6 Burst results for "Bulletin Of Atomic Scientists"

"bulletin atomic scientists" Discussed on Talking Politics

Talking Politics

13:19 min | 1 year ago

"bulletin atomic scientists" Discussed on Talking Politics

"The crane virus was already a huge story. As you'll hear they're not as big as it is now. We recorded it in the offices of the Center for the study of existential risk in Cambridge. A very appropriate place to talk about the end of the world. We were in that library. Which is on the street. You may hear some cars passing in the background. Rachel Bronson is the president and the CEO of the Bulletin of the atomic scientists who have been setting the doomsday clock since nineteen forty seven. I started by asking her to give us a bit of history and a bit of background. Maybe we could start with some historical context. The Doomsday clock is closer to midnight than it has been and it has been around since nineteen forty seven. The fifties actually was the closest. It's been until recently pitas frame the recent decision by the panel against the historical backdrop. So when the clock was first created in nineteen forty seven. It was set at seven minutes to midnight. It has moved as close as two minutes to midnight in nineteen fifty three when the. Us and the Soviets both exploded. Hydrogen bombs tested hydrogen palms. It's moved close to midnight and far away from midnight throughout its history and it was as far away from midnight Seventeen minutes to midnight in nineteen ninety-one so it moves forward and backwards in recent years. We've been moving closer to midnight for a number of reasons that I'm sure we'll talk about but the three big reasons really have been the deterioration in U S Russian relations. A huge reinvestment in nuclear arsenals across the Globe and a failure of the international community to cooperate on things like climate. Change the last move. In January of twenty twenty was to one hundred seconds to midnight which is the closest been in history and was very intentional Lee so so we are close and the reason that will talk about demand. Urgent attention in that story. Midnight symbolizes catastrophe. And it's one of these questions with existential risk. What do we actually mean? Are we talking about the end of everything? Is it measurable? I'm not going to ask you. What would midnight lit lie but when these decisions are being made house midnight calibrated? Yeah and it's gone increasingly complicated for us to answer that question. It was a little bit easier to answer the question in the forties and fifties where it was a nuclear exchange and a nuclear exchange. Then and in this day and age is really the end of civilization as we know it so it's very clear and it can happen within minutes. It's become a little bit more complicated. As the clock has evolved in two thousand and seven. We included climate change for the first time which I'd be happy to talk about but answering what midnight looks like climate change is a lot harder and it's not a matter of minutes. It's not a matter of minutes so well in our clock. It is a matter of minutes. You're this changes Is An event cats right and that really is a matter of minutes so adding in climate change makes that harder to answer but nonetheless. We still maintain that it's the end of civilization as we know it and what's been fascinating with the climate experts that are included in changing. The clock is have we already past midnight? How far away from midnight? It is when we set the clock. Every year I ask the Science and Security Board of the bulletin atomic scientists who set the clock is humanity safer or at greater risk this year than it was last year and this year compared to the years at which. We've been answering that question. How they answer that question dictates what time it is on. The clock in the report accompanied the decision in January to move to one hundred seconds to midnight. You describe the interplay between what we might call Roy. Existential risks nuclear exchange catastrophic climate change and also around technology as well and the potential inadequacies of the international institutions. That will be required. To mitigate these risks and a lot of different people go into making this decision but which one is weighing larger. Because what's so interesting about. It is the interplay between them. We're sitting in the center for the study of existential risk and risk can be this free standing set of things. It's the play with institutions that matters. Yeah it is the interplay of and the weaving together of the different rests. And so there's I think two points in this report that are really worth spending some time on and help generate The time the first and for watchers of this close watchers of this you would have seen this emerging in the last report last year. Which is the focus on cyber enabled threats and the role they play in exacerbating our ability to deal with these larger existential issues of nuclear threat and climate. There's a real focus especially last year but pulled into this report which is the threat enabler that that becomes an how it makes everything more difficult and so we saw that emerging last year. Very strongly and it's there again in this report and so that's one piece of the technology that's worth talking about. But you're talking about and really I would say the driving force of the move from two minutes to midnight to one hundred seconds to midnight. And that odd twenty-second move is a failing capacity of international institutions to manage what are clearly global threats whereas in past reports. We've really focused on the growing threat in this report. It's the decreasing ability to manage that and a real focus on not only the failure of the international community but the dismantling of architectures that allowed us to manage them in the past and that intentional dismantling of an international architecture without replacing it with anything really is driving that twenty seconds. I want to come onto that in a second on the first point the the kind of accelerators were enablers of the risk. There's also the interplay between the risks so just to give you an example corona viruses out there. Corona virus is not the end of civilization. Corona virus illustrates the weakness of a globalized world to certain kinds of threats that can then destablize institution says a possibility if it really takes off the big climate conference later this year that was due to happen in the UK might not happen and that was gonNA solve climate change. But you can imagine circumstances in which these things play off other and that's that's the real destabilizer in a very integrated globalised world. People focusing on supply chains. There's a kind of institutional supply chain issue. I was reading this morning. There's a big nuclear conference at the end of April beginning of. May that we're starting to look at like the climate conference may make it postponed. The Corona virus is a good example of the interplay. But even a better example of the collapsing international architecture to deal with global challenges the interplay that we see really between cyber and artificial intelligence and nuclear issues climate. That's where I see a very strong interplay where we think. How does the change in climate? How will that affect conflict in the future? How will that affect our nuclear security? If there is a nuclear exchange at some point they will have horrendous consequences to populations but also changes the climate which makes it impossible for others to survive the interplay between the cyber threats and understanding kind of what is true and real in moments when we need very fast reactions. Those are the kinds of interplay of the issues that we look at the focus on the Corona Virus. I think speaks to that. The international inability to appropriately manage twenty-first-century challenges and you would have thought a few decades ago that we would have just built and built and built on our capacity but that willful underinvestment and the willful dismantling of our abilities to to handle. This are are striking on this. I don't want to be alarmist about this part of it because we are seeing a global response and we actually if you speak to public health experts as slow as China's been to respond. They've been faster than in past pandemics so we are seeing them. Respond and there is a global learning that being said the kinds of investments that we need to being made and the kind of institutions we need are not keeping up with the threats and some cases are being dismantled away. The point of the clock. It's a wakeup call. But it's it's an device to educate and inform people. It's not designed to terrify them and there's always the hope for the crisis that will not be so bad that it destabilizes but we'll be bad enough to really galvanize something between galvanizing and destabilizing and the corona virus who knows how it'll pan out the disease. Say Not a reason yet to be profoundly pessimistic about and yet this is also playing against the backdrop of national politics where all of these issues feed into democratic and in the Chinese case non-democratic systems which are themselves vulnerable as we've seen vulnerable to loss of confidence but also vulnerable to shocks when you look at the institutional risks that international institutions that we might expect to manage it if they are being weakened. They're being weakened by national politicians. Who either withdrawing support all of the destabilizing them so then do we have to trace it back to the national level. That was a long question. Yeah well I think I think it's absolutely appropriate because what we're seeing in. A national context certainly across democracies is challenges of populism and distrust for government and a distrust for politics as we have known it and this rise of populism which has a sense of being destructive in terms of the architectures that we know one of the things this is in the US case right now very timely there is a question about how the krona virus will play in our in US politics. Which is we have seen exactly what you're saying national movements to dismantle global cooperation efforts. How is the corona virus going to play is it a reminder for US voters who are right now in their primaries that government matters and that you need to invest in government's ability to manage the public good public health or are we willing to kick it all down and we don't know yet but the corona virus will play into this question and at least in the US? Contexts were watching it be answered. But what we're seeing on other issues climate and nuclear issues. There is a to some extent certainly in the. Us context disinterest in arms control at a moment where we so desperately need it to manage our nuclear threatened by our. I mean the global nuclear threat this walking away from a period from one thousand nine hundred seventy two twenty then which would be kind of the golden age of arms control. There's a lot of skepticism around it. Lyndon Johnson had a quote that I think is really appropriate now president Lyndon Johnson. Which was it's easier to burn down the outhouse. Then install plumbing and we're seeing that in terms of global institutions around climate change public health certainly in the nuclear spaces. Well we interviewed Michael Lewis on this podcast. A couple of months ago by his book the fifth risk and the fifth risk from. Michael Lewis is government failure in fact bureaucratic failure and the point of his book was to say government works and they didn't know the things that it does and they didn't know how important is and he said he expected at some point in the trump presidency. People wake up to this because something would happen that would represent that failure and maybe the current Ivars is it but as you say there's also the nuclear question and managing not just the nuclear threat but managing the actual hardware is a job of bureaucracy is no job of politicians. The United States government has an extremely sophisticated on whose job it is to keep us safe from those weapons as well as have them available for us. Have we forgotten the biggest risk of all? Is that one. Because this clock started exclusively focused on that and over time other risks. Come in.

US president Lyndon Johnson Cambridge Michael Lewis Rachel Bronson twenty twenty UK Security Board Roy Lee CEO China Bulletin of the atomic
"bulletin atomic scientists" Discussed on The 45th

The 45th

13:21 min | 1 year ago

"bulletin atomic scientists" Discussed on The 45th

"Of nightmare scenario. We are closer to the apocalypse fist. Up Every day brings us closer every closer the last the last couple of years apparently the doomsday clock has accelerated last week. The bulletin atomic scientists moved us to a hundred seconds to midnight. The that's pretty okay. Just with the perspective in two thousand eighteen. We were like minutes. We were like minutes away like four five minutes like we have really accelerated in the the last couple of years they mostly thanks to trump and global warming. I think which is trump hindered our ability to respond. Even the two biggest factors in this consideration is that by the way they're like fifteen laureates. Who are part of this committee? You're not much of batty. Activist activist number. One is the threat of nuclear war and the second is the environment but they did site extensively everything that this administration has done to lead us. Had I in a nuclear war Like let's say you know stuff with North Korea's the negotiations association's collapsing Iran. The White House is going to withdraw from the Open Skies Treaty. What it's allowing Russia more freedom freedom with nuclear proliferation? And so anyhow. I thought I'd mentioned that I feel like things are really really moving very fast on that. That was kind of scary to me. I don't know if that means though hundred seconds sounds like a couple of months it it's a it's a long time span span here but it's a hundred years. Maybe not that long optimistic. No okay the point. Get into the idea that this can emphasize when certain points in our existence we have teetered towards making things more dangerous and making the likelihood Kapakis more prominent. It's not unfixable but it's something. We need to look at really closely really quickly. Oh yeah the clock can name a bat. If breath for example we fix all this stuff that trump has done on the nuclear front. But also you know like let's say reentering the climate treaty and and that kind of stuff so but it's it's GonNa be a tough push anyway. a story coming I today. Actually I thought today. Hey was this crazy ass story that apparently there's a coordinated effort with the trump campaign to who go into black communities and give cash giveaways like as her having kind of trump rallies. How'd you have you seen the story Susan? I saw it briefly. It seems I mean poly- legal but also like totally ineffective like I can't imagine that's going to do what they gonNA do. I mean I I mean like I don't know to what extent okay like so. Apparently A in December there was a something Christmas extravaganza in Cleveland. Ohio Hi oh they gave the I saw the poster. It said twenty five thousand dollars cash giveaway. It was organized by organization called the Urban Revitalization Coalition which was founded by you like one of trump's most prominent national black leaders has. He's a pastor named Darrell. Scott he's a CO founder of black voices for trump of the national all diversity coalition for trump and this is one of his organizations now is brandon is a five three which is a charity. This was not a charitable event They gave they did a lot a lot of messaging for trump and they did a raffle where they gave away envelopes stuffed with cash between three to five hundred dollars. I mean charities. Don't do that There's going to be more. There's another one scheduled for Virginia. I think next month but the idea is to sh excite black black voters in these in places where the calling urban revitalization. I don't know how they're going to revitalize community by giving individuals doing our butts but I don't know I don't think that that's a even ethical issues I've got with it. I've got some technical questions as well. Yeah Yeah I mean like well look maybe one vote at a time and that person gets other people to vote in their family. The same way I don't know because apparently like the political article that was The covered it one of the women. They interviewed she just went to one of the cash jobs. And she's like trump four more years I don't know I mean like he keeps pushing messaging on like you know yeah. No president's been better for black unemployment for all these other issues and maybe there's an up enough. obfuscation is a how you say that word to make certain black communities feel like look if all these pastors are in on it and all these black leaders are in on it then. There must be aren't showing that though and I'm not that is drew Scott to call. This is gonNA be a worthwhile endeavor for them. Yeah you're right. I think that's fair. I think that the polls are certainly not reflecting that but I'm just shocked at the blatant like buying votes scheme here. I wish I was shot. You're not you're not like it. Sounds like the kind harebrained stupidity. They would try so all right. So that's something that caught my eye in the last really two or three days. I don't even know what happened last week. It's a blur. The politics inferno continues outside of impeachment. Yeah the Iowa caucuses also around the corner. Right isn't isn't next week I right. Is it next week. That sounds right. That sounds like it's going to happen. It's happening but but because of the forest okay firestorm around trump and the impeachment and and so many characters from last The last episode we did was all about a Parnasse and hide and and Yvonne Invention and now l. couple of days ago. Big Bolton bombshell if you WanNa call it that let's get right into impeachment. We're in the middle of it. Yes we have just finished up to the twenty two days the twenty four hours each side gets over many days Can I ask what the defense really get. Twenty four hour do they really. They use more than they tend to not use twenty four hours. I could not tell you the exact minute count but they could use an today's original plan. They end up going for three deep because the Bolton News but they've narrowed up and now we're going to questioning which is should be a lot more worthwhile in terms of actually expounding expounding on situation than the opening. Were but before that let's let's go back up the see what's happening now. We have this trial it is the third presidential senatorial. There's been several like what fourteen There's been plenty of other inquiry history and typically. It's about federal judges who are on the bench the judges. Yeah if you want to remove them. He had impeach him now. The reason we have such weird stilted trial rules. It's not because traditionally impeachment Trials in the Senate acted this way. It's because of what happened with Clinton and it's because in that case. It was apparently little bit awkward. I don't know so so When they are going into the trial rather than you know doing a trial there? Let's ease into this and make sure we really need to put this on the airwaves. So they did very like careful. Approach did do but they did a lot closer stuff and it was a little bit like tiptoeing around because blowups. So that's why we had this awful president. They're now using in a case where it doesn't imply at all whatsoever. So what kind of precedent you're talking about. What kind of rules? Ah Carry over from Clinton that are really hampering this trial a big one is that you don't sign witnesses after the opening arguments that that's they're not gonNA wait 'til after Friday's probably won't get the big news. If they have the votes are not to call witnesses now in every single trial ever ever happened. There have always been witnesses says and there have always been witnesses who are not previously called before the house. So this is the facts even on the table is a shocking Deviation the ation from President it's a sign that we are beyond anything the constitution is prepared to deal with. I've seen so many. GOP senators like in the media's of saying thing. Well that was the house job how to call witnesses and we're just going to consider that you know their case and we don't need to but that's never happened before that's just as an excuse that the full excuses crazy part is. Let's so we have twenty four hours from the democratic side There are a lot of presentations. Have Good recaps the evidence I mean I gotta say I gotTa say Speaker Shift I mean I thought he really not excuse me not speaking to Adam Schiff. I thought he was really kind of remarkable. He was unease. He's he's one of the kind he is living in the days. Like Williams shootings Brian. And you know all those great orators like listening to him like Oh. This is why people were so impressed with like. Yeah you know the great speakers back in the day where you could just contemporary Ainsley. And he does have prepared speeches but like like in the actual impeachment proceeding before the house like a lot of time. He is off the cuff doing that. He's not even looking at nodes and he's so no tweet. Yeah he's really into really just just purely technically. It is an extremely impressive skill. Yeah better than I would say. Oh I thought Obama was a great orator schiff like hands down one of the shifts like another level out he's beyond any comparisons and modern politics. Yeah he's much more like a even I wouldn't say I've seen trial lawyers you better than him but he is probably more akin to a trial all your very very experienced skilled expensive trial lawyer level. Politicians don't usually need to be that contemporaneous smooth time fantastic if you missed it. Go back and listen all online. Okay because you know they're going to. They had the republic air so so they probably Whitehouse's turn came up and it was dreadful. It was actually a really bad like I mean simple loney was. I'm shocked. Trump allowed him to do that. I'm sure trump was seeding the whole time because he just wasn't good like no. It's fine I wouldn't either. I'd be terrible but like he was just objectively. Not Could it's like why are you there. I would think that I was gonna say I would think trump by watch secolo and said that's my man. Yeah but Secolo was rambling and like he was in his peers better for sure but if he was more of an attack dog and I think that's what trump lakes but it started off with the WHO opened it up for the defense. I'm Oh my God who gets kicked off. Oh no no no. No no no was applauding. Who gave us the entire lake history of Lake impeachment? What's up Bologna? I can't remember Ken Starr it was star. Thank you it was Ken Starr. Oh what was that now. I was not. I was not really watchful observer. At the time of the Clinton impeachment. I was too young child who went on. I was yeah. I learn certain lessons from the Clinton impeachment that was probably of A. What are the president exposure to? That was the that's like my main memory of the Clinton Clinton impeachment is certain awkward conversations. Yeah so I I don't really remember Ken Starr that well but I you know on tv all the time lately like in past years. He's still but around watching him give. His speech was the biggest. Fuck you ever seen like. It was so calculated so intentional. It was a lull. Nothing matters. Fuck all y'all because he went on about how Peterman is so damaging and so incredibly bad for the country how should never occur for like any reason. Essentially like he's on the record from ninety two saying saying that like you can impeach a president for poisoning cat which you know maybe little split level of wrongdoing. He's previously said rises to the for him Clinton's like resistance to certain interviews and in Clinton by the way was infinitely ahead of trump in production because he expert is something which trump is not at all but star then was like all Clinton's obstructing. That's the reason why he's impeach and now he's like. Oh you can't you can't possibly the president just because he won't handle any witnesses or documents he also made the argument that neither there's no actual crime here. You didn't actual- Kramer was Dershowitz. Those Dershowitz which it's Kinda like was wasn't there crime nine. There's kind of a crime is an extraordinary crime. I mean there's there was criminal conduct being. That's partly why doesn't matter. There's technical criminal conduct. That's not the concern isn't it. There happens the federal statute on the books that applies to this. The question is is it something that is incompatible being president and there's obstruction technically a federal crime is just like has certain jurisdictional requirements like if trump shots on fifth avenue would not be a federal crime. So guess you can't Peach Peach for that either. Yeah I mean I feel like it's kind of the argument. They're all making time though it. Is it really is hands down. The worst one was Dershowitz and only because after the fact at the time I was like wow. That's really what the hell whatever who cares afterwards..

trump Clinton Clinton president Trump Adam Schiff Ken Starr Scott White House North Korea Russia Bolton News Dershowitz Ohio Virginia Iowa Urban Revitalization Coalition
"bulletin atomic scientists" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

10:32 min | 1 year ago

"bulletin atomic scientists" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Janine Nina Anez who declared herself interim president in November on yes has a history of using racist anti indigenous language and has vowed to bring the Bible back to to the Bolivian presidency. The last US ambassador. Philip Goldberg was expelled in two thousand eight by then president. Evo Morales who accused the George W Bush administration of of working to destabilise his government at least thirty two anti coup protesters have been killed by security forces. Since President Morales ouster last November. Most of them Indigenous in Puerto Rico. Hundreds of people joined a protest outside. The governor's mansion Thursday demanding the ouster of government Wanda Vazquez. Some protesters carried a full-size Guillotine. Two the governor's mansion public anger is rising after a video posted online last week and showed undistributed emergency supplies meant for hurricane. Maria victims sitting unused in a warehouse in the city of Ponce Governor. Vasquez is also under fire over her. Handling of the recent six point four magnitude earthquake which killed one person left thousands homeless Vermont senator. Twenty two thousand presidential hopeful Bernie. Sanders tweeted a statement in solidarity with protests rating. After a decade of austerity hurricanes earthquakes Puerto Puerto Ricans have a right to a responsive government and full federal support to put an end to this crisis sanders wrote in South Carolina. A prominent African african-american lawmaker has switched her endorsement. In the twenty twenty presidential primary from Joe Biden to Senator Bernie Sanders Richland County Council. Member Dahlie Myers told the Associated Press quote. I like the fact that Sanders is willing to fight for a better America for the least the fallen the left behind on quote a new WBU WBZ you are poll shows senator. Sanders has widened his lead to double digits among likely New Hampshire Democratic voters ahead of next month's primary election this this comes as the New York Times reports California Senator Kamala Harris who suspended her campaign. Last December is weighing an endorsement of Joe Joe Biden meanwhile billionaire former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg has surged to fourth place nationally with about nine percent in a recent monmouth breath university poll after spending a quarter of a billion dollars on political ads since joining the race. Far More than all other Democratic candidates Bloomberg has said he'll spend up to two billion dollars of his own money to defeat trump no matter who the Democratic nominee is. Even if it's Senator Bernie Sanders. The National Archives and Records Administration has replaced a doctored photograph of the two thousand seventeen women's march with the original l. days after it apologized for altering the photo to remove criticisms of President Trump and exhibit cold rightfully hers. American women women in the vote. The National Archives had displayed a large image of the first women's March but at least four signs referencing trump had been blurred word to remove his name including poster reading. God hates trump instead it read. God hates here in Manhattan actor Annabella Annabella Shoora told to pat courtroom Thursday disgraced. Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein forced his way into her New York City apartment one night in the early nineteen eighteen ninety s where he held her down and raped her. The experience short testified left her so scarred she fell into a deep depression started cutting getting herself and began drinking heavily. It was the first time. One of Weinstein's accusers has confronted him directly in court since his arrest passed in May two thousand eighteen on charges of rape and Criminal Sexual Acts Five. More of Weinstein's accusers are expected to testify. During the trial the the statute of limitations has expired for all but two of their claims Harvey Weinstein faces life in prison on the New York charges and up to twenty eight ears in a separate criminal case in Los Angeles County. Over a hundred women have accused Harvey Weinstein of Rape Sexual Assault Sexual harassment and and professional retaliation in Arkansas. New evidence emerge bolstering. The claims of Delhi a condemned prisoner. who was put to death breath in April two thousand seventeen even as he professed his innocence? A freedom of information law suit filed on behalf of Lee sister by the American Civil Liberties Union and the innocence since project argues no physical evidence directly tied lead to the nineteen ninety-three murder for which he was convicted and tasks serious doubts on the claims of forensics experts experts who testified at the trial. Meanwhile an attorney assigned to lease defense has since admitted in an affidavit. He was struggling with drug addiction. At the time and unable able to provide effective counsel Lee sister is seeking the release of crime scene materials for new DNA and fingerprint testing. The Bulletin of Atomic Scientists says this advanced the Doomsday clock twenty seconds closer to midnight. The clock is a symbolic timekeeper. That tracks the likelihood of nuclear war and other existential. She'll threats it now. Stands closer to catastrophe than anytime since its creation in nineteen forty seven. This is Mary Robinson former Irish president former the UN human rights chief speaking Thursday the clock was set to one hundred seconds to midnight. The Doomsday clock is a globally recognized indicator of the vulnerability of our existence. It's a striking metaphor the precarious state of the world. But most frighteningly as we have just heard it's a metaphor backed by rigorous scientific scrutiny. This is no mere analogy. We are now one hundred seconds to midnight and the world's needs to wake up. Our planet faces two simultaneous existential threats the climate crisis and nuclear weapons the bulletin bulletin atomic scientists blasted president trump for withdrawing the US from the Cold War Era Intermediate Range Nuclear Forces Agreement. And it's calling on the US to renew the new new start treaty before it expires. Twenty twenty one new start limits the number of nuclear weapons deployed by the United States and Russia. US Treasury Secretary Very Steven mnuchin mock seventeen year old climate activist. Greta timber on Thursday after she called on investors to pull their funds from fossil fuel companies speaking to reporters at the World Economic Forum in Davos Switzerland. MNUCHIN said of tune very quote after she goes studies economics in college. She can go back and explain that to us. MNUCHIN comments sparked a torrent of replies across social media from economists. Who rushed to tune varies defense? Gretchen Mary responded on on twitter. Writing quote my gap year ends in August but it doesn't take a college degree in economics to realise our remaining one point five degree carbon budget an ongoing going fossil fuel subsidies and investments. Don't add up tune very sad and in Canada. Police arrested twelve indigenous youth activists early early Wednesday morning ending their day. Long sit in occupation of the offices of the Ministry of Energy Mines and petroleum resources in British Columbia. Their protests was the latest among dozens of solidarity actions taken in support of the wet sweat in first nation. which is resisting the six point? Six billion dollar coastal gas link FRAC gas pipeline earliest this month which wet and leaders evicted construction workers from the territory and set up a road blockade that cut off access to coastal gas link worksite. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police have since set up a checkpoint nearby raising fears of a raid. This is first nations activist to Kaya Blaney. One of the twelve arrested Wednesday because what had visited vision of people remember and Canada has forgotten is that we have a sacred obligation to this land as human beings. We all have a responsibility to that which it gives us. Life and as indigenous peoples parted stewarded these territories time immemorial it is crucial Russia that our sovereignty be respected collective climate future and those are some of the headlines. This is democracy now democracy now DOT ORG the Warren Peace Report report. I'm Amy Goodman. We turn now to the historic impeachment trial of president. Donald J trump democratic lawmakers are continuing to lay out their their case for removing the president from office. Today marks the final day the twenty four hour opening argument by the Democrats Republicans begin their opening inning arguments Saturday. The Senate impeachment trial comes a month after the house. Impeach trump for withholding congressionally approved military h Ukraine as part of an effort to pressure the Ukrainian president to investigate trump's political rival Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden on Thursday. There's Day House impeachment manager. JERROLD Nadler made the case that the president can be impeached for non criminal activity. No one anticipated that President President would stoop to this misconduct and Congress has passed no specific law to make his behavior a crime yet. This is precisely the kind of abuse use that. The framers had in mind when they wrote the impeachment clause and when they charged Congress with determining when the president's conduct was so clearly wrong so definitely beyond the Pale so threatening to the constitutional order as to require his removal during his presentation. Judiciary Chair in the house. jerrold Nadler relied in part on past statements made by key supporters of president. Trump might say the same thing of then house manager Lindsey. Graham Graham who in President Clinton's trial flatly rejected the notion that impeachable offenses are limited to violations of established law. Here is what he said a high crime. How `bout that important person hurt somebody and low means?.

President Trump president Senator Bernie Sanders Joe Joe Biden United States President Morales Harvey Weinstein interim president New York City senator Evo Morales Philip Goldberg JERROLD Nadler Puerto Rico Janine Nina Anez Wanda Vazquez Senator Kamala Harris Bloomberg Bulletin of Atomic Scientists
"bulletin atomic scientists" Discussed on Pod Save the World

Pod Save the World

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"bulletin atomic scientists" Discussed on Pod Save the World

"You murderer the love you ever had for it only. Use just built in sound. The iphone sound too. I'd roommate in college who had steal my sunshine or steel yourself. Oh. That is awful higher year. Rewatching? Movie at the movie go to movies you've seen versus the movie. You haven't seen make me six back. Go to college era. It's also a great soundtrack that has that song and others on. It we go. Okay. Well, it was a you know, what I will say for the movie go. There was a gay couple in it at a time where that wasn't common including Jay Moore and Scott wolf wolf and a gay couple in that movie. And I remember all the gay couples in those kinds of that era 'cause they were rare anyway, eight sleep speaking of heat up the bedroom. Imagine this scenario the surface temperature of your bed gradually adjust to wake you up gently and naturally without the sound of the alarm imagine. Now, waking up rested in alert not science fiction. This is the new pod by eight sleep the pod by eight sleep is a high tech bed scientifically designed to is what I've been using optimal sleep, fitness the topple. There's a reason why time magazine calls eight one of the best inventions last year. It combines dynamic pressure. Regulation and sleep tracking to enhance your rest and recovery. It learns your sleep habits in just the temperature automatically. That means if you like the bed cool, your partner likes the bed warm, you can have both at the same time too. Crazy, comfortable bed and. No more alarm clocks is a good innovation. Change the time. We have to get to work. I don't know. Try the pod for one hundred nights the bed not the show. And if you don't love it will refund your purchase in a range of free pick-up. They already sold out of their first batch going fast. For a limited time get one hundred fifty bucks off your purchase. When you go to eight sleep dot com slash world. One hundred fifty bucks off free shipping. Eight sleep dot com slash world. One more time that's eight sleep dot com slash world. I am thrilled to have in the studio in Los Angeles to people who hate nuclear weapons more than almost anyone else on the planet. Joe Joanie is the president of the pleasure is fund. I want to say the owner of the fun like it was some investment group. Jasmine, so give it that way. You're investing in not dying Yasmine itself as a partnership manager beyond the bump. Thank you both so much for being here. I'll pleasure. So you guys had a great event here van Los Angeles. Ben Rhodes is awesome. Ben Rhodes bat. Awesome menu. At similarly, some click some glamorous and celebrities Douglas longtime board member and big supporter of an Hato of nuclear weapons. Right. And Representative Lou great great. He was fabulous such honesty sober -freshing to see people. Just speaking the truth and saying it out and words, you're gonna understand to say, the least, and then we connect- Benedict. The publisher of the bulletin, atomic scientists another board member and nuclear weapons expert, great big believer in democracy in bringing democracy back to our nuclear weapons discussion who makes these decisions who decides good question. Lots of questions we're going to get into so, okay? What are the goals? Yes. Mean of beyond the bomb? What are you guys working on? It's a great and really broad question. Good. So I think at the end of the day, we are working to eliminate nuclear weapons worldwide. Right. But we're a little ways off from that. So we've got some intermediate steps. So right now, we are working on preventing nuclear war and decreasing nuclear tensions. But beyond that, we be on the bomb really like to focus on the fact that the nuclear system is impacting folks here in the United States day today, it's not just about this abstract idea of nuclear war. It's the down winters. It's the native Americans whose lands were seized and are still suffering the effects of radiation. It's the Marshall Islanders who don't have an unconscious te on the island, and so we really while looking to prevent nuclear war and raise the profile of this issue. Don't wanna forget about the people who have already been impacted important. So for those listening who may not follow this as closely as we do the arms control trajectory in the United States. Doesn't feel great right now. Trump's national security advisor John Bolton awful, mustache guy. He hit. Arms control agreements with a fiery passion as much as you guys hate nukes, arms control serial killer or bombs control agreement. Indeed, we'll kill again. And well, we just either intend to withdraw or about to

Los Angeles time magazine Ben Rhodes United States Marshall Islanders Lou John Bolton Jay Moore Joe Joanie partner Scott wolf wolf Yasmine Jasmine Douglas Trump Benedict Representative
"bulletin atomic scientists" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

WRIR.org 97.3FM

18:53 min | 3 years ago

"bulletin atomic scientists" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

"Kingston reefers director of disarm, but and threat reduction policy at the Arms Control Association, where his work focuses on nuclear disarmament, preventing nuclear terrorism missile defense and the defense budget. He was previously the director of nuclear non-proliferation at the center for arms control and non-proliferation and council for a livable world. And he writes, a monthly column for the bullet, atomic scientists working directly briefing Kingston reef, thanks so much for having me and Donald Trump unilaterally pulling out of the NFC intermediate nuclear forces treaty, which was signed I believe almost exactly thirty years ago by President Reagan and former Soviet leader Mikhail. Gorbachev has been very very sharply critical of this move on the part of Trump. What I find extraordinary batted as if there's a problem with. The Russians which what we are alleging over this Xander missile that they've developed by pulling out of the treaty. It doesn't do anything to bring Russia back into compliance with the treaty. You're exactly right in the decision to withdraw from the treaty as President Trump announced over the weekend that he planned to take would remove all constraints on production and fielding of the illegal missile under the treaty that Russia has developed and this would increase the threat to our allies. And Rangers those missiles decision to redraw also let's Russia off the hook for violation of the treaty and would leave the United States holding the bag for the tweets demise. And also create another source of division between us and our allies who are still chafing from the Trump administration's decision to withdraw earlier this year from the Iran nuclear deal. So other than. That how is the play. Mrs Lincoln, you might say there's really no upside to to withdraw from the treaty as you mentioned it won't put pressure on Russia to return to compliance. It's only downside. Well, I recall at the time when the treaty was being negotiated that it was a heavy lift because essentially the Russians the Soviets had the SS twenty short range missile, which is what we were trying to get rid of. But in retaliation. We were deploying the Pershing missile and the Christmas house both of which could reach Russia to the Pershing within eight minutes, and the Christmas hug the ground would come in undetected and the Russians position was well, you the Americans as a part of NATO you can strike us and destroy most of Russia most of targets, but since they won't be coming from the United States. States your nuclear arsenal is intact and you'll countries. Untouched. So on the surface from the Russian point of view. There was sitting amount of sense logic to that one. Yes. As you outlined. A key reason why the IMF treaty was agreed to in the late nineteen eighties was that there was concern on both sides that the deployment of intermediate range missiles by the United States and NATO on the one hand and Russia on other was particularly destabilizing because of the very short flight times of these missiles, they could reach Russian targets fired from NATO countries within a matter of minutes and likewise reach European targets fired from the Soviet Union within within a matter of minutes. So that was a obviously nuclear weapons pose a significant danger. No matter the the ranger of the weapons, but those intermediate range forces deployed in Europe or seemed to be particularly destabilizing and the removal and elimination of those systems. Has been a key pillar of stability in the euro Atlantic region for the past thirty plus thirty plus years. Well, my understanding is that the fear that the Russians had from the fact that the Persian could strike Moscow. And all they command centers within within eight minutes. You may recall at the time a light plane was flown in by German pilot little sister and landed in red square, which gave you an indication of how good the Soviet air defenses were that they instituted what they call the dead hand on their strategic nuclear forces that essentially of any kind of nuclear attack would happen. No matter where it came from an automatic dead hand would come into play and police the entire salvo of their thousands of nuclear missiles at mostly at American targets. Right. I do recall that and the Russians continue express concern to express concern that you. US missile defense launchers in Romania and soon in Poland could be used to launch offensive missiles, and perhaps even missiles armed with with nuclear warheads at Russia in a replay of the concerns that Russia articulated during the Cold War, and certainly the US withdrawal from US withdraw from the treaty would do nothing to reduce Russia's paranoia in that regard. If anything it will it will increase Russia's concern about such an attack, despite the fact that in my view, we are not going to put offensive systems in those missile defense launchers in in Romania and Poland, but but the Russians nonetheless remain concerned about that. In terms of the defense budget Trump is threatening to basically ramp up a program of bringing back intermediate Ray. Range missiles. Starting an arms race because he said this before we have an arms race will automatically win it. But you know, you can make the case that fact, isn't it that the defense budget as it stands today is higher than it was at the height of the Cold War when we had a real enemy and the idea of you're going to add more to that. When we already gotten thousands of nuclear weapons is extraordinarily. I mean, the fact that we went what are we go down from about sixty four thousand nuclear weapons to about fifteen thousand the idea that we would reverse that trajectory is just mind boggling. Yes, we agree as you just described the Trump administration in its nuclear posture review. I a document outlining US a nuclear pal policy, planning four structure and more recommended developing two new types of lower yield nuclear capable. Above and beyond the hundreds of low yield nuclear weapons that the United States already possesses designed to deter and counter Russia in addition to those two additional capabilities. The Trump administration also requested funds in fiscal year. Twenty nineteen about fifty million dollars to begin research and development on conventional intermediate range ground launch a missile systems designed in particular to counter Russia's violation of the IMF treaty and to attempt to build leverage to pressure Russia to return to compliance notice decision has been made on what form that new missile system would take. But if President Trump makes good on his threat to withdraw from the treaty. I would expect work on such a missile system to accelerate. So when President Trump says today. To reporters at the us would increase its nuclear arsenal until other nations. Quote, come to this census. What do you think the chances of that happening? Starkville record is that this is just a tit for tat process. And once you start escalating the other side escalates to. Right. I mean, Russia and China aren't going to come to the table. So long is as the US policy is to expand its nuclear capabilities and Sean diplomatic efforts designed to limit and rain in those capabilities in addition to stating that the United States will withdraw from night after the Trump administration has also not responded to repeated Russian offers to begin discussions to extend the twenty ten new strategic arms reduction treaty or no new start. And that agreement is the only agreement enforce that currently regulates the deployed strategic nuclear arsenals of the United States and Russia, and that treaty is slated to expire in twenty twenty one unless it is extended for five years as allowed by the treaty the treaty women. U S and Russian deployed strategic nuclear warheads to no more than fifteen hundred and fifty still an enormous number, but a significant reduction relative to where the two sides were during during the Cold War and indications are that national security adviser John Bolton who has been urging Trump to withdraw from. I n f is also also appears to be slow rolling and admitted in an internal administration review of whether to extend new start, and like I f Bolton has long been critical of the new start treaty as well. And if you start goes away, and it's not extended, and if President Trump doesn't need withdraw from treaty. There will be no I repeat no constraints legally binding constraints on the world's two largest nuclear arsenals for the first time since the early nineteen seventies. So in decades, which would greatly which would add to the tensions that. Already exist between the two countries and greatly increase the risk of renewed nuclear competition. Well, of course, Bolton is in Moscow as we speak he met with Lavrov, the foreign minister and Patricia Nikolai Patricia who's Putin's national security advisor Guba hawk. I mean rabid hawk these two Bolton and Patricia absolutely twins. But just in closing what we know. So far is that in an interview on Moscow Radio Echo Moscow? Bolton said that quote, I told our Russian colleagues that they're meddling in our election process had hardly had any effect. I just find that astounding that goes back to Helsinki where Trump standing next to Putin accepted Putin's version that he didn't meddle in the election says opposed to his own intelligence services. Now, they're doing it again. I mean, the message saying, well, they're not criticizing the Russians who holding them to account for meddling in out. Democracy. They're basically saying, well, you may have done it. But didn't have much of an effect. I just find that extraordinary. I mean, I know it's not related directly to what we're talking about. But the attitude just mind boggling. Yeah. It's not clear where we're Bolton is getting that. Because as I recall, the US intelligence community did not make a determination about what kind of impact the Russian attack had. Although my view is that it did have had a significant impact. But I mean to bring the conversation back to the IMF issue decision to withdraw the part of the United States as I suggested earlier plays into Russia's hands in my view it. Let's rush off the hook because it's Russia that has been violating the IMF treaty that violation is unacceptable and should result in a strong u s and NATO response. But the issue is how to what the smartest way about going about that is and we're trying from the treaty allows Russia to blame the United States for for ending the treaty and the United States will have much greater leverage to put pressure on Russia and attempt to convince. It to return to comply if the remains a party to the treaty as opposed to withdrawing from it. Thank you very much for joining us here today. Thanks so much for having me. And again, I've been speaking with Kingston reefers director for disarmament and threat reduction policy at the Arms Control Association, where he's worked focuses on nuclear disarmament preventing nuclear terrorism missile defense and the defense budget, and he was previously the director for nuclear non-proliferation at the center for arms, control and non-proliferation and council for a livable world. And he writes a monthly column for the bulletin, atomic scientists, we gotta take a brief station break. We're back speaking with not yet Telefoni Cova, the artist political activist and founding member of pussy riot. Welcome back. I'm Ian Masterson this background briefing. Available. Twenty four seven a background briefing dot org. And joining us now is dodger collocation Cova an artist political activist and founding member of pussy, right? She is the recipient of the Lennon Ono grant for peace, and is a code recipient of the Hannah Arendt prize for political thought in two thousand thirteen after nearly two years in prison for singing a song protesting Ladimir Putin in Moscow's mak- fedral, she opened the more go via office of Sona Pravda, a prisoners rights non governmental organization later, she started media Zona an independent new service. Now, partnered with the guardian, and she is the author of the new book just out read and riot a pussy riot guide to activism. Welcome to background briefing dodger Teleki Kabuga. Hello. And I'm happy to hear you all thank you for having me will thank you Nadia. And at this moment things have pretty bleak needless to say and the treaty. The it's called the IMF treaty that was to guess Eddie between Gorbachev and Ronald Reagan thirty years ago is now Donald Trump is sitting out tearing it up, and I used to work on control with the Soviets on the salt two treaty. And it's particularly dangerous situations for the Americans to give up on eight arms trading because it's we've never had in geopolitics before on the Russian side, the combination of national security and organized crime nuclear weapons and the mafia, and it seems that we are on our side behaving, very recklessly. Do you see us? Heading back into and you Cold War. I think on the problem that we never consciously got rid of the Cold War, Eric dying in the first place because in my mind when Kenyan so quickly collapsed. Everybody just took for granted this fences statement, that's is the end of Houston, and so right now and just relax and enjoy consumerism. But and so we kind of stopped our ideological work, and the questioning the very word of our political existence and avert existence as citizens of our countries, and this really important, political ideological work never was done. And it it never was done in in my country where we are lewd by. Metropolitan quiz, X KGB agent. Who twist coming directly from the USA Sar who never actually wanted to get rid on Soviet experience. I'm afraid that. A lot of American politicians. They're still trapped in this Cold War paradigm as well. And so until we will not. Think through all this experience until we will not try to invent something else will never be able to establish new new paradigm in relationships between our countries because you know, the black and white world really doesn't work, and it doesn't help us to establish communication. And that's why I think in the times when mainstream politicians that are failing to fulfill their duties to is this connection between our countries. It's specially important for us citizens and activists to. To reach out to each other to share experiences and find an actual human bed. Ground can connect us just pay less attention on the craziness that's going on in the mainstream politics Edison time trying to get back on the seats to us because we have to do something with this politics that can adjust Kennedy just let it. Well, the fate of the world depends on it. But there is ideological confusion here in the United States on the right wing..

Russia United States President Trump Trump administration IMF John Bolton Trump Arms Control Association Rangers NATO director President Reagan Kingston Donald Trump Moscow Kingston reef
"bulletin atomic scientists" Discussed on WHYR 96.9 FM

WHYR 96.9 FM

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"bulletin atomic scientists" Discussed on WHYR 96.9 FM

"Timing bomb during the manhattan project years that's correct and and articles were i think in the very first issue of the bulletin atomic scientists yet a piece and several others and that's still exists and and the spirit i think still exists the spirit of of reaching out to the public on these questions has not been completely crushed our okay let's talk about the mccarthy years and once again when the waters get troubled there's a tendency for professors to run like hell and and hide under the covers and here's einstein fine going right up against mccarthyism so tell us a little about that i think it may be that perhaps his greatest legacy to the future or as great as any i don't want to take away from any of his science the legacy of his ci but i'm not the first one to say this an einstein expert in in in boston john statue who's the head of the senator feinstein studies at boston university has said this that one of his greatest legacy certainly is his example of the courage that he demonstrated in standing up to the mccarthy committees and the other congressional investigating committees and urging people to refuse to answer questions this is a nineteen fifty three even if it meant going to jail and that it was the only way to defeat these committees and if enough people did it the committee's would be finished and mccarthyism would be punished and it was a call for civil disobedience at a time when it was it was the first one to do that really and and that was attacked for doing that even by the new york times and the washington post and yet he did it and it did have an impact on many people within within a year mccarthy was was on the rocks and i think he was censored the next year nineteen fifty four in any case einstein's call urging of witnesses to refuse to answer questions from these committees that made the front page of the new york times twice in one year in nineteen nineteen fifty three in june and in december and if it made the front pages of the new york times you can be sure it made the front page of newspapers around the world then as now and at a tremendous impact i think on the on the growing on this is sort of turning around the mccarthy.

boston university washington post mccarthy einstein the new york times manhattan boston senator feinstein one year