35 Burst results for "Bureau Chief"

German Conservatives Mull Merkel Succession

The Economist: The Intelligence

02:00 min | 4 d ago

German Conservatives Mull Merkel Succession

"Germany indeed the whole of the european union is preparing for an era beyond the leadership of chancellor angela markle and this weekend the contours of the battle to lead our party became clearer. Mrs merkel's christian democratic union or cd you along with its sister party. The s you have lead the country for four consecutive terms and the two party leaders themselves. The heads of germany's two most populous states are now vying to replace her arm unless it the cd. You chair has already announced his intention to run out pursued on ehab forty to get touch longest mid and undug yesterday. Mark zeltser leads the. Su threw his hat in the ring. Status vian an essay and germany's state-led corona virus response has come into question as cases have risen faster than vaccinations legislation. That's under review would wrest control back from the states and shape a federal covid nineteen response that creates a potent political mix for two candidates with differing leadership of their home states but the best part of the year. These two men have been engaged. In the sort of war of attrition conducted mainly through the media criticizing each other's approaches to corona virus suggesting that their respective approaches have been more appropriate. Tom novel is the economists. Berlin bureau chief and this of course is a sort of proxy war for the decision for which of them is going to lead the two parties into the federal election in september and therefore most likely succeed. I'm gonna mock chancellor now we've spoken about both of them before on the show but let's quickly go through each of them. Tell me more about arlette. I'm going to lash. It was elected leader of the christian democratic union. The main center right party in germany in january he is also the leader of north rhine-westphalia. And that's germany's big

Angela Markle Mrs Merkel Germany Ehab Mark Zeltser Christian Democratic Union European Union Vian Tom Novel SU Berlin Arlette North Rhine Westphalia
Chauvin trial focuses on George Floyd's oxygen deprivation

WSJ What's News

01:10 min | Last week

Chauvin trial focuses on George Floyd's oxygen deprivation

"In. Minneapolis were hearing from medical experts in the murder. Trial of former officer derek. Chauvin doctors testified thursday. That george floyd died of oxygen deprivation as he couldn't breathe while being restrained by police officers. Today we expect to hear from the local medical examiner. Here's the wsj's midwest bureau chief shady race. His name is andrew baker and his testimony is very significant because he is the medical examiner who conducted the autopsy on george floyd and he had several findings that make the case somewhat complex one. He declared the death a homicide which means that there was somebody else involved in the data. So that is something that is good for the prosecution however he also noted that he did not find any signs of his fixation no bruising to the neck or back and that is a little bit more complicated for the prosecution because they are trying to argue that derek chauvin the officer who kneeled on george floyd's neck and the two other officers who helped restrain him that essentially stopped him from being able to breathe and that s fixation caused his data

George Floyd Chauvin Andrew Baker Minneapolis Derek WSJ Midwest Derek Chauvin
Battle Acts: France Beefs up Its Forces

The Economist: The Intelligence

01:40 min | 2 weeks ago

Battle Acts: France Beefs up Its Forces

"Two thousand thirteen french armed forces have been stationed in the suhel fighting jihadists francis forces have been stretched just over five thousand of its troops for a region. Roughly the size of western europe. Such counterinsurgency operations might be challenging. But these days francis generals have their sights on something far larger forests in the plains of the champagne ogden region. The armed forces are beginning to prepare for the return of a major conflict exercise. Orion a giant drill plan for twenty twenty three who involve the full range of french military capacity on a scale not tested for decades specter of high-end war is now so widespread When you talk to military analysts that is an acronym for this scenario. Hei which stands for the english translation is hypothesis of major engagement. Sophie pattern is our paris bureau chief. And it's really a seismic shift. I would say for french forces because if you think back thirty years ago most of them were involved in overseas operations in peacekeeping and if the last decade it's been a question of counterterrorism or counterinsurgency most that side the being in operation but can in the sahel or even a counter-terrorist operation could operation centeno in france itself. But last year the head of the army general tilly bucker presented a strategic vision for twenty thirty looking ahead to the next decade and in it he described an outlined the need for the to prepare for high intensity state on state conflicts and he had this line which is very striking. He said the return of a major conflict is now a credible

Suhel Francis Sophie Pattern Ogden Orion Europe Centeno Tilly Bucker Paris France Army
Most Americans Support Tougher Guns Laws

5 Things

01:00 min | 3 weeks ago

Most Americans Support Tougher Guns Laws

"Americans support tougher gun laws. That's what new usa today. Ipsos poll found but is washington bureau. Chief susan page tells us republicans support has fallen and the issue is even more partisan than it was a few years ago. We took this poll on tuesday and wednesday right after that terrible mass shooting in boulder the second shooting in the space of a week in the united states. And it's similar to paul. We took about two years ago in august. Twenty nine thousand nine. That was also in the aftermath of two terrible shootings. The ones in el paso in dayton on the one hand. Two thirds of americans support tougher gun laws. So that's a really significant majority but the news poll is it. Support among republicans has fallen off a cliff when we asked this question two years ago. Fifty four percent of republicans a majority republicans supported stricter gun laws. That's dropped to a third thirty five percent.

Chief Susan Page USA Boulder Washington El Paso Dayton Paul
CBS News Political Reporter Roger Mudd Has Died at 93

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:36 sec | Last month

CBS News Political Reporter Roger Mudd Has Died at 93

"Was a story on Capitol Hill during the sixties or seventies. Chances are that it ended this way. CBS NEWS Washington Roger Mudd has died after kidney failure. He's being remembered by admirers and contemporaries is one of the best of his craft. Former CNN Washington bureau chief Frank Sesno Yes, was known as the Tiffany Network, and Roger Mudd was one of the jewels in the crown because he stood So far above everybody else, but left CBS when he wasn't chosen to anchor the Evening news when Walter Cronkite retired, but he once said he never truly ceased being a CBS man. Roger Mudd was 93

Roger Mudd Frank Sesno Capitol Hill Cbs News Kidney Failure CBS CNN Washington Walter Cronkite
Rubber-stamping ground: Chinas parliament meets

The Economist: The Intelligence

01:52 min | Last month

Rubber-stamping ground: Chinas parliament meets

"You today began the annual meeting of the national people's congress or npr china's parliament. Wash ambuhl legion shoe. Chairman of the standing committee declared this session. Open your trunk. Dr these komo. Thousands of delegates from across the country have congregated in beijing. to witness. the release of the communist. Party's next economic five year plan and to shake a political agenda for the year ahead. There's no question that those plans will be approved. Party officials used to grumble at suggestions. That all this parliamentary pomp was a mere rubber-stamping of the party agenda these days they spend that smoothness as a sign of china's stability. The of the national people's congress is a tremendous piece of communist party and as a foreign journalists your way up in the gods watching from a great distance distances enormous hall. This great big nineteen fifty kind of people's palace on the side of champions square. You bring your binoculars. 'cause you're so far away from the leaders david rennie. Is our beijing bureau chief this year because of covid only a very small number of talk and cameramen were allowed in. It's very restraint is shorter session than normal. But it is unveiling a new five year plan and these things will go tremendously scripted. They do send some real signals about real policy priorities. And what's been announced so far. The only address by the prime minister lee. Chang was that they will have an economic growth target. That reflects the confidence in the government. They have really smothered the covid. Nineteen pandemic remember that unusually. There wasn't a growth target last year because of the pandemic and we are also expecting that there will be changes to hong kong's election laws to further reduce the power of the opposition

National People's Congress Wash Ambuhl Beijing China David Rennie NPR Congress Chang LEE Hong Kong
Mayor Lori Lightfoot proposes changes to Chicago police search warrant policies following wrongful raid on Anjanette Young’s home

John Howell

00:40 sec | Last month

Mayor Lori Lightfoot proposes changes to Chicago police search warrant policies following wrongful raid on Anjanette Young’s home

"Tips that lead to the raids. No knock raids permitted on Lee Won, a bureau chief says, Okay. And giving everybody inside the premises, dignity and respect. Police Superintendent Brown was asked if this will endanger the lives of rating cops by making them hesitant, and he brought up the infamous wrong raid on Anjanette Young, So it Miss Young was the biggest drug kingpin. We still should've cheated her with dignity and respect, and the mayor said investigations of the young case by not one, but two city oversight agencies are long overdue. Camera. 8 90 told you listening. Tough words from President Biden for Republican governors loosening their states covered

Lee Won Superintendent Brown Anjanette Young Miss Young President Biden
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Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

04:43 min | Last month

test

"Mary frank johnson. Welcome to technician. It's great to speak with you. Thanks so much. Peter i always enjoy talking with you. I do as well so please on the record at this point. I'm i'm as somebody who is a luminary ao space. You do not need a big introduction with my audience. I don't imagine but you are perhaps best known. As former editor in chief of cio magazine the the moderator of the cio leadership live broadcast which is just a phenomenal phenomenal series of interviews with with leaders in the tech space x os with a healthy dose of course of chief information officers as the name suggests and a prolific writer. Somebody who's wisdom. I know my team. And i have have gained mightily from across the years as well so i'm so pleased to to have this more formal conversation after many many informal ones with you okay. Well thanks very much peter. I we've got a lot of great stuff to talk about indeed indeed wipe. We begin at the beginning at least as relevant to the cio space. You're not somebody who grew up with immersed in technology You are somebody who The written word came the more easily to the dentist too many others. Perhaps and and you were focused on journalism. I wonder what was what was the genesis of your time In focusing your skills on the cio. Space okay thanks. Exxon question and i love telling the story because i think that it reflects so much of how many of the it leaders cio's that we both know today ended up in the positions that you know they were music majors or they majored in english literature and history and then they got really interested in data side of things for me. I had started out. I spent ten years at daily newspapers. In florida and ohio in washington state and i reported on everything from city and county commission beats to k twelve education to police even state politics when i was two bureau chief for gannett news service out in columbus ohio and then we were moving to the boston area in nineteen eighty nine. My husband was an atmospheric scientist and he was taking a job in cambridge and so naturally i went reached out to the boston globe and to the boston herald and the it was. Nobody was hiring. So i was. We were arriving in the boston area. And i had heard about a very vibrant technology publishing world here and so i had examined it somewhat and made some phone calls A lot of this was so far before the days of regular emails. And you know we weren't living on our phones. Then so i was just applying my reporter skills to it. And i ended up getting a copy of computerworld mailed to me and sat there. I remember sitting there in my living room in ohio looking through it and feeling somewhat reassured that i could understand about what have the stories were about And then on the drive from ohio to massachusetts. I basically grill my husband One side down the other about the computer industry. Because i was coming into it only knowing that ibm made typewriters and the rest of it was kind of a big mystery. But i had been using some of the very early unix. That was vi editor on unix. That you could use to do work on. He had some sun workstations and very early versions of sun and unix workstations at our house and so i used that a little bit. And i remember when i was in my interview for the computer job with The executive and executive editor in the editor chiefs of computerworld. I think they were very impressed. That i was referring to things like vi editor in youth so but computerworld at always hired. They hired reporters who could learn the beat. And i think that's pretty much the way almost everybody on the tech journalism side got into it. They were journalists bite training. Then they do. They dove into their beats. Because one of the things we discovered trying to hire people over the years if you try to higher in a technical person and hand the technology beat they wouldn't know the story angle with fell on them so it was really important if you were genuinely out there reporting And then i found enjoyed it. I just enjoyed it so much and by the time i was a couple years into my job at computer world when the boston globe was to interview people and hire all. But i wouldn't left for anything at that point it just it was such a. I just enjoyed the way. The story kept changing and advancing and moving forward.

CIO Mary Frank Johnson Ohio Cio Magazine Boston Globe Gannett News Boston Exxon County Commission Peter Boston Herald Columbus Cambridge Florida Washington Massachusetts IBM SUN
There is a Surge Of Coronavirus Deaths in Mexico

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:21 min | Last month

There is a Surge Of Coronavirus Deaths in Mexico

"New data reveal a surge of cova deaths in mexico. The country has officially confirmed more than two million cases. An almost one hundred eighty thousand deaths from the corona virus but mortality rates. Tell an even more grim tale over the past year deaths were fifty two percent higher than in previous years. According to the financial times that puts mexico's rate of excess deaths much higher than that of countries such as america and brazil assembled woman to stay lot yet earlier this month. Mexico's president andres manuel. Lopez obrador widely known as anglo said. We are living in a stellar moment. The kovic spike is far from the country's only problem poverty. Corruption and crime are all on the rise but polls indicate that two years into amyloid term. Most mexicans are willing to give him more time. Mexico's president is incredibly popular. Sir burke is our mexico bureau chief he wanted on slide in two thousand eighteen and he still has approval ratings that most other leaders would be extremely jealous off at sixty two percent as it stands and that's all in spite of what looks like a very good handling of most things most obviously at the moment the pandemic. What do you mean by that. Mexico is a terrible record for covert hospitals are full and oxygen tanks in short supply. It's done very few tests for covid. It hasn't provided very much financial support tool for people who are suffering or being asked to stay home not to work the vaccination which is one sort of bright spot potentially insofar as mexico has lined up enough vaccines to cover its population. But it's a very very slow start. That might be picking up now. But otherwise there talks of ten years to get to seventy five percent of the population being vaccinated. I'm currently this has been a problem again from the top. So i'm low has completely downplayed the importance of the pandemic. He has refused to wear a face mask apart from wants when he flew in an airplane to go to the united states and he got covid himself the stars of this year and he reappeared and everyone thought well. Maybe he'll have changed his mind after this. But he reiterated again that he wouldn't be wearing a face mask so in the face of that pandemic response on wires his popularity still so high so he had this amazing vision for mexico in eighteen. Which is why he won with a landslide. He said. I'm going to do a fourth transformation. These big bold plan to make the country fairer and more equitable ending corruption and crime. And making sure there was economic growth where the gains were fairly distributed so that poor people go rich. The reality is slightly different from the vision so far in the two and a bit years. He's been in power. He's been undoing. The reforms of previous presidents and dismantling that system throwing out the baby with the bath water you could say. And then his new initiatives mainly they seem to fail to solve the problems that they put two and then a of third element is that he's really concentrated power in the presidency and some people say that they get things done and other people think they're more evil intentions behind that well. Let's come back to the throwing the baby out with the bathwater part. What's he'd been doing. In terms of reform he abolished prosper. Which was a very sort of lauded conditional cash transfer program for the poor he also reversed education. Reform was much more meritocratic assessment of teachers. A big one at the moment is he's trying to reverse bit by bit and opening of the energy market. That happened in two thousand thirteen so it was open to private and foreign enterprises which make electricity cheaper and greener on current. Neither congress is debating a bill which would favor cfe which is state owned electricity provider. So they're actually go first into the grid. As opposed to the cheaper electric which is often green provided by private companies. This would obviously raise prices and deti energy but it could also breach the. Us mexico canada agreement. Which is the north american free trade pact to replace after another sort of big thing has been getting rid of or proposing get rid of a lot of the autonomous agencies such as the freedom of information agency all these ones keep checks on the government and what it's doing so well he's been tearing all that down. What's he been building up. Will you say his own initiatives. Don't do what they should. He's very dedicated to fiscal discipline. That's a good thing especially in a so-called left leaning president it's also become very counter productive during the pandemic. The imf is telling mexico to spend more so far it's only spent nine point seven percents of gdp on extra efforts during the pandemic and more needs to be done and some people think this is going to need to scarring that there's going to be permanent drop in output caused by loss of jobs and businesses so the recovery is going to be much much slower in mexico than elsewhere. He's also splashed out on bizarre old-economy projects such as pouring money. Pex the world's most indebted oil company. And then he's putting eight billion dollars into a refinery at the time when no other country is building refineries and it's not clear what economic return that will be from that and you mentioned the big transformative plan was in part about ending endemic corruption and crime. How's that been going. Well either jason. That was point. Four percent dip in murders last year and he proclaimed this dip as a very significant success. But that's after a rise the before and frankly during the pandemic you'd expect it to have dropped them. In in other countries across latin america that also suffer high levels of violence that has been the case he also rejected the previous government's tactic of killing and capturing crime kingpins because led to a splintering of gangs. And you might be worth rejecting that. But there's no alternative puts in place. So i think his vision is that you alleviate poverty and crime goes down. That might happen in the long term but it does nothing to sort out the short term problem the problem of the current chapel as opposed to the ones who are still only three years old on corruption. As you could say he's set a good example so has been good political rhetoric. The stiffer penalties on bribe-taking for bureaucrats. But he's unless strengthen the institutions to carry that ford again it's more rhetoric than actual institutional change or heft. The national anticorruption prosecutors overwhelmed with cases and one government agency suggests that the number of acts of corruption actually rose by nineteen percent between two thousand seventeen and two thousand nineteen. It is as you say not a big list of happy news here. I mean when will that's ring down to the electorate. I mean how long we'll mexicans continue to support him for his failures because he really has persuaded a lot of people that he's like them and cares about the he's very popular because of who he is and his message rather than necessarily what he does. The opposition is seen as corrupt on what came before him was horrifically corrupt. And so he's seen the best of a bad bunch by a loss of people. But you know here's a classic populace and a lot of elite azam Against him they see him as a mexican version of hugo chavez. Which i think is a little bit of an exaggeration. But there's this big divides on the mix of policy failure. I'm power grabbing is is worrying.

Mexico Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador Sir Burke United States Anglo Brazil IMF Congress Canada Latin America Jason Ford
9 top New York health officials resign as Gov. Andrew Cuomo scorns COVID-19 advice from experts

The Takeaway

05:15 min | 2 months ago

9 top New York health officials resign as Gov. Andrew Cuomo scorns COVID-19 advice from experts

"York has been through hell, but the finish line is in sight. New York's governor, Andrew Cuomo, has arguably been one of the most visible politicians during the pandemic. The national media praised his measured tone during his daily press briefings back in the spring when New York City was the epicenter of the virus and New Yorkers agreed Polling in July showed that 72% of them approved of how the governor had responded to the crisis. For many Cuomo's apparent reliance on evidence and facts to guide his decisions was a relief from President Trump's daily Lies and misinformation about the virus. Here's Governor Cuomo talking to NBC News back in March. Don't operate on what I hope what I would like to see you What My expectation is I operate on the data on the numbers and on the science. Recent reporting from The New York Times, however, shows some cracks in that picture. According to the time since the summer, nine senior New York State Health Department officials have left their positions for being quote. Sidelined and disrespected by Governor Cuomo by not listening to their advice. Some believe the governor has potentially hindered the state's ability to stop the spread of the virus successfully roll out the vaccine. Here's what Governor Cuomo had to say during a recent press briefing. When I say experts in your quotes it sounds like I'm saying, I don't really trust the experts. Because I don't Because I don't Jesse McKinley is the Albany bureau chief for The New York Times. Jesse Thanks for joining us. Absolutely. So, What happened? I mean, why is Governor Cuomo shifting from someone who said he trusted the experts to someone who says he doesn't? Well, I think that was a pretty shocking remark. I think a lot of draws dropped not only in the room, but probably people listening nationwide and across the state. The point I think the governor was trying to make, although you might have been him handed about it was that he did not trust you know federal experts and people who Had given him bad advice in the past. Now, keep in mind. This has been a steady refrain of the governor that he feels like the feds let him down that the virus was coming when they didn't expect it. But the understood the thing that underscores this was our reporting in the paper on Monday, which basically showed that a lot of these so called experts that he has sustained for are in fact leading his department of Health. And leaving that department little bit in the lurch at a time in which the pandemic is so raging here in New York, you found in fact, in your reporting that nine senior New York State Health Department officials have left the department since the summer. Is this tension that you're describing between Governor Cuomo and essentially state public health officials? Really? What drove that? I think it's an undercurrent. Almost all of those nine leaving, you know, keep in mind the governor of common long before he became kind of the pandemic Slayer that he was known last spring and summer. Was known for a very heavy handed approach to state government and that included the state agencies like the Department of Health are under his under his, You know, Leadership s. Oh, he's always been known as a tough boss. But I think the intensity of the pandemic I think that the fact that he and a very small coterie of aides were dictating policy, often without the Department of Health, knowing what was coming Lead to enormous tension and also dispirited people in the Department of Health. You know, some of the sources we spoke to spoke of all time low morale inside at the Department of Health. You made the point that often times in situations like this, where you're facing a huge crisis, People rise the challenge, and they feel like their their expertise and their skill sets are are valued. And in many cases the governor made these people feel like they were not valued in and kind of dunderheads. You know, at a time in which he alone knew the best way forward. I want to get into the governor's decision to work with private hospitals in just a moment. But before that has the departure of these nine public health officials had any effect on the actual rollout of the vaccine distribution, or, you know efforts to control the spread of the virus. It's difficult to say at this point, but but what is incontrovertible is is that the governor instituted a different plan than the one that was on the books now. Now keep in mind, the Department of Health as well as local departments of health. Do Max vaccinations They have done these. They have plans on the books. They you know. In 2000 and nine they handled H one n one. There have been past outbreaks. There have been certainly public health vaccinations for everything from measles toe. Other childhood illnesses like this is something that local health departments know how to do and let they have plans to do. And in the case of this pandemic, the governor decided that they would do a different plan, often without informing the local health departments or even his own state Department of Health. That he had a different idea how to do this, and that leads to what you were talking about in using you know, large hospital systems is kind of the primary, you know point of contact for vaccinations rather than leaving it up Tol, local health departments or other authorities.

Governor Cuomo New York State Health Departme Department Of Health President Trump Jesse Mckinley Jesse Thanks The New York Times Andrew Cuomo Nbc News Cuomo New Yorkers New York New York City Albany York
Vials and tribulations: the EUs vaccine push

The Economist: The Intelligence

02:29 min | 2 months ago

Vials and tribulations: the EUs vaccine push

"The likes of. America and britain are racing ahead with vaccine programs. Most of the twenty-seven member states of the european union have barely left the starting blocks by last week the you had vaccinated one point four percent of its population. in britain. It was seven percent in america. Five and after that sluggish start the block. Looks like it'll be further hampered by cut to supply astrazeneca and pfizer biontech of both said production problems go preclude them from meeting. The expected numbers the eu says. It will tighten export controls and threatening legal action. The president of the european commission ursula von der lion urged the companies to meet their promises invested billions to help develop the world's first covid nineteen vaccines to create a truly global common. Good and now the companies must deliver. They must honor. The obligations. Astrazeneca has defended its efforts partly blaming the eu for delays in signing the contract the eu for its part hasn't yet approved the astrazeneca vaccine. That's expected to happen on friday a month. Behind britain the european commission had set a goal of inoculating seventy percent of europe's adults by the summer. It's a target that looks increasingly unlikely. I think the best way to describe how europe is progressing with the fact. Saination program is radically sophie. Petr is our paris bureau chief. Each european country has delegated all the buying the distribution of vaccines and the authorization for them to european authorities which means that each country ought to be at the same point. But if you actually look at what's happening on the ground that's not. The case is a very patchy pitcher. Then why is that. When you're dealing with twenty seven different health systems and health is something that is not managed at european level it manage country each of those systems different. They tend to be quite centralized. In some cases you take france be good example or centralized as in germany and each system has its benefits in some cases during the early months of the pandemic last year. It was actually thought to helped. Germany's have such a decentralized system. But now germany's steams be finding it difficult to get out the vaccine like disadvantage so it really is this patchwork of different health systems and different campaigns that i think explains the differences across the continent

Astrazeneca European Union Britain Ursula Von Der Lion European Commission America Pfizer Europe Petr Sophie Paris Germany France
Germany Expected To Put Right-Wing AfD Under Surveillance For Violating Constitution

All Things Considered

04:20 min | 2 months ago

Germany Expected To Put Right-Wing AfD Under Surveillance For Violating Constitution

"Now where the government is expected to put the country's largest right wing opposition party under surveillance. This means several dozen politicians in Germany's parliament may soon be monitored for racist and other unconstitutional behaviors that threatened Germany's political system. NPR's Rob Schmitz reports in German. It's called the For fasting shits. If you translate the name literally, it's called agency for the protection of the Constitution. Melania Moniz Berlin bureau chief of the German newsmagazine Der Spiegel, She says the fall fashion shoots is on the lookout for potential threats to Germany's democratic constitutional system. This agency has the power and not only to do surveillance on fringe groups, domestic terrorists threats, but also to keep an eye on any Political institution like a political party. The driving force behind the creation of the agency and its surveillance powers were the American led allied forces who after World War two helped write a new German constitution with an eye towards preventing the return of Nazi ideology. That's why the very first article of the Constitution guarantees the right to human dignity. And now the fall fashion shoots is on the verge of making an unprecedented move, placing Germany's largest right wing opposition party, the alternative fur Deutschland, or a F D. Under surveillance for violating that very article of the Constitution. This comes nearly a year after a far right faction of the F D, known as their flu eagle was put under surveillance by the for fashion shoots for the same reasons. A man who has written a book about the FD says In its report, The agency provided examples of politicians denigrating Muslim migrants to Germany, for example, they were all treated as potential terrorists. They were the humanized the speeches they were compared to animals. A hefty politicians also trivialized Germany's Nazi past. You know it. Because I'm sick of flip of age. Speaking at an FD event in 2017, the leader of the feudal faction beyond Hecker, called the Holocaust Memorial in Berlin. A monument of shame, I believe a finder. It was a year later, a FD parliamentary leader Alexander Gallant, like in Germany's Nazi era to a speck of bird droppings, and more than 1000 years of what he called successful German history. Women. I'm sure really, I ft off wonders of all off. If you look at how the FDA has been behaving for some time Now it's clear. It's acting against our democracy and our constitution. Social Democrat parliamentarian Thomas Hitler is a member of the committee that keeps checks on Germany's intelligence agencies. He says. The for fashion shoots has spent two years gathering evidence that'll inform their decision to put the FT under watch but FT politician New York that Starsky says the agency is run by Angela Merkel's government staffed with members of her CDU party. He says the CTU is worried about how fast the FDA has become a presence in Germany's parliament. The party now has 88 members in the Bundestag. If you have no opposition party, which is very successful within very short time, and we become a danger for the ruling party's, especially for the conservative CTU, and this is the reason by they are trying to stigmatize us. Really to put us in the Nancy corner and also to spread wrong rumors. But Social Democrat Hitler says the process is not political, and its findings must withstand legal scrutiny. You got Bestwick states. There are 50, often under different conditions, Wife reported decision must be so watertight legally that it will stand up in the courts. The FT have legal recourse to contest the decision. And the agency isn't about to lose face in court with the poor case. A hefty politician Hans Meyer, already under surveillance for being part of the far right, Floegel Wing, told NPR by email. He's worried that civil servants like police officers will cancel their membership out of fear of losing their jobs. Well the for fashion shoots is able to tap phones and use informants to gather information on whomever it monitors. Meyer says he hasn't noticed the surveillance whenever Germany announces its decision. The FDA is expected to file lawsuit challenging it and that may take years to resolve. Rob

Germany Rob Schmitz Melania Moniz Berlin Der Spiegel Alexander Gallant NPR Thomas Hitler CTU Cdu Party FD Hecker Holocaust Memorial FDA FLU Government Starsky Bestwick Angela Merkel Hans Meyer
Japan 2021 Olympics in Doubt

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:13 min | 3 months ago

Japan 2021 Olympics in Doubt

"Now. Japan's government is holding firm at the moment in its view that this year's olympic games should go ahead. They've already been postponed once. But there's a growing number of cases of corona virus and also calls for tokyo twenty twenty one to be shelved while tokyo bureau. Chief fiona wilson joins me now. Welcome back thank you very much tokyo. Twenty twenty one is pretty ambitious. They want to call it to tokyo. Two thousand and twenty there is this insistence. Isn't there in the government to to stick with the plan for it to go ahead but the has been an enormous poll suggesting that lots of other people think otherwise. Yes you're absolutely right. In fact i was out in chablis very busy central tokyo that usually very busy and slightly sad looking tokyo. Twenty twenty flags still flowing. They're looking a bit faded and they're not changing the year. It's going to be tokyo. Twenty twenty even if it's held and twenty twenty one but things are not looking good for the olympics at the moment For many reasons. I think you know the surging Virus numbers obviously very difficult to contain at the moment. And you know they started a big public cole and eighty percent of people said they would like the games to be either postponed or cancelled outright. So there's not very Warm feeling for the olympics at the moment and it's it's really difficult moment to ask people to think about welcoming styles ends of people into the country. The moment and i think many people just think it's too much of a distraction at the moment. I mean from from the outside. This does look like somewhat of a mess. Doesn't it given the fact that like you say a sort of a cool clear head would suggest that Welcoming thousands of athletes and tens of thousands of visitors to tokyo when we are still in the teeth of a pandemic isn't necessarily the most sensible of ideas. Oh absolutely and i really have to wonder why the conversations behind closed doors. It's hard to believe. The prime minister soga is going over. All those options for cancellation really. My guess is that they probably don't want to announce today it's really definitely not possible to do it in. Of course everything's a bit delayed with the vaccination program here. It's not really going to happen until the talk about late february but the idea that everybody will be vaccinated in time for the olympics is extremely ambitious. And i think just that alone is making people pretty nervous. So i think it's. It's not looking very promising and more kind of message Does this convey from the government when they are still standing firm in. What does it say about the way that you're shahida seekers reputation as being saying well. I think when you look at that poll that was was negative about the olympics of the moment along with those those side eighty percent against the olympics. At the moment his own ratings have really dropped quite substantially. they were down nine percent in a month And over sixty eight percent of people said they were dissatisfied with his handling of the pandemic in japanese. Public is pretty critical. They're very of our overall. If you look at numbers they're really not as bad nowhere near as bad as as most country so in japan overall dump pretty well but the population is quite tough on elitist. Here there's a feeling that he's authored. Called a state of emergency for tokyo in the surrounding area and a lot of people have been saying for a couple of weeks. You know you. It has to be called now. They felt it was a little bit too late. So what we're expecting tonight. There's a press conference at seven o'clock tokyo time and it looks like seven. More prefectures will be added to the list. So that state of emergency will be spread across japan mostly to the west of japan and expecting you know all soccer yoga kyoto. An down to coca and even you know beyond also in kyushu. The governor of komo motto is said. We'll come we big did we. We want a kyushu state of emergency. So i think it looks like more and more people will be coming onto this State of emergency umbrella. Not as tough as the sort of lockdowns. We're seeing in the uk but it does Impinge on people's behavior. And i think that many people are saying you know we've got to do it now before numbers Get to more than can be contained

Tokyo Olympics Chief Fiona Wilson Soga Shahida Olympic Japan Cole Kyushu Coca Soccer UK
Japan pledges support for IOC's efforts to vaccinate Tokyo Olympic athletes

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:23 min | 3 months ago

Japan pledges support for IOC's efforts to vaccinate Tokyo Olympic athletes

"Now. Japan's government is holding firm at the moment in its view that this year's olympic games should go ahead. They've already been postponed once. But there's a growing number of cases of corona virus and also calls for tokyo twenty twenty one to be shelved while tokyo bureau. Chief fiona wilson joins me now. Welcome back thank you very much tokyo. Twenty twenty one is pretty ambitious. They want to call it to tokyo. Two thousand and twenty there is this insistence. Isn't there in the government to to stick with the plan for it to go ahead but the has been an enormous poll suggesting that lots of other people think otherwise. Yes you're absolutely right. In fact i was out in chablis very busy central tokyo that usually very busy and slightly sad looking tokyo. Twenty twenty flags still flowing. They're looking a bit faded and they're not changing the year. It's going to be tokyo. Twenty twenty even if it's held and twenty twenty one but things are not looking good for the olympics at the moment For many reasons. I think you know the surging Virus numbers obviously very difficult to contain at the moment. And you know they started a big public cole and eighty percent of people said they would like the games to be either postponed or cancelled outright. So there's not very Warm feeling for the olympics at the moment and it's it's really difficult moment to ask people to think about welcoming styles ends of people into the country. The moment and i think many people just think it's too much of a distraction at the moment. I mean from from the outside. This does look like somewhat of a mess. Doesn't it given the fact that like you say a sort of a cool clear head would suggest that Welcoming thousands of athletes and tens of thousands of visitors to tokyo when we are still in the teeth of a pandemic isn't necessarily the most sensible of ideas. Oh absolutely and i really have to wonder why the conversations behind closed doors. It's hard to believe. The prime minister soga is going over. All those options for cancellation really. My guess is that they probably don't want to announce today it's really definitely not possible to do it in. Of course everything's a bit delayed with the vaccination program here. It's not really going to happen until the talk about late february but the idea that everybody will be vaccinated in time for the olympics is extremely ambitious. And i think just that alone is making people pretty nervous. So i think it's. It's not looking very promising

Tokyo Chief Fiona Wilson Olympics Olympic Japan Cole Soga
FBI warns of plans for nationwide armed protests next week

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 3 months ago

FBI warns of plans for nationwide armed protests next week

"The FBI is issuing a warning in the days leading up to Joe Biden's inauguration next week in internal bulletin warns of plans for armed protests at all fifty state capitals and here in Washington leading to more fears of violence after last week's deadly capital ride that followed weeks of online calls for violence here in the trump administration's waning days the National Guard bureau's chief says the guard is looking at any issues around the country to make sure it's ready to give support if asked he says at least ten thousand troops will be deployed in Washington by Saturday and another five thousand may be requested made questions about why the guard was not brought it more quickly as the capital ride unfolded Sager mag ani Washington

Trump Administration Joe Biden FBI National Guard Bureau Washington Sager Mag Ani Washington
What's next for the Asia-Pacific?

Monocle 24: The Globalist

05:10 min | 3 months ago

What's next for the Asia-Pacific?

"Today's special edition of the globalist we are going to focus on asia and what two thousand and twenty one might hold for the region. The obvious answer might seem and will hopefully be almost by definition what with one thing and another a vast improvement but even when asia does not find itself at the epicenter of a global health crisis it remains a complicated part of the world bringing their hostages to fortune to this look ahead to ages. Next twelve months are monocle. Hong kong bureau chief. James chambers monica's. Tokyo bureau chief. Fiona wilson a little later on monaco's bangkok correspondent gwen. Robinson will join us. But first to james and fiona fiona. Let's start with you. In japan as we mentioned in that introduction a new prime minister in office seeking to fill the big shoes and follow the tough act of shinzo are has yet figured out. What kind of prime minister he's going to be is a very good question. I mean i think he's been quite difficult for serger. Falling shinzo obey. Shinzo abe's for all his faults. You know longest serving prime minister in japanese history. So you go quiet trot record. He knows how to win elections. And you know. He survived an awful lot of ups and downs. Scandals also had to deal with the pandemic and ultimately how to deal with illness as well so yeah so quite challenging to come into that role. He started off pretty well. I think his ratings quite good. But i think as people have seen ways handled the pandemic Impressed is ratings have dropped. There's also the issue about the olympics. Will it happen waiting to happen. And i think so. Go really backing this. Huge domestic tourism tourism campaign encouraging. People around the country has gone down pretty badly although it has to be said Tens of millions of people have been guy around the country so they liked that bit of it. But so i think it's quite a tough time for him and interesting. He has to have an election by next autumn. And i think he's in for a pretty rough ride few under just to follow that up. You did the mention the oh word. If there is one thing that japan hopes it can look forward to in two thousand and twenty one it is the two thousand twenty Tokyo postponed because of the obvious right now on new year's day. How likely do they look. It really depends on you. Talk to to be honest. The government would love it to happen. They really wanted to happen dog to the saying we absolutely have to vaccinate everyone. And that's not guaranteed yet. Japan's rollout of vaccinations will be in the spring. And they say you know. We'll have everyone backs in asia by the summer. And if not. I think they are going to have a problem on their hands. There are so many vested interest in the olympics in definitely. The government is under pressure from tv companies. Advertises they want it to happen. Population is still quite lukewarm. I think many people feel it puts this unnecessary pressure on the country. At a time. When is trying to deal with the pandemic. we're still dealing with that joins in hong kong or bring you in now. It being new year's day let's at least out Attempting optimism As we were just discussing. Japan has one great big blue ribbon event to look forward to hopefully in two thousand and twenty one. Two thousand and twenty was a tough year for hong kong for the same reasons. It was a tough year for everybody but for other reasons. Besides is there anything in particular vet. People in hong kong are looking forward to this year. Yes well we've had a rough couple of years here in hong kong so You know when you've hit rock awesome. Which i think that's not hong kong. Has i mean the only way to go his up. So i guess people are looking at s- an economic recovery an a return to business as usual in terms of an making money and getting on that side of things but In looking ahead the the rest of the year. I mean there are few big dates to To look forward to the the first one would be at the end of this month on the polls in january when the the uk's visa essentially for the hong kong people comes into play and up to three million on congas could suddenly decamp to britain. So if that happens if the floodgates opened not lovely be a huge event we've oils essentially being stuck in vung most of twenty twenty so It's been difficult to town at the moments How big that exodus will be. And there's no no re- odds on dejean that which you know. Every time i do meet with hong kong peasant they do generate trying to ask me once. Lights live in the uk Just like an schooling an election. Step in where they should live. What's baath liken. Is it better than oxford as there is. There is a genuine interest. But i guess we're waiting to see how many people actually all through with all of the with these These moves

Hong Kong James Chambers Monica Fiona Wilson Fiona Fiona Shinzo Asia Shinzo Obey Tokyo Shinzo Abe Japan Olympics Monaco Gwen Bangkok Robinson James Dejean UK Britain
Thanksgiving Dinners Are The Cheapest They've Been In Decades

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:09 min | 5 months ago

Thanksgiving Dinners Are The Cheapest They've Been In Decades

"Every year before thanksgiving the american farm bureau sends volunteer shoppers into grocery stores. They note the prices of the ingredients. That go into thanksgiving dinner. Cardiff garcia and patty hirsch from npr. Podcast indicator from planet. Money discovered the cost of thanksgiving is going down. The american farm bureau is a group that represents farmers throughout the country and its annual survey. It found that the average cost of thanksgiving dinner for ten people. This year is forty six dollars and ninety cents on the farm bureau's chief economist. John newton says that figure is low really low down four percent of from what we saw last year and actually is the lowest level that we've seen since two thousand ten and that's what i'd adjusting for inflation. We asked john if he could tell us high. The cost of thanksgiving dinners changed when he does adjust for inflation and specifically. What we wanted to know was if it was possible. That thanksgiving dinner was actually the cheapest it had ever been since the survey was started back in nineteen eighty six way. Let me let me power a spreadsheet. Just a mayor sure for go for it. Yeah i check it out yes it is. It is the lowest that it's been thirty five years. Wait a minute what did you just tell me. The in inflation adjusted dollars. Thanksgiving dinner is going to be the lowest. It's been thirty five years. Are you stunned. You know i am actually. I don't know why didn't look at that particular statistic before you asked me so. John says that you basically have to understand two stories to also understand why thanksgiving dinner is so cheap this year. Because here's the first story what happened this year. The ingredient with the biggest decline in its price is the turkey turkey. Prices came in dollar twenty one per pound that was down seven percent from what we saw last year. Which means you can put a sixteen pound bird on the table. Offer less than twenty dollars this year and this could be partly because the pandemic has forced families not to gather together in the same big groups as they normally would so. There's just less demand for those big turkeys families usually by and it's also because a lot of grocery stores have discounted the price of turkey. Frankly just to get people through the door. According to the department of agriculture more than eighty percent of retailers were running promotions across the country. When we started this survey. So you'll see turkey. Prices that range anywhere from twenty nine cents a pound to two ninety nine a pound depending on what type of grocer your and then. There's the second the longer story to tell. And this is actually an easy one to explain. Because of new technologies and innovations in how to produce food over the last few decades farmers have simply become better at it more efficient which means that they can sell the food for cheaper. You got to recognize that we benefit from a higher quality very affordable food supply. You know we spend a small percentage of our disposable income on food. Food in the united states is very affordable now john and the farm bureau of course represent farmers so he's boosting his piece. They're a little bit but the general story that the agricultural sector in the us has become more and more efficient over time is definitely true.

American Farm Bureau Cardiff Garcia Patty Hirsch John Newton NPR John Turkey Department Of Agriculture Bureau Of Course United States
Farm Bureau Survey: Thanksgiving dinner cost down 4%

The Indicator from Planet Money

01:59 min | 5 months ago

Farm Bureau Survey: Thanksgiving dinner cost down 4%

"Every year. Right before thanksgiving. The american farm bureau sends out hundreds of volunteers shoppers into grocery stores all throughout the country. All fifty states their mission to find report the prices of the ingredients that go into a traditional thanksgiving dinner and then the most mouth-watering way possible harris farm bureau chief economist john. Newton listing a bunch of those ingredients. I mean it's your classic thanksgiving dinner so you obviously have the turkey so there check in turkey prices. We've got stuffing sweet. Potatoes brown and serve roles. Cranberries for the cranberry sauce. You're shells your pumpkin pie. Mix whipping cream a gallon of milk. But it goes without saying the prices of these ingredients will be different depending on where you are in the country. Yeah absolutely. I mean a turkey that you buy a whole foods in manhattan is probably going to be more expensive than turkey. You buy a hy-vee in iowa partly because the price of everything is higher in manhattan but also for other economic reasons to john says you also have different supply. Chain costs to get that bird into grocery stores in manhattan for example. It's going to be more expensive to do that. And say Put it in a grocery store in in iowa where you're very close to where turkish approved so john and the crew at the farm bureau do is find the average price of each ingredient across the whole country. Then they add those prices to find the total cost of that classic thanksgiving dinner in every year. John and the farm bureau look at the same ingredients so that they can see just how the cost of thanksgiving dinner has changed through the years. And this is the thirty fifth straight thanksgiving. The farm bureau has conducted the survey. But this is twenty twenty year unlike any other. The couvert pandemic has upended so many parts of our lives and that includes the prices of the foods. We love to eat on thanksgiving today on the show. How and why. The price of thanksgiving has changed. Not just this year though but also through the decades

American Farm Bureau Harris Farm Bureau Manhattan John Iowa Newton Turkey
"bureau chief" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:07 min | 5 months ago

"bureau chief" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Editor at Fox and David Renny, Beijing bureau chief for the Economist. Thanks for having me and David ready. Beijing bureau chief for the economists and David joins us from Beijing, David thanks again for staying up late for us. So how much interest has there been in China? Over what's happening here, David It's been really big. Most American elections come and go without a lot of attention. But this is definitely the biggest ever Chinese interests in an election and for a lot of people on social media. They've been playing it for laughs. And so the censors who normally very strictly control social media, they've been allowing a ton of jokes at particular Donald Trump's expense. There's a whole kind of mim out there that he's actually a secret agent for China because he's so incompetent on such a bad president for America that he's a kind of a secret agent who they call Chun Jenga, which means build up the country Trump which build up the country, the country in question is China, and there's even kind of names of him in a kind of Chinese on the uniform with things like saying you're doing. You're doing your job so well. You're going to get courts Don't blow your cover, Comrade Trump. That's the funny side. The much less funny side is that This. This is being allowed to happen because the Chinese public is being told that American democracy indeed all Western democracies are a sick, chaotic joke. And it's a system that chooses bad leaders like President Trump has not saved his people from 200,000 deaths from Corona virus, which really shocks the Chinese public who've had basically virus is more or less disappeared inside China's borders. And so there's this very strong propaganda push that democracy is Corrupt, chaotic can't even produce the result quickly. How terrifying on DH dangerous It would be to live in America and you see state meeting with images of riots and boarded up shops and people with guns. In the Chinese public generally who have a lot of admiration for many things about America. At the moment, they're kind of shaking their heads in disbelief and really buying into that government line. But this is an example of democracy completely failing, Have the country's leaders spoken out. They're being super cautious. So I was called in for a briefing recently with a senior Chinese official who wants to very deliberately planned the idea that China doesn't care. Who wins the next election. There's an element of bravado to that China doesn't want to see that it's waiting on American voters. But there's also kind of bleak truth somewhere in there that basically the last four years, the Chinese leadership thinks that Donald Trump really ripped the mosque off on revealed that America is essentially Not willing to share the top spot at the top table of kind of world powers and that America is vicious, and America is deliberately trying to keep China down. And so that's some really bleak level. Even if maybe they'll try and suck. You reach out to Joe Biden and try and restore some of the trade ties and see if they can mend some fences, if only to buy time for Chinese companies to buy things they want from American suppliers and to get some more American investment but really deep down. The consensus at the top of the Chinese machine is that America is Two vicious and too selfish to share top spot on it. So this is basically bent on doing China harm on China needs to get stronger and so powerful that America has just accept It's got to back off, so it's a really bleak kind of the talk is all of struggle on sort of historic confrontation. So that's the real truth that it may be in some ways, doesn't matter that much. Who's the next American president? Jennifer, can you bring us up to speed on the reaction from Russia? Share, So the Kremlin has largely been pretty quiet. So far. I think they're kind of just waiting to see how it shakes out. But below the Kremlin level. It's it's been a hotly kind of Contested conversation going on in Russia, basically, between you know the Russian government and supporters of the government and the opposition. So you know you have to understand that in Russia elections do not play out the way that they do here. And by that, I mean, there's not really a question the end of the day who's gonna probably come out on top. There is some limited kind of opposition, but it's very much not democratic in the way that our elections are our elections here. The fact that it's taking so long to count votes And that its so messy that's democracy right like that's because we don't have a predetermined outcome. And so what you're seeing in Russia is, you know Alexey Navalny, the the main opposition leader. Who you know, listeners may remember was poisoned. It's suspected by, you know, or have been ordered by Putin at the highest levels of the Kremlin. You know, one of his top aides did a live stream on YouTube. Basically, you know, live streaming the presidential election here. And for the opposition. It's very much an example of you know, this is what we could have in Russia. Right? This is we could have real democracy. We could have it to where the outcome isn't already known before you even cast your votes. But for the Russian government, they're using this as a propaganda tool to say, Look, the fact that there is chaos and then it's messy that there could even be potentially violence. Right. This is why we need control. This is why you don't want that kind of messy democracy. This is why, you know, we need to have You know, good control over what happens and peaceful, stable, You know system and so it's very much this kind of ideological political fight That's playing out with the United States election as the kind of backdrop to this we're talking to Jennifer Williams, senior foreign editor at box and David Renny, Beijing bureau chief for the Economist. Later this hour, will also be joined by writer and host Fareed Zakaria lots to get to including the latest global response to the pandemic. But first I want to get to this exchange.

China America Comrade Trump Russia David It Beijing president bureau chief David Renny David Russian government Jennifer Williams Joe Biden Editor Fareed Zakaria YouTube Fox United States
"bureau chief" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:32 min | 11 months ago

"bureau chief" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"By AP's Washington bureau chief Julie pace ground game discusses election strategy with newsmakers all through primary season download it wherever you get your podcasts seven twenty three time for traffic and weather together super retailers of New England all wheel drive traffic on the threes now Mike is a little bit foggy out there but I don't see any major problems yeah I got my fingers crossed Nicole here despite the foggy conditions things are quiet on the highways take for instance the expressway it's wide open leaving the tunnel all the way to the Braintree split ten or eleven minutes top to bottom plus the HOV lane is back in use that certainly helps the northbound side fine no worries coming in all route three south bound wide open along the south shore you'll make good time from Weymouth down to Kingston had reached twenty four ninety five south are both good really all the way to do it to the not New Hampshire the Rhode Island line up to the north one twenty eight's good about thirty minutes from the pike up to route one in Peabody had a steady ride continues Ruwan into Danvers in Topsfield routes three and ninety three north are good up to the New Hampshire line the mass turnpike westbound he's clear I'll pass for ninety five into Milbury into Auburn and it's pretty quiet downtown as well if you're coming in you can use the lower deck of ninety three the Tobin bridge invalid even stroke Dr looking good coming in fast the Longfellow bridge miking for WBZ's traffic on the threes right right now to the four day WBZ accu weather forecast it'll be a fair amount of clouds into tonight's we'll see a low around sixty four on average tomorrow will be a more humid day with the gusty breeze.

Danvers Longfellow bridge Topsfield Rhode Island Washington bureau chief WBZ Dr Tobin bridge Auburn Milbury AP Ruwan Peabody New Hampshire Kingston Weymouth Nicole Mike New England Julie pace
"bureau chief" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"bureau chief" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"Bill in a wave of the FAA is already on scene and they provide a very invaluable assistance they secured a five mile flight restriction for the the area of the crash site and also five thousand foot ceiling over it so that is a great help in securing the the crash site Los Angeles Laker lebron James was stunned by the crash happened to be into any conversation with Kobe bean Bryant for all time greatest bass will players ever play one all time greatest Lakers the man got to jerseys hanging up the staples center she is just crazy Bryant's thirteen year old daughter and seven other people also died in the crash I'm Christopher this is ground with me Julie pace Washington bureau chief for the back to back process because it's so you can for listeners have only ever voted in a primary I think there's a little bit of a fascination original unbiased news you need as America prepares for the twenty twenty election listen and subscribe to ground free the Westwood One podcast network where the conversation start Hey if you heard that ransomware attacks have increased by five hundred percent this year yes cyber criminals are targeting all types of businesses accepting their data and holding hostage unless they pay up what if where their next victim don't worry we have there could it to detect prevent and recover from ransomware and other advanced threats so were secured absolutely will pay no ransom and keep this business up and running that's a relief protect your business at barracuda dot com barracuda your journey secured.

Bill FAA Lakers Bryant Christopher Julie pace Washington bureau chief America Los Angeles lebron James Kobe Westwood One
"bureau chief" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"bureau chief" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Okay. So Liz sly is the Washington Post Beirut bureau chief, and here is what she tweeted out in the aftermath of this big esscalation in the Persian Gulf to oil, tankers struck and fire in the strait of Hormuz focus of US, Ron tensions comes after Trump failed to heed the last tank warning, and imposed more sanctions that lessons is still astonishing it beggars description. If the Iranian government, a terrorist backing evil repressive disgusting regime bombs, a couple of tankers and then threatens the most powerful military force in the history of mankind, and that most powerful military force in the history of mankind led by the president of the United States, the commander in chief refuses to kowtow to eight a third rate, power that represses its own people in jails dissonance. Then it's his fault. It's President Trump's fault, if the Iranians get more militants, but Barack Obama. Who spent years lying blatantly to the faces of the American people lying in their face? Ben Rhodes his national security adviser openly acknowledged that his involvement in the administration involved crafting, a narrative, I e lying to the American people that the Iranian regime is about to moderate, and if the United States made some sort of payoff deal, then Iran would become a moderate stable force for good in the region. It was all a lie. They knew it was lie at the time, and they pushed it they pushed that lie. The Obama administration kowtowed to dictators on a regular basis. It was Barack Obama pledging flexibility on an open mic to the Russian government in the middle of the two thousand twelve election. Was he ever hit with headlines like this from the Washington Post bureau chief in Beirut, of course not? It's that President Trump refuses to kowtow to the Iranian government. That's a big problem. And as I say, when the Iranian government, engages in the spread of terror across planet earth. Then it's all about. Well, I guess the west must have provoked them are the west must have done something bad, this springs from peculiar and ugly perspective on America. Foreign policy and really the world that suggests that there is a power hierarchy that dictates morality in other words that if you are more powerful, you must have victimized somebody at the bottom of the scale. And so the people at the bottom of the scale should feel fully liberated to be as evil as they wanna be around his put upon by the west and therefore if they bomb random ships. Well, you know that's just what they do guys. And you gotta give them some room to express themselves. What you expect the president of the United States to battle before the whims of dictators who literally lied chance death to Israel death to America. That's what you want Washington bureau chief from Beirut, how pathetic we'll be back in a second. But first, let's talk about your online security. So I'm a public figure that means I'm deeply worried about security, plus them online, like sixteen out of every twenty four hours. So I'm always worried that people are looking for my data, but it's not just because I mean, you should be worried about people looking for your data hackers governments and companies.

Iranian government Barack Obama president US Trump Washington bureau chief Beirut bureau chief Iran Obama administration America Persian Gulf Liz sly Washington Post Washington Ben Rhodes Ron Israel
"bureau chief" Discussed on The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

04:53 min | 2 years ago

"bureau chief" Discussed on The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

"This Tuesday night, Michael Schmidt Pulitzer prize winning reporter, and one of the bylines on this latest story from the New York Times, Philip Rucker Pulitzer prize winning White House bureau chief for the Washington Post who interviewed the president among other things today Kimberly Atkins, Washington bureau chief for the Boston Herald and Frank Figliuzzi former FBI assistant director for counterintelligence who in the past has worked for and with Robert Muller. Michael I'd like to begin with you what kind of information was shared as far as, you know, by Manafort to Trump through the intermediaries of their specific, lawyers, and how did the president's. Lawyers. According to your reporting, take that information and weaponize at my word, not yours. The most significant thing we learned about this was that Mahler's. Investigators led by Andrew Weissmann were pressuring Manafort, this is according to manafort's lawyers to tell them what he knew about the 2016 Trump Tower meeting in what specifically the president new to the president know that his son was going to be meeting with Russians who were offering dirt on Hillary Clinton. And what did the president know about it afterwards? And Giuliani says that they hammered on Manafort about this Manafort who was in solitary confinement was being brought out for these interviews every few days with Weisman. Weisman Giuliani alleges is pushing Manafort to essentially a lie and say things that Manafort said were not true. Now, this is an allegation from Giuliani, but this has given sort of opened up a new front for the Trump legal team, which has launched new attacks. Now on Muller Giuliani saying to us tonight. That Muller was not overseeing Weisman properly that Weizman needs at dolts supervision now Michael in the lingo federal prosecutors when someone flips when they decide to cooperate they will say either they've chosen to work for the home team or they've joined team USA. And here's why say that was there any specific language that barred. Manafort from sharing this with team Trump or was it just considered such an outlandish thing that one would do while working for the feds. They didn't have to put it in writing. There's nothing that we know of in the agreement or legally that would have stopped this. But it's a pretty interesting phenomenon because there is essentially to people in the world who would control Paul manafort's fate one of them was Muller who if he thought Manafort had cooperated a lot could go to a judge and ask for a more lenient sentence. The other person is Donald Trump who has the power to pardon him or commute his sentence. And the question is is that why was it that Manafort was not telling the truth to Muller's investigators with this simple disagreement of facts, I saw something one way you saw another. Or was there something else going on here? Michael I got one for you one more for you than we have a couple of ravenous journalists, and at least one former fed waiting to get on the air. And that is how does it fit into the time line of known outbursts by Donald Trump vis-a-vis what he had just learned. About the status of the Muller investigation. Well about two weeks ago. Trump was prepared to send his responses to Muller after nearly a year of trying to negotiate about an interview. And what happened was was sort of three things came together. One was that they learned about the language in the Coursey plea. The other thing was is they saw the the unsealing of document in Virginia that showed that Assange had been charged and they were very surprised by this. And they didn't understand what was going on with Muller. The third thing was the Manafort stuff, the pushing of Manafort and this led that Trump team to put on the brakes and say, hey, we're not gonna send in our responses. Just yet the president's lawyers demanded a meeting with the Justice department and with Muller's team they went in and they air their concerns in Muller's team said, look, we're not out to get you. We're not plotting against you. And then the president finally sent his responses in now, Mr. Rucker of the four of us you were with. Resident most recently and that would be late today for your interview in the Oval Office. The transcript is fascinating, you found him in an expansive mood. He went after his head of the Federal Reserve. He relocated the sweeping and the cleaning of the forest floors and said, the California has particularly dirty forest floors..

Robert Muller Paul manafort Donald Trump president Weisman Giuliani Trump Tower Philip Rucker Pulitzer Trump Michael Schmidt Pulitzer Michael Washington bureau chief Frank Figliuzzi Boston Herald New York Times Washington Post FBI Federal Reserve White House bureau Kimberly Atkins Hillary Clinton
"bureau chief" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

06:02 min | 2 years ago

"bureau chief" Discussed on KPCC

"Washington bureau chief for the Milwaukee journal sentinel to see if Trump's visits will energize those twenty sixteen voters to turn out for Scott Walker. I've been thinking about you know, the costs and benefits of a Trump. Visit and obviously it makes a certain amount of censoring him, not to go to the suburbs of Milwaukee, not to go to Madison and Milwaukee. But to go to a place like Wasser where he did well in two thousand sixteen but even in a place like Wassall, you're gonna place like central Wisconsin. When you look at his polling numbers, it's kind of fifty fifty and this is again, more conservative leaning rural part of the state. So he's not it's not like, he's more popular than Scott Walker in these places. But I guess the thinking is that if he can mobilize a certain group of Republican conservative voters, and I've talked to some people like this on the campaign trail that are pro pro Trump in there may be a little tap on locker. Then maybe that's worth it. What do you see as the reason that Trump's overall approval rating is not as high in Wisconsin as it was as we were moving into the two thousand sixteen election and right after the two thousand sixteen election. Wisconsin's one of those states were Trump's numbers were never very good. And clearly. The difference in Wisconsin was the voters that didn't like either candidate, meaning Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump broke pretty decisively for Donald Trump at the end. So there were always a lot of Trump voters that were very conflicted and had mixed feelings and some cases ages dislike Hillary Clinton more than Donald Trump. So you've seen his numbers bounce around a little bit. I think his, you know, his negatives aren't that much different than they were when he won that election. But now, obviously, it's a different context because we're talking about a midterm election where he's not on the ballot. He's numbers are got a little bit better. For example, in the last big statewide poll, they're still in the forties kinda bounced around from the low forty s to the mid forties. But by any poll, you'd have to say that, you know, Scott Walker is a little more popular than Donald Trump or a little less unpopular than Donald Trump. So again, there's sort of that mystery of what Trump does for Walker. Lot of what I heard after the two thousand sixteen election about Wisconsin. Was you had two things going on one very energized Republican base, especially small town rural that we hadn't really paid much attention to because we spend so much time thinking about Milwaukee and Madison and the area around Milwaukee. But the second was that liberal voters voters of color, either stay home or they cast a third party. Ballot. Do you think first of all is that a fair assessment of two thousand sixteen will I think one of those places where you can find examples of great democratic turnout in soft democratic turnout in the classic contrast would be kind of mad of Madison area where everybody votes in. Everybody's gonna vote this fall, and they're gonna vote just gets bluer and bigger all the time. And it's overwhelmingly democratic and nobody thinks that that's not gonna happen. Milwaukee is much bigger question Mark because you have a bigger minority population, and Milwaukee has a history of dropping off in midterm elections in terms of turnout and that mattered, you know, differently mattered in two thousand. I mean, the big change statewide was the small towns mean there's sort of two kinds of communities there. And that that swing was so decisive so much the story the twenty six can election, but you've got the Republicans small towns, and then he got the Swinney small towns, and there were like more than five hundred communities in Wisconsin that voted for Obama two thousand twelve and voted for Trump and twenty sixteen so those places there is an element there of just swinging. You know, one of the things Craig that I remember looking at right after the election was suburban Milwaukee Waukesha county, which is traditional Republican area. But this was a kind of place where we had heard stories true you'd written many of them about these conflicted. Suburban voter suburban women who were upset about the access Hollywood tape and Trump did not do as well in Waukesha as Mitt Romney did. But Hillary Clinton didn't do any better than Obama. Did do you think that's changing we hear so much? Now about suburban women, especially in these more affluent areas. Do expect to see that Waukesha behaves differently this year. Well, this is fascinating question. Because there's there's cross-currents really interesting cross-currents there because you know, the suburbs in Milwaukee are a little different than the suburbs. In a lot of other cities its size. They're they're pretty Republican. They have a real report. And again, we're talking about some gate many cases college educated voters, higher income voters. They do have this very Republican history. That's unusual in a national context. And so here comes Donald Trump, and they didn't like him in the primary. The kinda underperformed for him in the general election, but at the same time again that's been the heart of Walker strength in his election. So you've got Walker pulling them one way Trump pulling them another way, and I will vary. Interested to look at those numbers in the midterm elections. Because again, Trump's not on the ballot. But again, there are people that clearly Republicans that have qualms about Trump at the same time. There's like this partisan poll in a lot of these communities, and they're very they're very active politically engaged, and they have this history of just. Jumping into these kind of political wars with both feet. And if Republicans want to try to offset the pretty big numbers are gonna come out of Madison and Dane county. They need a pretty robust VO out of these Republican outer Republican suburbs in Milwaukee. So Craig all that being said is there Trump effect in this election will it's there it's, but it's not something that the candidates are spending all their time talking about I mean, the even the Democrats, I think they see it as something that's a given. And so they don't need to organize their TV ads around trying to tie Scott Walker to Donald Trump. And also by the same token, you know, Scott Walker is always have this kind of awkward relationship with Trump. They ran against each other trumpet beat up on Walker. But Walker is very aware that Trump is popular with Republican voters. So he whenever he kind of distances himself from Trump policy. It does.

Donald Trump Trump Milwaukee Scott Walker Wisconsin Madison Hillary Clinton Milwaukee journal sentinel Obama Waukesha Craig Washington bureau chief Wasser Wassall Waukesha county Mitt Romney Dane county Swinney Hollywood Mark
"bureau chief" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:02 min | 2 years ago

"bureau chief" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The Washington bureau chief for the Milwaukee journal sentinel to see if Trump's visits will energize those thousand sixteen voters turn out for Scott Walker. I've been thinking about you know, the costs and benefits of a Trump. Visit and obviously it makes a certain amount of censoring him, not to go to the suburbs of Milwaukee, not to go to Madison Milwaukee, but to go to a place like Wasser where he did well in two thousand sixteen but even in a place like wausau place, like central Wisconsin. When you look at his polling numbers, it's kind of fifty fifty and this is again, the more conservative leaning rural part of the state. So he's not it's not like, he's more popular than Scott Walker in these places. But I guess the thinking is that if he can mobilize a certain group of Republican conservative voters, and I've talked to some people like this on the campaign trail that are pro pro Trump in there may be a little bit on locker. Then maybe that's worth it. What do you see as the reason that Trump's overall approval rating is not as high in Wisconsin as it was as we were moving into the two thousand sixteen election and right after the two thousand sixteen election. Wisconsin's one of those states where trumps numbers were never very good. And clearly. The difference in Wisconsin was the voters that didn't like either candidate, meaning Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump broke pretty decisively for Donald Trump at the end. So they were always a lot of Trump voters that were very conflicted and had mixed feelings, and some cases they just dislike Hillary Clinton more than Donald Trump. So you've seen his numbers bounce around a little bit. I think he's you know, he's negatives aren't that much different than they were when he won that election. But now, obviously, it's a different context because we're talking about a midterm election where he's not on the ballot. He's numbers are got a little bit better. For example, in the last big statewide poll, they're still in the forties. They've kind of bounced around from the low forty s to the mid forties. But by any poll, you'd have to say that, you know, Scott Walker is a little more popular than Donald Trump or a little less unpopular than Donald Trump. So again, there's sort of that mystery of what Trump does for Walker. Lot of what I heard after the two thousand sixteen election about Wisconsin. Was you had two things going on one very energized Republican base, especially small town rural that we hadn't really paid much attention to because we spend so much time thinking about Milwaukee and Madison and the area around Milwaukee. But the second was that liberal voters voters of color, either stayed home or they cast a third party. Ballot. Do you think first of all is that a fair assessment of two thousand sixteen? Well, I think Wisconsin's one of those places where you can find examples of great democratic turnout in soft immigration turn down the classic. Contrast would be kind of mad the Madison area where everybody votes in. Everybody's gonna vote this fall, and they're going to vote just gets bluer and bigger all the time. And it's overwhelmingly democratic and nobody thinks that that's not gonna happen. Milwaukee is a much bigger question Mark because you have a bigger minority population and Milwaukee has a history of dropping off in midterm elections in terms of turnout and that mattered differently mattered in two thousand. Sixteen. I mean, the big change. Statewide was the small towns mean there's sort of two kinds of communities there, and that that's swing was so decisive so much the story the two thousand sixteen election, but you've got the Republican small towns, and then he got the Swinney small towns, and there were like more than five hundred communities in Wisconsin that voted for Obama two thousand twelve and voted for Trump in two thousand sixteen so those places there is an element there of just swinging us. You know, one of the things that I remember looking at right after the election was suburban Milwaukee Waukesha county, which is traditional Republican area. But this was the kind of place where we had heard stories you'd written many of them about these conflicted. Suburban voters suburban women who were upset about the access Hollywood tape and Trump did not do as well in Waukesha as Mitt Romney did. But Hillary Clinton didn't do any better than Obama. Did do you think that's changing net? We hear so much. Now about suburban women, especially in these more affluent areas. Do expect to see that Waukesha behaves differently this year. Well, this is fascinating question. Because there's there's cross-currents really interesting cross-currents there because you know, the suburbs in Milwaukee are a little different than the suburbs. And a lot of other cities its size. They're they're pretty Republican. They have a real report. And again, we're talking about in many cases college educated voters, higher income voters. They do have this very Republican history. That's unusual in an additional context. And so here comes Donald Trump, and they didn't like him in the primary the kind of underperformed for him in the general election, but at the same time again that's been the heart of Walker strength in his election. So you've got Walker pulling them one way Trump pulling them another way, and I will very interested to look at those numbers in the midterm elections. Because again, Trump's not on the ballot. But again, there are people that clearly Republicans that have qualms about Trump at the same time. There's like this partisan poll in a lot of these communities, and they're very they're very active politically engaged, and they have this history of just. Jumping into these political wars with both feet, and if Republicans want to try to offset the pretty big numbers are gonna come out of Madison and Dane county. The need a pretty robust vote out of these Republican outer Republicans serves in Milwaukee. So Craig all that being said is there Trump effect in this election will it's there it's, but it's not something that the candidates are spending all their time talking about the even the Democrats. I think they see it as something that's a given. And so they don't need to organize their TV ads around trying to tie Scott Walker to Donald Trump. And also by the same token, you know, Scott Walker's always had this kind of awkward relationship with Trump, and they ran against each other trumpet beat up on Walker. But Walker is very aware that Trump is popular with Republican voters. So whenever he kind of distances himself from Trump policy teaches.

Donald Trump Trump Milwaukee Scott Walker Wisconsin Milwaukee journal sentinel Madison Hillary Clinton Madison Milwaukee Obama Waukesha Washington bureau chief Waukesha county Democrats Wasser Dane county Mitt Romney Craig Swinney Hollywood
"bureau chief" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

03:00 min | 3 years ago

"bureau chief" Discussed on WTMA

"I'm john batchelor this is the john batchelor show speaking with my colleague aaron klein he is in israel he is the bureau chief of breitbart jerusalem were discussing the gaza provocations these last hours the protests at the gaza frontier the berm and the wall that the israelis have constructed to keep the gaza bad actors the terrorists from crashing through tunnelling through india israel to kill israelis and to cause mayhem however the reasons for the gaza provocation today aaron is identified those having to do with the embassy and also with the product of the rallying of the palestinians but we now turn to egypt egypt is in alliance with israel these days but egypt is also a troubled country their economy is sacking so how do these provocations connect to egypt sharon are just as a frayed of israel of hamas breaching the barrier of israel as the jewish status because you have to blockades here and again i repeat there was no blockade until israel dilemmas took over about what you have one blockade imposed by israel to make sure that hamas can't bring jesus into the jewish state and then also they can't transport goods used to build missiles and military installations and territorial to attack jews they also have a blockade imposed by egypt because the new egyptian well not new but the egyptian regime after mom mohammed the muslim brotherhood led by uc right leasees hamas in arm of the muslim brotherhood as a threat not just israel but also potentially to that egypt egypt also separately contends was a massive jihadist threat in the sinai peninsula and so the gypsies are paying careful attention because should hamas breach israel's border barrier then actually they might learn from not that they can extend the riots against the egypt border itself but egypt also needs to be very careful because they have their own jihadist operating in the sinai peninsula and so i know that actually today egypt normally works very carefully coordinates militarily with israel especially on their own threat in the sinai of islam state and other jihadist actually scandalously egyptian foreign ministry earlier today put out a statement that really as a one hundred eighty version of reality and condemns israel overcooked the use of force against peaceful marches better they obviously see what everybody else in the free world ken and these are not peaceful marches i in fact i should have mentioned before that of the.

john batchelor israel bureau chief gaza india aaron egypt hamas sinai peninsula breitbart
"bureau chief" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"bureau chief" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Channel a washington bureau chief how are you good to see sean never ends in terms of this it seems to come out of the blue and it just shows i think that people like myself that have been warning that muller's on a witch hunt and there's no stopping him in all these indications these thrown out there that he wants us to end is a crock well sean i have a source familiar with the investigation telling me that that story is true that he was not just michael cohen's office in new york that was rated but he's a part in his personal apartment as well the fbi looking for records as you mentioned so i can confirm that number one number two i mean as a reporter i won't call it a witch on us you know what i would say is that i think that what this is pointing to is something that you and others have said many many times going back to the beginning of the mueller investigation which is look it started out as an investigation of of alleged collusion between russia and the trump campaign and a lot of people wanting a year ago or or longer this was going to morph into something else and the fact that you now have this story in which sources are telling us that it was a referral from robert muller's office the special counsel who again is supposed to be investigating collusion between russia and the trump campaign that now might be referring something about stormy daniels and the payment or other matters that we simply we don't know yet all the facts i think is going to raise a lot of eyebrows about where this investigation is headed stay right there at henry let me bring an attorney david shown who's still with us david for me from my standpoint on the president's defense team at this point i'm looking at this and saying all right this is now become such a stretch too far so far from an original mandate that now this is just outright intimidation and it seems that muller's intentions harder oh wherever he can possibly go because he never found trump russia collusion let's take him down any way we can and that.

new york fbi reporter russia robert muller special counsel daniels david president washington bureau chief sean michael cohen mueller henry attorney
"bureau chief" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"bureau chief" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Channel our washington bureau chief how are you good to see you sean never ends in terms of this it seems to come out of the blue and it just shows i think that people like myself that have been warning that muller's on a witch hunt and there's no stopping him in all these indications he's thrown out there that he wants us to end is a crock well sean i have a source familiar with the investigation telling me that that story is true that he was not just michael cohen's office in new york that was rated but he's a part in his personal apartment as well the fbi looking for records as you mentioned so i can confirm that number one number two i mean as a reporter i won't call it a witch on us you know what i would say is that i think that what this is pointing to is something that you and others have said many many times going back to the beginning of the mueller investigation which is look it started out as an investigation of of alleged collusion between russia and the trump campaign and a lot of people were warning a year ago or or longer that this was going to morph into something else and the fact that you now have this story in which sources are telling us that it was a referral from robert muller's office the special counsel who again is supposed to be investigating collusion between russia and the trump campaign that now might be referring something about stormy daniels and the payment or other matters that we simply we don't know yet all of the facts i think is going to raise a lot of eyebrows about where this investigation is headed stay right there at henry let me bring an attorney david shown who's still with us david for me from my standpoint on the president's defense team at this point i'm looking at this and saying all right this is now become such a stretch too far so far from an original mandate eight that now this is just outright intimidation and it seems that muller's intentions are go wherever he can possibly go because he never found trump russia collusion let's take them down any way we can and that tells me that.

new york reporter russia robert muller special counsel daniels david president washington bureau chief sean michael cohen mueller henry attorney
"bureau chief" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"bureau chief" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"Channel of washington bureau chief how are you good sean never ends in terms of this it seems to come out of the blue and it just shows i think that people like myself that have been warning that muller's on a witch hunt and there's no stopping him and all these indications he's thrown out there that he wants us to end is a crock well sean i have a source familiar with the investigation telling me that that story is true that it was not just michael cohen's office in new york that was rated but his apart his personal apartment as well the fbi looking for records as you mentioned so i can confirm that number one number two i mean as a reporter i won't call it a witch hunt is you know what i would say is that i think that what is is pointing to is something that you and others have said many many times going back to the beginning of the molar investigation which is look it started out as an investigation of of alleged collusion between russia and the trump campaign and a lot of people wanting a year ago or or longer this was going to morph into something else and the fact that you now have this story in which sources are telling us that it was a referral from robert muller's office the special counsel who again is supposed to be investigating collusion between russia and the trump campaign that now might be referring something about stormy daniels and the payment or other matters that we simply we don't know yet all of the facts i think is going to raise a lot of eyebrows about where this investigation to senate stay right there at henry let me bring an attorney david schoneman who's still with us david for me from my standpoint if i'm on the president's defense team at this point i'm looking at this and say all right this is now become such a stretch too far so far from an original mandate that now this is just outright intimidation and it seems that muller's intentions are to go wherever he can possibly go because he never found trump russia collusion let's take him down any way we can and that.

washington bureau chief sean new york fbi reporter russia robert muller special counsel daniels henry david schoneman president michael cohen senate attorney
"bureau chief" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"bureau chief" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Channel in washington bureau chief how are you good sean never ends in terms of this it seems to come out of the blue and it just shows i think that people like myself that have been warning that muller's on a witch hunt and there's no stopping him in all these indications these thrown out there that he wants us to end is a crock well sean i have a source familiar with the investigation telling me that that story is true that he was not just michael cohen's office in new york that was rated but he's a part his personal apartment as well the fbi looking for records as you mentioned so i can confirm that number one number two i mean as reporter i won't call it a witch on his you know what i would say is that i think what this is pointing to is something that you and others have said many many times going back to the beginning of the modern investigation which is look it started out as an investigation of alleged collusion between russia and the trump campaign and a lot of people were wanting a year ago or or longer that this was going to morph into something else and the fact that you now have this story in which sources are telling us that it was a referral from robert muller's office a special counsel who is supposed to be investigating collusion between russia and the trump campaign that now might be referring something about stormy daniels and the payment or other matters that we simply we don't know yet all the facts i think is going to raise a lot of eyebrows about where this investigation the senate stay right there at henry let me bring an attorney david shown louie who's still with us david for me from my standpoint if i'm on the president's defense team at this point i'm looking at this and saying all right this is now become such a stretch too far so far from an original mandate that now this is just outright intimidation and it seems that muller's intentions are to go wherever he can possibly go because he never found trump russia collusion let's take him down any way we can and that.

washington bureau chief sean new york fbi reporter russia robert muller special counsel daniels henry david louie president michael cohen senate attorney
"bureau chief" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"bureau chief" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Channel our washington bureau chief how are you good to see you sean never ends in terms of this it seems to come out of the blue and it just shows i think that people like myself that have been warning that muller's on a witch hunt and there's no stopping him in all these indications he's thrown out there that he wants us to end is a crock well sean i have a source familiar with the investigation telling me that that story is true that it was not just michael cohen's office in new york that was rated but his apart his personal apartment as well the fbi looking for records as you mentioned so i can confirm that number one number two i mean as a reporter i won't call it a witch hunt is you know what i would say is that i think that what this is pointing to is something that you and others have said many many times going back to the beginning of the mueller investigation which is look it started out as an investigation of of alleged collusion between russia and the trump campaign and a lot of people were warning a year ago or or longer that this was going to morph into something else and the fact that you now have this story in which sources are telling us that it was a referral from robert muller's office the special counsel who is supposed to be investigating collusion between russia and the trump campaign that now might be referring something about stormy daniels and the payment or other matters that we simply we don't know yet all the facts i think is going to raise a lot of eyebrows about where this investigation is headed stay right there at henry let me bring an attorney david shown la who's still with us david for me from my standpoint on the president's defense team at this point i'm looking at this and say all right this is now become such a stretch too far so far from an original mandate that now this is just outright intimidation and it seems that muller's intentions are to go wherever he can possibly go because he never found trump russia collusion let's take him down any way we can and that tells me that.

new york fbi reporter russia robert muller special counsel daniels david president washington bureau chief sean michael cohen mueller henry attorney
"bureau chief" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"bureau chief" Discussed on KQED Radio

"By the trump campaign cambridge analytica reportedly harvested personal information from fifty million facebook users without their consent after days of silence facebook ceo mark zuckerberg responded to the growing scandal in a blog post and interviews zakar brook said facebook will take new security measures and restrict access to some user data by third party apps me well some lawmakers wants to testify before congress and there's now a social media campaign urging users to delete their facebook accounts joining me now with more on this are cake silicon valley bureau chief tanya moseley marketwatch tech editor and san francisco bureau chief jeremy owens and electrician frontier foundation researcher jenny gephardt's welcome to you all well there are so many issues here trust regulation data privacy how facebook is responding to all all of that but tanya i have to ask you first of all lay out the senior figure for us because the misuse of data involving cambridge analytica happened in twenty fifteen when did facebook know about it and why did it not notify users who were affected earlier so facebook received word that cambridge analytica had this data around that time in twenty fifteen and they went to them and said please you need to destroy this and cambridge analytica said yes we will do that and they actually gave them an agreement saying that they would do that from that point i want to tell you though they found out about it from reporters from the guardian reporter there as well as another publication notify facebook that this was a possibility and it's this was happening i think the million dollar question is why they didn't notify the public until now we received word before the new york times published its piece about all of this that facebook was going to deny cambridge analytica on there platform and they were we receive that in a facebook post as well as on their newsroom blog as well so that's the big question is why we didn't know about the sooner and what do you think the answer is i mean it's were they wanted to practice protects their profits or what do you think happened here.

mark zuckerberg facebook congress editor jeremy owens jenny gephardt cambridge analytica reporter new york times ceo zakar brook bureau chief tanya moseley san francisco researcher million dollar
"bureau chief" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"bureau chief" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"David merit joining us a london bureau chief let's find out what else is happening around the wealthy the details of that bloomberg's liane garros thanked skying germany's chancellor is trying to reassert control of the christian democratic party elkton fading some surprising picks for the six cdu how pace and had new coalition cabinet bloomberg sanita alf reports another mark less nominated her most outspoken tunnel critic from a finance that humanist they and sean as you health minister in annexed cabinet in addition she has appointed more female and young ministers to covenant in a move to counter the growing criticism within her own party this team is a good mixture of experience and new faces which will be able to tackle the challenges of the future amac said in berlin on a delves bloomberg daybreak europe italy's former premier matteo rienzie has urged politicians to combat all forms of violence ahead of this some days election rienzie spoke to bloomberg at an antifascist and antiracist rally in rome after clashes between far left and farright activists in recent days very aboard the blah busily of course them resolved by means apology romania revaz we've all where barbarism vulgar associations side against though the spread of wireless the winter olympics have wrapped up in south korea and new developments indicate that this could be remembered as that diplomacy gains bloomberg's at backstop reports president moon jae an delivering the message of the us that north korea may be willing to have talks bloomberg's ross crasnick there really could be at one of the bigger over by kim and north korea really in the years in terms of a reaching out but the white house's responding that any talks would come with a precondition that kim jong un start scaling back his nuclear program in san francisco i'm ed baxter bloomberg daybreak europe and australia has a new deputy prime minister off to former janice michael mccormack was elected liza off the national policy with all electoral lima before cells we have thames hit it off the comax succeeds bonded rejoice who stepped down last week amid as sex scandal that has seen michael time coalition government lose public support global news 24 hours a.

europe ed baxter kim jong president romania italy berlin sean chancellor germany london David janice michael mccormack prime minister australia bureau chief san francisco white house ross crasnick
"bureau chief" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"bureau chief" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Dot com the wmal weather channel forecast scattered braley boarding showers force here today otherwise mostly cloudy skies who'd cooler high fifty one upper 40s to chance for more showers warmer temperatures over the weekend bureau chief ken boone from the weather channel on w by now forty of burke thirty and damascus forty two in washington adult obstacle five point on fm and am six thirty washington's paul w washington mornings on and am six thirty the good morning we are live from sepak it is seven thirty seven odd this friday i of mary walter vince college days with me and joining us right now former congressman sector tim hules kept he's the president and ceo of the heartland institute joining us thank you so much bigger the time so that you're you're here to join is now you obviously are a conservative you're elected to congress in the tea party way even to want to eat had you are now president of the heartland institute tell us about the heartland institute what do you do but we are a national thing take have new race in the chicago area we fight for issues of freedom in not only here in washington dc but also in all fifty states and the sowa we communicate with almost a million times a year a state legislators and and promoting everything from smaller government lower taxes a school choice climate sensibility and.

bureau chief ken boone burke washington president and ceo heartland institute washington dc damascus congressman congress chicago
"bureau chief" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"bureau chief" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The beijing bureau chief for the financial times and the woodrow wilson center scholar ser mcgregor comes to us today from want their welcome to bloomberg good to have you ever richard so i heard leading into this 1930 congress this will be a time of consolidation of the power of president gene how did we see that in this over three hour long speech while i think it's it really marks the beginning of a new era i mean if you like chairman mao rescued the country china deng xiaoping rescued the chinese economy now see jinping is risking at the chinese communist party in that said sets the stage for what really is a fantastically ambitious programme i mean this lies at a program in theory in two stages from twenty twenty two 2035 infant 2035 the 2050 and seaching pain will be at the central that we don't know what's going to happen with the leadership next week but it's very lie i played that us he jinping my say on long than another five years when a person she first came to office there was a lot of talk about reform how does that reform movement sit together with the state permeating every aspect of society well i think frankly that you and i define the word reform very differently from how they define it not trying to make their economy like a western economy and i think that's a key point to understand when we talk about reform hear more interviews like this one on bloomberg television streaming live on bloombergcom and on the bloomberg mobile app or check your local cable listings global business news 24 hours a careful the radio mobile app.

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