22 Burst results for "Bureau Of Prisons"

"bureau prisons" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

04:21 min | 7 months ago

"bureau prisons" Discussed on WTOP

"IMAX men hospitals here scrambled to add beds and staff I'm John Aaron what to look for in a mask or face covering I'm Neil or consisting are you a fan of James cordon you may become a bigger fan if you watch this I'm sandy comes out to thirty one CBS news update as of all leaders Johns Hopkins University coronavirus tracking more than three hundred thousand Americans have non contracted covert nineteen some have recovered about eighty five hundred have died White House makes clear it expects many more that's the next couple of weeks but vice president pence ads even though we see the losses rising in the days ahead do not be discouraged because there is evidence across the country the Americans have been putting the social distancing and mitigation and to practice and it is making a difference meantime president trump insists not sometime not too far off the country will have to get back to work I need more money for the small businesses it's been working out so well it's been so efficient the banks have been doing an incredible job I think we're going to need more money there I think yeah we'll see but based on the first the first couple of days it's been incredible CBS news update on top forty it's two thirty two Republicans in Wisconsin say they'll ask the U. S. Supreme Court to block extended absentee voting and allow in person voting in Tuesday's primary this despite the fact that Wisconsin democratic governor Tony Evers is issued a statewide state home order in order the state's chief medical officer has credited for helping slow the rate of corona virus infections in the state governor Evers called a special session for Saturday afternoon asking Republicans to take up bills that would convert the election to all mailing give voters until may twenty sixth to return ballots leaders of the Republican led assembly and Senate refused maintaining that Tuesday's in person voting should go on as planned president trump has fired another member of the intelligence community this time it's the intelligence community inspector general Michael Atkinson was the first to inform Congress about the anonymous whistleblower complaint last year that described trump's pressure on Ukraine to investigate Joe Biden and his son senator mark Warner calls the move on conscionable the ranking Democrat on the Senate intelligence committee Warner ants Americans should all be deeply disturbed by ongoing attempts to politicize the nation's intelligence agencies the president informed the Senate intelligence committee late Friday of his decision to fire Atkinson saying he no longer had confidence in him Ben Thomas Washington Attorney General William Barr has ordered federal prison officials to speed up the release of some eligible high risk inmates at three federal prisons eight inmates at facilities in Oakdale Louisiana and help them Heil have died of the coronavirus at least twenty in Danbury Connecticut have tested positive Attorney General bars also notified bureau prisons officials to increase use of home confinement all those let go more than ninety inmates and fifty staff members have tested positive at federal correctional facilities nationwide earlier this week prison officials ordered a lockdown keeping all federal inmates confined to their cells for two weeks Gary non CBS news it's two thirty for the Supreme Court has delayed oral arguments for the second time in less than a month in might not hear arguments in most cases until next term legal analyst Thane Rosenbaum has more on what this means for the High Court the supreme court's cancellation of oral arguments for most of March and now throughout April leaves a few options it could simply reschedule those that are not time sensitive to the next term in October it could wait and see if the end of the pandemic allows for more time this term or it could decide some of the cases without hearing oral argument at all one of the time sensitive cases involves two that are seeking president trump's financial records legal analyst Thane Rosenbaum it's two thirty five these are unprecedented times which are causing.

John Aaron IMAX
Top U.S. lawmaker demands answers in Jeffrey Epstein's death

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

03:42 min | 1 year ago

Top U.S. lawmaker demands answers in Jeffrey Epstein's death

"General bar said today in effect. Don't don't blame me. Attorney general bar claimed to be quote appalled and angry. Those were his words about the death of jeffrey epstein and he made it very clear. Hurwitz is in line to take the fall for this one. We are now learning of serious irregularities. At this facility ability that are deeply concerning and demand a thorough investigation so william bar is clearly going to point downward word and blame hugh hurwitz or someone lower down the chain of command the federal correction center in new york jeffrey epstein died. Maybe the bar investigation will ultimately i point the finger at the unionized guards who failed to keep jeffrey epstein alive or the chief psychologist correctional center who was supposed to be in charge of the suicide watch of jeffrey epstein and the aftermath of the suicide watch of jeffrey epstein after jeffrey epstein reportedly tried to kill himself last month he was placed on suicide watch wjr for some period of time and then reportedly taken off suicide watch. The federal bureau of prisons rules for suicide watches were written in two thousand seven when hugh you. Her wits was working at the department of education. It's entirely possible hugh. Her wits had no idea what those rules were until he got the judiciary committee's letter tonight. One of the rules says once an inmate has been placed on watch. The watch may not be terminated under any circumstance without the program coordinator nater or designated performing a face to face evaluation. Only the program coordinator will have the authority to remove an inmate from suicide watch. The program coordinator is usually the prison's chief psychologist question twelve of the judiciary committee's letter to the bureau of prisons is does m._c._c. New york have have such a program coordinator did he or she authorized the removal of mr epstein from suicide watch. If not who did question thirteen to the program coordinator consult with anyone else <music> in making this determination. If so who question fourteen was the termination of mr epstein suicide watch by the official who who made such determination discussed with or directed by any supervisory personnel or leadership of the bureau of prisons or any department of justice personnel or executive branch personnel outside of the bureau prisons question fifteen who bureau of prisons department of justice and elsewhere in the executive branch was notified of the termination of mr epstein suicide suicide watch and went the trump. White house is the craziest whitehouse in history. It is the most reckless group of people who have ever worked in the white house and the president himself as the the most reckless of them. All the judiciary committee's letter signed by the top democrat and top republican on the committee is asking if anyone in the trump white white house was involved or aware of the removal of the suicide watch of jeffrey epstein. That's what's in question number. Fourteen was the termination a nation of mr epstein suicide watch discussed with or directed by any supervisory personnel or leadership the bureau prisons or any department just personnel or executive branch personnel was william bar involved was donald trump involved that is what is is in question number fourteen and the house judiciary committee is going to get answers to these questions to all of these questions including please provide information pertaining to the

Jeffrey Epstein Federal Bureau Of Prisons Judiciary Committee Mr Epstein Coordinator Hugh Hurwitz Bureau Of Prisons Department O House Judiciary Committee White House William Bar New York Donald Trump Attorney Department Of Education Executive President Trump Official
"bureau prisons" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

14:38 min | 1 year ago

"bureau prisons" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"What a privilege, which explain you should explain what precisely that means what does that job entail? Well, it's essentially the chief operating officer of the department of Justice. The attorney general, is obviously, the top law enforcement officer for the entire country. But the deputy attorney general access the CO for a department of a hundred and thirteen thousand employees, which includes not only all of the US attorney's offices across the country, all of the components at main Justice. But also, the law enforcement components as you well know from your time, though, that FBI and as. The head of DA. But includes FBI DA in the Marshall service and the bureau of prisons. So it's, it's a pretty big operation job. Yeah. Did you come to it with any ideas of what you would like to do? And I ask that because it tends to be a reactive job, Noor so many issues every day that land on your desk, and that require your immediate attention that even if you come with things you'd like to do that, sometimes hard to do, I did come with some ideas, because I was the last two years of the Obama administration. So maybe a had in some ways the luxury of deadline, I knew that we only had two years there. And I'm talking about us here being the office of the deputy attorney general Odette to leave at the end of that two years. And thank all we had done was really handle the emergencies the crises, and they're plenty of those, but the handle those things that came across our desk. And so I had some ideas of things I wanted to do, but also talked with people in DOJ. Both the assistant jeez, as well as folks on my staff about what are some things that you think need to be done here. How do we want to impact the department? So there's some things that are different when we leave they were when we walked in the door having worked for you. I remember well, your interest with me. With you, and for you, but I remember, well, your interest in sentencing reform in prison, reform, and also something that I'd like an I'd love to talk about any or all of these things. But I recall your interest in implicit bias, all of us carry around unconscious biases. It doesn't mean that you're a racist. It means that our brains have ways of making shortcuts and we associate individuals with groups and sometimes they're avert biases here. I'm not to say that, that there aren't those things as well. But this unconscious bias seeps into how we make decisions. That's bad enough for regular people out there. But if you're in law enforcement, or you're a prosecutor and you have an unconscious bias that is impacting how you're making those decisions those decisions that can impact people's liberty. That's something we need to do something about. So what did you want to do wanted to train people, you know, we had learned. That there is training that law enforcement officers and prosecutors around the country on the state level had been involved in and that it can. At least I'm not gonna pretend that this fixes it, you can say check, you know, that's not a problem anymore, but it at least trains, people and alerts them to the biases that they're carrying with them and gets people, some tools to try to address it. And also, I think it's important that the department is acknowledging that this is an issue that it's an issue. We need to try to combat and we have a responsibility to do something about. I think you're right Sally being aware of it is better than not being aware of it, and whether or not it's sort of changes behavior makes people more sensitive to it. That's still valuable. Oh, absolutely. And, you know, again, this is not something that you're gonna fix with a little training course here. But at you not know that a lot of people came into this somewhat skeptically. But I think from the feedback that we got when people actually went through the. Raining, it opened their eyes to things that they didn't really realize that they were doing that was my sense to that people were somewhere between skeptical and oppressive up when they had the training, it opened up there is that's the goal. And look you were key among those who did some of this at the beginning. I think we needed to adjust along the way in terms of how to most effectively train law enforcement officers and prosecutors in ways that will be practical for them as well. And so I don't think you can just sort of take training and say, this is going to be it, you need to be willing to adapt to how it's going to make it more effective, and more useful. I'm glad you did that. Thank you. Thank you for that. And thank you for participating in it. You bet. So another thing near and dear to your heart was prison reform. Absolutely. This actually started back when I was she was attorney, and we had started a program, there were, we were going to connect service providers with people who are coming out of state prisons at that time. And to our most Challe. Hinging neighborhoods. And so we had a program that we started actually at the Lindsey street Baptist church. They are an English avenue in Atlanta, and we had different service providers of housing and jobs and drug treatment and others that were there. And we had a form for the folks that were coming out of prison to fill out of what services that they needed, what was so striking to me is when we're getting a lot of those forms back at the first meeting and a couldn't figure out why. So I went and sat down next to gentlemen on a church pew there and asked him why we haven't gotten there forms. And they of didn't really answer. Then one quietly leaned over to me and said, I can't read, and I realized that there were a lot of folks in that room that couldn't read they weren't going to raise their hands. You know, that's humiliating for them to have to tell us that they can't read so that really spawned my interest to want to find out. What are we doing to ensure that the people when they are in prison that we are giving them those basic tools that they need? To be able to be successful things like being able to read the drug treatment that they need the basic job training for jobs that will actually exist, when they get out of prison anger management, those things that are really absolutely essential for them to have just a fighting shot at being successful. When they get on the intro to move Sally, because we talked earlier, about stigma, whether it was mental health or addiction illiteracy is another type of stigma, my husband, who's a lawyer, actually, we both medications balding, but he missed the head of a school for children with learning disabilities, and who are deaf and hard of hearing, but they also have a teacher training institute for children who come from poverty, and particularly generational lack of access to education. And so I was very attuned. The literacy issues there as well and the kind of, impact that, that can have on people's lives for the rest of their lives. And so what to do ask the Federal Bureau of prisons to do, so we didn't have a lot of time. So we had some consultants come in and we look. At a whole variety of things. We looked at education. We looked at the job training that we were doing importantly, the halfway houses and the kind of services that were being provided there. And on the education side, we began a system there, a sensually building a school district within the Federal Bureau of prisons that would I assess each individual, when he or she is coming in to the federal prison system to find out where they are in that educational continuum is this somebody who could benefit from post-secondary, or is this someone we need to teach to read, or do they need to be able to get a high school diploma that would I assess them and then be able to tailor the educational things that were provided to them to what their needs were, and we had started a pilot project actually through tablets, essentially, rugged ipads that could be used in their cells. Because, you know, at the time really all that existed in the bureau prisons for the most part. Was a GED prep. Course it was a waiting list, thousands, and thousands of inmates long to be able to get into that GED print course if you were lucky enough for that. All you got was an hour, a day of education. What I found was is that in symptoms are good. And all, but we didn't have an issue with incentivizing individuals in prison to want to participate in. They, they were they were begging to get into these programs. We just didn't have the resources to provide the services. And so with the declining prison population as we were adjusting drug sentencing there we were able to essentially reprogram some of that money into the educational services because the truth is Sally that the overwhelming percentage of people who go to prison reenter society, like ninety five percent. We don't want them to go back. You can look at it from various different perspectives. But this is one of the smart. Just things that we can do from public safety standpoint. We know recidivism rights are now about sixty six percent. We know that those drop dramatically if an individual is able to engage a meaningful education programs, and even more than that, if I'm top of that they have meaningful job training programs. And so it's not just doing something nice for people who were imprisoned. It's the smartest thing we can do to make our communities more safe toward the end of the Obama administration. The attorney general Loretta Lynch, your direct boss resigned, President Trump sworn into office and his nominee for attorney general Jeff Sessions has not yet been confirmed by the Senate. And so for two hundred and forty hours for ten days. Sally Yates, you're the acting attorney general of the United States. Yeah. Well, there's a tradition at the department of Justice that the deputy attorney general stays on as the. Acting AG during a transition and unites important check in any agency for there to be continuity. But given the national security and the law enforcement responsibilities DJ, it's particularly important. And so our colder had done it when he served as Dag between the Clinton and Bush administration. So I was happy to do it during this time as well. When you spoke at Harvard Law School in two thousand seventeen out its class day exercises. You said the defining moments in our lives often don't come with advance warning during your ten days as acting attorney general President Trump issued an executive order one three seven six nine which restricted travel to the United States from seven predominantly Muslim countries. Can you talk about that a little bit? Yes. I mean this was entirely unexpected. There's this tradition that I just mentioned. But there's another tradition to, and that is that nothing happens during this time on that you're serving is the acting attorney general. And so I was actually leaving the white. House, the afternoon of the twenty seven after having been there talking with them about the situation with general Flynn and ambassador Kislyak and learned from principal deputy from a phone call. Because he read on the New York Times website that the president had signed this travel ban that we didn't know anything about there had been no inter agency process that you would normally have to try to figure out what it is the administration's trying to accomplish and how you could go about doing that. So what to do? Well, we spent the weekend actually trying to get our arms around what it was. They were trying to accomplish this was travel ban. One were on travel ban three now but travel ban one actually applied to people, for example, who had valid visas, and who were lawful permanent residents in our country. And so we had lawyers who had to be in court that next morning, Saturday morning to enforce the president's executive order, right? Because they were people who are literally in the air as the president signed this executive order that then were being turned away from the country when they landed here. So we spent the weekend, lots of discussions with the White House, trying to, again, sort of figure out who's in and who's out because it was not clear at all from the face of this executive order. What that was, and then on Monday morning. I learned that, that on Tuesday morning. The judge wanted the position of the department of Justice on the constitutionality and the lawfulness of this executive order amounts, your responsibility. Right. What was your view on its constitutionality? Well, I had been over the weekend and through that Monday morning, reading, all of the challenges going on and reading the cases, I mean, Chuck, you know, from your experience at DOJ normally for something by the time it gets to the deputy attorney general, even the enacting AJ, lots of people have reviewed it, and distilled it. There's no time for any of that. You know, we're just having to read the raw information. And so I wanted to hear from the people in the department both the career people and the Trump appointees about what those challenges were, and how we would defend this challenges. I wanted to hear their views as well. So call them all into the conference room, we have a big meeting, and we start going through the challenges in what our position would have to be on these assume to you that the -secutive order of the president's was motivated by religious animus against Muslims. And that's what became really clear to me as that to defend this hour's gonna have to send department of Justice lawyers into court to take the position that this executive order, had absolutely nothing to do with religion. And that's despite all the statements that the president of made not just on the campaign trail. But statements, he had made after that as well after he was. Elected. And that was in the face at the fact that this only applaud to Muslim-majority countries. But yet provided priority for Christians in this instance to, to send them in to advance a pretext and I don't think any lawyer should do that. And I sure don't think that department of Justice lawyer, should here's the fascinating thing to me. Traditionally if a senior officials put in that position they have a binary choice to enforce the law as the president has promulgated it or to resign. And I know you Wade, both of those options, but you came up with a third way a middle way. I did struggle..

DOJ deputy attorney general president attorney executive Sally Yates bureau of prisons acting attorney general Obama administration prosecutor FBI President Trump United States US attorney department of Justice chief operating officer Noor
U.S. attorney general orders probe into mistreatment of gay employees

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

00:26 sec | 1 year ago

U.S. attorney general orders probe into mistreatment of gay employees

"Twenty attorney general William bars. Order the F B I and the bureau prisons to investigate allegations of discrimination against LGBTQ employees. The order is in response to concerns from DOJ pride organization represents thousands of LGBTQ employees of the Justice department that its component agencies. The group raise concerns gay agents are dismissed the kademi because they aren't

Justice Department William Bars Attorney
"bureau prisons" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"bureau prisons" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"The Federal Bureau prison says the power is back on at a detention center in New York City where on Sunday protesters clashed with guards and we're pepper sprayed. It was a chaotic scene as Yvonne. Merchants and tried to get inside the jail to see her son Desmond correction officer told me the backup and get out as more people start coming in. They pushed all of us. Dax they start spray spray in the jail was on lockdown without lights and power after an electrical fire last Saturday caused the outage. It was also a heating congressman Jerry Nadler who visited the facility says he wants answers. It's apparent to me that when this is over we are going to have to have some hearings as general. Not only procedures sufficiency of heating and some other things in these facility at the metropolitan detention center Brooklyn, I'm Julie Walker. More of these stories from townhall dot com. European Union powers have officially recognized opposition leader one guy DOE as interim president of Venezuela. More on that from correspondent Charles de LA desma Britain has joined Germany Spain Sweden and France in recognizing Guido with Thornton sixty Jeremy hunt saying, but Waylon President Nicolas Maduro have not called for a new presidential election within the eight day time limit set, while Sweden's foreign minister says the election that brought Madurai was neither three nor in Spain prime minister Pedro Sanchez illegitimate zero to move promptly towards a fresh vote. And German Chancellor Angela Merkel says quite is the legitimate. Interim president I'm Charles. On Wall Street, it's closing bell. The Dow Jones industrial average posting up one hundred seventy five point gain it twenty five thousand two hundred thirty nine the.

Jerry Nadler interim president Yvonne Waylon President Nicolas Madur New York City Federal Bureau Sweden Spain Angela Merkel Pedro Sanchez Desmond congressman Brooklyn prime minister Charles de LA Julie Walker European Union Madurai
"bureau prisons" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"bureau prisons" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"The Federal Bureau prisons has power is back on at a detention center in New York City where on Sunday protesters clashed with guards and were pepper sprayed. It was a chaotic scene as Yvonne. Merchants and tried to get inside the jail to see her son Desmond correction officer told me the backup and get out as more people start coming in. They push back. They start spray paint scrapes. The jail was on lockdown without lights and power after electrical fire last Saturday caused the outage. It was also a heating looser congressman Jerry Nadler who visited the facility says he wants answers. It's apparent to me that when this is over we are going to have to have some hearings as to the general not only procedures, but the sufficiency of heating and some other things in these facility at the metropolitan detention center in Brooklyn, I'm delete. Welcome. More of these stories from townhall dot com. European Union powers have officially recognized opposition leader want Widodo as interim president events. Waylon? More of that from correspondent Charles de LA desma Britain has joined Germany Spain, Sweden and FRANZ in recognizing Guido with Thornton secretary Jeremy hunt saying, but as Waylon President Nicolas Maduro have not called for a new presidential election within the eight day time limit set, while Sweden's foreign minister says the election that bought Madurai was neither free nor in Spain prime minister Pedro Sanchez eligible dodo to move promptly towards a fresh vote on. German Chancellor Angela Merkel says why is the gym interim president I'm Charleston on Wall Street, the closing bell. The Dow Jones industrial average posting up a one hundred seventy five point gained twenty five thousand two hundred thirty nine the NASDAQ up by eighty four and the S and P five hundred picked up eighteen points. More of these stories at townhall dot com..

Waylon President Nicolas Madur Jerry Nadler interim president Yvonne New York City Federal Bureau Sweden Angela Merkel Spain Pedro Sanchez Desmond congressman European Union prime minister Brooklyn Madurai Chancellor Widodo
New York Governor Calls On Justice Department To Investigate Freezing Jail

Seattle Kitchen

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

New York Governor Calls On Justice Department To Investigate Freezing Jail

"Agents, New York governor Andrew Cuomo is calling for a Justice department investigation of the circumstances at a federal detention center in Brooklyn, New York, where there is no heat or power WCBS reporter, Kevin Rincon. Governor Cuomo says no one in New York should live in fear that they may freeze to death alone in the dark in a statement. He adds prisoners in New Yorker human beings. Let's treat them that way. Attorney General James and state Senator Michael generous were among a group there at the facility today. Some family members tried to get inside. They were pepper sprayed. The Federal Bureau prison says power will be fully

Governor Cuomo New York Kevin Rincon Federal Bureau Justice Department Brooklyn Senator Michael Reporter General James Attorney
"bureau prisons" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

10 10 WINS

02:45 min | 1 year ago

"bureau prisons" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

"His channel ten wins. You give us twenty two minutes. We'll give you the we're good morning. Thirty four degrees at four twenty on this Sunday, February third I'm Mario boss gays, and here is what's happening. The mayor says a Federal Bureau prisons failing inmates at one Brooklyn facility protests overnight to overheat power hot water issues. Uproar over the Virginia governor racist yearbook photos house, he responding to the state of the union fast approaching Tuesday, the president now with harsh talk about house speaker Nancy Pelosi the big award of last night's directors guild of America. The best director feature film Alphonse aquarium for Roma wins AccuWeather today. Milder mix us unin clouds, high forty five. This Rams at patriots today for Super Bowl fifty three. Saquon Barkley is your pets have rookie of the year. Kevin highlight Bala pain class Anderson. Devils both one Rangers lost wins. Houston four twenty one. From the ram trucks traffic center. Here's Jeff Jensen, Jeff and Mario sales some accidentally as both ways on tellingly avenue in north Bergen. That's over fifty first street. Am I going to stay with Kennedy boulevard? Instead good news agrees accident on the at the venue. It cleared delays are gone to. So no troubles. Any longer flipped over vehicle is taken off the road there. Grand central's way to go to queens your travel free their van with cross island. Clearview, all good, no roadwork this morning. Here's what we see a long island's big three. The LA moves well sodas in northern state Parkway. Southern state is looking for another big not one of the big three one of the big eight. Let's say Hempstead turnpike closed in the westbound direction between the NASA university diversity medical center, and the entrance to Eisenhower park that is all due to a water main break, and here's what you need to know about the bridges and tunnels. It's finally, quiet. The Holland and Lincoln and George move well and Easter crossings they're all looking good to with no troubles at. No roadwork for that matter either no problems in the trains either. He sees something on the roads. Eight four four jam ten ten eight four four or five to six ten ten. Call us on the tip line. I'm Jeff Jensen. Next report four thirty one on wins. News time, four twenty two mayor de Blasio says a Federal Bureau prison failing inmates at a Brooklyn facility that's experiencing heat and power outages much of the last week or so jail. Ficials say prisoners do now have hot water in their cells limited electricity to in some areas. A protests continued into the morning hours outside the metropolitan detention in sunset park inmates. Relatives calling attention to the outages which apparently results a fire week ago during that rally yesterday relatives of inmates chanted the heat is a human right? One woman whose son is in the facility says he's been sick with an upper respiratory infection for two weeks. Now, she blames jail conditions to a.

Jeff Jensen Federal Bureau Brooklyn Saquon Barkley AccuWeather Nancy Pelosi Virginia Bala NASA university diversity medi LA Bergen Clearview Ficials director Houston Eisenhower park
 Violence plagued West Virginia prison before Bulger killing

The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

04:06 min | 2 years ago

Violence plagued West Virginia prison before Bulger killing

"Was in a wheelchair when he was attacked at Hazelton prison in West Virginia that he was beaten beyond recognition with a padlock stuffed inside a sock. The times citing a law enforcement source not directly related to the case reports Bulger's is appear to have been dislodged from his head that it's not clear whether his attackers gouged out his eyes or if they were knocked out because he. Was beaten so severely. Frankly. Why do you went out the way that he lived? I mean that is what he did to his victims. He was vicious. He strangled. He was convicted of strangling a woman, and then he would go upstairs and take a nap while his friends buried her body. The attorney for an inmate at Hazelton photos. Freddie, Jesus tell CNN tonight he believes his client as a suspect in Bolger's grisly murder. Lander standing is that he is in solitary confinement. He's in the segregation unit at Hazelton because he's under investigation for him being involved in this Jesus is a mafia hitman from west Springfield, Massachusetts. And was convicted for murdering a boss in the notorious Genevieve's crime family as well as an associate this Jia, certainly did not like informers he's doing to lay sentences because some very close decided to become an informer and going back and I've visiting Mr. Jesus from the better part of two decades. Now, he'd had a particular distasted and Bolger was a well known informant. Investigators said that for years before a corrupt FBI agent tipped him off depending. Charges against him. Bolger gave the F B I information on rival mobsters. He was leading south. Boston's violent winter hill gang at the time. Why do you someone who is truly a gangster an associate Pathak murderer? That's what he was. He's someone that sold out his colleagues to law enforcement to get advantages for himself Bolger's exploits as a murderous gangster and an FBI informant with picked it in the popular hit movies. The departed man as lack mass were Johnny Depp, played Bolger, John, Geno. What I did eight rand Jimmy. It's alliance alliance between the FBI between you and me. Ultimately, a jury found Whitey Bolger culpable of eleven killings between nineteen seventy three and nineteen ninety-five tonight. The attorney who represented the family of a woman who was strangled by Bolger says he doesn't believe they're taking pleasure in Bulger's murder. There is such loathing Bolger. And for what he did. Did with his murders. His drugs is corruption that obviously he's not a person that engenders many feelings of sympathy from anyone, but there are many serious questions tonight regarding the circumstances at Hazelton prison, which according to his lawyer inmate, Freddie, jeez said was very violent place. Why was Whitey Bolger? A high profile inmate a notorious informant placed in the general population of that prison when he arrived just the day before his murder CNN tried multiple times to get answers to that. From the Federal Bureau of prisons a spokesperson for the bureau told us, they could not comment because the matter is under investigation wolf and Brian. There's disturbing new information about patterns of violence and chaos at the prison that federal prison in West Virginia. That's right wolf, the New York Times did a big investigation recently reported that the Hazelton prison was routinely, understaffed overwhelmed. The times report says they've been short on guards since two thousand sixteen and that there were two hundred seventy five violent episodes there. Just last year, including fights among inmates and attacks on staff, the bureau, prisons has not commented when we have inquired about all of that. Brian Todd reporting for us. Thank you coming up. There's breaking news an Email exchange from the peak of the two thousand sixteen presidential campaign shows longtime Trump ally, Roger stone wasn't touched with the highest level of the Trump campaign about the WikiLeaks release of democratic emails stolen by Russia. Is there a collusion case for the special counsel, Robert Muller? Are you interested in learning how enterprise scale companies drive organic traffic to increase their online visibility than download the voices of search podcast from the heart of Silicon Valley here? Search

Whitey Bolger Hazelton Prison Bulger Murder FBI Bolger Mr. Jesus West Virginia CNN Federal Bureau Of Prisons Brian Todd Hazelton Freddie Attorney New York Times Johnny Depp Genevieve Boston Robert Muller
"bureau prisons" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"bureau prisons" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"Watch continues. Judge sends a Gray's lake man to prison for running a marijuana growing operation in Kane county. Prosecutors say Maxine go C'mon was growing two hundred marijuana plants in a building he at least in Auburn police say they also found marijuana and go C'mon car as well as items used to sell drugs, including plastic bags in a scale goatman pleaded guilty to unlawful possession of cannabis with intent to deliver. He was sentenced to seven and a half years in prison as part of a plea agreement. Investigators say go C'mon was growing various strains of marijuana. Jim got us. News Radio one zero five point nine FM. Police warning residents of a series of armed robberies over the weekend in the south loop and Hyde Park police say a group of men driving a Cray car have confronted people on sidewalks and demanded property one. Robert, flashed a black semi-automatic handgun, the others battered the victims. The first incident was reported Friday night at twenty third and Wabash. The most recent robbery happened yesterday morning on the same block WBZ news time five fifty three. If you're a small business finds you as a self employed, actor, it might be time to think about doing time. The US Federal Bureau prisons is putting out a casting call for actors to help train crisis intervention teams. According to the solicitation, the bureau, a division of the department of Justice is looking for actors to performance of Philadelphia department of prisons training facility the performers will need to act out several assigned inmate based mental health crisis scenarios the actor should be able to use props and makeup to simulate mentally ill patients. This would include the use of objects inmates have been known to possess uniforms.

marijuana goatman US Federal Bureau Philadelphia department of pri Kane county Hyde Park department of Justice self employed Maxine solicitation robbery Auburn Jim cannabis Robert
"bureau prisons" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"bureau prisons" Discussed on KPCC

"In one day you know it was it that's possible you wake up with that doniama you wake up you're going to marry you wally ray hit a black damn i get locked up today i can get killed today i'm michael barbaro that's coming up on the daily from the new york times the daily begins in five minutes but first from kpcc news i'm nick roman with the stories we're covering at seven thirty buses with immigration detainees on board began arriving this morning at the federal lockup in victorville a thousand detainees will be housed there was immigration authorities say they're running out of space at their own facilities kpcc's libby dankner says some critics are raising red flags about moving immigration detainees into prisons immigration advocates including lawyers that i spoke to said hold on these detainees have not been convicted of a crime there awaiting civil proceedings and a federal jail isn't necessarily set up to handle them on that last point the union for prison guards at victorville says doesn't like the idea of adding a thousand people to the prison population john's omkar with the american federation of government employees lok thirty nine sixty nine says there aren't enough staffers at victorville and he says they've said that to the warden and the federal bureau prisons so that was a big surprise that they were going to give us a thousand new people and not give us one new staff member the prison guards union says they're worried that prison clinics don't have enough guards and nurses to handle the detainees medical needs more on the printing air that left about one hundred eighteen thousand names valley county vote of valley county voters off the voter rolls during tuesday statewide primary election the problem was big enough that the la county board of supervisors and the la county.

michael barbaro new york times nick roman victorville libby dankner la county wally ray kpcc american federation of governm five minutes one day
Lawyers, workers question putting immigration detainees in U.S. prisons

The Frame

01:54 min | 2 years ago

Lawyers, workers question putting immigration detainees in U.S. prisons

"In one day you know it was it that's possible you wake up with that doniama you wake up you're going to marry you wally ray hit a black damn i get locked up today i can get killed today i'm michael barbaro that's coming up on the daily from the new york times the daily begins in five minutes but first from kpcc news i'm nick roman with the stories we're covering at seven thirty buses with immigration detainees on board began arriving this morning at the federal lockup in victorville a thousand detainees will be housed there was immigration authorities say they're running out of space at their own facilities kpcc's libby dankner says some critics are raising red flags about moving immigration detainees into prisons immigration advocates including lawyers that i spoke to said hold on these detainees have not been convicted of a crime there awaiting civil proceedings and a federal jail isn't necessarily set up to handle them on that last point the union for prison guards at victorville says doesn't like the idea of adding a thousand people to the prison population john's omkar with the american federation of government employees lok thirty nine sixty nine says there aren't enough staffers at victorville and he says they've said that to the warden and the federal bureau prisons so that was a big surprise that they were going to give us a thousand new people and not give us one new staff member the prison guards union says they're worried that prison clinics don't have enough guards and nurses to handle the detainees medical needs more on the printing air that left about one hundred eighteen thousand names valley county vote of valley county voters off the voter rolls during tuesday statewide primary election the problem was big enough that the la county board of supervisors and the la county.

Michael Barbaro New York Times Nick Roman Victorville Libby Dankner La County Wally Ray Kpcc American Federation Of Governm Five Minutes One Day
"bureau prisons" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"bureau prisons" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"What he walks with a walker now because his knee was so broken lawsuit we have this lawsuit so the case is going to wrap up today and i am hoping that i am hoping that the judge does the right thing so if he wins well then the he'll get money presumably to never use these imprison no but you you're the guy because you know when they go both people talk on fox they're all lawyers and they never they never i don't know that any of them have practiced except for judge napolitano of course who has been like a very esteemed judge in the state of new jersey you should go to las well you know i'm not going to do that i've noticed higher to take on another one hundred thousand dollars tuition but and do wanna thank i had another matter in federal court yesterday in the same court house that i can't talk about what but hopefully next week i can't but it's a federal court case i do want to thank god i can't say so town but i do want to thank matthew mary magistrate who represented me on this matter a case you said well i can't discuss what it is but i will as soon as i discuss it i have quite a bit matthew marriage is absolutely your lawyer so this is an i'm pretty sure he represented me for free well he wasn't representing me at the time but now the deal there at michaels the very last minute but how about unique exactly so i'm not sure if he's sending me a bill but if he is then i will watch it was fun he said he's telling people he tweets to people yesterday he'll be in federal court all day he has to surrender his phone if you need to get in touch with me just beat me i felt like i was in nineteen ninety three whether the bureau prisons was negligent but witness after witness this guy kept saying well isn't it true that mr what are you struggling with.

fox napolitano one hundred thousand dollars
"bureau prisons" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"bureau prisons" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Deference that the courts have given the federal agencies even to interpret a number in a statutes is so extreme that the agency can alter the law so this part of the bill that's going to be voted on tomorrow it does nothing more than tell the bureau of prisons at overturns that court ruling and tells the bureau prisons by golly when we said sixty four days we meant fifty four days now give the fifty four days of good time credits are wiggle wiggle words in laws and we all anybody who's ever worked in washington knows that and some of them are open to genuine interpretation fifty four may not be interpreted as forty seven right and you know there's obviously i'm a former attorney general i can be a log equally crazy there is something called chevron deference it refers to a case and chevron differences the difference the courts give to agencies to interpret the laws themselves that govern those agencies and when neil gorsuch was nominated for the us supreme court this was noted as an area he has written on and he has said it is ridiculous that the agency of government the courts called on to interpret statutes have turned that responsibility over to the agency's applying the law and this is a great example they literally turned the number fifty four into forty seven back into the cancun cinelli here and to be back in just a moment hi i'm jay farner ceo of quicken loans you know i believe buying a home is almost always a better idea than renting but if the fear of a big down payment is holding you back i've got some good news today the average down payment for first time homebuyers is a lot less than twenty percent and here's the best part our mortgage expert at quicken loans can help you find variety of mortgage options that may require little as three percent down now add to that rocket mortgage it gives you a salad approval.

washington neil gorsuch us ceo bureau of prisons attorney chevron cancun jay farner fifty four days sixty four days twenty percent three percent
"bureau prisons" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"bureau prisons" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Welcome back to jim bohannon show as we talk with ken kuching la he's the president of the senate conservatives fund and the former virginia attorney general general a signatory to the right on crime statement of principles and senate conservatives dot com is the website now then what exactly is in this bill that is being considered question jim so three years ago the bureau of prisons for their own reasons really clamped down on the ability of volunteers to work in prisons and there's fifty million dollars associated with the programs in this bill and that's a lot of money to me but it's only about three hundred seventy dollars per federal inmate and the goals of the rehabilitation reentry won't be achieved unless volunteers are let back in the federal prisons in significant numbers and so one of the big things this bill does is reopened those doors to volunteers and louie gohmert congressman from texas also got an amendment to the bill to make sure that volunteers who are with faith based organizations are not discriminated against which was believed to have been done in the past at various points and and that opens a massive the number of resources all over the country to come in to federal prisons and and opens the doors to make that happen and that's absolutely critical because the federal government simply can't do this by themselves either financially nor in terms of manpower and i would note sadly the bureau of prisons has a corporate culture that doesn't believe the people that they are keeping our for any purpose other than warehousing and keeping off the streets they do not have a a mentality that seeks to improve these folks and i i wish i didn't have to say that but that's just the reality and so unless you bring people in from the outside you lose that opportunity another thing that happens into the example of the bureau prisons in legislation from twelve years ago congress directed the bureau prisons to give fifty four days per year of good time credit for for those inmates to earn it they have to earn good time credits and somehow or another the bureau prisons managed to.

president senate conservatives fund congressman texas federal government congress jim bohannon ken kuching virginia attorney bureau of prisons louie gohmert three hundred seventy dollars fifty million dollars fifty four days twelve years three years
"bureau prisons" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"bureau prisons" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"So that's the problem there's nothing written in their bill that fails out people that are exempt and in fact that codifies an opportunity to present their case to one of the things that does and this is unbelievable there's one hundred eighty thousand people in under the auspices of the bureau prison mandates that torney general make a determination and submitted a report valuate basically all hundred eighty thousand and determine whether they're eligible for some of these early release programs or these leniency programmes in times time credit programs and he has to do so within six months attack for the fact that if you marshaled all of the justice department resources just for this and took it away from everything else you would be able to do that no exception he would have to sit there for even if you're a liberal you have to admit that the vast majority of those federal prison are pretty bad dude all right let's isolate the really low level cocaine guys okay but no it totally indiscriminate it's for everyone and by the way i would note that thirty per cent of the prison population on a federal level it comprised the foreign national what the attorney general determine their case to the this is just unbelievable it's all coming from this onesided brainwash i've seen from all the conservative think tanks at aren't conservative anymore they've all bought into the willie horton michael dukakis mcgovern philosophy behind criminal justice and this is very disturbing could it is more than just disturbing it is it is downright dangerous in his daniel said and and i really appreciate the opportunity to speak with daniel horowitz he's really one of the best conservative mine's going in punditry right now i have an aunt from conservative review on my local program in cleveland all the time and i wanted to bring him to here on the dennis prager show but but daniela i talked about that this morning the republicans are willing accomplices in all of this in these these lighter jail sentences these early releases these these all of these different changes and shifts which which people have no idea how dangerous the actual criminals are it is just incomprehensible that we would allow this to happen especially with republicans in control of congress but that's where we are that is a bipartisan bill all right we'll get out and.

daniel horowitz cleveland daniela congress cocaine attorney willie horton michael dukakis dennis prager six months
"bureau prisons" Discussed on Reasonable Doubt

Reasonable Doubt

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"bureau prisons" Discussed on Reasonable Doubt

"Yeah and is there a medical condition part of the thing out is there that part you know he was blind he got blind they're gonna stay i hearken back to this case because it was so similar now susan mcdougal when she was in contempt and was in custody one of the things we did before we ever went to either trial did to jury trials with her and she was acquitted in both but before that we got her out of custody because we said we put on hearing that the department that the the bureau prisons could nat deal with her scoliosis condition i put a i put a neuro on i did some other testimony and the judge ruled that they couldn't deal with her medical condition so that's certainly within the parameters of what you would argue that you don't wanna put this person in custody because he the the the system can't deal with his ailments it's kind of a first cousin of the argument that i make a lot about the california prison system we've got we've got an aging population that is you can't believe the amount of money we spend on healthcare in the prison system for guys who are never going to re offend because as their aging you spend more money trying to deal with all of their ailments as they get into their sixty seventies and eighties than you would ever do if you just throw them out and told him okay go back and let your family deal with you i got a note from dr drew saying that i was allergic to black and hispanic people and so at least in california i never have to worry about going and and dr drew i'm sure wants you to publish that hate well he told me not to say anything but yours fr friend i grew up with i'm going to be at the gore theater in cleveland ohio coming up may seventeenth and then at the royal oak music theater and that'll be outside of detroit that's coming up on seventeenth eighteenth may one man show live stand up there's live standup everywhere just go down kurla dot com the big podcast was shack you should know about talk basketball but he'll talk movies talk tv and talk about everything what's happening own life even a little goss.

susan mcdougal california gore theater cleveland ohio detroit basketball royal oak
"bureau prisons" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"bureau prisons" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"And other inmates in the tailor shop fifty one years old fourteen year marriage adult children she was even the tax collector town you know relationships you were the many prisons surprised when we talk about this we had a little discussion you said these relationships could happen every day in a different prisons around the country is that true she is it's not a rare case the public thinks it's rare because you don't hear about these maximum security escapes being so successful but every prison america every prison in america has a on a regular basis has have staff being compromised and as a former chief of internal affairs before it was warden back in the nineties ninety two to ninety five i was the chief of internal affairs for the entire bureau prisons so we had a group of about twenty five or thirty staff and we would monitor the thirty eight thousand staff within the federal system to make sure they're following policy we've worked with inspector general's office fbi's you could service at times things like that and as i flew around the country i was it prepared me to be a warden i'll tell you why because i was able to see if there's so many great staff you know ninety five percent of your staffer outstanding but that other percentage are those that are the weakest of the staff the compromised by the inmates in only it's something simple i bringing in some cigarettes which are contraband items and then it gets bigger and bigger and before you know you have people all around the country sneaking in cellphone sneaking in drug sneaking in items of escape are rare much rare but again like in.

america fbi ninety five percent fifty one years fourteen year
"bureau prisons" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"bureau prisons" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"In i left and i did a book called family of spies and it was made into a five hour mini series and was in new york times bestseller and i thought wow this is easy uh and i quit my job much my mother's chagrin and i went off and i thought i'll go to a prison 'cause i always wondered what happens when you put a bunch of sharks together and the bureau prison uh the head of bureau prison says i'm tired of you guys you show up when there's a riot but you don't know a slight day in day out so i said wall spend a year in a prison if you give me entree so he gave me a pass and so i'd go out 23 days and just wander round the prison and then everybody knew as reporter in that i come home from my own sanity and then go back out and until crazy that book which remains my best selling book even those published 1990 that book probably had the biggest influence in my life except for crazy uh just to see how people with criminal minds and how the prison system works it changes you forever while that's incredible incredible story all the way around this episode is sponsored by better help dot com secure convenient and affordable online counseling all councillors our license accredited professionals anything you share is confidential schedules secure video or phone sessions plus chat and tax with your therapist whenever you feel it's needed a month of online therapy often cost less than a single traditional facetoface session go to better help dot com forward slash site central and experience seven days free therapy to see if online counselling is right for you better help dot com forward slash sykes central for the last couple of courtrooms rigor of your overflew redo hawker in the show are your website where can people find the war that we've been talking about for most the show.

reporter new york times seven days five hour 23 days
"bureau prisons" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"bureau prisons" Discussed on WLOB

"Vice president mike pence is on his way home after visiting south korea to attend the winter olympics opening ceremony and there was a bit of a diplomatic breakthrough away from the olympic action influential sister of north korean leader kim shown own met with south korean president luhn inviting him to pyonyang for a summit with both brother if it happens it would be the highest level meeting between the two countries in years moon said they should work to make conditions to allow it to happen vice president pence who has been in south korea for the games in politics said saturday there was no daylight between the us and south korea in their aim to rid the north of its nukes and missiles faxes greg pow cut pants and south korea's president wants to skating event before the vice president left a second white house staffer has resigned after being a key stubbed domestic abuse in trump appeared to address the domestic violence allegations against both of his staffers on twitter again just a couple of hours ago as you just heard he addressed it on camera the other day he wrote on twitter and park quote people's lives are being shattered and destroyed by a mere allegation summer true and some are false is there no such thing any longer as due process the exwife of one of trump's speechwriters david sorensen told the washington post he was abusive during their marriage sorensen says that he did not abuse his wife she abused him he resigned on friday according to the white house two days before that staff secretary rob porter resigned after two of his former wife said he physically and verbally abused them version zealous a barber disgraced former gymnastics doctor larry nassar has been transferred to a federal prison in tucson arizona federal bureau prisons in may registry indicates the fifty four year old is now housed at the high security prison nasser faces to prison sentences in michigan first he must serve sixty years in federal prison i'm toto fox news.

larry nassar michigan arizona secretary washington david sorensen nasser tucson mike pence rob porter white house twitter vice president president us kim olympics south korea
"bureau prisons" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"bureau prisons" Discussed on WJR 760

"Sunday another round of tweets between president trump in florida congresswoman frederico wilson after he again called her wacky wilson this tweeted today that the ambush that killed four us soldiers in news year is trump's benghazi ohio democrat sherrod brown says the entire fight over what the president did or did not say to the widow of a fallen soldier who could easily and with an apology it would be a nice touch if the president would once in awhile act that way instead of always attack always attack always demean the way he does to off brown also on cnn two new films tops at the box office tyler peiris bhuttu of a deal halloween is the number one film in north america this week earning nearly twenty two million dollars its first week in theaters in the us and canada the disaster film geo storm came in second place with just over thirteen billion dollars in ticket sales happy death day runner twenty forty nine and only the brave round out the top five i'm mike cremedas police officer and gerard ohio was shot in killed last night justin leo when this partner approach to the door of a home win the suspect open fire he was killed by the other officer i'm richard johnson seven sixty wjr news gene vogel good afternoon a lawsuit has been filed against the federal bureau prisons by the nigerian man known as the underwear bomber lamar faruk abu matala is currently serving poor prison terms at a prison in florence colorado he was convicted in detroit voter quarter trying to detonate explosives hidden in his underwear while on a flight from amsterdam to detroit right on christmas day of two thousand nine his lawsuit says he's being forced into solitary confinement chastised for being a muslim by guards and other prisoners forcefed non how food and has not allowed to communicate with most of his family members his suit was filed in us district court in denver.

abu matala christmas detroit partner gerard ohio mike cremedas cnn ohio benghazi florida denver amsterdam florence colorado frederico wilson gene vogel richard johnson officer justin leo geo storm us north america halloween president sherrod brown trump twenty two million dollars thirteen billion dollars
"bureau prisons" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"bureau prisons" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Serve at least a short prison term his lawyers say he deserves no more than probation several correctional officers at a federal prison in downtown brooklyn were arrested and charged with sexually abusing at least six female inmates earlier this year and since then new evidence has come to light suggesting a pattern of sexual assault on inmates going back decades new york times reporter joseph goldstein has been investigating sexual violence at the metropolitan detention center and he joins us now joseph welcome back to wnyc thank you for having me and are you been reporting on this for awhile now you're reported back in the in the spring when these officers were charged and arrested on but how did you find this pattern of abuse what well it's it's described in court papers sit federal prosecutors unsealed back in may but for a few months now i i've been looking into problems in the women's wing at the seized it's cold and in one of the fascinating thing about this story in troubling things who said there well over a hundred jails for prison from the federal bureau prisons from the federal prison system and one would imagine that the most troubled ones would be in the middle of nowhere um far from sort of oversight of lawyers and family members visiting but in fact one of the most troubled federal uh prisons is right here in brooklyn brought right off the bq we die i've been passing by it for years and really only recently started reporting on on what happens inside so aren't there are supposed to be systems in place to prevent abuse against inmates what will there are a lot of rules being a prison but there were few things fit that i found quite striking one is is that the bureau prison position is that an inmate is an inmate is an inmate and it doesn't much matter if it's a male inmate or but female inmate in terms of gender of the correctional officer assigned to supervise them so you might have a dormitory with fait fifty women living there in may and in the middle the night there would be a single male correctional officers supervising them and above back correctional officers there might be a single male lieutenant we which works out okay if nobody's a predator.

brooklyn assault joseph goldstein federal prosecutors officer new york times reporter