16 Burst results for "Bureau Of Podcast"

"bureau podcast" Discussed on Bear Grease

Bear Grease

03:30 min | Last week

"bureau podcast" Discussed on Bear Grease

"Respect for where you're at. Just go ahead and call maker. He's in the 80% yourself. He's kind of got to go. I've been here for a while and I can kind of just got to kind of read the room. And if it's particularly hostile, you go with acreage. Just avoid the subject altogether. Yeah, yeah. Well, now present company accepted. You gave us some great knowledge on the podcast. So are you going to introduce the rest of us? Yes. I was going to say, so the regular crew that's here. To my right, misty newcombe. Great to have you misty. Always, 'cause you guys know that most of the comments we get about the burger surrender are about misty. Yeah, because she's better than us. Yeah, very much so. Brett Reeves. Great to see Brent. Great to be seen. Josh filmmaker here. I'm glad to be here. Daniel roop couldn't be here. His mustache is excellent. I have that in my notes. What did you guys think? First thing I thought of was catfish hunter. Should we possibly get some context for why we're talking about Dan's mustache? Go ahead. Well, he would not out this information because we follow HIPAA guidelines here at the bureau's podcast. I've got rabies. We've.

misty newcombe Brett Reeves Daniel roop Brent Josh Dan
"bureau podcast" Discussed on Top Advisor Marketing Podcast

Top Advisor Marketing Podcast

05:23 min | 5 months ago

"bureau podcast" Discussed on Top Advisor Marketing Podcast

"On both the beer on la podcast and the top advisor marketing podcast and there's a strong reason for that number one because the beer podcast has a little different of a format but most importantly it there isn't always a lot of transition or a lot of symbiotic sort of stuff that you hear in the bureau. Podcast that really focuses on what we talk about here on the top advisor marketing podcast but our guest today. He broke the rule right He changed the game for us has also. Don't try to do a really long intro. But there's a couple of things. I need to say here number one. He's the founder of the myers method. You need to follow him lincoln. We'll have we'll make sure that we have his links in the show notes. His name is joel myers. He's the man who took the red pill he's the man who's gonna help you. Exit the matrix. You all live more in the matrix than most people do in so many of you tired of so many of you are looking around and saying matt. I just so tired of running on this treadmill. And i don't seem to beginning anywhere. We'll guess what our guest is going to help you get off of that because here's the final point before we get started. You can't successfully market in the expertise economy like we've been teaching you over three hundred episodes if you don't have you together if you don't really understand who you are. What makes you unique and different and how you can use that to position yourself in the marketplace to destroy your competition you will never be a successful as you can be. Because here's the deal you gotta be you his everybody else's taken and our guests as can help you figure out who you are and help you go to levels that you didn't even realize we're opportunities feel jerome. Welcome to the show. Matt i gotta take you around with me for the rest of my.

joel myers lincoln matt jerome Matt
"bureau podcast" Discussed on The Daily Beans

The Daily Beans

08:31 min | 6 months ago

"bureau podcast" Discussed on The Daily Beans

"We're talking to host of the bureau podcast former assistant director of the fbi for counterintelligence. Frank fog luzi and frank before the break. I had mentioned that you are the first person usually a to that. I see on social media and and you know on the news programs calling out the fbi when they mess up. It's part of your book the fbi way talking about accountability. It's ingrained in you as a former member bureau and talk a little bit but there was a recent case that that you stepped up and said this was they botched this and so we'll talk about that a little. Yes indeed. So really really. Disturbing is the case involving a usa women's gymnastics and of course we've we've heard this now almost ad nauseam but there's a there's a new twist that's developed here. Net net is of course. Dr larry nassar Physician to the gymnastics team had been molesting Multiple jebusites gymnasts for for a long period of time. And it's come out recently through release a at least in part of a department of justice office of inspector general report on the fbi's role in this. It's come out that they mishandled the early Allegations from family members about that family members being families of gymnasts and mishandled is kind of polite. Word i'm going to be more honest with you. I'm very concerned about what was going on particularly at fbi. Indianapolis as referenced in The i j report. The was so concerned that there appears to have been a criminal referral Of of of at least one. Fbi official likely out of indianapolis. And so i'm concerned about reports in the inspector general's report bad afford the former head former being keyword. Perhaps of the indianapolis fbi office may have been offered a job with the us olympic committee that there may have been other to close relationships between Fbi agents and usa gymnastics Which i think is headquartered in indiana thereby the relationship there and then it goes. Further in that family members then went to fbi. Los angeles because Either either certain gymnasts were residing there or violations had occurred there and f. b. i. l. a. did more they they actually did investigative work But at the end of the day no one told the local authorities in michigan where nassar was and it turned out that this case was broken. Open by a female detectives for university of michigan. I believe police department okay. So what's wrong with this picture on one is for a long time. We've been under the. At least i've been under kind of the impression that there were serious jurisdictional issues here for the fbi. Okay i get it maybe. This doctor is in traveling into the federal law. Here is really tough. You gotta show that someone's travelling for the purpose of having sex with a minor so as this doctor to. The team is traveling around the country with them. You'd have to actually prove that he's doing so because he wants to have sex. Well he's doing so because he's assigned to the team. So i can get that agents and us attorneys would go boy. This is going to be. It's a thorough case fantastic. We can argue that all day at the end of the day. Some people are getting molested actively. And the thing to do. If you can't figure out your jurisdiction is call somebody who has jurisdiction which would be the local authorities and so that appears to never have been done fund incredibly disturbing and once again. We get the fbi. This by the way. This did not happen under chris rates far source. I could tell. But chris wray coming out in a statement going pretty much. Yeah we we screwed this up and guess what. We've got new rules of the road. Now which are the rules of the road. Well district a no brainer. If people if if miners are being actively molested Stop it gets the police a do something about it and let's not get concerned about. You know who knows whom and who's been offered a job whether there's federal jurisdiction. Yeah i i had a very similar feeling today. But the new. Nda came out. And it's going to include senator gillibrand language for the Reforming military sexual assault. Which i'm very happy about. But meanwhile every day people are getting raped in the military and jack reed wants it to go through committee and go through markup and you know. We're sitting waiting around for this to happen and honestly we've been waiting decades but you know it. We had sixty six senators to support it and he objected a democrat objected to it. So now it's going through the nda process and meanwhile we're sitting here in in these things are continuing to happen and it's an apparently there's some sort of information that there's some top senators who don't want to upset each other and that's why they're not bringing it to the floor for a full vote as its own bill. And meanwhile you know like you said there is something going on that needs to be stopped immediately and you're delaying it over these kinds of really lame considerations is just. It's an incredibly frustrating. I wanna ask you about you. Know i think these when the fbi messes up you call it out when they don't. I don't think it's fair to call it out at. This has been happening a lot lately. We got to see a lot of people on social media calling for ray to resign calling for garland to resign. I feel like this is detrimental to our national security to our democracy. We need to support these institutions but we also need to push back when we think they've done something wrong. What is the best way to do that to push back to say. Hey garland i think he should release the second. Half of that bill barham. Hey ray i think you should come out and do a press conference. Tell us where you are on the insurrection as much as you can etc etc. How do we push back as citizens but maintain the necessary supportive institutions to keep our democracy afloat. Wh what a great question. And what a timely question and look. We've come through the last four years where are as you know and your listeners know. Our students were harangued attacked eroded every single to end the career professionals in them. We we've come through a time where. Fbi director was fired. Essentially for investigating the the president and refusing to pledge loyalty to the president if we get into a mindset we allowed that mindset to take over where you can just fire. Fbi director outside of their tenure term. Where you can demand people leave At harangue institutions. Be really careful. Because you're going to get what you asked for which is institutions at no longer mean nothing and don't stand for the rule of law and the constitution but rather stand for political whim and partisanship which is the worst thing that could happen to dj and the fbi and someone says it's already happened. Were just trying to recover. So where's the balance. Okay this is. This is where it's the hard part right. The hard part is get smart. Do not accept the rantings or opinions of of people who tweeted out or screen for somebody said but rather in my so. We just talked about the larry nassar case with usa Gymnastics it took me a while. But i had to read the report. You know who who does that. How many times do you and i actually tweet something. We immediately get a response from a follower and it's quite clear they never read what we posted. They never read the attachment right. I read read. Read get smart and develop your own opinion. That is based on the facts. And beg you can scream at holland. Then you have the absolute license to scream for someone's head when the facts dictate bat. I don't think we're there yet for garland or for ray old people might say. I disagree on the cabinet..

Fbi Gymnastics Frank fog luzi Dr larry nassar department of justice office o us olympic committee nassar indianapolis chris rates chris wray usa senator gillibrand frank Indianapolis university of michigan jack reed garland indiana bill barham Nda
"bureau podcast" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

04:13 min | 7 months ago

"bureau podcast" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"Of other options. They have available to them. It's great question. They choose selfridge's because they trust the fact that we have done the work in terms of creating the best product from around the world being able to work with great collaborations great creativity and being able to create environment which is unique so that combination of of curation of experience of service is something that's unique to us in amsterdam netherlands. We have tassos. And he's asking about given all of the kind of growth in digital penetration does actually mono brand retailers pro present a greater sense of competition to selfridge's then maybe you're multibrand counterparts. We know a lot of the big brands are taking their wholesale businesses in house. I know you have a whole strategy here about concessions which enables you to keep those brands in the mix. Even though they're running those operations themselves who do you see as your most formidable competitors well specifically on the mono brand. We don't see that as a competition. In fact many of them are brand partners looking to us to do creative partnerships. they can see that what we're creating something that's unique. They can showcase their brands in new ways. I mean the deal. Restaurant on the roof at the moment and the pop-up evidences that it's the fact that brands selfridge's is a way to connect to customers in a way that they can't necessarily do through the mono brands and it gives them a much wider scope to be able to be creative about realizing that brand propositions so i wouldn't say that that monir brands are a threat in that respect. I think it's a synergistic partnership of being able to create something unique in saint petersburg florida. Tommy sullivan is asking. Bloomingdale's used to do foreign country promotions yearly. There indian irish thai and indonesian promotions. Come to mind. How do you think about engaging with specific cultural groups from different parts of the world while it's a great question and it's an area that we're continuing to look into is. How do you take hyper localization. Which is what we're doing and creating the stores specifically for the communities that were so seeing the moment and how does that manifest itself in different regions and to be honest with starting on that journey. And we're really excited about what that can be but we're really just at the start of that process. We have time for one more question from india. This is son. Jonah she asked. Could you please elaborate on the way. Selfridge's has created spaces for customers. You mentioned the dior riviera space like talk about what you're doing. And how do you think that's different from what selfridge's did before the pandemic. I think that it is a commitment to sue how we use spaces as immersive spaces. It's not different. It's about the realization that we're giving out more space to being able to bring these experiences to life in new ways so currently we have over ten percent of us who are in this in this store which is given out to unique experiences and so whether it be cinemas soil cycles restaurant pop-ups so but clubs or weddings. It's it's really about the continued commitment to making sure that our brand comes to life and that really immersive what andrew. We've run out of time. Thank you for our child. Congratulations on your new role. Thank you very much. Thank you for hosting us here to be in your window. I'm never going to forget this moment. And you know. Thank you for sharing your insight. Thank you if you enjoyed this episode. Don't forget to subscribe to the podcast for our look inside fashion and how it connects to currency in the wider world if you're not yet a. b. o. f. professional member joined today with our thirty day risk free trial and benefit from exclusive access to agenda-setting analysis. You won't find anywhere else. The bureau podcast is edited and produced by emma clarke. Kate barton and eric brea in the b. o. F. studio team..

selfridge monir brands Tommy sullivan amsterdam netherlands saint petersburg Bloomingdale Jonah florida india andrew emma clarke Kate barton eric brea
"bureau podcast" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

02:30 min | 7 months ago

"bureau podcast" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"Because of what's happened that you feeling. I think it has. I think that. I've really very even more aware than ever that my job is as a retailer in a storyteller is to integrate myself into the community. Not have them integrate to me. I need my job is to come into the community and serve them. You are woman on a mission. I think my anthem. I really think. I am and you can take that away from your experiences over the last year. So that you'll sense submission as being honed. It has but yes. It's kind of same sufficient. I hadn't from day one but it has been hard and hence being re clarified knowing your any sort of business or create a field can just get quite bogged down on the dislike deadlines making it happen. And there's another project another project. And i think one of the really liberating things about going Seasons sh- mazen's will. This will develop it will make it when it's really will put it out into the market and we have some vague dates. We wanna hit. But if i vote project happening like slipper crocheted like oh well fit takes six months or twelve months one months to develop. It doesn't really matter the whole businesses. Infringing off that is get it. Right is making beautiful. And then we'll put it out into the community when the time is right for them to have and it has to sit in the white house before months waiting for it to get a bit chillier waiting for lockdown. So we have to from. That's fine as well. We can be flexible and nimble makes precious. Yeah yeah that's that is kinda hot of having a respect for the product in the story in the customer. The real gift for me with covered was that it made me. Just go and sit quietly in the corner and think for a while you know business as usual stalk it was like what are the sales today. We gonna hit this meeting. You can happen is kinda sit back and be patient and be curious to learn. Speak to people the simple makes discover. It's actually really nice. Thank you karen cute. If you enjoyed this episode. Don't forget to subscribe to the podcast for our look inside fashion and how it connects to currents in the wider world if you're not yet a. b. o. f. professional member joined today with our thirty thirty day risk free trial and benefit from exclusive access to agenda setting analysis. You won't find anywhere else. The bureau podcast is edited and produced by emma clarke. Kate bar tag and eric. Brea in the b. o. F. studio.

mazen white house karen emma clarke Kate bar Brea eric
"bureau podcast" Discussed on The Daily Beans

The Daily Beans

06:18 min | 8 months ago

"bureau podcast" Discussed on The Daily Beans

"Host of the bureau podcast author of the fbi. Way frankford. lucy. Frank how is it even possible that sessions and rosenstein embar. Didn't know 'cause you know there was reporting that bar at the very least Had to have known that they were renewing. The gag order on these things. And there's a you know we bring up ballantyne. Who is the person who is sort of embroiled in those Falsified or inadvertently falsified three from mccabe and struck in the flint investigation. You know where they had posted and removed some. An ads added some dates and stuff like that. She's the one who submitted those to flynn as potential exculpatory information But you know i. It just didn't make sense that she would be presenting to a grand jury to get these subpoenas without the knowledge of anybody up above her. Yeah so here are the rules. At least they were the rules. When last i looked and that is there's something called a sim special investigative matter and there are there's chapter and verse on what a sim is. But i can tell you that once you're looking at it member of congress or the white house counsel and per your subpoena their Their meta data and by the way. Then you're going to go to court because you have enough to say We can't tell these people yet A gag we need to do the gag order again. So you know there's there's no inadvertent accidental re up a gag order we advertently. What's the court and asked for a re up up though. Didn't even know what it was for. So when you when you trigger a sim and that's want one in there's there's others Members of the clergy journalists Maybe some academics professors all of you can trigger a sim and there's various levels of approval. Now have to get involved and at a minimum at least at the fbi building. It's going to involve the general counsel's office. It's going to involve a senior executive when congress white house counsel. You're probably talking the deputy director and director right well similarly across the at doj. You're going to be looking at consistent. Attorney general like john merced and correct me if i'm wrong but didn't bill barr himself. Put out a memo requiring express authorization for any investigations into any president vice president member of congress running for office. Didn't he make that a thing. That's that's become infamous that memo and he he particularly wanted to just wrest control from the us attorney's of anything that could that could hurt a trump and the republican party during an election period. And by the way. I get the caution that has to be exercised as you grow closer. You do not want a repeat of the gym coney debacle where he actually ended up influencing perhaps the outcome of an election and certainly the perception was there. So yeah you want. But he if true. He violated his own policy. Because maybe involved cnn and new york times and democrats. Yeah i mean it just occurred to me. Yeah no no. Member of congress could be investigated and not not not in a sixty day window before the election just ever. He said you have to get my swallow and swallow has as you know has been in the past a candidate for president. I mean that's an additional layer of concern is on that the national election. Yeah and of course shift. Being a head of the intel swallow was being considered for intel. if shift had left his position At some point. I mean that's a that's a that's not just like a marjorie taylor. Green situation not that any member of congress should ever have without criminal predication their records See us the point. It's all about what causes you to go the extra step and get the metadata and what did you have on them and look if if these all. These people were leaking. You can't rule that out right. I mean not. Maybe these people are never lakers. I probably maybe they have but again we need answers on this. We need to know. I feel like they would have brought charges. They brought charges against the woman from the treasury department. Who released all the sars to to washington post. I'm sure trump in bar would have like nothing more than to bring viable charges against those two if they had it and the original reporting by can you better and and others said no They didn't have any evidence and allegedly. They told bar we. We have to it and keep digging well all right. Well we'll see we'll see what happens. I know the senate might be hard pressed to to subpoena anybody. Because of the power sharing agreement you would have to have at least one of the republicans or chuck. Grassley agree to subpoenas the in. The senate judiciary is that might be difficult. And then of course. I know dick durbin. Just sent merrick garland. Hey i want to see all the subpoenas but frank if those subpoenas were issued by a grand jury doesn't rule six e per like Suit would not say garland doesn't have to hand that stuff over jeb grand jury secrecy you could absolutely yeah but but see. I just wanted to warn. Everybody like if merrick garland actually argues. That don't don't it doesn't mean he's protecting bar trump. That's a great point that we already know garland's very much about processing and institutional and i get it that's great. We need to preserve the institution. So yeah it's not mutually exclusive. He could say yes. The case is over yes. We released the gag orders. However we're still talking about material that went before a grand jury. And therefore or i'm i should remain secret and then you can have. You can see a battle over that. Yeah kind of like how we all want. The grand jury material Took through the courts As part of an investigation into a judicial proceeding which was under article one impeachment powers which was a couple months before nancy pelosi actually announced the impeachment proceedings into the former. All right lots to go over lots to think about. Thank you for coming on and explaining some of those some of those things and rules and it's gonna be I i knew we were. Just chipping away at the tip of the iceberg but.

john merced nancy pelosi congress trump marjorie taylor white house Frank sixty day two democrats Grassley republicans republican party rosenstein Way frankford article one three doj cnn couple months
"bureau podcast" Discussed on Mastering Finland

Mastering Finland

02:25 min | 8 months ago

"bureau podcast" Discussed on Mastering Finland

"Welcome back to our broadcast. And today i have a great guest seen inc who is the host of polly bureau. Podcast about finnish politics and she's actually candidate in municipal election for the most part the this this year. Welcome to a podcast. Thank you thank you and thank you. So i'm one of those people that that's crazy enough. Joe also be running for election. So i mean i mean you're brave. I don't think that Brave enough to to do the but the a good luck so today. Basically i invited you so we could talk about the municipal election. And what does it mean for foreigners because actually foreigners certain foreigners are eligible to vote in these elections. So could you tell us a bit about What is municipal elections. And what is the difference between simple municipal elections and parliamentary elections. Yes sure so. In municipality elections you select the local council that's making the local city or municipality council that's making basically decisions are on on the local level at eight phelan municipalities have a lot of power. They are allowed to make their own independent decisions when it comes to you know schooling or education and so forth Like of course the government gives you some and the law gives you some kind of guides and these are the things that you have to do this at the services you after produce but the way that they are produced is pretty much in the remiss abilities hands so this is the election where we select those people to the city council's to make the decisions and in the parliamentary election. Of course you you select or elect the lawmakers but here here you make the elector decision-makers to the local level. Yes perfect thank you and i think it's just really interesting. How in finland. The municipality has sought to power because for example in my country integra public and its european union. It's completely different and we're basically do municipalities. Like has almost no power when it comes to decisions and is really really cool..

Joe today finland one this year eight phelan union those european
"bureau podcast" Discussed on Harvesting Nature’s Wild Fish and Game Podcast

Harvesting Nature’s Wild Fish and Game Podcast

02:51 min | 9 months ago

"bureau podcast" Discussed on Harvesting Nature’s Wild Fish and Game Podcast

"Get ten percent off on your order so with that. I'm actually going to open it up. Chase is here with us. Chase waller the infamous field staff writer for harvest nature. And he wanted to hop on tonight because he's a big fan of Spearfishing and our buddy. Shrek is on with us to from From australia right. Yep yep yep chases client at some quite familiar with tampa. But i really want to get over there. Man got to come over so great time on what are you. What do you spirit over. Most of the time shapes head. You get sheep's head closer. Inshore go offshore. He get a lot of Gags gag groupers snappers. Our two biggest allen say numbers wise but goglia. You run into average tax. You run into Every once in a while somebody brings up a couple years ago. I shot a black man. Yeah wow that's cool man. It seems like you guys have got like such a wicked coastline in terms of the availability of the spearfishing resource like obviously some of the management strategies are working but like there's a really vibrant community there some really different sort of cultural factors in the florida spearfishing community than the rest of the world. Sometimes there's a little bit of conflict. Have you experienced any of that. Yeah it's a little bit you see Ucla gulf coast nurses atlanta code. Central florida words virk south florida. I don't know what the north florida guys doing arab. That's what the guys the guys up in the panhandle and stuff. They kind of have their own unique thing. And then us us boys down here in the florida keys Unique to it's interesting the cultures for such such a small state like everything has its own little micro culture What i'm brisbane. Which is like the east coast of trillion. We've got aaron so the distinctive cultures well and. It's different from some of the other states in australia. But i originally came from new zealand as well and i think that's partly why sort of sometimes see the distinctions in the in the differences in. It's interesting sort of A nice social media's brought us all together and sometimes for the bitter and some folks for the worst but it's it's interesting to watch be of so. I your quick introduction to these these fancy for introduction so what we've already covered the fact that you're that you're living in Brisbane in australia so So everybody knows Shrek here spiro. Podcast host and writer so he host the noobs bureau podcast and co authored. Ninety nine tips to get better at spearfishing and blog yes to a website..

australia Brisbane new zealand tonight ten percent Chase Ninety nine tips north florida south florida brisbane florida Chase waller Central florida couple years ago bureau atlanta Ucla gulf coast aaron two biggest arab
"bureau podcast" Discussed on Grumpy Old Geeks

Grumpy Old Geeks

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"bureau podcast" Discussed on Grumpy Old Geeks

"I think good good. This deserves whatever. Mocking can can be thrown. Its way so exactly exactly you know. In the old days we used to put this in second life but A platform called the vr chat. But yeah yeah. I'm not familiar with that one but It's it's awesome. It's just. I heard somebody say i don't know if this is true or not that the location of Four seasons total landscaping is actually right next door to the location that they used for fred. Sanford's company. In sanford and son the exteriors for sanford and son is right next door to this place. So if you go to google maps evidently you can look at it and you. Yeah that sanford and son. So i haven't checked that myself but you heard somebody say that which is kind of fun also and probably half of our audiences going. What's a sanford and son. But that's so true. Yeah i'll just. I'll just drink my chicken broth and figure all right now. This next one. I found over at the writers. Detective bureau podcast. It's the podcast. I listen to a police. Detective in california named adam who is also a writer and he gives people tips on how to make their writing more realistic from police perspective. Which it's really cool. It's fascinating it's a green short podcast and you get to learn all about the procedural in and outs of how detectives work using. Yeah it. it was just this random. Find that i found and i just i have listened to it. Religiously he's coming up on episode one hundred and there's all this real fun stuff in there because people are like i've got this plotline. I'm trying to do this in. how would i do that. And what would the detect all the detectives do and the policemen and all that stuff. So this episode. Someone asked about partial license plate numbers and is it feasible to give a detective a partial license plate number. And how does that work. And he went into the inner workings of the dmv and they don't have partial license plates in the dmv. They don't have the ability to search for partial license plates in the dmv. So which. I which i thought was. I'm like what really surprises me to very antiquated system. I'm telling you this is worth listening to. It's okay really worth listening to in what he told us was. Well since carfax is out there now they have partnered with local law enforcement. So you can actually send a partial license plate to carfax and carfax will give you back some different options where you can then get the vin number and then you can take the vin number and go to the dmv in then you can actually get the owner of the car. Yes going to say. I would imagine that this is the sort of thing. The data brokers would have easily accessible. Because they will have a along with a license plates that they gather they'll note a lot of times. What kind of car. It is because they can do basically the the facial recognition version of image matching for vehicle types yup..

Sanford sanford carfax adam writer california
"bureau podcast" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:31 min | 1 year ago

"bureau podcast" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We should also talk about Zora Neale Hurston and Ernest Gaines and Alice Walker. And folks like that. And so that definitely did it. Drive my my narrative engine. So speak not to be too clunky with the metaphors when I was writing blacked out, wait for him. Over talking to crime novelists Sean Cosby is pen name is S A Cosby, Walter Mosley and Rachel. How's L hall? I'm curious for each of you when if you read crime novels growing up How did you see people of color and police depicted? Was there anything even in the reading of those books as you were growing up? That left you feeling unsettled? Rachel? I didn't see my experience at all attended. When I read crime fiction, I tended to read a lot of Chechi Collins, which you know is on the other side. But I, you know, like so many girls, and even some boys wanted to be. You know, the Italian Gangsters daughter because she was cool and she had power and That was as close as I got to seeing someone like like like me. Unfortunately, I didn't see many African Americans in the The Raymond Chandler stories or the Daschle, Hammett stories or even you know the Agatha Christie stories. If they were there, they were racist depictions or not even thought of it all. And so when I decided to write, I wanted to write what I saw, and that's the people who were around me. Who Are depicted as the bad people in all of the great crime novels. I was very I wanted to do that in like Sean. I had problems with publishing because I live in Los Angeles, where it's blue skies and palm trees and no one got that. You could be poor working class with, you know, a palm tree in your courtyard in your apartment. So I I could not be urban enough back then when, after my first book was published in 2002 but I stuck with it, and I am still committed to making sure that The black Los Angeles experiences is a part of the pantheon of great literature. Because we're not a monolith monolith. We experience and live in different places and That should be reflected in the literature. Well, Shawn, I know, he said, you read Walter Mosley's books when you were growing up, But Walter, what about you? Did you? Did you find yourself in crime novels when you were growing up? And I'm dancing wasn't but it was before that listen to what Rachel was saying. A friend of mine from the old days, June Jordan and extraordinary poet and political activist on thinker. Once told me that the first thing that she told her a son When he was able to walk was not to run down the street. Because if you run the police are going to see you running, they're gonna know you did something wrong. Hand. At the worst. They're going to shoot you. I just think that you know, because the black mother doesn't only deal with the daughter The daughter's. It's also the sons that they're you know, they're trying to save and raise At the same time, So you know what was that question again, Max. I see myself in it when one of the great things about one of the great things about reading. Is that when you read a book You're interpreting it in your own world. And so the idea the idea that of race you know, if you're if you're Ah little girl and you're reading Nancy Drew. You imagine that your Nancy Drew and you're goingto, you know, and you're black, But you're Nancy Drew and you're going to go look in the house across the street where the mystery is occurring. I mean, and I think a lot when I was reading just reading now, when black characters and black neighborhoods were represented, which is very rarely and genre, the the crime genre then You know, it was it was nothing. And you know, that's why my biggest problem started writing, you know, Mysteries fiction. Lot of black men wouldn't read it because they thought they were going to be insulted by what was written a long time for me to convince people want. You know, black men can read this to me, and I was helped a lot by black women who did read it. Well, we got a message from a police detective named Adam, who hosts the writer's detective bureau podcast, where he answers technical questions for writers about how policing works. My own drive to become a police detective was the direct result of the mysteries I read in the cop shows. I watched in my youth loving the ideas of being the good guy standing for justice and equality, and that good can still triumph. Crime fiction. Storytelling inspires those ideals in many people. But my concern is what will happen if the next generation the good, smart, fair, young adults from all walks of life that we want to be. Our police are neither willing nor interested in pursuing policing. So with the next generation in mind, do we want our crime fiction stories to reflect the way things are or inspire the way we want things to be? Thanks for that message, Adam, I'll put the question to you, Rachel. How would you respond? I want them to be inspired. I want like Lou, who saw how it was done wrong for her and her family. To say, Well, I want to do this and I can do this and I have the tools and I know the people in that neighborhood and they respect me and I want to do this work. I think. Ah lot of people will be inspired. They know it's hard work. But then you know, the human race has never shied away from doing the hard things and when there's a vacuum there, people who are certainly going to fill it. I believe that more women hopefully will like they're like a lot of women right now are being elected into public office. I I hope there are class of women who want to do policing because there's No need for women in the community because, you know they bring skills and a different type of authority. Then what meant typically do So I think I think once we get over this, which is something we've been hitting over for years and years now, From women will come out. Black women especially will come out and say, I want to be a leader in my community in this way. I got this email from Richard, Who says, Is it retired federal law enforcement officer. I can say that I applaud the.

Rachel Sean Cosby Walter Mosley Nancy Drew Adam Zora Neale Hurston Los Angeles June Jordan Alice Walker Ernest Gaines Chechi Collins Agatha Christie Shawn Richard Lou Daschle officer The Raymond Chandler
"bureau podcast" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

09:47 min | 1 year ago

"bureau podcast" Discussed on KPCC

"Tends to be incredibly rich, because, you know, fortunately and unfortunately we have so much to draw from from being policed by police and being police by our own community. Well, Sean Blacktop Wasteland opens with your main character bug entering an illegal drag race to try to win money that he that he needs and you grew up in poverty and rule Virginia. You said that wasn't Part of the experience Publishers were were interested in. But how did your upbringing shape your storytelling? I think it made me as a writer focus on the little moments in in litter in books, the moments that are defined the character and to find there. Their path being. You know, we had spoken about this a lot, you know, growing up in rural Virginia and poverty, not him into deployment in America until I was 16 which you know that's a shame. That our nation and people they're still struggling like that. And so for me, it drove me. To tell those kind of tables. I wanted to introduce the rest of America to ah, part of the country that they have a lot of preconceived notions about you know, I spoke about it before that, you know the self. You know that the term Southern heritage has been co opted and overtaken by, you know, neo Confederate apologised and races and it just it infuriates me, because that's not the entirety of the Southern experience. That we have earned our right to tell these stories with blood and sweat and travail and so Did you know when you get those rejection letters, and some publishers are basically telling you we don't care. We don't want to hear that is infuriating. And so I think I think I did channel some of that into blacktop wasteland because of the experience I had with my first book. And so there is an undercurrent of Of of rage and frustration and despair, because I feel I deeply feel that these stories are vital to our experience. You know, there are Southern writers there. People will talk about Southern writing, and they only talk about William Faulkner or you, Darryl lt or Flannery O'Connor. And rightly they should talk about them. We should also talk about Zora Neale Hurston and earnestly gains and Alice Walker. And folks like that. And so that definitely did it Drive my my narrative engine, so to speak, not to be too clunky with the metaphors when I was writing blacktop Wasteland over talking to crime novelist Sean Cosby is pen name is S A Cosby, Walter Mosley and Rachel. How's L Hall? I'm curious for each of you when if you read crime novels growing up. How did you see people of color and police depicted? Was there anything even in the reading of those books as you were growing up? That left you feeling unsettled? Rachel? I wouldn't see my experience at all attended. When I read crime fiction, I tended to read a lot of Chechi Collins, which you know is on the other side. But I, you know, like so many girls, and even some boys wanted to be. You know, the Italian Gangsters daughter because she was cool and she had power and That was as close as I got to seeing someone like like like me. Unfortunately, I didn't see many African Americans in the The Raymond Chandler stories or the Daschle, Hammett stories or even you know the back of the Christie stories. If they were there, they were racist depictions or not even thought of it all. And so when I decided to write I wanted to write what I saw, and that's the people who were around me. Who Are depicted as the bad people in all of the great crime novels. I was very I I wanted to do that in like Sean. I had problems with publishing because I live in Los Angeles, where it's blue skies and palm trees and No one got that You could be a poor working class with, you know a palm tree in your courtyard in your apartment. So I I could not be urban enough back then when? After my first book was published in 2002 But I stuck with it. And I am still committed to making sure that the black Los Angeles experiences is a part of the pantheon of great literature. Because we're not a monolith monolith. We experience and live in different places and That should be reflected in the literature. Well, Shawn and I know you said you read Walter Mosley's books when you were growing up, But Walter, what about you did Did you find yourself in crime novels? When you were growing up. And I'm gonna answer questions. But I just want to say before that, you know, listening to what Rachel was saying. A friend of mine from the old days June Jordan and extraordinary poet and political activist and thinker once told me that the first thing that she told her a son When he was able to walk was not to run down the street. Because if you run the police are going to see you running, they're gonna know you did something wrong. Hand. At the worst. They're going to shoot you. And I just think that you know, because the black mother doesn't only deal with the daughter The daughter's. It's also the sons that they're you know, they're trying to save and raise At the same time, So you know what was that question again, Max. I see myself in it when one of the great things about one of the great things about reading. Is that when you read a book You're interpreting it in your own world. And so the idea the idea that of race you know, if you if you're Ah little girl and you're reading Nancy Drew. You imagine that your Nancy Drew and you're goingto, you know, and you're black, But you're Nancy Drew and you're going to go look in the house across the street where the mystery is occurring. I mean, and I think a lot when I was reading just reading now, when black characters and black neighborhoods were represented, which is very rarely in the genre, the the crime genre then You know, it was it was nothing. And you know, that's why my biggest problem started writing, you know, Mysteries fiction. A lot of black men wouldn't read it because they thought they were going to be insulted by what was written. It took a long time for me to convince people want. You know, black men could read this to me, and I was helped a lot by black women who did read it. Well, we got a message from a police detective named Adam, who hosts the writer's detective bureau podcast, where he answers technical questions for writers about how policing works. My own drive to become a police detective was the direct result of the mysteries I read in the cop shows. I watched in my youth loving the ideas of being the good guy standing for justice and equality and that good can still triumph. Crime fiction. Storytelling inspires those ideals in many people, But my concern is what will happen if the next generation the good, Smart fair. A young adults from all walks of life that we want to be. Our police are neither willing nor interested in pursuing policing. So with the next generation of mind, do we want our crime fiction stories to reflect the way things are or inspire the way we want things to be? Thanks for that message, Adam, I'll put that question to you. Rachel. How would you respond? I want them to be inspired. I want like Lou, who saw how it was done wrong for her and her family. To say, Well, I want to do this and I can do this and I have the tools and I know the people in that neighborhood and they respect me and I want to do this work. I think. Ah lot of people will be inspired. They know it's hard work. But then you know, the human race has never shied away from doing the hard things and when there's a vacuum there, people who are certainly going to fill it. I believe that more women hopefully will like they're like a lot of women right now are being elected into public office. I I hope there are class of women who want to do policing because there's No need for women in the community, because, you know They bring skills and a different type of authority than what meant typically do so. I think I think once we get over this, which is something we've been hitting over for years and years now, Women will come out. Black women especially will come out and say, I want to be a leader in my community in this way. We got this email from Richard, who says As a retired federal law enforcement officer. I can say that I applaud the changes to the genre. There's a lot of laziness and apathy in all levels of law enforcement. I remember training new agents before I retired. I was encouraging them to go out to meet people. They told me they would rather hide in their offices. I think new perspectives will reflect a truer version of what people are actually like. We're talking with a panel of black crime novelists as a Cosby, Walter Mosley and Rachel. How's L hall? I'm Jen white. We'll hear more from you and our guests in a moment. Since 2000 for more than 2000 American newspapers have gone out.

Rachel Walter Mosley Sean Cosby America Virginia Nancy Drew writer L Hall Los Angeles Zora Neale Hurston Adam Alice Walker William Faulkner Chechi Collins Jen white Flannery O'Connor Shawn Lou
"bureau podcast" Discussed on Cascadian Beer Podcast

Cascadian Beer Podcast

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"bureau podcast" Discussed on Cascadian Beer Podcast

"Have a <Speech_Male> friend who? <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> was a good kind of <Speech_Male> <hes> chef. <Speech_Male> Shout to kill. <Speech_Male> He moved away <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> <hes> for the Metro <Speech_Male> Vancouver area, so used <Speech_Male> to lean on <Speech_Male> his cooking out <Speech_Male> whenever I want a super <Speech_Male> great meal, and <Speech_Male> now I've had to learn how to <Speech_Male> just do all <Speech_Male> these spices <Speech_Male> and everything myself so <Speech_Male> today. Actually we <Speech_Male> had just a fantastic, <Speech_Male> but her chicken <Speech_Male> with some <Speech_Male> sweet potato. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Creed? <Speech_Male> Baked Bites <Speech_Male> on the side <Speech_Male> admitted. <Speech_Male> Four <Speech_Male> experimentation <Speech_Male> mode, and <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> I'm looking at recipes <Speech_Male> that take me like <Speech_Male> half the day sometimes <Speech_Male> to <SpeakerChange> complete <Speech_Male> on my days off from the Bruce <Speech_Male> Though. <Speech_Male> Curry. Games definitely <Speech_Male> gone up in the <SpeakerChange> last few weeks <Speech_Music_Male> to. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Just kills you live with you. <Speech_Male> Oh, yeah, I just <Speech_Male> got. <Speech_Male> LONG-TERM! <Speech_Music_Male> Done. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> The minute. <Speech_Male> I bought <Speech_Male> to feed <hes> <Speech_Male> two years ago and <Speech_Male> I've been you know really <Speech_Male> using that guy a lot <Speech_Male> to just <Speech_Male> yeah. <Speech_Male> Done perfectly <Speech_Male> every time <Speech_Male> you. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> Grew up with those <Speech_Male> yeah. <Speech_Male> All right cool. <Speech_Male> Thank you very much clean <Speech_Male> from another beer company <Speech_Male> up there on the top box <Speech_Male> and Matt from <Speech_Male> whistle <Speech_Male> punk over in spokane <Speech_Male> Washington on the <Silence> bottom there. <Speech_Male> Thank you very much. <Speech_Male> Guys have fun. Be Safe <Speech_Male> and thanks for <Speech_Male> having US Yeah <Speech_Male> <Silence> Appreciate <SpeakerChange> it. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Thanks so much <Speech_Male> for listening, really appreciate <Speech_Male> it. Hope you enjoyed this bonus <Speech_Male> episode of <Speech_Male> The CASCADIA <Speech_Music_Male> bureau podcast of <Speech_Music_Male> the virtual beer <Speech_Male> show, which was my <Speech_Male> virtual streaming <Speech_Male> event during <Speech_Male> the covid nineteen <Speech_Male> at lockdown <Speech_Male> This is episode one i. a <Speech_Male> couple of other <hes> <Speech_Male> virtual beer show <Speech_Male> interviews as well <Speech_Male> so those will be. <Speech_Male> Released soon <Speech_Male> on the channel I <Speech_Male> thought I'd get this one out and <Speech_Male> share with you. <Speech_Male> If we WANNA follow the podcast <Speech_Male> along you can by <Speech_Male> going to the website <Speech_Male> at cascading dot <Speech_Male> beer also <Speech_Male> on the socials <Speech_Male> facebook dot com <Speech_Male> slash cascading <Speech_Male> beer. <Speech_Male> I'm on twitter <Speech_Male> at Cascadia and <Speech_Male> beer, and on Instagram, <Speech_Male> cascading and beer podcast. <Speech_Male> Thanks so <Speech_Male> much for listening I. Really do appreciate it and until next time remember support your local.

"bureau podcast" Discussed on Cascadian Beer Podcast

Cascadian Beer Podcast

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"bureau podcast" Discussed on Cascadian Beer Podcast

"Temporary closure brewery tasting rooms as well as restaurants throughout B C I encourage you to stay home and stay healthy for now. But you can still support your local breweries and restaurants in your local area throughout Cascadia By purchasing products from them. If you can a lot of Burris are doing some home delivery services now be sure to check out their social media channels to see what you can do to help support all these small businesses at this time. And now's your chance to go back to the archives as well listen to past episodes and you can plan your post. Pandemic Vacation Visit Breweries Out British Columbia Washington and Oregon. And I'm looking forward to getting back into those tasting rooms eventually having a pint with you and all the other friends of the podcast so for now police day home. Please look after your family and friends have fun. Be Safe and support your local and now I hope you enjoy this. Episode of the PODCAST. This podcast is made possible by the BBC Ale trail arrive thirsty leave inspired at the BC L. Trail dot CA. Welcome to the CASCADIA and bureau podcast Aeronautic.

"bureau podcast" Discussed on The Successful Encore Career Podcast

The Successful Encore Career Podcast

14:15 min | 2 years ago

"bureau podcast" Discussed on The Successful Encore Career Podcast

"I Have Catherine Land Klein from portfolio. Creative portfolio crave has been around since two thousand five and we have been servicing their creative community Finding people Talent essentially people that are in the creative industry. And that's all we specialize in so anything in advertising and marketing. That is what we feel when we started out. And this is what kind of blows me away is like I think about fifteen years ago. A lot of the people that we are starting to help. Now we're just children and now we're fighting for them but essentially when we started Both my business partner Chris and Harrison. I came from the marketing area. We have been had for many years and decided there was a need to fill Just in finding talent and finding you know The jobs for people. I worked as a freelancer for years. I also worked in corporate America. Kristen works a lot in corporations. It was always just finding that right freelancer for the right price. The right cultural fit and We we felt that if there could be somebody to do that service It would just really help out in a lot of aspects and we started with just copywriting and graphic design and that has now since exploded into everything digital and social and content and really kind of no end to what we place now. That's great yeah. I can imagine it's grown exponentially in the last five years probably of night and what really surprised us is that we thought we knew just about every creative person to town and that might have been database of one hundred people's. That's that's everybody but then you know fifteen years later you've got thousands and thousands of people and they're all really good so I mean this is really a fantastic town and a time to be in Columbus. Just because business and creative is going crazy. Awesome what I wanted to bring to the forefront for our listeners catherine is three episodes that I caught it. I know there are more. But there's three caught my eyes elimination bureaus podcast episode. Thirty one ageism and this. I'm going to name them specifically but also put them in the podcast show notes and number twenty three twenty eight on workplace culture. Tell me a little bit more about you. Know The podcast itself you. Are you dealing with two different audiences ultimately? But let's talk about what the the episodes that are geared more toward the the businesses. Okay they're hiring but why Why why with the AGEISM WIDE WORKFORCE CULTURE? What what what what stem those types of conversations? the ageism workforce culture kind of came up because there there have been times. Well I bought a plot. Along time ago it was back in two thousand eight about When a lot of people were losing their jobs essentially and we had a lot of people coming in had worked for companies for like ten twenty years and they were getting laid off a lot of middle management. A lot of you know like that lower tier upper management sort of stuff and Really frightened that they would not get another job So we had to deal a lot with with a lot of that and just how do you reinvent yourself? You know even at an older age because If look at yourself going up against a lot of younger people who might have stayed? Current on more skill sets and things like that So it was definitely an area that we thought we had to help. I guess and essentially we recreated the podcast. I wrote a blog initially and then we got a little deeper into it with the with the podcast. Justin how? We could help people do that. How we could help them. Look at their resumes. Look at their careers and figure out. What exactly exactly did you do. And how do you bring certain things to the forefront and how do you Maybe brush up on some skills and Also now that you're in an interview for example and somebody walks in and he's like Oh. I didn't think you were going to be so old. Which out without saying that because that would be and you know I'm I'm reading closer though stars too so I I know what it was kind of like to be in space because everybody who works for me as a lot younger than me They think of. That's The lady in the office. So how'd you chance correct? So Yeah Hi how do you how do you say relevant? How do you not feel like you're the person calling in to help you promote on something like that you know and a lot of it is just you know playing up on your experience? I think People will sometimes sell themselves short on that they might say. You know I didn't do that but oh my God. You have so much experience in this area. Is there some way that you could you know mentor the rest of the team somewhere Because there's a lot of people let's say for example that no social media and that's like you know right out of the boom anymore. They right out of college but that is getting younger and younger. And you might have somebody on your team. That is a master of social media but marketing plan. Do they know how to speak to the client? You know and it. It's sort of expertise that you could hire a company for Oregon. Hire a team member that is going to understand your brand and and so you have to. You have to sell that you have to talk about. You know what I was. Not The hands on social media person. But here's what I did to contribute to social media or outlining some ideas you would have for that and and really be confident in that and not Get all wish you. I never did that or digest. It don't you. You can do this. And that's a little bit of coaching. That we will give people two and also speaking from the client side to like people might think they need to hire you. Know some. You know fresh face kid because we want to be young and current and whatever but again To kind of discount all this experience as somebody else might have you know is is not necessarily fair or to somehow that they're gonna be wildly more expensive than somebody else. That's not always true Reggie we look at it for the value of it and speak to your value is what you can contribute when you interview for example and if you're an older candidate going exam and tell them exactly how you can help the company not. I saw your job description and I think I think I can do this. You know there's a big difference Another thing I really encourage people to do. Is You know. Maybe there's a lot of people who are now turning into consultants that I think that's also a really good choice like for example. If you're going in an interview you think you want a job Talked about for awhile and then you know maybe second baby. Hey come consultant. You can try me out for a while and hire me on if you like me later Or You could just start building a business of just you know consulting work which a lot of people have done really successfully because it's all again about just that experience really owning it and selling it when you're talking to people right and I I like the the workplace culture episodes. You're talking about you. Are you in love with having a Ping Pong table in the pool table? Is that you have to really think about. Is that if that is your culture. That's great yeah. Yeah but you also need to remember who you're interviewing in UC talent that may be forty five fifty fifty five. They are going to be extremely uncomfortable. They're probably that is true too. If that's something you really really really want and would do the job for you. You have to think about what you're doing inside too. I would have people really start questioning the whole being big chair Ping Pong Table. Who I know a few cumby set to it and it works out. I'll preface by saying it works fantastic but there are some that it remains. Nobody ever sits on those chairs. Nobody is playing Ping Pong for a couple of reasons. One they don't necessarily like Ping Pong really does play ping pong and doing the work. They're they're they're taking you home so play play at work and working with your games with that and then What is it that people really really want you? Don't ask them. You know because you might think you know you know agency has all these great games. So let's get those and nobody in your team's GonNa WanNA use it. Maybe just wanted to go home. But what is a benefit for them? Maybe it's a gym membership. Maybe it's you know pizza Thursday. Maybe it's You know it could really be anything but as a matter of Egypt asking could be great snack bar. You know right but or free drinks free coffee. It could be something so minor. It doesn't take up any space at all and you have gotten their loyalty but say you know what this job. I could probably another job. But nobody's GonNa offer me this good of coffee right and they and that will build loyalty sure But yeah I I rarely see. People make a decision of whether to work for company based on what the Games are in the room. I mean sometimes about just the overall feel it's open space and things like that but even that has you know limits as far as you know what that the value of that is beautiful? Workspace and everybody's a jerk. You know the point of that that See I it's definitely working. Look worth looking into some of those investments in placing. You're making your money you know. And we're in or placing manure. We're such a unique situation. Now that we've got potentially up to four generations working together right bright and you've got to balance that because I'm super close to that age range where I like facetime. I hate to say it. But that's how I always had always worked. You know you you got credit for sitting in your chair and people could see you in your boss could see you. And now there's this whole new generation that says You know I want to work from home and I don other working you know because it's the output output output and if the output is there but as doing but if sometimes you know people have a choice of working a couple of days at home versus a company that has got to be here every day and I'm gonNA see your face. They make choices with that. Doesn't matter how much you pay them or what. You provide them So yeah and he started making it here culture on how that ends up being successful and that definitely like I said we base another podcast. Totally on that Just because there are so many things that could go horribly wrong with that no And one thing that was brought to my attention which was kind of a bit of the game changer for me to allow some of this working from home and all of that is someone had said to me. Well if you don't trust them to work from home why aren't you do employ them and I was like. Oh you know what? That's a very valid point and I trust them. I really did but it was just this kind of justice hump. I had to get over mentally in order to be comfortable with it and it's worked out really good. Yeah I see I guess. I'm all going almost old schools. Like what you've gotTa Pay. Your dues for years is thought about that too. You know but yeah right almost to the point of understanding how to work with people though too bright and there is a point of that office work is kind of valuable to understand who wanna work. And there's collaboration things on in class coming in going. Whoa WANNA be part of that meeting. I was like wow that sound fun through and I think Y- as you go. Maybe you're on the right to later onto the solar entrepreneur especially in the niche. You're working with ACO a lot of Silla preneurs. They just have their own little unconsolidated consulting house and they can. They can make some good money..

Ping Pong Catherine Land Klein consultant America Kristen partner Columbus Oregon Justin Chris Silla preneurs Reggie Egypt ACO Harrison facetime
"bureau podcast" Discussed on > Better Series

> Better Series

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"bureau podcast" Discussed on > Better Series

"To the council the better business bureau's podcast better business better sooners where we will top of mind topics with business and industry leaders to understand friends innovations that continue to push the envelope in today's marketplace. Thank you for joining us on the better series podcast. I'm known offend your host for today's dynamic conversation. I'm also joined by James. Lee a new voice being added to our better series podcasts say hello to our listeners James. Go Away everybody here. We are glad to have you will spring is here and we are gearing up for the summer but before we go there. Let's not forget the need to spring clean to ensure. The remnants of winter is a well behind us as you were person up your office space. Yes we urge everyone to spend a few minutes ensuring that the data your businesses collecting is secure. You know a few simple very basic steps can go a long way to safeguard safeguard your business against any number of potentially harmful or disruptive issues. They could cause mayhem in your business. If your data's compromised and James we have have someone in studio with us today discuss these safeguards Kelvin Coleman Executive Director of the National Cyber Security Alliance here to help small businesses understand. Why it's it's not only a good idea to ensure your data houses clean but a must do idea. I've heard Kelvin's say if you're a business leader. It makes good sense to make this a priority for both you and your customers. Yes it does and Calvin. We just want to thank you for joining us today..

James Kelvin Coleman Executive Direc National Cyber Security Allian Kelvin Calvin Lee
"bureau podcast" Discussed on The Bistro

The Bistro

09:46 min | 2 years ago

"bureau podcast" Discussed on The Bistro

"Welcome to the council of better business bureaus podcast the bistro where we will discuss today's hottest consumer trends and predict the future with consumer experts and learn how elite businesses and entrepreneurs continue to push the envelope in today's marketplace hello and welcome to the bistro oh i'm your host elena spinola this month were celebrating mothers everywhere on sunday may twelfth and today we wanted to share some of the latest trends and gift giving to help butte prepare to spoil the special women in your life this mother's day joining us in the studio is shopping expert lifestyle journalist and brand strategist trae posh who specializes in smart shopping personal finance and retail trade thank you so much for being here today thanks so much for having me well we really appreciate you and you you sound like you have the coolest job ever i know you've been a contributor to many popular magazines y- appeared on dozens of tv shows including rachel ray inside edition CNBC ABC just to name a few so trey tell us how long have you been a smart shopping expert and what does that entail exactly i've been doing this for about six years i an tales a variety of things so like you said i do contribute to women's magazines i do a lot of TV segments both local and national and my main goal is to help consumers sumer save while they shop and also save money for the future i also talked quite a bit about parenting i love toys and kids and all that fun stuff as well but my mingle really is to help people save money in their lives got it well here on the bistro we're always aiming to help consumers and again today we're trying to help people be more savvy abby shoppers all year round and as mother's day approaches so as a shopping expert trae what's the top advice you can share with our listeners to help them shop for mom this hear my number one word of advice to any consumer is never take a price at face value so if you're in a store online and you see that something is on sale l. that's great but it doesn't necessarily mean that you are finding the lowest price so i love to send consumers to my favorite coupon sites or to use browser extensions you savings apps there are so many cool and very easy to use platforms that you can use to save yourself a little extra every time you buy something that's it's really really great advice i wonder if you've spoken to my husband because he is the master in finding beyond anything and that's such great advice for everyone and again mother's day's coming up here here on sunday mates wealth what can you tell us about some of the latest trends in gifts for moms this year so one of the trends that i'm seeing are experiential gifts at mom's tom just want to spend time with us right so anything from taking your mom out to brunch to taking your mom on a sightseeing tour museums all all those things that you can do with your mom to spend time with them makes a really good failsafe gift on mother's day though sound grade what about traditional gifts for mom what seems to be the best gifts for moms that never get old and why do you think that is i think the gifts that never get old our jewelry and then also flowers and thankfully really right around mother's day we will see lots of sales on both of those categories you can save along the way something that i like to recommend for flowers in particular because farmers only early maybe last a week and a on the good high quality flour i like to do succulents or plant or something that she can plant in her guard and like a tree that way she'll always be able to look at that item and think of you on her mother's day celebration i love that that's great advice you mentioned sales and tell me about mother's day's gifts if money is tight what are some other low cost ways to celebrate yes so we talked a little bit about experiential gifts and so you can do that on a budget you could make her breakfast for instance or maybe this is you know not so exciting but if there's something around her house that she's been kind of putting off that she needs to do for instance if she bought a piece of furniture that needs to be assembled and you're great at that go over and help her put that together or if she's not that digitally savvy and she needs to hook up her wifi why fire her smart tv i think especially with the older consumer moms may feel a little bit intimidated by certain things and you're obviously younger than her and probably more savvy there so you can go in and help her get herself all setup digitally so she can maybe communicate by email with you or by text or facetime with with her grandkids for for instance yeah those are all really great tips and i think you're right people mothers especially they love great intentions in those great experiences these have been really really great tips for mother's they shopping and as i mentioned here at the shirt were always aiming to help consumers shop smart and be more savvy all year long trae what are some tips you can share to help our listeners snow's remain savvy shoppers through all of their buying experiences absolutely so there are a couple of tips that i like to always share so first of all think about timing so oh if especially if you're making a very large purchase or planning a very large purchase like an appliance for instance or a new TV there are certain times during the year a year that are better than others to buy those items so for instance TV's are usually at their deepest prices around black friday heidi cyber monday also right before the super bowl is really good or a lot of times stores do black friday in july sales so for instance buying a TV around those times you'll be saving a lot more than if you purchase them at other times same thing to think about with things that are seasonal for instance clothing so we're we're coming into spring we'll see some spring teaser deals on clothes but nothing really clearance level until the end of spring so if you think about things in terms of that you can do you much better on price and save all year long so that would be one kind of bucket of savings advice the other thing that i always recommend is looking for a special the deal that you can apply to a certain item so i work with a company called slick deals which is a deal site so they have deals on their site all year round they have eleven million deal l. seekers vetting those deals all the time so that's a good kind of base camp for deals but they also have a feature called a a deal alert which i like to set if there's something kind of pricey that i'm looking to buy for instance i have my eye on a new laptop you can see my laptop here it's a little bit old and i love of it and i'm afraid to give it up but i do need a new laptop until the same one so i'm going to have to do you buy dillard's for for a minute that was mac book air i'm waiting waiting for slick deals to tell me when that item is going on sale so i can save on it so that's something else that i like to do discounted gift cards is another savings tip that i like to use there's a site gift card granny that has thousands of discounted gift cards from anything from restaurants to your big box retailers taylor so it's always good to look for a discounted gift card for instance if target has a discounted gift card on that site for ten percent off and you buy that card then you shop op with it you've automatically saved yourself ten percent so it's a way to create sale where there may be wasn't a sale before so that's another tip that i like to use and then the last that i like to use really suggest that consumers do this is that if you do a lot of shopping online use a browser extension so oh browser extension is what it says it extends the functionality of your regular browser so if it's safari or chrome or whatever browser you use so for instance there's one from swags called the swag button when you shop and you have the swag button installed you'll be alerted to deals as you're shopping hoping around so it does a lot of the work for you there's another one called gum drop from a deal site called good shop and good shop is a really nice when because they there's a charitable component to their deals in same with swag button as you're shopping around you'll get a little alert that will let you know that their savings available you simply just click on it to activate activated and then you save along the way so i'm all about making things easy i i have the utmost respect for those crazy couponers out there with their their folders ars in their coupons and that's too much work for me i just want to take advantage of the functionality of my digital device my laptop put a savings applic- slick deals goes on my phone and find those savings quickly and easily along the way you're right it does the work for you which so awesome and what i'm hearing you say is with a little bit out of cleaning and patients and informing yourself you can really get some great deals out there that's true thank you so much he's have been awesome tips trae where can our listeners find and now more information like the tips you share today sure so i i'm at trae dot com i'm true trae on twitter i'm trae bod on facebook and and instagram so those are all the places that you can find me and i'm constantly sharing special deal savings tips advice for the long term as well so i hope you'll follow me there and i look forward to answering any questions that you might have as well wonderful thank you again so much for being here my pleasure i'm elena spinola host of the bistro podcast we thank you for listening and ask you to give us your feedback on this episode go ahead and write us on itunes and share our episodes to help inspire others until next time it it's been my pleasure discussing better business and savvy shopping tips with you you just enjoyed the bistro podcast be sure to tune in next month for away brand new episode 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