2 Burst results for "Bureau Of Indian Affairs"

"bureau indian affairs" Discussed on Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

12:45 min | 2 years ago

"bureau indian affairs" Discussed on Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

"We have to have a loin and <hes> that border the border situation really got to me because we shouldn't have these voters. We should be able to live in a world where <hes> <hes> you know you speak that language speak this language but you know what come here I know go there and that's just live happily ever after about a nominal Dallas by just it just accommodation. You haven't report back to an early age when I grew up thinking. Why do we need palm sports to go to another part of the world? WHO's the boss of the world anyway? Now you understand by Molly freaky brain show leave you to annoy you have a good show the morning and <hes> yes nice time you back on. I don't have much more to say and our vigil farewell. Thank you thank you leave. The next Weenie roast will be sure to invite you. You know we have to have a meet up that would be that that would be great in days companies. Yeah I love to cook. You know that I know yeah. He does <hes> and good. Oh thank you leave mentioned the border a majority of the fool in the White House at supporters don't realize that there is altogether about six hundred fifty miles of border fence or wall and various forms already standing along the border they just don't they don't know that their their your foaming at the mouth the rabbit in their their chance about build the wall. There's already a border there you damn for yeah exactly. There's already a border fence in wall there so but at least correct you know why why are there borders well. Here's the thing I always always think that history again looking through an indigenous Lens we always had territorial to`real wars right you know even even between the tribes okay the nation's but there was no physical barrier there okay you know sometimes they had to do with just hunting hunting territories and things like that but <hes> didn't didn't mean armed conflict in every single case in people came and go as we pleased and then the other you're the thought that had around <hes> with was thinking back to about the <hes> sorry the Algonquin console you know what I mean brother where we had leaders that traveled great distances by foot two different different gathering places all along the East Coast <hes> <hes> to discuss all kinds of different things going on with whether whether people to the point where we we had a common language and so if we had barriers between each nation makes it rather difficult especially the way they're system is set up where it's like. <hes> Chaumet Basma ought right right shadow may pay us you know it it does not instill friendliness you know confidence in being able to travel freely to see other people and just talk about what's up you know right and you know and Dave gone by a lot of tribes did did you know grant passage you know from other or the nation's in and out of the territories you know that occurred often and there were agreements that that stood that that you know one nation would want would hunt out another nations <hes> territory hunting territory and those those agreements stood the test of time exactly yeah and there were even agreements where nations would would you know welcome other nations to hunt in their territories if the game was scarce in the other territory these things did exist. They did happen so you know this. Whole Silliness of barriers is just that it silliness what what what does it solve it solves nothing as evidenced by people crossing into to other countries anyway? You have to look again. Also it the cause -ality all right so so it's it's that those cultures that support that you look at their histories and annual and you'll see I wanna step back again to discussion around order of the Arrow because there was a couple other own points made here in chat to <hes> that let's see back with a busy. She said <hes> if they really they WANNA learn about the culture they can invite indigenous speakers they can visit a museum and indigenous community visit Powell there are options beyond this insult and that that's absolutely true and we make that point in the video as as well you know that <hes> you should learn not mimic in everything case and then let's see I believe <hes> let's see Dave Dave and chat said I never did boy scouts scouts as a child and thus I had no idea the ceremony existed when I saw the video <hes> the get up look like something from the Nineteen Fifties Western in which <hes> white actors played native American characters unacceptable instant this day and age. They should have taken the route that is he said yeah so so there you go again. We encourage you guys. Just take a look at that video. I think it's about five minutes is not long at all so thank you so. Let's see it is time for our native new segment. It is and our first article is infrastructure and Indian country needs to be fair and equitable and this is brought to us by Indian country today news you know it troubles me greatly troubles me in the depths of my soul that in this Dan Age age cultures have to fight for fairness and an equity that should be something that is a given but you have to fight for fairness and equity that that just doesn't set right in in my in the depths of my native being it never has but this article was brought to us by Kobe kicking woman subcommittee says hearing it's a step in the right direction towards identifying problems at at least they didn't use the word issue and finding solutions on tribal infrastructure roads are crumbling and unpaved bridges lack the funding for repair tribes are facing many the issues they had to get it in there somewhere in regards to infrastructure on tribal lands the subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States held a hearing <hes> on tribal infrastructure her roads bridges and buildings which began more than an hour after the original start time due to a larger than usual number of votes needed to be taken on the House floor hum chairman Rueben Lego Democrat of Arizona said roads at Indian countries saint rank. Excuse me they seem to but rank among the most underdeveloped and under-maintained roads in the United States he cited a recent incident incident. Excuse me on the Standing Rock Sioux reservation where a forty foot wide chunk of highway with swept away due to flood waters which resulted in multiple <unk> fatalities. Excuse me wow adding that climate change contribute continues to affect our everyday lives quoting Indian country as well as other rural and minority communities days have always been on the front lines of climate change in quote Lego said quoting again without strong and well-contained infrastructure to mitigate negative impacts Indian country will continue to disproportionately fortunately suffer as a result of changes in the weather patterns and Worsening Natural Disasters in quote representative Paul Cook Republican California echoed some of the sentiments Collegue Gallego adding that the hearing was a step in the right direction. Excuse me to having fun allocated to address the deficiencies that have been around for a long long time and I quote you have to have a buy-in with multiple shareholders and we have to recognize that there is a problem in quote Cook said among could problems discussed include the backlog of deficiencies in dangerous of unkept bridges at Indian country as well as the lack of resources available to tribes to properly maintain roads on tribal lands ends of the thirteen thousand six hundred fifty miles of road owned in maintained by the bureau Indian affairs are unpaved which affect native communities a number of ways Martin Javier or have year president of Salt River Pima Maricopa Indian community told that subcommittee that while his community was was at one time time on the outskirts of the Phoenix metropolitan area it is now boarded by Tempe Scottsdale in Messer interesting they result is a larger than normal number of stakeholders that that have responsibility for the roadways making it more complex to deal with the governmental entities varying levels to solve infrastructure issues as they arise highest priority for our community in this is a quote it's paving the fifty two miles of dirt roads would serve our members in quote hobbyists said quoting again based on current funding levels it will take approximately fifty nine years to pave these roads in quote quote. That's ridiculous and they're surrounded by those major towns. Those aren't little towns well. I I WANNA go back real quick to something Cook said mode you have to have by with multiple shareholder. Why exactly why that's a waste of time and quite frankly that's the that's the core of the problem absolutely we keep talking talking and talking and talking and saying we need this? We need that we need this Winnie that bolt hockey <hes> it's a waste of time in an excuse and not getting the help to the people that's correct period brother. I'm sorry no problem Red Lake Nation Chairman Daryl G Seki senior discussed how be a has failed to assist his tribe in repairing public safety buildings and their tribal.

Paul Cook Dave Dave United States Dallas chairman White House Molly Red Lake Nation Chaumet Basma Standing Rock Sioux bureau Indian affairs Powell Daryl G Seki Indigenous Peoples Arizona Rueben Lego Kobe California Collegue Gallego
"bureau indian affairs" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

08:20 min | 2 years ago

"bureau indian affairs" Discussed on KGO 810

"I'm John Batchelor. This is the John Batchelor show. The supreme court decision recently handed Washington State Department of licensing versus Koga Dannon cooperating is in fact, a story of the sovereignty of the tribal nations. Those who have been deprived of their own ability to prosper in the twenty first century after the twentieth century following the reckless and unacceptable decisions in the nineteenth century by the United States government that continue to this day. Who's taught me this? I welcome Terry Anderson of the Hoover Institution who has very carefully written about this new supreme court decision that favours the sovereignty decisions by one particular Indian nation. This is the Yakima of Washington state, Terry a very good evening. Kill the striking detail. Is that Ruth beta Ginsberg and Neal Gorsuch two opposite ends of the spectrum. We're told have joined together at Coker, Dan. What is the issue for the ACA? Good evening to you. Good evening. Yes. You wouldn't have expected. Those to come together on anything, given the earrings that we witnessed with with Justice Gorsuch, but they've come together in this case mostly because they both agree about individual rights and in this case individual lights of Yakima Indians. The the issue is the state of Washington wanting to tax a company owned by Yakima tribal. Members company that transports gasoline from Oregon to gas stations on the reservation. The state said we want to tax you, the company said, but we have a treaty dating back to eighteen fifty five that exempts from any state interference with our right in common. With other citizens of the United States to travel on all public highways supreme court, and the Gorsuch is opinion concurring opinion with. The other liberal justices said you can't do that. Because we have to live by the treaties. We side. That makes a lot of common sense. And so the puzzle here is why anybody would disagree with that. Now, if I understand correctly, it is generally true that the Indian nations the tribal nations have to struggle with the United States government to have thority over their own lands. This looks like an example of that. But in this instance, is not the federal government. It's the Washington state government as this as this struck the Washington state as irregular are they going are they upset by this because they can't tax the outcome. Well, the Washington state is and other states are probably going to be a little nervous. Now, not only do the tribes in the United States lack authority over their own lands. Their lands are held in trust. Because the congress has deemed Indians to be incompetent something. That's just seems unimaginable in this day and age so they lack control of their own lands. At government tells them what they can and can't do on their lands, but they also lack any jurisdiction protect -sation. And as a result, they get government. So this this marks a real change in the potential for states to tax tribes, and it it hearkens back to individual rights, especially individual Indian rights, not just the tribe sovereignty, but individual sovereignty to carry on trade, you might even think that it hearkens back to a couple of clauses in our constitution about contracts and interstate commerce. I wanna press this because I learned from you over the years that this is not a matter of just taxing gasoline that you brought in for another state. This has to do with property property rights that you write are incomplete does the tribe on its own land can sell its land can attacks people who live on its land. It owns its own land in that the lands of the tribe are demarcated on maps as tribal lands. But that ownership goes, no doesn't go any farther than those little lines automatic. They can't sell their lands. They can't make decisions about how those lands are used without the story for the bureau Indian affairs. They can't tax people within the reservation. They they basically it's a it's a fiction to think that that in any way the Yakima or any other tribe are really sovereign nations. So the rule of law as you point out in your essay the rule of law is in doubt on the reservations. And that means that prosperity is is a is an illusion. If if people can't trust your contract, therefore, you can't do business. Totally the case and reservations some tribe. Are beginning to get a handle on how to make the rule of law stronger. So that people will do business. I was just at a conference in Louisiana with a retired Justice both the Navajos nation supreme court. So this is not the US supreme court with Gorsuch and Ginsburg, this is a native American the novel Indian who who just articulated so beautifully. What the rule of law is about. And he concluded and I quote, it is important to work toward an independent tribal judicial system and in so saying he went on to describe just how effective the Navajos become in creating rule some harkening back to their tribal customs and culture their common law. And as a result have created a much better environment for business investment without that it is virtually impossible for tribes to. To to to attract outside investors. You report that Ruth Bader Ginsburg is against tribal sovereignty how so what is her? What is her thinking not to not to fully and franchise citizens? I think the her her resistance to tribal sovereignty is is to protect states and other local governments from tribes encroaching on their territory. Look, let the us gaming as the example. It's it's a classic case where tribes do have sovereignty later engaged in contacts with the state's compacts that give an agreement between the drive in the state to allow the try to engage in gaming, and of course, in some cases that generates huge amounts of revenue. What it means though is now that may not be easy for the state to enjoy and not surprisingly states often resist the gaming tribes. So I think Justice Ginsburg is really articulating positions and other faces that that support state sovereignty over tribal sovereignty despite case in ball individuals. She could side with with Justice course, insane. That it's it's not a matter of tribal sovereignty in the space battle matter of individual sovereignty and individual Indian entrepreneurship, that's at stake have at Tara with just a minute. We have left what about the treaties? How do they respond to the fact that the treaties were made in good faith by the US government? And they're no longer being honored. This is where Justice Gorsuch really shines in his in his concurrence with the the three liberal justices on the court. He says we need to go back and read the interestingly original intent of what the treaty signers were were at signing. And in this case of the Yakima. He said it's very clear they were not going to be trapped on the reservation. They could travel off and use public roads and work to have that interfered with and then included the taxes certainly do that form provide that kind of interference Terry Anderson of the Hoover Institution riding with his colleague Wendy per now on a supreme court case recently decided where Neil Gorsuch joined with with bay against back to do the right thing are the combination..

United States Ruth Bader Ginsburg Yakima Justice Gorsuch supreme court Washington Terry Anderson Hoover Institution John Batchelor Washington State Department of Koga Dannon bureau Indian affairs Neil Gorsuch Oregon congress Coker ACA