we already we. We talked on the phone a couple of times. We had these these emails emails back and forth and you know and he had a set of narrative that he wanted to get out there which was at odds with everything that the prosecutors that the trustee Irving Picard And everything that independent fact checkers and investigators found found Bernie had a different take on things and he wanted to project himself as somebody who felt bad about what he did felt bad for the victims. But look I'm getting them their money back. I'm I'm they wouldn't be able to find all this money without me which is not true But by all accounts since this wasn't Bernie madoff telling you where the bodies were buried. He didn't do that But he wanted to talk about that he wanted to talk about how the system worked. And how the system system failed in the system did fail. No question about that that. The system failed But he wanted to still put his kind kind of spin on things his put put himself in the best possible light while always trying to put out there whenever he could. I feel bad I feel I feel horrible for the victims. I'm ashamed of what I did And that type of thing but then still sort of nudged things his way. We sat down with Mark Lit. who was the prosecuting attorney? And you talked to him about his cooperation. I talked to him about Yeah and and Mark Let who's never talked talked about this case publicly until the ten year anniversary he was the lead prosecutor and lit talked about meeting made off at the time after he had confessed and asking him about asking him questions and he said that you know fairly quickly. It became clear that he wasn't telling the truth and he didn't make anybody any money. He never invested a dollar in this business. I believe that he's a pathological liar. The same story came from Irving Picard. The trustee who's been rounding up all this money they met with made off. I think more than once And determined that there wasn't any Houston it because he wasn't giving them that much information What what what may have wanted to say when he talked to us and this sort of running theme was that there were others that were complicit and and Made off attorney. I really sorkin. Who still in touch with them? tells US similar story that there were there were clients. That wasn't just about Bernie Madoff make me a little bit of extra money. It was about. Hey Bernie I I need A. I need to show a loss on my taxes. Can you reconstruct these trades for me or show help me create a tax loss to to offset some income he created fictitious documents and the customer investor slash slash investor knew about it and government never pursued that. Why I don't know but There were investors who did profit through that type of trade which is which is illegal. And you know but these these clients were. He's supposed victims were complicit in that way You know his. His main bank was J.. P. Morgan Chase J. P. Morgan Chase Ace ultimately entered into a deferred prosecution deferred prosecution agreement with the. US Office in New York. They were charged with two felony accounts of Not Not maintaining adequate a money laundering controls and things like that not knowing their customer which you required to do It was deferred prosecution. So they had two years to show that they had cleaned up their act. They'd implemented these controls and they pay two point six billion dollars in fines so so so it was a significant amount of money for you and me. It was a significant amount of money for you and me for J. P. Morgan Chase. It's about ten days worth of revenue Nonetheless two point six billion dollars dollars and was money that went toward toward victims and so there is certainly some value in that we don't I don't know what what the bank did to clean up. Its Act We don't know because that was never disclosed. The charges were dropped opt after two years. The government said yes. They've they've implemented these controls. They paid their money. Were dropping the case and so so made offs position and and what he talked about during this interview. Was that his fraud. The fiction of the Ponzi scheme was something that he did And and that no no one else could. Even even Peter made off who was the compliance officer at the Investment Advisory Business and did wind up pleading guilty going to prison Bernie madoff younger brother other They couldn't have known and the Sun's absolutely couldn't have now. What about the relationship between the father and the sons Was it an open relationship that they could go up to the floor and say what's going on here Apparently not and we don't know we know that well we know that you could go back back to December tenth. Two thousand eight when the financial crisis is in full swing. made off as being pounded with redemptions adaptions. People want their money back and he confesses to to his sons. Th this has all been a giant Ponzi scheme there's no money to reverse no money to return her He he there was no way out at that point Now supposedly. He wanted some time then to unwind things he let them them. No he was going to Make sure that I guess favored clients got their money. He was able to wind down the business. The sons wanted nothing of that because if they had at that point gone along with it they would have been complicit in the crime and so the story goes that the sons called the fads and and I and made off was arrested the next day he wanted a week this original plan supposedly. He wanted a week he and we think that it was again to shit to wind things down to to make payments to people that he felt should should have their money Maybe he thought in some way he could still get out of this. This this death spiral although that's probably not the case Yeah he wanted he still wanted to do things on his own terms and the sons. And if you believe the story and the sons aren't here to tell us about it. The Sun said no they they call the FBI right then and there a and the next day he was in custody and there's still people questioned whether the sons knew anything zone forever I guess and and it will and you know in the the story of the sons is just is just tragic agit versus mark made off the older son Who killed himself in the second anniversary in two thousand ten His his son was in the other room. Tom Hanged himself And and it wasn't so much and I believe this I I as I said. I believe. It's plausible that he didn't know but still everyone was coming at them and this this scandal he was he knew he was never going to escape this by changing his name when he was still going to be mark made off Bernie Madoff of Sun and around that time the The the the trustee Irving Picard was ratcheting up his pressure against the sons and had sued both of the sons and saying that they They received fraudulent or a fraudulent benefits from scheme and that they should be paying some money back okay and Picard was ratcheting that up to the point where he was going to go after the family going after the children going after the family's money or their freedom going after the family's money was primarily because he wasn't a criminal prosecutor he was the guy rounding up the money but he was going after not just made off sons but made offs grandchildren and it was too much remark made on an so so he hanged himself getting back to Bernie. What was his take on? Mark suicide his take on on mark suicide was that he's sending a message and and brought in my notes Da. Yeah I was sending a message and he you know he did it on the second anniversary of his of his father's arrest confession Russian He was sending a message. We don't know exactly what that message was. I I think it's just that's just a horribly tragic story of these sons by all accounts. They revered their father. This was the patriarch of the family. They took after him in the family business and and now here they find out. Dad's whole thing was a lie And victimized thousands and thousands of people and if if you believe them and you believe the family that the sons knew nothing about it Imagine what it would be like to live with that and for mark made off it was just too much. He just couldn't So so made off. You know he felt I think he felt badly about it. He told me at the time. How he he hoped that someday he would be able able to connect with his grandchildren? But but Andrew made off was insistent that that ruth brings wife have no contact with with she and basically Lee said to ruth. If you WANNA see your grandchildren again you will have no contact with with our father And for the most part she she she stuck with that And Bernie and Bernie was you know He. He wanted to know his grandchildren. He he said to me that he hoped that someday they they would somehow understand and that someday before he died that he would get to see them. I can't imagine that will ever happen in your email exchanges. He talked you uh-huh Not Regretting pleading guilty. Where did that come from? Yeah he said at one point I I wish I hadn't pled guilty. And this. This came from Bernie madoff always wanting to try and control the narrative and at that point the narrative was being controlled largely by Irving Picard. The trustee see the civic trustee who securities investor Protection Corporation whose rounding up assets for the victims and and was telling a story. Korea of Bernie madoff fraud fictitious trades. The all the things that he did Also told by people like Harry Markelle. Police who was was A fraud investigator based in Boston. Who claimed to have alerted the SEC? Years before These are the people who were telling the story of Bernie made off and by pleading guilty. He kinda forfeited the ability to help shape. That and now this was a way for him to do that. And so at one point he said to me. I wish I hadn't pled guilty not that. He didn't admit that he did his crimes. But I think it came from the fact that he wanted to be he wanted. It'd have a voice in this. He wanted to have a say in this Of course you and I and the prosecutors and the victims figure he kinda forfeited that you know he he He should just go away. Marlet talks about that the prosecutor how he says he's a he's a pathological liar. Why does everyone want to anybody? Want to hear from him. I don't believe people who are pathological. Liars should be given a soapbox and I don't think people should be interested in what they have to say and I don't think people pushes report what they have to say. Why did reporters like me want to go to prison? And give this guy a soapbox and we would. We would hear that every time that I would get an Numale and we reported on CNBC And when we did this victims are victimized again victims are victimized again. Why are you giving this guy a platform and it's a fair air questions? I do think that it's valuable to get into his head to know how to protect yourself To know what makes somebody he liked this tech that would steal all this money and ruined ruined so many lives really in service of his own ego But it is a fair point and something something that we we. We always thought about and tried to be careful with to not. Just give him a soapbox but I think that getting back to your question question when he said I sometimes regret pleading guilty. It was it was frustration with the fact that he had lost control of the narrative and we lost control One thing we know about Bernie madoff from the the way that he wanted his office laid out the way that he From from the everything down to the interior decoration of his office he was somebody who wanted control. And in this instance he had no control anymore Martin. Other people were telling his story and I think that's why he wanted to talk I guess when you live get accustomed to a certain way and a certain certain amount of people kissing your ass you know you don't want to give it up so you want to just keep the respect the money you know. Yeah I mean our we we. We can't can't we as much as we try and as much as we're doing here trying to get into his head we can't and I try not to do that but But just again you look you think about about your own commonsense. That's what they tell jurors to do. the yeah. He had a lot going for him. He had a nice life he wasn't somebody who was ostentatious ostentatious about his wealth but he had a bunch of yachts. He had a home in Palm beach a home in Montauk home in Manhattan. He was living well and he and his family he and his family were living well and his family revered him His sons his grandchildren his wife. His brother his employees. And you know he was faced with a choice at that point of do I am I honest and do I forfeit all of that by being honest or do I take this different course. So whatever fraud. He was doing if if he was doing fraud before that believe the regulators and the prosecutors and the investigators that it went on for longer or as as we said if you just think think about. Does somebody suddenly become a dastardly criminal. After thirty four years of being pure as the driven snow. I don't think so You Know He. He was faced with this choice and he he took this course and the rest is history so now he's in prison right and his demeanor his sir he said he looked. What do you look like? The weight of the world was often he yes and he he told me that You know he said once she get past the fact that that I'm going to die in here and once they get past the fact that I'm cut off from my family and my son market taking his own life. At that point Andrew was still alive but suffering from from cancer. He died about a year after that at just forty eight years old. Once you get past that it's it's a lot less stress. He said You know he used to be always paying attention to the news and the ticker and all of that back. When he was on Wall Street now he can read so he had just finished a a biography of Winston Churchill? And he said to me he said this is kind of like being in the army. Except you're not afraid of getting killed as far as day-to-day there. There were that he'd gotten into fights and and things of that nature. What what what was your findings on that? You know it's he. He said that wasn't the case. There was a talk about at some point fairly early on that he had been In a fight with an inmate or been beaten up and I think he he spent some time in that medical center that we talked about. That wasn't the as far as I could tell. That wasn't the case. He may have fallen or something like that but it wasn't it wasn't so much an altercation. he he basically felt as though as as life goes if he was gonNA wind up in in prison. This isn't so bad. This is a lot less stressful. He friends he. He claimed that he was friends with Jonathan Pollard. The the Israeli spy There have been other conflicting reports about that. Maybe they weren't On good terms but he said that they were friends and And we're told today by by Sorkin his attorney that he he commands a certain respect in prison. I'm told that The prison system inmates respect age and intelligence. There's a respect back from the prison population. I think he's got that he's he's an older inmate clearly. He's a high profile inmate. Clearly he he he carried out the scam of the century and so he has a certain stature. There people have financial questions they might as. Well ask Bernie Madoff. He knows about the stock market. He knows about finance So so as as life goes for somebody who pulled off what he did the massive Ponzi scheme and the lives that he ruined and Yes he'll never be a free man again yes he'll die in prison but there are worse places for him to be true in the homes of victims victims. Yeah Yeah you've you've you've interviewed a whole heck of a lot of white collar criminals in your career. What did it is there? Anything that strikes out are there any redeeming qualities that you found in those prisoners. And and where are you with Bernie in that. I mean look I I. I've I've met dealt with interacted with most white collar. Criminal is totally to my own horn here. But you cover this beat for a while on you. You get to know these people and you do get to to see why they got to where they were interred whether it's a CEO or a cfo or where somebody like that And a lot of they're all smart made off. His different made off is He he's certainly as I they said came off like kind of a regular guy You know old man from Queens told interesting stories and he he has had some Pretty fundamental important impacts on the markets as we know them today but he i. It's hard to find a lot of redeeming qualities in him in terms of what he did how he rationalize nationalizes it and he will tell you as long as long as the day is that he's not rationalizing it. He takes responsibility but I never really felt like he took it to heart certainly not when I met him in prison when I corresponded with him. Afterwards maybe when he was standing in that courtroom getting his sentence it and Looking like the way the world really wasn't his shoulders and feeling the feeling the wrath of his victims seeing his victims and that moment during the sentencing when he he turns to the victims after after speaking to the judge in the so called allocution saying what he did he he had one at that point turns around and says I will turn and face you. I'm sorry and I know that doesn't help you and I think that was a moment of honesty and that was that was Bernie really facing up to what happened but in my my one on one with him since whether it's by e mail by phone or in person person. I didn't feel that. So how did you leave it with them on your visit there on my visit there it was you know we were told by the there was a public public information officer in the room kind of in the back of this big conference from the whole time and she said okay. Your time is up. We had two hours Obviously felt like we could have gone longer but that was such as it was Shook hands as it. Kinda come see you again. He said absolutely. That of course hasn't happened Have have a good day. We'll talk to you soon And that was pretty much it and I was left to think about what I just experienced. Who I who? I would just spent two hours face to face with and it was It was an amazing experience. It was it was unsettling for sure it. was you know this was the worst financial criminal criminal of all time and I sat across the table. Just like we're sitting across the table for two hours you know and we talked about about had talked to financial white collar criminals before Sometimes it's just fascinating it's fascinating to get into their heads and what they what they know. This didn't feel like it was fascinating. This fellow Moore unsettling this felt like it always was him trying to get his story out there and bear in. Mind this At this this information at the time all the emails at his insistence were off the record. Which is why we didn't Report on them at the time and subsequently he said you can use this from and we did but he part of it was that His employees were still to go on trial at that point. His son Andrew drew was still alive. He so he wanted to spend me without being out there and again that's controlled. That's Bernie Madoff in control. Aw and so. I think that was sort of what came away with was right. This guy was trying to control you. He's trying to control the story. You can use it So in that respect it was sort of unsettling but in many ways the experience of a lifetime for someone who covers white collar crime. He's he's the big fish he's the big fish. Yeah there was an email one of the last emails that That he sent. I just asked him how he was doing. I don't do that every so often. What's on your mind these these days He writes back hanging in there. I missed my family terribly. How on Earth did I get myself into this nightmare Bernie and think about that though. It's it's all about him. Yeah how did I get myself into this night. And they're where's my family and this is this was sometime sometime. After Andrew had died His his younger son died. Tragically of cancer. Not You know. I feel so horrible for my victims. I want want to do such and such now. How did I get myself into this nightmare and I feel I feel terribly? I miss my family. I think his victims would say Crimea River and as far as the next Bernie madoff. Could that ever happen again. I mean I down. I think that's what we're going to find out we're gonNA talk about that. Could it happen again could there. Was this a perfect storm or Or are we gonNA see this again. There are a lot of opinions about that. There's a lot of people want to separate you from your money and we'll talk about that in our next episode so you think you could not get scammed scammed by a Bernie madoff while we're GONNA ask about that on our next episode in this special American greed podcast series. We hope you'll subscribe today. And and listen to all of our episode awesome. Thanks for listening to the American. Read podcast presented by C._N._B._C..

Bernie madoff Irving Picard Andrew CNBC trustee fraud prosecutor CNBC Ponzi scheme ponzi scheme bureau of prisons Mark Lit. Butner Sorkin Scott Cone attorney Chuck Schaffer
Terri Jo Neff on the ACLU going into prisons to investigate poor health conditions during COVID crisis.

The Conservative Circus w/ James T. Harris

06:53 min | 4 months ago

Terri Jo Neff on the ACLU going into prisons to investigate poor health conditions during COVID crisis.

"You are listening to the conservative circus I am your ringmaster, James. T Harris in the center of conservative circuits Terry Joe Neff. She's an ADA writer writer for Arizona Daily Independent. We've had on in the past and she really has her. Finger on the pulse was happening in the state especially when we talk about corona virus happening in the prison. The ACLU is up in our prisons these days until Joe. NEFF has been following sheets into centering right now Terry Joe. What exactly are they doing? What are the investigating in the prisons? Well the ACLU James has a lot of different interests both from the federal and state prison system You know they've they've been part of the ongoing fight with China Department of Corrections about poor health care in the state prisons, but now they've gone after a federally a Federal Detention Center privately owned, but as where three to five thousand pre trial, federal detainees are capped right now there about at three thousand and the ACLU isn't too confident that the the detainees are being treated well. Do the COVID nineteen issues? With nineteen issue. Most of us I should say many of us think that it's overblown. We were Kinda surprised when we found out that jails and some prisons were letting people go because of the fear of this. Especially, we now know more that you have to be part of a certain demographic over the age of twenty sixty five You have to have underlying health issues in order for you to to kind of be in danger, but we're still learning that. About twenty percent, or should they? Twenty people, Detainees and staff combined tested positive corona viruses in floor forints is complex, and that was as of May the eighth of so. We're a month later. What do the statistics look like now? Are they still contemplating letting people go? Well the problem there is. We don't really know much because of the lawsuits Everyone's pretty much clamped down the US Marshall Service the Federal Bureau of Prisons. core civic the company out of Tennessee that operates all of these federal detention centers. You know they're not a public entity. They don't have to make records available. So the last bit of information comes from a court filing by the Florence. Warden Chris Klein, and that's from May thirteenth at which they admitted that they now had twenty four people that's between detainees and staff ought of four thousand that had passed it positive. for so pretty much for almost a month. We don't know what's happening and a lot of people at the ACLU. Public Health officials are concerned that the prison system is going to turn out to be the new nursing home problem. Because we we couldn't find out what going on in there and you know everything was going crazy. And so I have a feeling that at some point when ACLU gets in and can really get access to those records. We're GONNA. Find out that a lot. More than twenty four people tested positive. Joel Nethon to sit to ring. She's a writer for the Arizona Daily Independent. She's been on top of this story about what's been happening in our prisons. I wonder where the ACLU was when it came to the to nursing homes. Terry, but that's probably a question for another day. What surprised you most about? The incarcerated covert nineteen rabbit hole that you that you fell into? The, first thing is that there's this assumption by the public that the prison system, but the US marshals are you know even the state of Arizona Department of corrections can just on their own. Let people out. the folks that are at Florence, the three thousand people. They have not gone through trial yet. They've not been convicted. They've not been given a sentence so. The Bureau of Prisons. And and core civic can't just let these people out those decisions as to who qualifies for pretrial release are made by judges. They're done through the federal pretrial services, so they know where these folks are going that they have jobs or someone to take care of them. So even though it's a horrible situation to be locked up during this time right now, WHO's GonNa? Let these folks out. You know Paul Manafort who you got us seven and a half year, federal sentence and the Alabama legislator who was serving just under three years in federal prison. They've been convicted. They've had their sentences handed down. And now at the bureau prison says said with them is. You're still sentenced, but we're just. GonNa move you from prison to your own house. So you're still under house arrest, that's a different circumstances, and we can't compare the two. We can't compare to and I. Thank you for that clarification. Terry Joe but I still sorta bothers me of that because of the perceived mortality rate from this pandemic that you're letting your. that. Some people who are who are were convicted are in jail are being moved to more comfortable surroundings. And then you gotta look into how this is so uneven. It's not even handed. You still got bill cosby. He's deliberation. I don't I. Don't understand. I don't understand how this is. Fair how people evaluate this and why there's acting like this wind has been proven that the that the virus it was not as deadly once thought. Well the the difficulty. You Have James in the federal prison system especially is you have such a wide range of of inmates with or preach pretrial detainees? They're not inmates because they haven't been convicted yet, but we don't know what a lot of those people's medical records would show so for instance the five people that the ACLU is suing on behalf of one came in as a detainee in the middle of leukemia treatment. She's asking to be let out because she's at a higher risk of getting the infection but without really knowing how many of those three thousand detainees in the one thousand staff members really are sick now. We don't know what their curve is compared to what we had. Let's say on the outside.

ACLU Terry Joe Federal Detention Center Bureau of Prisons writer Terry Joe Neff James US Florence NEFF Federal Bureau of Prisons. Arizona Daily Independent Arizona Department of correcti T Harris Terry bill cosby Paul Manafort China Department of Correction Chris Klein
NPR News: 04-01-2020 8AM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 7 months ago

NPR News: 04-01-2020 8AM ET

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Korva Coleman. The White House says Americans should continue social distancing to slow the spread of the corona virus. Npr's Nina read is someone says despite the distance and states with stay at home orders the numbers of virus cases and deaths will increase the models at the White House is relying on say so many people in the US are already infected with corona virus. That not only is drastic action needed. It's GonNa take a while for those measures to slow down the process of one person passing disease to another and onto another and so what these models predict. Is that over the next two weeks. There'll be more hospitalizations. More deaths for two to three weeks when infections are projected to hit their peak. Npr's Narita Eisenman reporting researchers at Johns Hopkins University report. There are nearly one hundred ninety thousand corona virus cases in the US. More than four thousand people have died worldwide. The number of diagnosed cases is nearly eight hundred. Seventy four thousand people. The Bureau of Prisons says that starting today all federal inmates will be locked in their cells for fourteen days. Npr's Ryan Lucas says. It's an effort to try to stem the corona virus. The fourteen day lockdown will go into effect at all one hundred twenty two bureau of prisons facilities around the country. The agency says this step is based on health concerns not disruptive inmate pave yer. It also says that inmates should still have access to mental health treatment. Education and other programs during this fourteen day period when feasible the new restrictions come as corona virus continues to spread through the Federal Correctional System. According to the agency's official tally twenty. Eight inmates twenty four staff of tested positive for cove in nineteen so far one inmate has died from the virus. Ryan Lucas. Npr News Washington UNICEF reports. Thousands of children in Democratic Republic of Congo are at risk of dying from epidemics of malaria measles and cholera. Lisa Shaw Line reports from Geneva UNICEF is warning COPLAND. Nineteen threatens to divert scarce resources from these other killer diseases since early last year. Unicef reports of measles epidemic and DRC killed more than fifty three hundred children. Nearly seventeen thousand died from malaria and tens of thousands have been sickened by Colorado author the report Simon Ingram warns the arrival of Covert Nineteen. Will worsen this situation unless public. Health centers can provide immunization nutrition another essential services the lives and futures of millions of Congolese. Children will continue to be Scott or destroy by preventable diseases. Unit F is calling for urgent international support to shore up. Dr Congo's fragile. Health system is says more than nine million children in the country need humanitarian aid for NPR news. I'm Lisa Shlein in Geneva. You're listening to NPR news from Washington a cruise ship with four deceased people and nearly two hundred ill. People aboard may be allowed to dock in Fort Lauderdale Florida. The ZAANDAM has been denied permission to dock by several countries over virus concerns. The coastguard is working with the cruise line to resolve. How healthy passengers can disembark. While sick people can stay aboard and be treated the Los Angeles County. Sheriff has reversed himself and will allow gun. Stores to reopen California has ordered non-essential businesses to close to slow the pandemic. Npr's dwayne Brown reports at coalition of gun shop owners had filed a federal lawsuit to stay open Los Angeles County Sheriff. Alex Vienna wave is scrapping his decision to shutter all gun shops. After the county's top lawyers said gun stores qualifies essential businesses. Vienna UEVA tried to close gun sales to everyone except police and security firms after Governor Gavin. Newsom ordered all non-essential businesses to shut down last week but the order failed to mention closing gun shops. Firearm sales are surging in many states since the virus pandemic but there's no consensus on whether these shops which also cell survival gear are considered essential. So the rules vary by state dwayne Brown NPR News Los Angeles officials in Japan have decided to keep the Olympic flame burning in the northeastern region of Fukushima. For the rest of this month that will then be taken to Tokyo. The Twenty Twenty Summer Olympic Games and Paralympic Games in Tokyo have been delayed by a year because of the pandemic. I'm Korva Coleman. Npr news from Washington.

Npr NPR Npr UNICEF Los Angeles County Korva Coleman Ryan Lucas Washington US Twenty Twenty White House Bureau of Prisons Tokyo dwayne Brown Democratic Republic of Congo Geneva UNICEF malaria Los Angeles Federal Correctional System Lisa Shaw Line
NPR News: 04-02-2020 10AM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 7 months ago

NPR News: 04-02-2020 10AM ET

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Korva Coleman. The stock market is showing little movement this morning despite a record surge in unemployment claims. Npr's Scott horsely reports. The Dow Jones Industrial Average was up modestly in the opening minutes of trading investors appear unfazed by the spike in jobless claims. It's hardly news. At the corona virus has temporarily idled many Americans nevertheless numbers from the Labor Department are startling. More than six and a half million people filed for unemployment. Last week shattering the previous record set the week before in all nearly ten million people have filed jobless claims in the last two weeks since the nation began hunkering down in an effort to slow the spread of the pandemic the steep jump in applications has tax state. Unemployment systems but workers are processing claims at a record pace. More people will be eligible for unemployment under the past two trillion dollar relief. Bill Scott horsely. Npr News Washington researchers at Johns Hopkins. University say that more than two hundred sixteen thousand people have been infected with the corona virus in the US more than fifty one hundred people have died worldwide. The number of infections is getting closer to one million people more than forty eight thousand. People have perished German Chancellor Angela Merkel as welcomed the development of a European Cova nineteen tracing APP. The application is said to protect data and does not record the location of its users. Npr's Rob Schmitz has more. The APP uses Bluetooth to log proximity to other cellphones users. Receive a message if they've been in close contact with positive case of Kovic Nineteen Saudi authorities the ability to track down those at risk of infection accurately could make it possible to ease countrywide lockdown that have brought economic activity to near halt. The APP follows a successful use of smartphones in some Asian countries to track the spread of the virus and enforced quarantine orders although their methods would violate strict European data protection rules. The German government is aiming launch the APP by mid April Rob Schmitz. Npr News Berlin. The Patriarch of the musical. Marsalis family has died of Cova nineteen complications. The family of jazz pianist and Educator Ellis Marsalis says he has died at the age of eighty five. The accomplished musician recorded fifteen albums and played weekly at a small club in New Orleans. Ellis Marsalis had many accomplished students such as Terence Blanchard and Harry Connick Junior. They also included his children BRANFORD. Defeo Jason and Winton on Wall Street. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is up about four points at twenty thousand nine hundred forty seven. You're listening to NPR news. A High Court in Pakistan has overturned the murder conviction of a man found guilty of kidnapping and killing Daniel Pearl. He was a Wall Street Journal reporter. Who went missing eighteen years ago in the city of Karachi? Npr's CD reports from Islamabad? Local media reported that the High Court in the southern Pakistani province of Sindh found Almodovar side. Cher guilty of kidnapping poll but not of motoring him. He was sentenced to seven years in prison but a chef's already spent eighteen years on death. Row this new sentence will likely be counted as time served three other men who were given life sentences over the killing were acquitted by the court and released but Failures Shah the prosecutor Journal in. Sindh says he'll urgently appeal. The decision and try Provincia from being released. Paul went missing in Karachi in January. Two Thousand and two while investigating Islamic militant activity. Authorities reported that he was killed a month later deity. Npr News Islamabad. The Federal Bureau of Prisons says three inmates have died of cove. Nineteen all the deaths have occurred at a facility in Louisiana. Federal prisoners are being kept in their cells for fourteen days to help slow. The spread of the virus. Federal Park Officials Have Shut Down Grand Canyon National Park Indefinitely citing the pandemic staff had been closing down some services within the park but interior secretary. David Bernhardt said he closed Grand Canyon Park after a local county. Officials said keeping an open put employees residents visitors at risk. A staffer tested positive for the virus. I'm KORVA COLEMAN NPR news.

Npr NPR Ellis Marsalis Daniel Pearl High Court Rob Schmitz Npr European Cova Sindh Washington Karachi Islamabad Korva Coleman kidnapping Failures Shah Scott horsely Bill Scott horsely Federal Bureau of Prisons
NPR News: 04-04-2020 12AM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 7 months ago

NPR News: 04-04-2020 12AM ET

"Live from NPR news in Culver City. California I'm doing Holly Cycle Tell President. Donald trump has fired the top watchdog for the intelligence community and peers cloudy resolves reports Michael Atkinson. A key figure in the president's impeachment will leave his post in thirty days trump alerted leaders of congressional intelligence committees of the plans in a one page letter. The president said he must have the fullest confidence in the intelligence communities inspector general but that was no longer the case at consent I raise concerns of a whistleblower complaint that the president was withholding military aid from Ukraine as trump also sought an investigation into his political rival Joe Biden. The effort led to the Housing Corey that resulted in the impeachment of the president last year. Earlier this year. A majority of senators voted against trump's removal from the presidency in an impeachment trial quality selous. Npr News Washington in southern California. Physical distancing is slowing the spread of Cova nineteen but La's mayor warns the trajectory of cases is still tracking. New York's and peers John. Ruiz reports Mayor Eric. Garcetti says the rate of increase in confirmed cases has slowed in Los Angeles in recent days. Even with more testing Los Angeles saw an increase of a thousand new confirmed cases in the past two days. And now has more than forty five hundred. Garcetti says despite some evidence that social distancing is helping California's largest city is still tracking parallel to New York. Where cases and hospitalizations have soared as of Thursday? La County was about eleven days behind New York in terms of per capita deaths from covert nineteen and two weeks in terms of confirmed cases. He said doctors and California's two biggest metro areas. Los Angeles and San Francisco are reporting a rise in patients. Emergency Rooms most was symptoms of cove. Nineteen John Lewis. Npr News in Fort Lauderdale Florida passengers aboard a cruise ship with cove in nineteen travers. Finally walked off the ship for the first time in weeks. Broward County sheriff. Tony said he dispatched more than seventy deputies wearing protective gear to help people disembark earlier. Look this is something that we know is a real threat to us. We anticipate regardless of how much more equipment that we put in in terms of personal protection equipment wearing on a daily basis. That we're probably going to have more increased numbers. The Sheriff said the vessels have been turned away enough that it wasn't some pirate ships. These are our brothers and sisters on this planet. He said more than a dozen critically. Ill patients were taken to area hospitals while others who were healthy enough to travel when two airports the Oklahoma city-based Hobby Lobby says it's closing its stores until further notice due to the corona virus on Friday officials also add. They are furloughing. All Employees Zola's corporate and distribution workers. You are listening to NPR. News American Soul Singer. Legend Bill withers has died of heart complications unrelated to crow virus West. Virginia public broadcasting is Caitlin town reports. He passed away Monday in Los Angeles at eighty one years old sunshine when she go ain't no sunshine lean on me and lovely day. We're just few of the hits. Bill withers wrote and sang. During the peak of his career in the seventies and eighties he abruptly departed the music industry in nineteen eighty five after disagreements with his label. Columbia records William Harrison withers. Junior was born in nineteen thirty eight. The last of six children in the segregated coal mining town of Slab Fork West Virginia which inspired several of the songs withers was three time Grammy Award winner and was inducted into the rock and Roll Hall of fame in two thousand fifteen for NPR news. I'm Caitlyn Tan in Charleston. West Virginia the Federal Bureau of Prisons says at least ninety one inmates and fifty staff are confirmed to have covert nineteen at correctional facilities across the US and late. Friday attorney. General William Bar in a memo to the prison systems director ordered officials to move vulnerable at risk inmates of custody and into home confinement where they could be quarantined for at least two weeks. The hardest hit federal prisons include Oakdale Louisiana were. Hundreds of inmates. Apparently quarantined elkton in Ohio. And Danbury in Connecticut. I'm Doin' cycle tell. Npr news from Culver City.

Npr Bill withers Donald trump Los Angeles President California Garcetti Culver City New York John Lewis NPR Slab Fork West Virginia Zola Joe Biden La County Corey Federal Bureau of Prisons Broward County Michael Atkinson Holly
No Heat, No Power: How a Federal Jail Failed Its Inmates

The Daily

24:04 min | 1 year ago

No Heat, No Power: How a Federal Jail Failed Its Inmates

"In the New York Times, I'm Michael Barr. This is the day. Today, but times investigation found that inside a Brooklyn jail more than one thousand inmates remarked inside freezing cells with no heat for twenty three hours a day prompting an investigation by the department of Justice, why the involvement of the department of Justice may not be the turning it appears to be it's Wednesday, February thirteen. Any when do you first hear about this story? So it's the end of January and like much of the country New York is heading into eight deep cold spell. Stephon halt. And this is news for now. For Thursday, January thirty first first up. Yes, the weather. I don't even have to tell you. It's cold out there. It was just four degrees. When we shot this this morning with a wind chill of more than twelve below other parts of the area felt like negative thirty after midnight on January thirty first I take a look at my Email, and there's an Email from an unfamiliar address. The subject line is MDC Brooklyn without power, and it says, no heat, no power, no proper food over seventy two hours. In lockdown goes onto say, please help can't complain at the prison with our names as they retaliate against inmates and block our visits. Any quarrel covers New York for the times, I am mmediately thought if this is real there must be some sign of it. Especially in New York. It's hard for anything to happen without it being tweeted. So what I do see is one tweet from a lawyer who said two weeks before that she had been turned away because the jail said that it was testing a generator. So I sent her a message, and she writes back saying, yes, there is an issue. She's getting information that there is no power Sunday afternoon when there was an electrical fire, and she says that the person I'm really gonna wanna talk to is an attorney named Deirdre von dornam who runs the Brooklyn office of the federal public defenders they represent hundreds of inmates at places like metropolitan detention center. So I called Airdrie and she doesn't sound exactly shocked to hear from me. She's pretty much like, yeah. We've been hearing from people all week, and they sound really stared. It turns out that there is this telephone line that connects the jail to the federal defenders offices. And so even though power is down this line kept working. And so over the course of the week. The federal defenders have started getting more and more calls from inmates inside NBC saying were cold. We've been on lockdown there. No lights in the jail. So pretty much they've been gathering accounts. There's one paralegal endeared as office who even has a chart of where calls are coming from in the jail which floor seem to be affected more than others. So this is one of the only places that the inmates could reach in this moment. I think it's fair to say that it's the only place that they could reach in less. They happen to have a contraband cell phone this became a bit of their lifeline. And so what are the stories through this direct line to the public defenders office that these inmates are? Sharing with do draw and her colleagues, so the stories all paint the picture of a jail that has been plunged into darkness ever. Remember there was no whites. So we're gonna talk. So I had no idea. What time what they anything was lost talk of every toll sensory deprivation. It's kind of distill you've got hundreds of inmates. Locked into cells that are pitch black like forced air heating system fourth year when he goes off, it's don't blows and instead of hot air blowing through the vents blowing from the outside. So it was cold employees cold. It's cold air on the top bunk. So ambulance direct Biondi. So I was I took a cover of a book and used to spring too tight up there to block the vents when blow cold air on over to close enough. It was and the. The council can get tickets the blocking d don't have anything. But a couple of blankets blankets hero. Like if you get the hospital and they won't blanket. It's very thin blanket issue to do. So it's a thin cotton blanket almost like a little stick sheet, and I had three of them recalled the officer took one he had an extra one and only allowed to have to. Any way to stay warm on this is in the middle of the cold spell. You described the weather during those days is really getting colder and colder alkyl that day that I got the tip would be the coldest day in. I think three years in New York it dropped two degrees. So it was frigid cold and at the same time, many of these inmates didn't have access to their prescription medication that they would usually get nor did they get any medical care. So we had people who had, you know, infections open wounds, they weren't treated. There was a guy who had been hit by a handball and had sort of an open wound around his eye that appeared to have been infected. There's another guy who had a chronic sore on his leg that was festering, and he was sleeping on bloody sheets. I think some of the most worrisome cases were psychiatric patients who didn't get their usual medication or so they told lawyers. And were known suicide risks. There was one man who lawyer told me was known to swallow razor blades. There was another man who had to take a news out of his cellmates hands because the sky was just having an emotional breakdown in the middle of this blackout. So I think that the shutdown wasn't it wasn't just cold, and it wasn't just sort of bleak. I think it was very difficult for inmates to be held in these cells without knowing how long it would last against the whole. Touch in a cement, but we were treated. They were let out for about an hour. And during that hour was when they appeared to go to the phone and call the lawyers. So the word began to get out. But before my editors were comfortable taking this to press. They wanted me to find someone else who could attest to these conditions. I should note that I was reaching out repeatedly the warden and his staff Herman quay, the sort of Dickensian warden name, I'm reaching out to him no response, and I'm kind of scratching my head. How can I get someone to confirm this with the help of my colleagues? I reached out to union leaders, the correction officers are part of a national union, and they too were really forthcoming. It was similar to what I experienced speaking to the federal defenders. They were like, oh, yeah. As though finally someone called. And they begin describing a situation very similar to what the inmates had described. So we decide we're going to publish the first thing the next day. Then you're times reports inmates in freezing cells at a federal jail in Brooklyn after we published the story, we do hear back from the warden and the warden's office says that they're experiencing partial power outage and operating on emergency power, but assure that the housing units have been quote minimally impacted. And that there is hot water that there's heat that inmates are getting hot meals, and it's interesting because this contradicts what we've heard pretty dramatically. I mean, you're pretty much hearing opposite accounts of minimal impact. Exactly. So after that, you know, I had also reached out to the Federal Bureau of prisons in Washington which runs the show, and I hear back from them, and they echo the warden's message nothing to see here. And they add that, you know, Konak has been busy going to send our company the local power utility has been responding to several incidents, and so they seem to sort of put the blame on con, Ed. And so I call con Ed, and they're like, no, this is an internal issue. It has nothing to do with us. And we've actually been pretty good during this cold spell. So now you've got the public defenders. The corrections officers union the inmates the power company all pointing back to the jail. Exactly. So then what happens at what is happening outside of the metropolitan detention center in. Car horns are going off. Once the speech the outside world. The response was swift and Blau. And they need to until there is Justice for the inmates. Here in New York protest today over conditions at a federal jail within hours of the story appearing news trucks. Protesters and lawmakers were at the jail there are inmates families. There's local advocates. Hundreds of family, friends and concerned citizens have spent the entire day out in the cold biting vs inmates. Come for the night actually end up staying through the weekend. He is. And they will have kind of a twenty four hour vigil demanding that the heat comeback on. And we're looking at about nearly a week at this point that the jail has been without power. So you've got people throughout the weekend with bullhorns, and they're kind of communicating with the inmates who are lining up and banging their windows in the design of call and response. With the protesters outside. This gets captured by social media. It's very poignant seconds of video that goes out through the world. And the response just seems to kind of grow and grow. Visited the facility Saturday to address heat electricity and medical concerns by the end of the weekend. You've got national lawmakers kind of chiming in to say something's got to be done Senator Kirsten gillibrand and Kamala Harris and people who are we're now really thinking about in terms of presidential candidate. And by Sunday night. You've got the lights back on at the jail. And that's kind of a moment. Because the protesters are still there late at night and the lights come back on and you see all of the inmates flipping the switch in their cells and the jail light up and everyone sort of cheer on the street. That may have been kind of like the end of the story. But actually as the week begins the action around this only kind of grows a letter signed by two dozen legislators with these powerful Democrats included goes out to the bureau of prisons and to the Justice department, and they're demanding an investigation and low and behold Wednesday, the DOJ says, yes, we are going to have our inspector general investigation. So once the DOJ launched this investigation, I imagined for you as a reporter covering this breaking it, this is kind of mission accomplished, right? You've got a tip you've gotten to the bottom of it. You've written about it and the federal government is investing. So what more is there really to do? Right. It all happened really quickly. I will say that it seemed to be one of those moments that suggests that things do work the way they're supposed to warn. You report something out you get it out there into the world elected officials respond and the government takes action. But I don't know if it's that simple. It turns out that there is a long history of pretty agree GIS issues, the DOJ's been called in the inspector general has been assigned to investigate they come out with scathing reports, and then it happens all over again. A report the Justice Department's own inspector general in two thousand three concluded that the metropolitan detention center in Brooklyn, head conditions of confinement that were unduly harsh. So the first major instance of that was not long after nine eleven when a group of round eighty Muslim and Arab men were rounded up on immigration charges after the attacks of September eleventh. They suffered everything from harassment to physical assault. Very limited access to attorneys or families lights illuminated twenty four hours a day and a pattern of physical and verbal abuse. One lawsuit described men being slammed up. Against the wall and told that they would never leave that they would die there. And no one would know in one case the man said he was sodomized with a flashlight by the coaches. Yes, by employee's at the MDC, virtually every one of the post nine eleven detainees was eventually cleared of connections to terrorism and many people said, well, you know, this reflected an emotionally charged time following nine eleven but in following years. There were cases of inmates beaten by several officers in a premeditated sort of way, federal prosecutor guards at a federal lockup tried to cover up a vicious attack on an inmate, and they say it didn't stop there the attack so violent that the officers later tied a bid sheet from prison bars to try to claim the inmate had tried to commit suicide one case involved officers leaving news in the cell to suggest that the man had been trying to kill himself and had become combative. When they tried to intercede the second alleged attack dates to June of last year. When an inmate was punched and stomped by officers in an elevator inmate beaten an elevator. You attorney Rosalyn Moscow said, quote, we will vigorously protect the constitutional rights of individuals to be free of excessive force by officers whose duty is to uphold the law in a few cases, there were women who were sexually assaulted and raped by correction officers and lieutenants, so all of that has been laid out in horrifying detail in inspector general reports in the past and here we are. So here we have a situation where the department of Justice is involved, and because they're involved that suggests that they will solve this particular problem as they have in the past. But the cases you describe suggest that when the department Justice begins investigating they tend to the larger problem. Untouched. That persists exact. Really that's been the cycle the pattern in some ways. Though, it's understandable. You're asking the department of Justice which runs the bureau of prisons to police itself to root out the source of its own dysfunction. And there's plenty to suggest that that just doesn't happen or doesn't happen very quickly. So you might question whether that's going to be effective and various people are, you know, win. The department of Justice announced that its inspector general would investigate MDC various people, including the federal defenders said we applaud the efforts of lawmakers bring us to the step, but they've done it before and nothing is chain. So if the department is not involved, how is change achieved in a jail like this. Exactly. So where does that leave us? Lawyers here New York the federal defenders that represent hundreds of these clients they're asking for an independent monitor. What's known as a special master who isn't involved in the department of Justice to come in and be part of this attempt to finally bring change to MDC. We don't know whether that's going to happen. But I think whether or not an independent monitor is assigned. This incident comes at a moment when both parties are really examining the future of criminal Justice America is a nation that believes in the power of redemption from Donald Trump to Elizabeth Warren, America's legal system is great at locking people up. But terrible at doing what it's supposed to do. Dispensing? Equal Justice under law. People are asking what should send people to prison are. Drug offenses worth it. How long should they spend in prison? What should their rights be when they're they're? So what could be a better example of a system that's not quite working than a jail where they can't even get the lights to work and the heat to stay on in the dead of winter. Any? Thank you very much for this reporting. Appreciate thank you, Michael. With Lincoln learning, you can access over thirteen thousand online courses top by real world. Experts to help you land that job nail that new project or earned that next promotion Lincoln learning recommends courses based on your career and helps you learn skills. Employers are looking for at every level. Keep learning all the moments that matter to your career, try linked in learning free for one month at linked learning dot com slash daily linked in learning dot com slash daily. Here's what else you need to my happy at first laugh. I just got to see it. The answer is no I'm not I'm not happy on Tuesday. President Trump said he was displeased with the border security deal reached by Republicans and Democrats in congress to avoid another government shutdown. But he refused to say whether he would sign or veto it. The proposal includes far less money for border wall. Then Trump has demanded and less than the plan. He rejected in December which triggered a thirty five day shutdown. I don't think you're going to see shutter. I wouldn't wanna go to during a cabinet meeting on Tuesday. The president seemed reluctant to plunge the government into another costly shutdown. But said that if there were one it would be the fault of the Democrats if you did have an it's Democrats fault. And I accepted the first one enough proud of what we've accomplished because people learned during that shutdown all about the problems coming in from the southern border. I accept I've always accepted, but this one I would never accept an apple minutes ago. Federal jury here in the eastern district convicted Joaquin El Chapo Guzman Luay on all counts the federal indictment on Tuesday after a three-month trial and a years long investigation involving authorities at least four countries the. Mexican crime Lord known as El Chapo was convicted on charges of running a multibillion dollar drug empire that brought hundreds of tons of drugs across the US board whose conviction is a victory for the American people who was suffered so long and so much while Gu's Mont made billions pouring poisoned over our southern border. The trial of Joaquin Guzman held in a heavily secured courthouse in Brooklyn, exposed the financing logistics and bloody history of a major drug cartel from the precise profit it earned on cocaine sales to its members use of bazooka for target practice. Guzman who has a long history of escaping from prison in Mexico who secret doors and underground tunnels is expected to be sentenced to life in a supermax prison in Colorado conviction is a victory the Mexican people. Who've lost more than one hundred thousand live in drug related violence. Conviction is victory for every family. Who's lost a loved one to the black hole of addiction? Those who say that the war on drugs is not worth fighting people are wrong. That's it. I'm michael. The desire to travel is universal. So when you go make sure the journey is good as the destination when you trip to Japan fly the only airline that can take you there before you arrive with a Anna, you can enjoy five star astronomy, inspired by chefs when hundred eighty degree fully beds and choose from forty five destinations in Japan. No wonder it's Japan's largest five star airline and rated twenty eighteen airline of the year. No matter why you fly you'll always trouble pleasure. Fly. A n a this is Japan. Elevated certain features limited first and business class.

Brooklyn New York department of Justice officer Justice department MDC Federal Bureau of prisons President Trump New York Times Michael Barr Japan attorney New York federal government Joaquin Guzman Stephon Democrats Brooklyn Joaquin El Chapo Guzman Luay MDC
NPR News: 04-13-2020 9PM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 6 months ago

NPR News: 04-13-2020 9PM ET

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Jack Speer. President trump used the White House's Daily press briefing today to attack the media and responded to criticism that he did not act quickly enough in the early weeks of the corona virus pandemic. Npr's Scott detro- more instead of updating the country on the trend lines of CORONA VIRUS INFECTIONS AND DEATHS. President trump responded to several recent news reports showing how the White House delayed guidance on social distancing and other steps to slow the virus. He repeatedly attacked specific news outlets as he defended. Not imposing distancing before mid-march. All I'm saying is this. How do you close down the greatest economy and the history of the world when on January seventeenth you have no cases and no death the briefing involved a campaign style video which trump says White House? Staffers made more than twenty one. Thousand Americans have died from Corona virus infections. Scott that tro. Npr News Washington Governor Andrew. Cuomo says his State's death toll from covert nineteen is now top ten thousand with hospitals. They're still seeing around two thousand new patients a day. The latest death tally coming just a month after the state recorded its first death for awhile and CUOMO's words. People are still dying at a horrific level. The number of deaths in the state yesterday fell for the first time in a week. Meanwhile was out today. The governments of New York New Jersey Connecticut Pennsylvania Rhode Island Delaware and Massachusetts are forming a working group of health and economic officials from each state to plan eventual reopenings of businesses. The Federal Bureau of Prisons says three more inmates have died from Kovic nineteen as NPR's Ryan. Lucas explains that raises. The number. Federal inmates have died from the virus to thirteen the latest federal inmates to die from Kovic nineteen being held at the correctional facility in Butner North Carolina. The Bureau of Prisons says all three men had long term pre existing medical conditions that put them at high risk to the corona virus. The news comes a day after the bureau announced the first death at Buckner from Kobe. The death come as the virus continues to spread throughout the federal prison system. Nearly six hundred inmates and staff of tested positive for the virus advocates and lawmakers have been pushing the bureau and the Justice Department to do more to try to mitigate the threat to federal inmates including moving at risk inmates to home confinement. Ryan Lucas. Npr News Washington Bernie. Sanders is endorsing Joe. Biden's presidential candidacy. The two former rivals for the Democratic nomination made a joint appearance today with Sanders calling on all Americans to come together to support Biden's candidacy. The backing is crucial for Biden. You must now bridge a Democratic Party. Divide UNIFY VOTERS AGAINST PRESIDENT TRUMP? In the fall the endorsement stand in sharp contrast to an extended fight between sanders. Hilary Clinton in two thousand sixteen. Sandra suspended his campaign last week. A mixed close on Wall Street today the Dow was down three hundred twenty eight points. The Nasdaq closed up. Thirty eight points this is NPR. The XFL has filed for chapter eleven bankruptcy. Just days after the rebooted pro. Football League suspended operations and laid off nearly all of its workers. Npr's Tom Goldman reports. The XFL canceled its inaugural season last month because of the corona virus outbreak. When the xfl canceled its schedule. Halfway through the season officials assured fans the league would be back but now after the chapter eleven filing the xfl has no current plans to return in twenty twenty one after starting its first season with strong attendance numbers and TV Ratings. Both declined the XFL. I go around in two thousand one created by pro wrestling IMPRESARIO. Vince McMahon was heavy une gimmicks and light on good football. This year's version again backed by McMahon was supposed to be a football I enterprise but now fans won't have the chance to see if it had staying power as a second pro league football landscape dominated by the NFL. Tom Goldman NPR news. Nation's highest court says it will hold arguments by teleconference may as it looks at some key cases including President. Trump's bid to shield his tax financial records. The court says it will make live audio of the arguments available for the first time previous court arguments scheduled for March and April were postponed due to the corona virus outbreak. The court says it's May session. Justices will hear arguments. In ten cases other questions include whether presidential electors are required to cast. Their electoral college ballots. The candidate who won their state. Where rose twenty cents a barrel today to end the session at twenty two ninety-six a barrel in New York? I'm Jack Speer. Npr News in Washington.

President trump Npr Npr XFL Federal Bureau of Prisons NPR President Jack Speer White House Ryan Lucas Sanders Washington Scott detro Biden Tom Goldman Cuomo Vince McMahon New York New Jersey Connecticu Democratic Party Hilary Clinton
NPR News: 04-10-2020 8PM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 7 months ago

NPR News: 04-10-2020 8PM ET

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Windsor Johnston. President trump is repeating his call to reopen the economy as the nation continues to fight the corona virus pandemic speaking at his daily briefing at the White House. Today trump said the facts will determine his course of action. I'M GONNA make a decision based on a lot of different opinions. Some will maybe disagree and some I'd love to see it where they don't disagree will be risk is always going to be a risk that something can flare up. Trump says he plans to convene a and diverse council of scientific and business leaders to guide his administration toward reopening the economy. The nation's top health officials have warned against relaxing social distancing measures prematurely tech giant's apple and Google are teaming up to build technology to track the spread of the corona virus using smartphones. Npr Shannon bond reports. The tool will let people know if they've come into contact with an infected person. The tech giants are creating a system. That uses your phone's Bluetooth. Signal to keep track of other phones you get close to if one of those people get infected. You would get an alert to let you know you should go into isolation or quarantine apple and Google say. The tool will protect your privacy. It doesn't track your location or identify infected people to each other or to the tech companies. It's intended to be used by public health officials to trace the various points of contact of people with the virus. That kind of contact tracing is expected to play a key role in the effort to contain cove in one thousand nine hundred and eventually let people return to work in normal life Shannon bond. Npr News San Francisco. Nine federal inmate has died of the corona virus. Npr's Ryan Lucas reports. The illness continues to spread within federal detention centers across the nation the Federal Bureau of Prisons says the individual was an inmate at the correctional complex in Oakdale Louisiana. The agency was not immediately providing any more details until it could. The inmate's family Oakdale has been especially hard hit by the virus. Six of the nine total inmate deaths in the federal prison system have been at Oakdale. According to the Bureau of Prisons. Two hundred and eighty three inmates and one hundred and twenty-five staff have tested positive so far for the virus the agency has taken a number of steps to try to stem cove in nineteen spread including moving some older and high risk inmates to home confinement advocate groups say the bureau has moved too slowly though leaving thousands of inmates vulnerable to the Virus Ryan Lucas. Npr News Washington. The trump administration and congressional leaders are expected to launch a new round of talks on an additional corona virus. Relief Package top Democrats say. The White House has agreed to pursue bipartisan negotiations. On an interim bill to replenish a three hundred fifty billion dollar paycheck protection program for businesses. You're listening to NPR news. In Washington Israel has banned citizens from hosting family and friends for Passover meals to prevent a new outbreak of the corona virus. Npr's Daniel Estrin reports. The Prime Minister and president are now under fire for not following the nation's quarantine roles Israelis were ordered not to host relatives. Who Don't live in the same home for the Passover Seder meal this week. Police and soldiers were deployed across the country to enforce the ban but prime minister. Benjamin Netanyahu was accused of setting a bad example by filming a stage Passover gathering with his twenty five year old son who lives in a separate apartment and at a time. Netanyahu was supposed to remain in self-isolation because his health minister tested positive for the corona virus. Itani says he didn't break the rules because his son had not been out in public in weeks though. A local news channel claim that wasn't true and Israel's eighty year old President Reuven Rivlin apologized. He hosted his daughter for Passover. Daniel Estrin. Npr News Jerusalem. The Health Minister of Spain. The government will begin lifting restrictions. That were put into place to help. Slow the spread of the corona virus but warns the country is not in a de escalation phase workers and non essential services in. Spain are scheduled to return to work on Monday. Trains and other public transport will also start to increase operations. The government says residents will still be required to follow the country's strict social distancing measures. Wall Street is closed today for the Good Friday holiday this is NPR news in Washington.

NPR Washington trump Npr Federal Bureau of Prisons Ryan Lucas Shannon bond Npr Daniel Estrin apple Oakdale President Reuven Rivlin Npr Google Israel Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu Windsor Johnston White House
NPR News: 03-27-2020 9AM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 7 months ago

NPR News: 03-27-2020 9AM ET

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Korva Coleman British Prime Minister Boris Johnson says he has the corona virus individual statement on social media. The British leader says he tested positive and has mild symptoms. Johnson says he is continuing to work from home makers send a two trillion dollar corona virus relief package to the president today. Npr's cloudy Solace reports. The House will convene under new social distancing guidelines house leaders. Say They hope to approve? The package with a quick voice vote which doesn't require a corum to be present here Speaker Nancy Pelosi. This is an emergency a challenge to the conscience as well as the budget of our country and every dollar that we spend is an investment in the lives in the livelihood of the American people. The plan includes direct payments of up to twelve hundred dollars for some Americans. It also extends unemployment insurance to full pay for four months and raises the weekly benefit by six hundred dollars. Here's minority leader Kevin McCarthy. This is not another day in Congress. This is a time when we have to come together. The plan also offers billions in aid to businesses hospitals and state and local governments Silas. Npr News Washington. The White House Corona Virus Task Force is putting together a range of options for president trump on social distancing guidelines. Npr's Aisha Roscoe reports the initial guidelines were set to last through Monday president. Trump says he wants to get America back to work soon. He sent a letter to governor saying the administration will do risk assessments on a county by county basis but officials. Having given a time line for win that might be done and the. Us has now passed China in Corona virus cases. Npr's Aisha roscoe according to Johns Hopkins University the US has nearly eighty six thousand diagnosed cases. More than twenty three thousand of those cases are in New York City alone. Nationwide thirteen hundred people have died of Cova. Nineteen after reporting more than thousand cases of the corona virus. South Africa has begun a twenty one day. Nationwide lockdown NPR's ater Peralta reports the South African militaries on the streets but residents are defying orders last night. The President Cyril Ramaphosa stood in front of his military. And somberly sent troops off to enforce this lockdown. Our country has never been through a period like this. This is unprecedented but by morning the state broadcaster showed people were still on the streets. Long lines formed outside supermarkets one elderly passenger was livid when police made him get off. The bus is the only breadwinner he says. How will he survive with twenty one day locked down? The government says this is the only way to avert a catastrophe. Interpol TO NPR news. Nairobi this is. Npr The Commerce Department says the US consumer spending rose moderately in February. It was up two tenths of one percent but the gain was recorded before the US began to experience economic calamity due to the corona virus consumer spending drives more than two thirds of the US economy. But many Americans are now out of work about three point. Three million Americans registered for unemployment benefits last week. A number that shattered records attorney. General William Barr says. He's directing the Federal Bureau of prisons to increase the use of home confinement for inmates who qualify as NPR's Ryan Lucas reports. The move comes as the Justice. Department tries to mitigate the spread of the virus in the nation's federal prisons the US Attorney General says. He has instructed the Bureau of Prisons to expand the use of home confinement particularly for older prisoners. Who has served much of their sentence no longer pose a threat to the community. Decisions will be made on a case by case basis. William bar also says that any inmate who qualifies would have to quarantine for fourteen days before making the move the announcement comes as lawmakers and advocacy groups raised the alarm about the risk of covert nineteen in the nation's prisons particularly to older inmates already. Ten Inmates in eight staff tested positive for the corona virus according to the Bureau of Prisons Ryan Lucas. Npr News Washington one of the world's most iconic races. The Indianapolis five hundred has been postponed. Because of the pandemic it's traditionally held on Memorial Day weekend but officials from Indycar and the Indianapolis Motor speedway have rescheduled race for Sunday. August twenty third. I'm KORVA COLEMAN NPR news.

Npr NPR Npr Federal Bureau of prisons US president Boris Johnson Trump Washington Ryan Lucas Corona Aisha Roscoe Commerce Department Korva Coleman Speaker Nancy Pelosi William Barr Kevin McCarthy Indianapolis
NPR News: 03-26-2020 1PM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 7 months ago

NPR News: 03-26-2020 1PM ET

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Lakshmi Singh. The pandemic related surge in unemployment claims in the US continues to reach unprecedented levels last week. Applications for jobless benefits top three million. The onset of the Krona virus in the United States has upended the labor market here many employers carried out sweeping layoffs in anticipation of disruptions. That could drag on for months. The Corona virus economic relief package passed by the US. Senate has received lots of attention for the twelve hundred dollar checks that'll be going to Americans but is NPR's Danielle courts. Laban explains the greatly expanded unemployment program could be even more helpful to many families. The bill would add six hundred dollars onto each weekly unemployment. Check for four months. That's a meaningful bump. Currently unemployment checks average around three hundred seventy dollars. The additional money would mean the average worker would have their wages fully replaced. The bill would also extend the length of unemployment. Insurance people are allowed to receive by thirteen weeks currently the maximum in most states. Twenty six weeks or half a year. In addition many more people including the self employed and new entrance to the job market would be able to sign up for the program. If passed by the House. This could be a widely used program as the economy suffers a crippling blow due to the pandemic last week. New Jobless claims hit nearly three point three million shattering previous records. Danielle Kurt Slaven. Npr News one of the areas to be hit as the auto maker sector will. Ford Motor Company is hoping to restart production at some of its North American plants in early April. It says it'll have new safety measures to protect workers up details from NPR's Yuki Ford's auto production lines are currently shutdown although the company has started making protective gear and medical devices to help fight the corona virus. Now Ford says it plans to open one car plant in Mexico for one shift day on April sixth a week later it would reopen some. Us plants that make trucks and commercial vehicles that would have ripple effects for stamping plants component plants and suppliers. They would also need to be up and running to feed into the assembly lines. Ford says it will adjust those plans if necessary based on public health conditions and how prepared suppliers are to reopen Camilo Domino. Npr news the FBI has arrested a southern California man for allegedly claiming to have created a cure for the corona virus. The Department of Justice Accuses. Keith Lawrence middle of telling his two point. Four MILLION INSTAGRAM FOLLOWERS. That investing in his product would bring hundreds of millions of dollars in returns. Well there are no known. Vaccinations or cures for the corona virus. In fact federal health officials have repeatedly said that a vaccine that is deemed safe enough for the general public would not be widely available for another year at the earliest. You're listening to. Npr News Attorney. General Bill Barr says at the Bureau of Prisons will increase the use of home confinement especially for older inmates to allow medically vulnerable inmates to serve the rest of their sentences at home Barr says. The bureau has also initiated several measures in prisons where concerns have risen about the krona virus spreading more easily among inmates who were unable to practice social distancing. The measures include mandatory two week quarantines for all new inmates and the isolation of infected inmates postcards from the US Census Bureau are starting to arrive in the mail for households that have not yet filled out a twenty twenty four mm on their own and Pearson Z. Long reports the bureau is calling on all households to participate in the national headcount now to avoid getting a visit from a census worker later this year. The Census Bureau is still collecting responses from households at my twenty twenty Census Dot. Gov over the phone and by paper form if they receive one. The results are used to help. Determine each state share of some one point five trillion dollars a year in federal funding for Medicare Medicaid and other public services. The closing of colleges and universities has some communities worried about being undercounted. Census Bureau is Advising College. Students feel left school but usually live off campus to respond online using their school address. Students who usually live in dorms. Don't have to worry about it. Because the Census Bureau says it's working with schools to make sure they get counted on Zee the long. Npr News New York. The Dow is up five point three percent or more than eleven hundred points at twenty two thousand three hundred thirty seven. I'm Lakshmi Singh NPR news.

NPR Census Bureau United States Lakshmi Singh Yuki Ford Danielle Kurt Slaven Npr Ford Motor Company Bureau of Prisons Bill Barr Washington Senate Keith Lawrence Laban Department of Justice self employed Camilo Domino California FBI
NPR News: 04-16-2020 8PM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 6 months ago

NPR News: 04-16-2020 8PM ET

"Live from NPR news. I'm Jack Speer President. Donald trump has outlined how he would like to see the country gradually reopened essentially giving the nation's governors a roadmap for recovery who guidelines unveiled today during the Administration's Daily Corona virus briefing outlining. What would be a phased in approach to getting people back to work? Our approach outlines three phases in restoring our economic life. We are not opening all at once but one careful step at a time and some states will be able to open up sooner than others who guidelines would ease restrictions in areas with low rates of Kobe nineteen disease caused by the virus while holding the line in some harder hit areas like New York state new guidelines. Make it clear be far longer. Process than trump originally envisioned but officials have warned. Some social distancing measures could need to stay in place till the end of the year. New York Governor Andrew. Cuomo says he is extending his State stayed home order for another month in response to the corona virus pandemic and Pears Honda Lewan reports to the Governor says New Yorkers running public transit will also be required to wear mass or cloth face coverings starting tomorrow. Under New York's extended executive order non essential businesses to stay closed and New Yorkers are supposed to keep on social distancing and public until may fifteenth near Governor Andrew. Cuomo says the policies are helping to keep the hospitalization rate on the decline. So now we know that we can control this disease. The bad news is two thousand. People walk into a hospital yesterday for the first time with the disease and the worst news is six hundred. People died yesterday from the disease. Starting Friday evening says New Yorkers two years old and over will have to wear face coverings when writing public transit taxis or ride hailing cars. Honsi Lewan. Pr News New York. The Federal Bureau of Prisons says another inmate has died from. Cova nineteen is NPR's Ryan. Lucas explains that raises to eighteen. The number of federal inmates who have died from the corona virus. The latest inmate to die was the ELKTON. Federal Prison in Lisbon Ohio. The death adds to the grim toll. The viruses already taken on those federal lockups more than seven hundred inmates and staff have tested positive for the virus so far in response the Justice Department inspector. General has announced a series of remote inspections of federal prisons to determine whether they are taking the proper steps to try to prevent the viruses spread. Attorney General William Bar. Meanwhile has sent senior staff to three hard hit facilities including Elton to check on their efforts and report back to bar. Those moves come as the bureau ended apartment face criticism from inmates advocates and some lawmakers over their handling of the pandemic Ryan Lucas. Npr News Washington. Even more people are staying home and millions are out of work. The stock market closed modestly higher today. The Dow up thirty three points the S. and P. Five hundred Rose Sixteen points. The Nasdaq was up. One hundred thirty nine points this is. Npr The World Health Organization says a US funding cut would especially hard in Africa where US funds many public health projects. Npr's Ping Wong has more on the reaction to president trump sharp criticism of the WHO including a plan to cut off funding in his words pending an investigation. Do its response to the novel. Krono virus in the past two years the US has contributed one hundred fifty one million dollars to WHO's work. In African countries methodism MILETI. Who's regional director for? Africa says the president trump does cut funding. That would take money away from projects that deal with many diseases so the impact potentially of this decision will be quite significant on areas such as polio eradication as well as other priority programs that address communicable diseases such as HIV. Malaria already says she hopes the president's position will be rethought because the. Us government is an important player in crafting policy and strategy at WHO Pingpong NPR news? Italy which has seen more than twenty two thousand Corona virus related. Death says it plans to begin immunity testing on an initial one. Hundred fifty thousand people nationwide as part of an effort to identify those who were exposed to the virus but did not become sick. Move comes as hard. Hit country seeks to begin reopening after a weeklong shutdown European epicenter of the pandemic. Italy has imposed a lockdown in production. Shutdown through may third criminal futures prices closed blow twenty dollars a barrel for a second straight day oil in the session basically unchanged at nineteen eighty seven a barrel in New York I'm Jack Speer NPR news.

New York Donald trump US NPR president Jack Speer Ryan Lucas Governor Andrew Npr New York Cuomo Federal Bureau of Prisons Africa Npr William Bar President Italy ELKTON Honsi Lewan
Prisoner's Dilemma: COVID-19 and the Legal System

CNN's The Daily DC

19:36 min | 5 months ago

Prisoner's Dilemma: COVID-19 and the Legal System

"Hello listeners you might be surprised to hear from us on a weekend well. We recorded this episode last week but then decided to talk about the monumental events coming out of Minneapolis instead but we still think that this episode is when you should hear so bring it to you now from the Miami Hayes Mentor Wednesday Center. Give a damn clear in the sale from the Ghost Club could happen to me. 'cause I'm fifty one call to anyone of you can towards those were prisoners in Florida sharing their fears over Corona virus with the heroes project. Now the county that runs the prison where they're housed says that. It is giving soap and masks to inmates. Renting up testing and that inmates are quote instructed to sleep in staggered formation. Head to toe. Hi Everyone I'm CNN correspondent. Kristen Holmes in for David Challen and this is the daily DC across the country prisons jails have emerged as corona virus hotspots. They have cramps cells and overcrowded facilities. And these are all the things that obviously accelerate the spread of the virus and prison officials. Say they're doing the best. They can but prisoners now are turning into the legal system to protest those conditions. They're filing lawsuits across the country seeking improved conditions or in some case. They're seeking early release. This has set off a series of legal battles that have made it as far as the Supreme Court so joining me now to break this all down and help us figure it out is Supreme Court reporter Ariane Vogue Arianna. Thank you so much for being here. I'm glad to be here so petitions concerning inmates who say they are suffering quote cruel and unusual punishment. Because prison's aren't doing enough to protect them against. Kovin are now reaching the Supreme Court. Can you give us some background as to? What exactly is going on here right. Well as soon as this hit lower courts were on it. Those judges knew that Cova would recap in the jails. They looked at the recommended. Guidelines masks social distancing handwashing and those judges knew that the prisoners were tinderbox. Is this contagious disease. And the prisoners came to court. And they said Look. We've got a lack of space. Overcrowding few sanitary supplies and these judges kristen they see life and death situations all the time but in some of those early opinions you could see their nervousness. They knew that this contagious disease was really going to be challenging. And it was going to move superfast and of course these cases don't start off at the Supreme Court. They started the district court than they. Go to the appeals court. A just now. They're beginning to reach the justices one petition. One of the first I thought was really interesting because it almost at the top called out the justices because the lawyer began the petitions thing most people in the US including the justices are staying at home. As if saying look you. Justices can distance. You can have your arguments by telephone but prisoners. Can't it's really really hard for them to social distance and one thing we should say at the top. Were talking about lots of different kinds of legal challenges right summer in federal court some state courts summer for these low risk prisoners and others are for people were in there for attempted murder. But one thing. That's really clear here is that it's not only the prisoners but the staff. They're all feeling the same kind of fear and panic at this point right because everything is such close quarters as you said it and I think that is a really good point to make when you're making these arguments and you're talking to justices. Who are in the safety of their own homes and they don't have to deal with this and even the judges across the country who do interact with prisoners on a regular basis at this point. They're not they're not even going to these prisons. They're safe at home. It is interesting because one judge in Louisiana. He came right to that point like this judge doesn't know what prisons are like. And he had this conference call and he wanted to hear from one of the inmates right and this inmate had diabetes and he gave this long testimony in front of the judge and I read part of the transcript and it was part of what he said was really poignant. Let me read it to you. He said laying in my bed. I can reach my left hand over and touch my neighbor. Five feet from my head is a water fountain. It's the only waterfall traffic by every inmate in the door. So that shows a really stark picture. We did talk to another inmate. I talked to her lawyers. Her name is Talawa McFarland. She's serving a thirty year federal sentence for massive fraud. She's in Florida and she described her conditions. Take a listen are ninety five women on a very tight or an average walk in closet. Because of the number of elderly inmates or older image or inmates live metabolic issues. They've now the bump edge have a twenty which takes up all her fuller. No only one person you move around. That's pretty chilling right. Yeah it is and it does not sound like social distancing. I mean having only one person be able to walk around at once. Does not sound like a six foot gap in between these prisoners at all right and she is really worried. She's interesting actually because she was ordered released. A home confinement. A hasn't happened yet is taking all this time for the paperwork to come through. So she's waiting all the while she's at high risk and she's worried that she's going to get it because not all of the prisoners here are asking for release. Some are looking for better access to healthcare rights. Some just concerned for their safety and you started the podcast with those prisoners in Miami and they were talking about one inmate who had fallen sick. Listen to them again because here they described the help that one of the older prisoners who was dying from Kovic received like we he had a lot of fluid the bright and we went to young corporal problems because I it off. Yoda just walked out and never came huge uneven Covington so he didn't even come into the south although Chilanga back in Florida right. She says that in her facility. Healthcare has improved four days a week depending on how many people go on a survey and it may be a week or longer before. You're actually sleep while I mean thinking about waiting a week at a time when this virus spreads so quickly and they're still so many unknowns we've heard these stories about how people feel the next day they might have to go onto a ventilator. The idea that you wouldn't even get to see a doctor or be able to talk to anyone for a week is really chilling. I WanNa be clear you kind of touched on this. But some of these prisoners are seeking early release but some are just looking for improved conditions. They just want a safer situation right. Yeah I mean as I said in the beginning. I don't want to confuse apples and oranges. We're taking a big picture here. And some people like Chilanga. She's been granted early release. She's waiting for it other people there in for much more serious crimes and all they are asking for is improved conditions on the federal level according to the Bureau of Prisons. There's been nearly one hundred and fifty thousand inmates and a thirty six thousand staff who have tested positive and on the federal level there's been sixty four deaths and zero staff members but again go back to the testing and the fact that it's hard to trust some numbers because a lot of people aren't being tested right and I can't imagine how hard it is. I know that we said that. They swear that they're ramping up testing they're trying to make it easier but we're still living in a place where there are places within the US that aren't prisons that you can't get a corona virus so if that's the case you know looking at these prisons it's quite scary and I want to. He was. I know that bill bar weighed in on this at some point. Can you tell me a little bit about that? Well you know. We've been talking about a lot on the prisoners perspective but it is worth talking about the other side right. Because for instance in the states you heard that testimony from marlow and Louisiana came back to the Supreme Court and said look. We're doing the best we can. This is a pandemic like nothing that we've seen they said in breeze that they're being aggressive dynamic and ongoing and bill bar as you said he tried to attack the problem. He says that the federal government wants to release inmates when it's possible from prison to home confinement when they don't obviously pose a risk to society. We've been trying to keep our inmates as safe as we can. We let a lot of in May two or older and don't pose a threat to the community. We put them on home confinement to get him out of the institutions. So we're taking every measure. We can to protect those inmates. Here's what's interesting is there is some who say. There's a disconnect between what bar is saying and what's actually happening in the prisons because they're saying that the bureau of prisons in some instances aren't following those recommendations we talked to David fighting of the ACLU and he said the federal prison system has been woefully behind the curve despite to memos from attorney general bar instructing the bureau of prisons to maximize the use of home confinement. We've seen very few federal prisoners transferred out. It's nowhere near the population reduction that the public health experts are telling us is essential. If we're going to slow the spread of the virus and protect those who were most medically vulnerable. But you know just to reiterate no Franscisco. He is the Solicitor General the United States. And He is behind one of these petitions at the Supreme Court and this isn't a case out of Ohio where there's District Court judge said. He basically blasted the Bureau of Prisons. Essentially for not moving quickly enough for not following bars directive but Francisco said. This is a complicated scenario here. For instance transferring people is dangerous. Not only for the prisoners but for the people were doing the transferring. And then when you talk about social distancing this federal judge said look. These people are in dormitory style. Facilities can't work. We've gotta move them to places where they're single cells but here's a complication with that. Those people in that particular case they were all low risk inmates and that's why they had dormitory style facilities. If you go ahead and move them to places where they're single cells you're moving them to a higher risk prison and maybe even the inmates wouldn't like that so it's really complicated. Yeah absolutely and I assume that overall they're trying to find a solution that could work for everyone but this is not a scenario in which the same thing will work for everyone you know. Obviously some people just can be released with their lower risk. You can have some people who can be separated. But there's all different scenarios and different crimes that people have committed which changes the entire dynamic. Because you have to look at each case individually particularly in a system that's already strapped for resources and what you're saying is so true right because you you have to do that. Analysis and guess what that analysis takes time and right now. You've got this unbelievably contagious disease. Going on or virus going on and then there's the other thing is the thought about a backlash like for instance. What if you go ahead? You do? Release someone to home confinement. And then there's another crime and that's a point that the governor of Texas really pushed on back in March we've already worked with the Texas Department of Criminal Justice Solutions that we will work with all local authorities on solutions but releasing dangerous criminals from jails into the streets is not the right solution and doing so is now prohibited by law interesting so this is exactly what we're talking about right. Releasing dangerous criminals from jails onto. The street is not the right solution and gives us this idea that there really are two sides of this or are really multiple sides of this on this so many sides and with that we'll be back with more from Supreme Court reporter Ariane de Vogue. We expect a lot from our homes. They're more than a place to hang your hat. Your home is where you try your handed gardening and new recipes rest and recharge work and play. And that's why it homeadvisor were committed to keeping your home up and running no matter what from the projects that creep up on you like appliance repairs Gutter cleanings and Fox and fixes to the ones. You look forward to like creating your very own backyard. Retreat worthy of a summer vacation will find local pros to help you get the job done right. Use The homeadvisor APP day or night to get matched with the best pros for your projects. You can book and pay for more than one hundred projects with just a few taps plus see the tasks trending in your neighborhood whether you need a last minute. Fix routine home. Maintenance or an exciting new upgrade home is standing by ready to do everything to fix your everything. Download the HOMEADVISOR APP today to get started and we're back with Supreme Court. Reporter are Janda Vogue. Now let's focus on those prisoners. Who are asking for release. How are they pleading their case? Well again to Lana McFarland. She is in a federal penitentiary. She did get that release right. She got the release. The bar wanted and it's not happening. They're dragging their feet. She thinks as far as getting her release but she had a lot to say about what people should know about what is happening. While her request is pending. Walk out on a security. We should not have death set. That's that's incredibly powerful to hear her. Say the and it's true. She was not sentenced to death and now there is a fear of the possibility. I do WanNa to touch on the process here because it's just an uncertain to me are unclear to me that the process was designed to handle complaints like this pandemic. So how are these prisoners suing for the release or for better conditions right? Well there's lots of legal issues at play just as you said. But here's one under federal law. It's called the prison litigation. Reform Act under that law. An inmate before filing a lawsuit has to go through a grievance process. Right so you can't file a lawsuit and the law was signed. Obviously because they wanted to get rid of frivolous lawsuits. They wanted to try to handle these issues. Obviously that law wasn't passed when Kovic was anywhere in sight. But that's one of the problems because we've seen some of the prisoners. Early appeals fail. Because judges have said look under federal law you've gotTa go through the grievance process go through the grievance process and then come back and file a lawsuit and that's the problem that takes time. I hate to keep repeating it. But that's the problem here. Is You know we've talked about these numbers and going through. That process always takes time but in this situation. It's zest and it's time that they don't really have particularly with what we know about this pandemic so what has happened at the Supreme Court so far so at the court we've seen so far three petitions two of them from inmates and then one from the Solicitor General. Like I told you earlier. No Francisco and he's come to the court because a district court judge was very critical of what the Bureau of prisons was doing and that judge ordered the release to home confinement or at least the transfer of eight hundred thirty six low risk inmates. It's a huge number right. Nine prisoners in that prison had died and the judge said the progress creeps so Francisco race to the Supreme Court and one of the things he said to. The justices is be very careful here. Because we're talking about precedent right however you rule. You're going to set precedent and if you rule in favor of the prisoners. Here he said incorporate it would mean that every prisoner in dormitory style detention facility in which there are confirmed cases of COVID has a constitutional right to be rude from that facility. So that's part of the argument. He made the Supreme Court acted on that petition. But basically punted the case back because they said that the government had made a procedural air so that one is still pending but there is another case. That's still out with Louisiana prisoner and the court acted on Texas case and this was really interesting. Because I told you about the hurdles that you have to get over before you can file a lawsuit and this Texas case was brought by geriatric prisoners. They wanted better relief. And the Supreme Court basically denied their petition for now so they're cases going to continue in the lower court but just as Sonia Sotomayor. She agreed with the court's decision. She said look. You didn't follow the path you're supposed to but she wrote on her own and she was joined by the other liberal justice on the court the two of them and they made perfectly clear that they are watching this as it plays out. She was really poignant in her opinion. She said that she has long been said that. A society's worth can be judged by taking stock of its prisons. That is all the truer in this pandemic where inmates everywhere have been rendered vulnerable and often powerless to protect themselves from harm. And then she ended with this flourish. May We hope that our country's facilities serve as models rather than cautionary tales. So that's what we heard from soda or and now we're waiting to see how the justices will deal with these other cases that come up while there's a lot there's a lot to continue to monitor. Arjan. Thank you so much for joining us and for bringing this story to light. I actually had not heard so much about it until we started emailing about. And I think it's very important that we get that out to our listeners. Thank you again for coming on. Thank you so much. And today is my last day hosting and I have had a blast talking to you and I am very appreciative of all the listeners who I know downloaded every day this week and of course David Chaldean will be back from leave next week the daily DC is a production of CNN. Audio Meghan Marcus. Is the executive producer and Haley. Thomas is the senior news producer. Raj Makita is our technical lead. Our episodes are produced by the amazing. We'll CADIGAN and meeting Tessa and engineered by Francisco Monroy. David Toledo is the teams production assistant. So stay safe. Stay healthy and David. We'll be back next week.

Supreme Court Bureau of Prisons United States Florida Francisco Monroy Louisiana Kristen Holmes CNN Texas David Talawa McFarland Ghost Club District Court federal government diabetes toe Minneapolis Miami Hayes Mentor Wednesday C
NPR News: 04-25-2020 7AM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 6 months ago

NPR News: 04-25-2020 7AM ET

"Live from NPR. News Washington on Giles Snyder at the daily White House Corona reaping president trump focus more on getting the economy going again. We ask every American to maintain vigilance and hygiene social. Distancing involuntary use of face coverings. Were opening our country. It's very exciting to see. We have a lot of talent involved from governors down to people that just Stand there and help you with the doors. there's been tremendous talent involved and tremendous spirit from our country and with President did not take questions and the briefing was much shorter than usual as the White House deals with backlash over. The president's remarks about whether disinfectant could prove to be a treatment for covert nineteen trump said earlier Friday that he was being sarcastic after the comments received sharp criticism warnings for melt experts amid the debate over win and how to reopen the economy Republicans Michigan's legislature appear to want to rein. In the governor's authority Michigan Governor Gretchen. Whitmer has issued a new executive order. Michigan public radio's recruiter reports a move to a rebuke from Republicans. It may have seemed like a tradeoff. Governor whitmer extended hurry emergency powers into mid-may by issuing a new executive order but the new order also relaxes some restrictions and will allow activities such as golf and boating as long as people wear face masks and remained six feet apart. She says the pace of known. New Infections is slowing. It's doing the right thing and is paying off. The majority of people in businesses also have done the right thing over the last six weeks. Let's keep it up. But Republicans in the legislature are not happy and returned to the state capital to name a special committee to examine her handling of the crisis and to require her to return more often to renew her orders for NPR news. I'm Rick Luda in Lansing Michigan West. Virginia Governor Jim Justice urging the director of the Federal Bureau of Prisons to halt the plan. Transfer of inmates to a federal facility in the state they missed it of West Virginia public broadcasting reports justices arguing at the transfer could undo successful Corona Virus. Mitigation Practices justices allowing the transfer of inmates. Would be quote unwise and unnecessary. The letter comes after the president of a local labor union said. He was made aware this week of the plan. Transfers American Federation of Government Employees Local for twenty president. Richard Hildreth says he was told hundreds of inmates would be brought to Hazleton pitted injury from jails in the District of Columbia. The DC Department of Corrections has reported one hundred ten cases of the virus in one death. A federal judge ordered the system to improve hygiene and social distancing in their facilities the Hazelton complex which houses more than four thousand. Inmates has not reported case of the virus the US Bureau of prisons declined to comment on any transfers for NPR news. I'm Dave mistake in Morgantown West Virginia. And you're listening to NPR news. A California law requiring background checks for people buying ammunition has been blocked by a federal judge in Peers Twain. Brown reports judge ruled. The law violates the constitutional right to bear arms. The ruling takes effect immediately in California at the time when some gun stores have been ordered to shut down due to the corona virus. There was even a run on people trying to buy firearms as the pandemic force. Most non essential businesses in the state to close on Thursday a federal judge in San Diego ruled in favor of the California Rifle Association scrapping the State's requirement for people purchasing ammunition. The also pass a background check. California will likely appeal the decision Dwayne Brown. Npr News Los Angeles early fifty three thousand people in Brazil or now confirmed as infected with the corona virus and now another top government official has resigned. Npr's Philip Reeve says this comes says President Bolsonaro faces increasing political upheaval. Says Yo Mato has quit? As Justice Minister he was one of the Brazilian governments most powerful figures a former judge. Who before taking this one huge popularity for CAMPAIGNING AGAINST CORRUPTION MOTTO SAYS? He resigned because both sacked the federal police chief. That's unacceptable political interference Mojo. His departure comes at a particularly turbulent. Time Bolsonaro is struggling with the corona virus pandemic and the vast economic damage. That's causing last week. Not Caused widespread anger by firing his Health Minister. Partly because they disagreed of social isolation measures for the breathes. Npr News Radio. Nato and Joyal Snyder in Washington.

NPR Governor whitmer NPR President California Michigan President Bolsonaro president White House Corona Washington Rick Luda Virginia Federal Bureau of Prisons Dwayne Brown executive Governor Gretchen West Virginia Giles Snyder Richard Hildreth Yo Mato
Investors Seek Safer Assets

WSJ What's News

11:15 min | 1 year ago

Investors Seek Safer Assets

"The the most forward thinking businesses are well aware of the relationship between technology and growth but what are the principal initiatives driving them to invest in cutting edge tech find find out when we return to the transformation minute comcast business u._s. Stocks start the week off on a positive note but investors will have plenty to absorb in the days ahead with the minutes from the federal reserve's last meeting and the jackson hole summit on tap. It's a big week for investors. There's certainly a started off pretty positively. Which kind of gives you an indication of how important trade talks are to investor psychology plus. It's more russia. Nuclear monitoring stations go silent and the new york police department fires and officer in a case. That's become a flash point in the national debate over race yes and policing. This is what's news from the wall street journal. I'm anne marie for totally before we get to u._s. Stocks and russian a nuclear monitoring stations. Let's start here new york. The n._y._p._d. Has terminated officer daniel pantaleo who face disciplinary charges over the twenty fourteen death of of eric garner pantaleo was accused of recklessly using force by chokehold unintentional strangulation in connection with garner's death on staten island five years ago the wall street journal's ben chapman has more it became a national symbol of conflicts and difficulties between black communities and police officers around the country. Mr garner's death came just weeks before <hes> another on armed black man was killed by a white officer are in ferguson missouri and those to death together sparked protests around the country and ongoing national conversation ascension about race and policing that is still playing out as far as where civil rights leaders may take the dialogue moving forward. Who does the reverend dr al sharpton speaking in harlem this afternoon with mr garner's family just after the police commissioner issue is there's decision said that the garner family and activists feel relieved the story so i think that we can expect them continue their push for reforms that have been ongoing over the past several years in june. Federal prosecutors declined to bring civil rights charges against against pantaleo. His defense says underlying medical issues killed garner who went into cardiac arrest for more on this story police head to our website wsj.com or the w._s._j. App u._s. Attorney general william barr says hugh hurwitz the chief of the federal bureau of prisons has been removed following the death of disgraced financier jeffrey epstein epstein died by suicide while in custody awaiting trial on federal sex trafficking charges hurwitz who had been leading the federal prison system temporarily since may of twenty eighteen will be replaced by kathleen hawk sawyer who previously served as director from nineteen ninety two to two thousand three the f._b._i. And the justice department are investigating epstein's death to staffers have been placed on leave. President trump renewed his calls on the federal reserve reserved to cut interest rates. The president tweeted on monday that the central bank should cut its benchmark interest rate by at least a full percentage point. He also criticised fed a chair. Jerome powell saying he has quote horrendous lack of vision at its last meeting the fed cut rates by a quarter percentage point to arrange between two percent and two and a quarter order percent the minutes from that meeting will be out on wednesday planned parenthood is withdrawing from the federal title ex family planning program there were an ization made the decision to withdraw rather than comply with a rule that prevents clinics from referring patients for abortions that means loss of about sixty million dollars annually planned planned parenthood's acting president says the organization will continue offering its range of services but we'll be forced to serve far fewer patients. Welcome back to the transformation minute from comcast business. What business initiatives are the chief drivers of investment the new technology. We asked denise hasty s._p. Comcast business according to a recent report there are top five business priorities three of which require great technology in order to deliver corporate infrastructure leveraging i._t. Investment and customer focus across the board the c. suite season season investing in technology as a path to growth he was stock and bond yields started the week higher. Thanks thanks in part to the news of progress in restoring trade talks in china. Still we report that concerns over slowing global growth are pushing investors towards safer assets including gold here with more wall street journal reporter ira llosa bosh kelly ira. We've been hearing a lot of talk recently about a possible recession on the horizon now opinions opinions on how much of a immediate concern that should be very but how are we seeing investors responding to growing concerns about global growth and continued trade tensions investors festers are in a funny place right now because on one hand you have the major stock indexes not far from recent record highs on the other hand. If you look out to the rest of the world you see that these fears of slow global growth or more than fears now. It's actually happening in and a lot of places yet at the same time you look back into the to the u._s. And you see growth is has moderated but it it's kind of chugging along so that puts investors in a position where many of them don't want to stop buying u._s. stocks but they do want to hedge those bets and the way they hedge those bets is buying haven haven assets these are assets that appreciate when markets good volatile or rocky and these include gold the japanese yen treasuries and others in your piece for the wall street journal you do talk about gold and the japanese yen which has become something of a safe haven for nervous investors. Yes these are two very very traditional. Safe havens for nervous investors. Gold is an asset that does not offer investors yield and when yields in the u._s. are high. It's not very attractive but as yield start going lower it becomes a more attractive asset and with a ten year yields having fallen into multiyear lows. It really raises the allure of gold. The japanese yen is kind of a different story because people say that part of the reason that the japanese yen has performed so well during mounts bouts of market uncertainty is because japanese investors have so much money out there in the world that would markets turned volatile. They pull that money back and it converted back into yen. Causing the answer is no beginning of the new week. We're reporting on rising stocks and bonds monday. This week also brings the fed minutes and the jackson hole summit which should also give investors. Some more clues was about the fed's thinking here. It's a big week for investors certainly started off pretty positively. Which kind of gives you an indication of how important trade talks wchs are to investor psychology just the notion that there is a a roadmap out there. It seems to have soothe investors. Here's minds for the time being at least and the minutes from the fed meeting as well as the <hes> speech at jackson hole by mr powell is also could be very significant depending on what kind of signals he gives if it looks like the fed is kind of a setting up for a very very dovish position going forward that could certainly help markets wall street journal reporter ira llosa villa joining me in our studio. Thank you so much ira. Thank thank you additional nuclear clear. Monitoring stations in russia have gone silent bringing the number up to at least four since an explosion at a missile test site earlier this month. That's according to an international arms. Control troll official here with more from washington is the wall street journal's michael gordon michael. What's the latest you can tell us. Regarding these monitoring stations well on august because day there was a catastrophic explosion in north west russia where the <hes> russians were undertaking attest of a novel missile system that is believed to be nuclear power and just a few days after a nuclear monitoring stations in russia suddenly went off line and and these are stations that report to <hes> the comprehensive nuclear-test-ban organization so it looks like the russians are trying to cover up just what happened in that test and the nature of the system <hes> that was being tested what we heard from russia so far. We haven't heard anything is wall street. Journal reporter is i've gone to the russian embassy with some questions. They referred me made a moscow. Our moscow bureau has gone to the russian nuclear energy ministry into the kremlin and we've gotten no response. The russians are are being silent and their public statements statements just as they are in these nuclear monitoring stations. There is another issue which is this effect. The viability of the comprehensive nuclear-test-ban test-ban treaty and this is an agreement that was actually signed but never ratified by the u._s. That prohibits nuclear weapons tests most experts believe leave that even if the russians are taken four of their monitoring stations offline there many other ways of evaluating compliance science with this treaty which the russians had promised to adhere to including other stations in russia stations outside russia. They're they're all sorts of mechanisms. So people people do not believe the russians are trying to cover up a clandestine nuclear weapons test nor do they believe this punctures a hole in the the comprehensive nuclear-test-ban treaty which has not yet entered force for what they do believe is the russians are trying to conceal the nature of the nuclear powered system that they were testing from a western experts in western intelligence mission and russia. I used to live there <hes> trying to conceal information about embarrassing events and a deep suspicion of <hes> foreign powers who they <hes> think are trying to to learn secrets about what their military establishment is up to in. This seems to be another example of that wall street journal reporter michael gordon joining us from washington. Thank you so much michael. Thank you and that's what's news for this monday afternoon. I'm ameri for totally. Thanks for listening <music>.

wall street journal russia reporter Mr garner officer fed comcast new york jackson hole michael gordon michael russia Jerome powell jeffrey epstein epstein edge tech anne marie eric garner pantaleo federal bureau of prisons washington president
NPR News: 04-02-2020 8AM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 7 months ago

NPR News: 04-02-2020 8AM ET

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Korva Coleman. The number of worldwide infections from the corona virus is inching toward one million people researchers from Johns Hopkins University. Say More than forty eight thousand people around the world have perished in the US. The death toll has reached more than fifty one hundred people. Npr's Alison. Aubrey says the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is looking closely at Kovic nineteen patients who have died so far the CDC has found that seventy eight percent of people hospitalized in the ICU with cove. It in the US had at least one chronic or underlying condition. Some of these are very common. Third had diabetes thirty percent had heart disease. Twenty one percent had chronic lung disease which includes asthma and COPD. So people with these conditions are most at risk but we should point out. This is unpredictable. The CDC is also found an early snapshot that twenty percent of patients hospitalized were under the age of forty four NPR's Alison Aubrey reporting job. Losses related to the pandemic are continuing to grow. Npr's Scott horsely reports. The Labor Department will issue a new tally of unemployment claims. This morning Corona Virus. Layoffs are shattering all previous records in both size and speed a week ago. We learn more than three and a quarter million people at filed for unemployment since the beginning of widespread public health measures. This week we could exceed. That tally with another four or five million people out of work. Businesses across the country have been closing their doors in an effort to slow. The spread of the virus forecasters say the unemployment rate is likely to soar from just three and a half percent in February to twelve or even fifteen percent before the pandemics under control. Most that spike will not show up in tomorrow's monthly jobs report though is based on surveys taken before the big corona virus. Crackdown Scott horsely. Npr News Washington. The Federal Bureau of Prisons says three inmates have died of cove in nineteen. All the deaths have occurred at a facility in Louisiana. The Federal Bureau of Prisons Says Nearly Twenty other federal. Inmates have been sickened. By the corona virus. The agency has ordered all one hundred forty. Six thousand prisoners be kept in their cells for fourteen days to help slow the spread of the illness. The Patriarch of the musical. Marsalis family has died of cove. Nineteen the family of jazz pianist. And Educator Ellis Marsalis says. He has died at the age of eighty five. The accomplished musician recorded fifteen albums and played weekly at a small club in New Orleans. Ellis Marsalis had many accomplished students such as Terence Blanchard and Harry connick junior they also included as children Branford Defeo Jason and went in this is NPR US Learner Command in Colorado Springs. East taking the unusual step of splitting up and isolating some of its commanders as a precaution against cove nineteen as Colorado public radio. Dan Boyce reports their orders. Go well beyond the shelter in place directive issued by states. Northern Command is the part of the military focused on protecting the North American continent. It's based at Peterson. Air Force Base but as its duties ramp up in response to Corona virus. Command teams are working in shifts. Some have been moved to an underground bunker in nearby Cheyenne Mountain as well as a third undisclosed location. The teams are also being isolated from their families as long as the pandemic persists among its midi duties. North Com manages the military's corona virus response including sending naval medical ships too hard hit coastal cities for NPR news. I'm Dan Voice. In Colorado Springs Accord in Pakistan has overturned the death penalty for three people accused of involvement in the kidnapping and murder of Wall Street Journal. Reporter Daniel Pearl that occurred in two thousand and two. The Pakistani court also changed the murder conviction of pearls main accused killer into a lesser charge of kidnapping. The man's death sentence has been converted into a prison term of seven years. The National Weather Service says there's wintry weather extending from the northwest mountains in the US to the North Central Plains which storm warnings and advisories are posted from the Canadian border. In Minnesota to Colorado temperatures will be below normal separately. A coastal storm is meandering in the Atlantic Ocean and will spread to New England. This is NPR.

Npr US NPR Ellis Marsalis Alison Aubrey CDC Federal Bureau of Prisons Scott horsely Colorado Springs Colorado Npr Johns Hopkins University Korva Coleman chronic lung disease Washington Northern Command COPD kidnapping Atlantic Ocean
NPR News: 03-29-2020 6PM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 7 months ago

NPR News: 03-29-2020 6PM ET

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Jeanine herbst New York State's death toll from the corona virus is approaching one thousand as. Npr's Joel Rose. Reports figures released today. Show that the state accounts for more than forty percent of all Cova nineteen deaths in the US. The number of deaths in New York state jumped by more than two hundred nine hundred sixty five. That's the biggest single-day increase so far. The number of total confirmed cases continues to climb as well but governor. Andrew Cuomo says the numbers aren't growing as fast as they were last week when the number of cases was doubling every two days now Cuomo says they're doubling every six days so you're still going up towards the apex but the rate of the doubling is slowing which is good news still cuomo extended the state's restrictions on non essential work and travel in New York through the middle of April and offered no timetable for when they might be lifted. Joel rose NPR news. Louisiana officials say the first federal inmate death from Cova nineteen happened in a rural prison. The Federal Bureau of Prisons Says Forty nine year old. Patrick Jones died Saturday after falling. Ill with the virus. Paul Bron from member station W. Arkaev reports Jones had an underlying health condition. Ten Days Ago Jones complain to prison staff that he had a persistent cough. He was evaluated by the facilities medical personnel and sent to a nearby where he later tested positive for Kovic Nineteen Bureau. Spokesperson said in a press. Release that Jones had long term pre existing conditions that contributed to his quick decline. He's about halfway through a twenty seven year sentence for drug charges when he died at least four other inmates at Oakdale Louisiana's Federal Correctional Complex have tested positive. The bureau prison says it is temporarily suspended social visitation nationwide and is quarantining new inmates for a period of fourteen days for NPR news. I'm Paul Braun and Baton Rouge Italian officials say the country's lockdown measures are starting to produce results the latest date on the death toll. A number of new virus cases suggest they're not increasing as rapidly. Npr SYLVIA POHJOLA reports the Civil Protection Agency said that the number of deaths has climbed by seven hundred fifty six to ten thousand seven hundred. Seventy nine and the total number of cases has reached more than ninety seven thousand. Dr Luca Raquel pointed out that the numbers of deaths and patients admitted to. Icu's have dropped the last two days by ten to fifteen percent. A sign he said. The lockdown is starting to work but after nineteen days of restrictive measures and fearing social unrest. The government approved a four point. Eight Billion Emergency Fund for vouchers for millions of Italians. Who can no longer buy. Food and pope. Francis has backed the United Nations call for a global ceasefire so the world could focus on fighting the corona virus outbreak. Silvia Poll Jolie. Npr News Rome this is NPR news. Elton John is hosting a living room concert tonight to raise money for victims and first responders. The fundraiser will be televised and streamed the musicians. Though we'll stay at home singers. Include Billy Irish Maria Care Mariah Carey Alicia keys and Tim McGraw. They're scheduled to appear and perform from their houses. The Kennedy Center is furloughed. All Ninety six musicians of the National Symphony Orchestra. The musicians received the news on the same day that the president signed the Emergency Relief Package which includes twenty five million dollars for the Kennedy Center. Npr's Elizabeth Blair has more. The Kennedy Center told the musicians. They would no longer receive a paycheck. After April third the musicians union immediately filed a grievance saying the action was in violation of the NFL's contract which provides six weeks notice before it can stop paying musicians for economic reasons. The Kennedy Center says the twenty five million dollars from the relief package will help pay essential personnel to ensure the center can reopen. When it's safe to do so in a statement Kennedy Center President. Deborah Rudder says without this funding the center would run out of cash for operations by mid May rudder also announced that she is foregoing. Almost all of her one point two million dollar salary. Elizabeth Blair. Npr News Washington at award winning conductor and one of the world's most popular contemporary classical music composers has died Kristof Hendra rescues. Music was featured on the soundtracks of the exorcist. And the shining he also influenced rock groups ranging from the band to radiohead. He died at his home. He was eighty six Janine herbst and listening to NPR news from Washington.

NPR Npr Kennedy Center Patrick Jones New York State Janine herbst Joel Rose Washington Cova Andrew Cuomo Kovic Nineteen Bureau Elizabeth Blair Federal Bureau of Prisons Jeanine herbst Deborah Rudder US Dr Luca Raquel Kennedy Center persistent cough Paul Braun
Into Resuming Federal Executions

Into America

26:26 min | 3 months ago

Into Resuming Federal Executions

"The. The fourth of July weekend became a weekend of protests as people continue to take to the streets calling for a more humane approach to law enforcement. As much of the public is looking to minimize death at the hands of the law in American society. The trump administration appears to be ramping it up. I've always supported that. Those. I don't even understand people that. President trump has been a proponent of capital punishment for years in the late eighty s, he publicly called for the execution of five teenage boys wrongfully convicted of raping a Jogger in Central Park. And last July his Justice Department under Attorney General William. Bar announced that the federal government would resume the killing federal death row inmates. While the death penalty has continued at the state level of federal execution has been carried out since two thousand three. In June the attorney. General directed the Federal Bureau of Prisons to schedule the executions of four federal death row inmates. All four men were convicted of killing children. The first execution is set to happen one week from today. I'm sure mainly, and this is into America. Today. We're going into the trump administration's move to revive the federal death penalty for the first time in seventeen years, despite a mass movement against violence and a decline in the use and support for capital punishment. There's a consciousness about the problems in the criminal legal system. Mirim Mahara spent sixteen years representing clients sentenced to death. I the Lacey. C. P. Legal, Defense Fund, and then as a specially designated federal public defender, and here the federal government is deciding to take the step to resurrect the issue of the death penalty at a time when it is neither necessary nor called for. Mira Mahara is now a clinical associate professor of law at Yale. Law School. Miriam thank you so much for joining us today. Thank you your professor at Yale. Law School You spent a number of years representing a death sentence clients and post conviction litigation. But how did you actually get into this work? I always knew I wanted to be a civil rights lawyer by the time I was probably in sixth or seventh grade and what I thought was that I was going to go and litigating school desegregation, cases and affirmative action were then when I was in law school. I took a clinical class in which my professor had students working on cases, representing children who were accused of crimes in the Boston area. I realized through that work that all the issues that I was concerned about with inequities, schooling, segregation and housing disparities in healthcare were all coming together to put these children into the pipeline for involvement in the criminal justice system I realized that criminal justice issues are civil rights issues, and that's how I ended up. Attracted to criminal, justice work. And so here we are, and when you consider the death, penalty and executions in a lot of people don't really understand the difference between the state courts and federal courts. Let alone state executions in federal executions. Could you break down the difference for us? Most criminal justice in this country happens in the states and happens at the local level, so the vast majority of the over three thousand people who are on death row in the United States are people who've been convicted in local jurisdictions in their states, and what happens is they then have levels of review that are available to them through the State Court systems up until the highest state courts, and then they're entitled to review by Federal Courts of any federal constitutional claims now in the Federal Death Penalty. There are sixty two people on federal row. All of them were convicted by the federal government in local federal judicial district. They were tried and convicted and sentenced to death. Your GonNa bring moving here so in a capital case that could qualify to be tried in the state. How does it in the being routed through the federal courts? I'm really glad you asked that question. A lot of people believe that the federal death penalty is reserved for crimes like treason or espionage. Terrorism. and. Think that there has to be some sort of crime against the United States security interest, and that's actually not true. There's only one person on death row. Federal death row has convicted of a terrorism related crime, and the vast of people on the row or convicted of crimes like bank robbery murders associated with drug, dealing mergers associated with kidnapping, and these are crimes which in the. The nineteen nineties, the Federal Crime Bill Drastically expanded the availability of capital convictions and sentences for a range of punishments, so most of the people who are on the row now are the legacy of that decision. Even though you know bank robbery could be tried just as easily in State Court, so could kidnapping murder. So could a you know felony murder arson murder? Whatever what happens is? There are ways to federalize the crime, so for example kidnapping can be federalized if a even a car that had been used in interstate commerce is used in the crime, and certainly if someone takes someone over state lines that's considered a federal. Crime so the reason that some jurisdictions opt for the federal prosecutions is because. They are looking to bring the federal government's resources to bear on a case for some reason, and unfortunately in many instances, there is also a racial consideration there, because for example in the city of St Louis were there are a number of men on the row for who hailed committed their crimes in the city of Saint Louis City of Saint Louis has a very high African American population. So if someone is tried in that jurisdiction in the county, they will have a jury pool. That is quite diverse. What happens if you federalize a case is that the judicial district for the federal court is much broader and larger than would be available or possible for a local slash state prosecution at the county level, and so for example in the Eastern District of Missouri, which is where Saint Louis sits, the jurors are drawn from many surrounding suburban or rural communities, and in fact, at least two of the three men who were convicted in the Eastern District of Missouri had all white juries, so this is an example of some of the reasons and considerations that go into federal death penalty prosecutions. When the the geographic area from which juries are being selected is wider. How do you maintain a defendant's rights? Jury of their peers like again? You mentioned that, but what happens when you know when you widen boundaries, get outside of Saint. Louis Now! You're in the county now. You're in a different state. It's very very challenging. It's very very challenging, and so what happens is defense. Lawyers have to do a lot more work to make sure that the jury pool is representative of the diversity of the jurisdiction in which the crime actually took place for these men who are from Saint Louis for example, and their crimes took place in the city, and then they have to draw from a jury pool that includes many people who have opted out of the city for many of the same reasons that we're concerned about now. Right redlining white flight. You know racial segregation segregation of schools. They're fleeing the city, and yet they are called on to pass judgment on offenses that take place in the city. So this is a real concern. Because this this issue about these executions that are coming up. It's not just about the fairness of the death penalty against defendants. It's also the questions of fairness plaguing the federal death penalty generally when we talk about things like the availability of citizens to participate in juries. In which the federal government's pursuing the death penalty. Think about the the thirteen thousand and fourteen thousand homicides that happen every single year. Our these cases actually chosen for capital punishment. I'm so glad you mentioned that. One of the notorious aspects of capital punishment in the United States is that it has been disparately applied to people who have murdered white victims. This was demonstrated in a case notorious case out of Georgia in the nineteen eighties, which went all the way to the Supreme Court, called mcklusky versus COMP, in which rigorous statistical analysis showed that a person who can who killed a white person in Georgia was many times more likely to receive a death sentence than a person who killed a black person in Georgia so the disparity. Disparity wasn't even about the race of the defend. It was really about the race of the victim, and that is a problem that has persisted in in capital punishment throughout the United States. It is a question of whose body gets valued right, who which victims are valued, and this is a problem with capital punishment in the United States that dates back to the era of lynching. Once enslaved people became free. They were no longer property, and therefore they were no longer deserving in many. Jurisdictions of protection. When they weren't slaves, they were actually worth more to people then when they were free, and so when somebody dating back to the immediate post civil war era. Decides they're going to lynch a black person. What they're deciding is we are going to send a signal about protecting white communities, and in particular, oftentimes the dynamic was white women and fear of sexual violation by black men unfounded fear. In most instances, and that's where the roots of this. Disparity in the valuation of which victims deserve quote, unquote, right the top line punishment that the United States has to offer. And at this time, the top line punishment that the United States has to offer. Is The death penalty. And so people are victims are put in a position of believing that unless my family member gets the death penalty. Pursued on their behalf then somehow they were less worthy. When was the last federal execution? Mr Lewis Jones he was a veteran. He was a war veteran and he was African American, and he was executed in two thousand and three before him in two thousand one. The federal government had executed Timothy McVeigh who had been in? The Oklahoma City terrorism bombing. And then a man by the name of Raul Garza, so of the three executions to have been men of color, and one has been someone who was convicted of a mass crime, which was quite notorious and infamous, and that's I think pretty emblematic of the federal death penalty unfortunately. Of the sixty two people who are on. Federal death row thirty. Five of them are men of color and twenty six African, American men. And so that's the. That's the reality of the federal. Death Penalty in this country. And so, we have seventeen years since the last execution, less federal execution. Why haven't we killed anyone? Since then well, there have been good reasons that cases have been litigated. There have been a number of people who have had death sentences reversed because of various systemic problems with Catholic capital punishment in the federal system, and these cases you know the Obama Administration did not prioritize carrying forward federal executions I suppose with the understanding and belief that there were many other more pressing issues facing the country's Department of Justice at the time. which was you know began to examine for example Ferguson Missouri after Michael Brown's death so the Justice Department under the Obama Administration was simply putting resources into into. Things like consent decrees with local police departments. Most people now are most jurisdictions I should say are turning against the death penalty Colorado just abolish the death penalty. Death sentences in this country have been declining steadily since they're high in the in the mid nineteen ninety S, and so the popularity of the death penalty has declined significantly because people have serious concerns about innocent people on death row. They have serious concerns about prosecutorial misconduct. It costs a lot of money and people realize, and even very conservative jurisdictions realized that the cost is not worth it so in this sense I actually think America is in many respects ready to let go of the death penalty. But This Department of Justice for some reason has now decided to make it a priority to carry out these executions again at time when the majority of the country believes that we need some serious criminal legal reforms. Would we know about the decision? Is it just? The politics is what do you think it is? I can't presume to understand what is motivating. The trump administration are ag bar in particular to try to resume federal executions at this time I certainly don't understand what they're rushes. It's it's alarming that they're planning to execute three men days apart from each other, and it runs the risk that litigation that might be beneficial, meritorious or or Earth meritorious claims on. On behalf of these men will be cut short were also in the middle of a global pandemic where attorneys were not permitted to visit their clients at the federal penitentiary in Terre, Haute where most of the people on federal death row, House and so rushing forward with this at this time is inexplicable to me, and also I think puts the correctional staff. Who have to oversee these executions. There are many protocols that have to go into place before an execution. PUTS THEM I think at risk both physically and mentally The these executions traumatized that people who have to carry them out so in the meantime as we're engine towards these four back to back to back to back executions there had been a court battle that held them up a nutshell. Can you kind of explain what was going on? So the issue is that there have been a number of the people on federal death row who have been involved in a lawsuit challenging the lethal injection protocol, so the method and the drugs used for lethal injections, which has the form of execution in that the federal government will use to carry. Carry these out so for a number of years that lethal injection those direction lawsuits have been under consideration by federal judges in Washington DC and the most recent judge who had an opportunity to examine the record on those decided that there should be no executions moving forward. Unfortunately, the DC Circuit Court of Appeals reversed her decision, and so at this point, there are a lot of questions concerning the safety of the drug used the method that they're planning to use a single drug. Now. Instead of a cocktail had been used in previous executions, and there have been botched executions at the state level, and so there are still major concerns about. The safety of the drug and obviously when we talk about safety, people might be thinking well. What are you talking about? The person's going to be killed with it. So why does it need to be safe? But the eighth amendment. Prohibits cruelty in the carrying out of a sentence. Now some of US believe that killing somebody is a cruel and unusual punishment in and of itself, but even if you don't hold that belief I think many people would agree that even if you're going to execute somebody, you don't want them to be tortured. As they are meeting their death, and unfortunately some of these botched executions witnesses who have attended them have described very disturbing physical reactions that appear to suggest that the people who are being executed are in great pain, excruciating pain and unable to express themselves verbally while the executions being carried out, so that's why the Federal Court had been permitting hearings and testimony and evidence on the issues related to the the method of the execution. We'll be right back. We choose to go to the moon and do the other thing not because they are easy, but because they are hard. I'm Chuck Rosenberg on my podcast. The oath I speak with those who sacrificed for the common good. Leaving collective responsibility who do things because they are hard, our conversations on the author, thoughtful, civil, respectful essential, we bring these leaders and their struggles and successes to life this week. Former judge and United States Attorney Carol Lam when I walked through that door. They would all look at me then I would think to myself. I know what you're thinking about me right now, and by the time we leave this room. You're going to be thinking something else. Join me for season. Three of an MSNBC podcast searched for the oath wherever you're listening right now and please subscribe new episodes. Everyone's Day. Hey It's Chris as this week and my podcast wise is happening. I'll be talking with philosopher and former police chief Brennan. Del Pozzo about police accountability and reform. When you physically struggle with someone, even if you can overcome them, and they don't hurt you and you win that fight so to speak you have Adrenalin and chemicals in you that make you unsympathetic to the person you're dealing with is a human being and puts you in a different place than the bystander an policing his ignored that. That and policing hasn't taken seriously the fact that it has to build in safeguards to stop those emotions from being what leads to the decisions I think the army does a better job. The army knows its soldiers in combat like are filled with crazy uncontrollable emotions, and they build indiscipline checks as much as possible to stop it from leading to war crimes. Policing has yet to take that seriously. That's this week on wise happening search for wise is happening wherever you're listening right now and subscribe. So, let's talk about these specific cases coming up these specific federal executions. Four of them have been scheduled at this point as you mentioned. Can you tell us a little bit about these cases in these men were scheduled today. So they're all white men, and that's something that I imagined that the federal government will mention whenever issues around the systemic racism of the death penalty in the United. States are raised one of the things that they'll say. Is that the first man up for execution? Daniel Lee is a white supremacist. That's not true Daniel Lee was a misguided young person who like many misguided young people in this country fell under the influence of older people, he was a traumatized, neglected and abused, young man who found family with a group of people who, at the time espoused white supremacist abuse. He has long since renounced those of us. the federal government has said that all four of these men are selected for execution in part because they'd killed children Daniel Lee is according to the government's own evidence, not the person who pulled the trigger on the child and his more culpable co-defendant. Actually didn't get the death sentence on top of that the trial prosecutor and the victim survivors all have asked that he not be executed. They've all made statements. Saying he was convicted on junk science, and that the outcome of his trial was unfair. Miriam there are a lot of people out there. Who say you know what you're? You're committing heinous crimes. You're murdering children, and some in really despicable ways and that if there is anyone worthy of death, it's people like this are the crimes that are worthy of the death penalty. Every single one of these crimes was a tragedy. These are not crimes. Anyone is suggesting one should take lightly. These are not crimes that anyone is suggesting weren't a slap on the wrist, but what one has to ask when looking at capital punishment is whether. The person who committed the crime? themselves. Are directly culpable for all the harm that they experienced. Before they ever harmed anybody else and. We all would agree. I think children deserve protection and children deserve nurturing, and children deserve to be safe, and I've never once represented. person's been convicted of homicide who is not extremely underprotected, neglected abused harmed not only by family members, but by institutions that were entrusted with their care, and that's that's a common experience of all four of these men who have been selected for execution, and sometimes those institutions were previous. incarcerations sometimes, they were juvenile facility. Sometimes, they were in group homes. And that is where we have to begin to shine the light on. Not, what does just this individual deserve? But what role did societal neglect divestment? Inadequate health care poor education, inadequate support a family is how did all of that play a role in this specific tragedy that the government is deciding to prosecute and carry out a sentence for today? So it comes down to the question, not just what punishment individual person deserves, but what punishment we deserve, or we want the government to impose in our names, when so much has failed these people before? They ever committed a grievous harm to another family. Do you believe there's any crime worthy of death? I personally am morally opposed to the death penalty. I don't understand how it helps to kill somebody who has caused harm. It just perpetuates a cycle of violence, and it produces a level of public consciousness that is ignored to the brutality of our criminal legal system generally, and so personally, the is now. Where do you think this issue? Those who want to end the death penalty fits in this moment in this time of greater protests. I think it's all of a piece because what people are talking about when they talk about defunding police or abolish prisons is. Let's think about how we could put all of that money. All of that training all those resources all that apparatus of arrest detention punishment into something that would promote healthy vibrant communities, healthy vibrant people. That would invest in the communities that have been stripped of investment for generations. and. That is what people are calling for. When they're out marching in the streets on behalf of George, Flynn Brown, Tiller, and the other people who have been murdered. Too many to even name or count at this time on this on this phone call and I think. You have to consider capital punishment as part of that, and so for better for worse capital punishment has I think fallen out of the public consciousness for some time. When I started doing capital work in the year, two thousand capital punishment was at its height in this country. and. It was very much on the nation's mind. And I think for many people. The death penalty has faded, but now this is the federal government is putting it back on the radar. And that I think cannot be divorced from the current moment that we're in where people are asking for. A. Redirection of our attention, our money and the power of our governments to heal invest provide support for families provide support for young people and have our communities begin to imagine and develop true safety true security. That doesn't depend on the apparatus of death, being handed down by police or on a Gurney. With a needle in somebody's arm. Let me! Ask you this last. Question you've. been doing this work for a very long time. You've seen a lot. You've seen all the influence. Y- you know more recently. You've seen what's happening in the streets. Do you believe? With all that you know about the system that these four men will be put to death. I really don't know I really don't know I can't answer that. Question I think there are a lot closer to being put to death now than they were when the federal court had stopped their executions. I understand that all four of men have very dedicated legal teams that are pursuing every avenue possible on their behalf, and are continuing to litigate all sorts of issues to try to put a halt to this, but are certainly several steps closer to being executed today than they were several weeks ago before the government made this announcement before the Supreme Court decided to let the DC circuits decision stand. Miriam Go Cahora. Thank you so much for your time. These are tough conversations but I'm glad you joined us to have it. Thank you very much. Thank you so much. That was Mirim Cahora from Yale Law School. The federal execution of Daniel Louis Louis. The I in seventeen years is scheduled for July thirteenth one week from today. We reached out to the Department of Justice about their decision to reinstate the Federal Death Penalty, and they pointed us to a June press release in which Attorney General Barr says quote we owe it to the victims of these horrific crimes, and to the families left behind to carry forward the sins impose Barry Justice system. into. America is produced by Isabel. Angel Alison Bailey Aaron Dalton. Max Jacobs Barbara Rab Clarence High I should turner and Preview Var thon. Original music by Hannah's Brown. Our executive producer. Is Ellen Franken Steve Tie is executive producer of audio. I'm mainly will be back on Wednesday and again Thursday. Hey Guys Willie geist here this week on the Sunday. Sit Down podcast. I get together with Oscar winning actress Charlie's Sharon for a brand new version conversation. Get it now for free wherever you download your podcasts.

federal government Federal Courts United States Federal Bureau of Prisons Miriam Go Cahora America Yale Daniel Louis Louis Justice Department Department of Justice Daniel Lee kidnapping Supreme Court attorney Mirim Mahara murder Lacey