35 Burst results for "Buddhist"

Joe Biden Has a Young Person Problem

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:05 min | 2 weeks ago

Joe Biden Has a Young Person Problem

"Are repulsed by identity politics. And we should be. The politics of trying to put people in different categories based on their skin color is not something that we appreciate or something that we support. Now identity politics is rooted in the idea of trying to let's just say use a word that came in the 1990s, balkanize the American political, the American political landscape. However, there is one part of kind of segmenting of politics, if you will, or the country that I think is very helpful. And that is to look at things generationally. Instead of looking at things based on skin color, I think looking at political dynamics based on age is far more helpful. While I do believe there are differences between men and women, I do not believe there are differences between white people and black people. I don't. I do not believe in racial differences in people who do. We have words for them, racists like Nicole Hannah Jones, or like Robin D'angelo, or ibram X kendi. But I do believe that there's big differences in experiences and let's say things that people have to live through in generational dynamics. So typically, the younger the voter, the more Democrat and the more liberal they are. They tend to be more idealistic utopian, less rooted to the tragedy of life. And not all life is a tragedy, but life could be tough. The first Buddhist principle is life is suffering. I don't quite believe that to be perfectly honest. Life can be full of suffering, but it also can be beautiful and full of joy and love and prosperity. Generational dynamics for me are the most helpful and interesting to look at. And so when we look at Joe Biden's approval rating and we look at who actually is driving the decline of Joe Biden's approval, it's remarkable when we learn that it's younger voters in particular that disapprove of Joe Biden the most.

Nicole Hannah Jones Robin D'angelo Ibram X Kendi Joe Biden
Activist's self-immolation stirs questions on faith, protest

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 2 weeks ago

Activist's self-immolation stirs questions on faith, protest

"An an an an activist activist activist activist self self self self immolation immolation immolation immolation is is is is stirring stirring stirring stirring questions questions questions questions about about about about faith faith faith faith in in in in protest protest protest protest last last last last Friday Friday Friday Friday on on on on Earth Earth Earth Earth Day Day Day Day a a a a fifty fifty fifty fifty year year year year old old old old photographer photographer photographer photographer and and and and climate climate climate climate change change change change activists activists activists activists name name name name when when when when Bruce Bruce Bruce Bruce set set set set himself himself himself himself on on on on fire fire fire fire outside outside outside outside the the the the U. U. U. U. S. S. S. S. Supreme Supreme Supreme Supreme Court Court Court Court as as as as in in in in Buddhist Buddhist Buddhist Buddhist priest priest priest priest who who who who described described described described herself herself herself herself as as as as Bruce's Bruce's Bruce's Bruce's friend friend friend friend said said said said he he he he had had had had been been been been planning planning planning planning the the the the act act act act for for for for at at at at least least least least a a a a year year year year the the the the act act act act by by by by the the the the Colorado Colorado Colorado Colorado man man man man who who who who was was was was Buddhist Buddhist Buddhist Buddhist was was was was reminiscent reminiscent reminiscent reminiscent of of of of a a a a Vietnamese Vietnamese Vietnamese Vietnamese monks monks monks monks self self self self immolation immolation immolation immolation in in in in nineteen nineteen nineteen nineteen sixty sixty sixty sixty three three three three protesting protesting protesting protesting an an an an oppressive oppressive oppressive oppressive regime regime regime regime experts experts experts experts say say say say Buddhism Buddhism Buddhism Buddhism doesn't doesn't doesn't doesn't condone condone condone condone self self self self sacrifice sacrifice sacrifice sacrifice but but but but they they they they say say say say it's it's it's it's position position position position is is is is more more more more complex complex complex complex when when when when the the the the motivation motivation motivation motivation is is is is lofty lofty lofty lofty or or or or altruistic altruistic altruistic altruistic one one one one of of of of Bruce's Bruce's Bruce's Bruce's friends friends friends friends wrote wrote wrote wrote an an an an emotional emotional emotional emotional post post post post on on on on Twitter Twitter Twitter Twitter saying saying saying saying his his his his self self self self immolation immolation immolation immolation was was was was not not not not suicide suicide suicide suicide but but but but a a a a deeply deeply deeply deeply fearless fearless fearless fearless act act act act of of of of compassion compassion compassion compassion to to to to bring bring bring bring attention attention attention attention to to to to the the the the climate climate climate climate crisis crisis crisis crisis I'm I'm I'm I'm Walter Walter Walter Walter Ratliff Ratliff Ratliff Ratliff

Bruce Bruce Bruce Bruce Bruce Colorado U. U. U. U. S. S. S. S. Suprem Twitter Walter Walter Walter Walter Ra
Remember the Power of Prayer, God, and Christ's Love

Mike Gallagher Podcast

02:39 min | Last month

Remember the Power of Prayer, God, and Christ's Love

"It is Friday. April the 15th, 2022. It's good Friday, 2022, and normally we would either take the day off, or we would just stay in our regular format. Today, though, I was reminded of the importance and how crucial it is to remember our faith. The lean into our faith during difficult times. This is, of course, a time when we Christians should honor and recognize and appreciate the death and resurrection of our lord and savior. And, you know, I remembered that and I think it's important to acknowledge the tendency we have to turn away from our faith. And it's a mistake. It's a mistake we make. What a week we've had. With all the terrible news of inflation, the horrible mass shooting in Brooklyn, New York, the illegal immigration crisis, the work shortage in America, the worker shortage, went to a store the other day, big sign on the window, please bear with us. We are experiencing a worker shortage. Staff or no, they said staffing shortage. People are depressed. People feel challenged, people, there's a lot of anxiety, of course, there's a lot of focus on mental illness, which seems to be getting profoundly worse in the country and how could it not? Considering the challenges of COVID, what to do is it coming back? Are we going to have more mandates? There's just a lot. Is it just an awful lot? And yet, the antidote, the salve on the wound, the light at the end of the tunnel is right in front of us. It's our faith. It's our belief in something greater than this world. And so with that in mind, we dedicate today's episode of the Mike Gallagher show to our spiritual side and whether you're Christian or Jewish or Buddhist or Muslim or whatever, whatever you feel and believe and whatever your belief system leads you towards, I hope you remember the power of prayer, the power of God, the power of Christ's love.

Brooklyn New York America Mike Gallagher
Taliban Guards Once-Hated Buddhas as It Eyes Chinese Cash From Copper

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

03:00 min | Last month

Taliban Guards Once-Hated Buddhas as It Eyes Chinese Cash From Copper

"I want to talk about the Taliban and the statues of ancient buddhas that are in Afghanistan built many of them hundreds of years ago. And you might remember the episode going back now to when the Taliban first came to power, they hate these Buddha statues because to the Taliban, this is sort of heresy. This is not heresy, but this is the wrong path to the truth, if you will. The only path is Allah's path. And so these other religions are kind of violations of the truth. And so the Taliban mounts what can be accurately called a crusade against those. Buddha statues and they blew up a bunch of them in a part of the country. They said these are pagan idols. We don't want them in an Islamic State. And so bam, down they go and the world was a little outraged, not because the world is people around the world are partisans of Buddhism, per se, but these statues have a historical and a. Historical significance, as well as obviously a religious significance for Buddhists. So there was a sort of outrage against religious freedom, a kind of outrage against the idea that these are a preservation of the historical record, but the Taliban, of course, doesn't care about any of that historical record who reads history, and probably for them history begins in the 7th century anyway. Now, interestingly, the same controversy has been resurrected now because there are ancient Buddha statues carved into the cliffs of rural Afghanistan and they are looking over a kind of ravine. And hundreds of meters down, there is what is believed to be the world's largest deposit of copper copper. Now, in Taliban want to promote economic development in their country and I think ordinarily, they'd be really happy to blow up these Buddha statues, but they've realized that the Buddha statues are going to be of some value to any country that wants to come in and mine that copper for them. Now, a bunch of countries want to be in on this deal. Russia has said, we'll do it. We'll line the copper Iran has said, we'll do it. Turkey said, we'll do it with a country that wants to do it the most is China. China. And interestingly, although China is a communist society and although China is officially anti religious and they of course persecute Christians in China, the Chinese like the Buddha statues. Partly it could be because there was a history of Buddhism that made its way to the far east and all the way to China. It could be because the Chinese simply think that for historical reasons they would like to preserve these statues in any event, they have let the Taliban know that these statues are valuable and should not be desecrated or

Taliban Afghanistan China Russia Iran Turkey
Matt Palumbo: Why Is George Soros Speaking Against China?

The Dan Bongino Show

01:35 min | 2 months ago

Matt Palumbo: Why Is George Soros Speaking Against China?

"Now lately there's been a very strategic turn by Soros Soros has been writing I know you picked up on it I've seen your writing on it We obviously worked together He's been writing and attacking China and Chinese communist policies collectivism and that kind of thing which is kind of strange because the candidates George Soros tends to back the chase a Buddhist the left wing DAs here the Joe Biden far left types all practice the same type of kind of soft collectivism the Chinese Communist Party some hard collectivism is practicing right now What do you think is what's the motivation behind that What's he up to So I guess no pun intended you follow the money So you have to wonder you know the question I was asked is like why now of all times And you look into what G is doing So he for instance crackdown and Alibaba which is sort of like China's version of Amazon.com Well what do you know a very large chunk of Alibaba is owned by George Soros There was another company that went public a few months ago called didi which is sort of like China's version of Uber and Soros owned a very large chunk of that They cracked down on the company immediately after they went public I think it's down 90 or so percent What do you know Soros is upset about that because he's invested in it So all these I think it was maybe two or so other games that I say went to where it's not in Seoul China went after companies that Soros was personally invested in that he pretended to care So unless it affects him personally he's pretty much fine with it I don't see much of the Uighurs or anything like that So

Soros Soros Chinese Communist Party George Soros China Alibaba Joe Biden Amazon.Com Soros Seoul
We've Neglected Conversations of Virtue for Too Long

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:35 min | 2 months ago

We've Neglected Conversations of Virtue for Too Long

"Well, it's interesting because what you're talking about, what we're both talking about as men in the old days, people would say it's called being a man, right? Man up. Man, man. And certain things you go through, they would say that made a man out of you. Now obviously that works for women in a different way. But the concept is that that's what life is supposed to be like, right? You go through stuff, but you go through it the right way, and it makes you a better person. And if you don't, if you shrink from that trial or that suffering or do or make the wrong choice, if you just say, I can't suffer, I don't want to suffer. I'll do whatever. I'll do drugs. I will find a way to get pleasure because suffering, I don't want to suffer. You do it at the price of your soul. You don't become a better person. And I think what we have to do is we have to paint the picture for people that the whole goal of life is not to borrow from the Buddhists or the Hindus, but not the migration of your soul. But your character, becoming a better person, becoming wiser through suffering. I mean, the ancient Greeks talked about that. We don't really, we don't sing those songs very much in our culture anymore. There was a time when we talked about virtue. And we talked about doing the right thing, and we understood that as a culture. And I really do think since the 60s, that's kind of drifted away. So we're not at this weird inflection point because we've kind of neglected these conversations for some time.

Nancy Pelosi Instructs American Athletes Not to Speak out Against Communist China

Mark Levin

01:38 min | 3 months ago

Nancy Pelosi Instructs American Athletes Not to Speak out Against Communist China

"House speaker Nancy Pelosi has now quote instructed U.S. athletes all of them to not speak out against communist China's human rights abuses during the Winter Olympics because it might make China angry So who are you representing now You represent America You representing China Quote I would say to our athletes you are there to compete Pelosi said in a in part during testimony before the congressional executive commission on China Do not risk incurring the anger of the Chinese government because they are ruthless I know there's a temptation on the part of some to speak out while they are there I respect that but I also worry about what the Chinese government might do to their reputations to their families The commission's hearing on the eve of the opening ceremonies for the 2022 Winter Olympics in Beijing was organized as a platform for Pelosi and several activists to highlight China's human rights record including reports of forced labor and acts of genocide against ethnic communities in China as well as suppression of democratic protests in Hong Kong and religious repression Of Tibet's Buddhists Pelosi encouraged the athletes to quote be safe this is the Speaker of the House the United States of America You could argue the most powerful Democrat in Washington because she's in my opinion more powerful than Joe Biden just from a cognitive standpoint Telling American athletes shut

Chinese Government China House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Congressional Executive Commis Winter Olympics Pelosi United States Of America Beijing Tibet Hong Kong House Washington Joe Biden
Funeral held in Vietnam for influential monk Thich Nhat Hanh

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 3 months ago

Funeral held in Vietnam for influential monk Thich Nhat Hanh

"A a a a funeral funeral funeral funeral has has has has been been been been held held held held for for for for renowned renowned renowned renowned Buddhist Buddhist Buddhist Buddhist monk monk monk monk in in in in peace peace peace peace activist activist activist activist who who who who died died died died at at at at the the the the age age age age of of of of ninety ninety ninety ninety five five five five in in in in central central central central Vietnam Vietnam Vietnam Vietnam monks monks monks haunted haunted haunted empire empire empire is is is many many many Vietnamese Vietnamese Vietnamese lined lined lined the the the streets streets streets to to to show show show respect respect respect to to to teach teach teach me me me how how how to to to Han Han Han thousands thousands thousands of of of monks monks monks and and and disciples disciples disciples trailed trailed trailed a a a procession procession procession of of of pool pool pool there there there is is is carrying carrying carrying out out out tons tons tons coffin coffin coffin from from from where where where he he he spent spent spent his his his final final final days days days to to to the the the cremation cremation cremation sites sites sites others others others kneeled kneeled kneeled in in in class class class the the the hands hands hands in in in prayer prayer prayer on on on the the the right right right side side side and and and fell fell fell to to to the the the ground ground ground as as as the the the caustic caustic caustic when when when polished polished polished the the the populism populism populism monster monster monster was was was well well well known known known for for for his his his digestible digestible digestible Buddhist Buddhist Buddhist teachings teachings teachings on on on compassion compassion compassion and and and suffering suffering suffering during during during his his his lifetime lifetime lifetime dedicated dedicated dedicated to to to working working working for for for peace peace peace he he he lived lived lived in in in exile exile exile in in in southern southern southern France France France for for for most most most of of of his his his life life life off off off to to to being being being expelled expelled expelled from from from this this this country country country for for for campaigning campaigning campaigning against against against the the the Vietnam Vietnam Vietnam War War War he he he was was was any any any allowed allowed allowed back back back into into into the the the country country country in in in two two two thousand thousand thousand and and and five five five when when when the the the communist communist communist ruled ruled ruled government government government welcome welcome welcome to to to back back back in in in the the the first first first of of of several several several visits visits visits I'm I'm I'm Karen Karen Karen Thomas Thomas Thomas

Vietnam Monk Monk Monk Monk Han Han Han France Vietnam Vietnam Government Government Governme Karen Karen Karen Thomas Thoma
The Difference Between Buddhism and Christianity

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:41 min | 5 months ago

The Difference Between Buddhism and Christianity

"Difference between Buddhism and Christianity, right? So Buddhism believes that the highest level of Buddhism you don't talk. I've been to the bed right into the monasteries and they have these incredible debates where they're looking at each other, and they will clap with their hands, at each other, and yet they're not actually speaking. In Christianity. The two creation stories, God created heavens the earth and the beginning was the word the word was God the word was with God, right? Is logos, which is the word for speech. God spoken to exist. We are the speaking beans. At the highest levels of existence and earthly existence, we are being at a reasoning, speaking and communicating. And the highest level of existence in Buddhism, you shut up. It's a big difference. You turn yourself over to what exactly, you know? Yeah. Right. But also you're not obviously, you're not winning people over. You're not communicating. You're not reasoning. It's very sheltered, it's very, it's like retreating. I think there's a place for that. I think resting is obviously important, but the highest level of Buddhist philosophy is that you then assent to the highest level of Nirvana, right? Right. Through that, where we believe the total opposite and that's how you're breaking the cycle and you believe Jesus came to us. We believe Nirvana, whatever heaven, which we believe is a real place, has a nonstop ticket where Jesus said here you go, I paid the whole price for you. You don't have to go sit down and shut up and go to some hill and clap at each other and wear an orange robe. No offense anyone that might do that that listen to our show, you might be a nice person, whatever. The point is that it's totally different. Here's a ticket, free admission, go free, as it says in Johnny 38, the truth will set you free.

Nirvana Jesus Johnny
Kathie Lee Gifford Talks About Sharing Faith With Craig Ferguson, Kevin Costner, and Others

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:49 min | 5 months ago

Kathie Lee Gifford Talks About Sharing Faith With Craig Ferguson, Kevin Costner, and Others

"Okay, so you get a job on Days of Our Lives. So you are quote unquote a secular actor, but you're still very much walking with lord. Yeah. Yeah, very much so. And that's what sort of this book is about. All of the conversations that I have had through the years. Several of them I shared in my last book, which is called it's never too late. And when I was my literary agent here in New York, a person very different from myself. He's a man. Number one, he's a male. He's Asian. He's gay and he was raised a Buddhist. But he's a fantastic guy and I love him. And he told me that what he liked the most about the last book that we had all done together with the stories of like when I shared Jesus with Craig Ferguson on a set in a movie that I wrote for you. I want to talk to you about this kind of stuff. So we're going there folks. But yeah, so that's Kevin Costner or that tell that story in this one. And he said, Kathy, because you've had a different kind of life experience because of the world that you have made your living in. Right. But I was exactly where I was supposed to be. And as a result, every time I had an opportunity to share Jesus or a scripture or just anything any moment that the Holy Spirit would give me in my own spirit, I'd know say it, say it in love, say it intended to say it and humor. You know, say it in a way that will not speak gently and tenderly to people and make them laugh, too, if you can. And they will take notice. And I probably, and I thank Billie with all my heart for this, because he became a very dear friend. I have probably reached millions and millions and millions of people with the gospel. I'm not saying that like, yay, me, I'm saying, that's because I'm fulfilling my

Craig Ferguson Kevin Costner New York Kathy Billie
"buddhist" Discussed on The Philosopher's Zone

The Philosopher's Zone

05:17 min | 6 months ago

"buddhist" Discussed on The Philosopher's Zone

"Logic and teach us about life at everyday level? So in popular culture, I think Buddhism is sometimes understood to be anti intellectual. But I don't think that's right. Making sense of the word is an important aspect of being a Buddhist from the very beginning. So the emphasis meditation which seems to suggest that we should get rid of our fault. And in some respect that's right too. But the Buddha pointed out a long time ago, our program is to do with the mistakes we make in making sense of the world. He thought that we are all doing it wrong, and not that it is wrong to understand and have thought about the world. So it is important that we get our cognition straight. It just that we should get our cognition in line with our experience. And that's what I take to be the main lessons of Buddhism. And in the way that I talked about Buddhist logic, this emphasis on experience is an important lesson. The way you make sense of the world should be the result of your own work based on your own experience. I think that's an important lesson for our everyday lives. But to me, the lesson of taking Buddhist approach to logic doesn't reside not only in what Buddhist traditions say, but the fact that it is actually a traditional philosophy that I wasn't educated in. I was a student in Australia, which meant that I was thought what we might call straight western logic and western philosophy. So Buddhist logic was an eye opener for me. And it took me a long time to work out what was going on and it took me even longer to work out what I could do with that. But the whole experience has been really rewarding. And I can recommend to all philosophers or anyone really to learn at least one tradition of phosphate that they are not educated in or not familiar with. Because doing that gives you resources that can expand your philosophy toolkit and enrich your conceptual landscape. Now, outside of philosophy, this ability to move across different traditions of thought is also important one. Just to give you a sense of this about the year ago in the middle of this pandemic, I was invited to collaborate with the action group on intrinsic value in Antarctica. Yes, you had me right. This is a group that Lisa international project on the protection of Antarctica under the sponsorship of the scientific community, committee on Antarctic research, which is a thematic organization of the international science council. Now, this group is working to protect Antarctica, whose environmental health is rapidly deteriorating. But the necessary infrastructure development for scientific programs, as well as tourism and exploitation. The reason why this is really one to me is that under the national treaty called the moderate protocol, the environment of Antarctica is protected by recognizing the intrinsic value of Antarctica. This identifies the main challenge facing the protection of Antarctica to be that development of the concept of intrinsic value. That is relatable by all the nationalities and cultures operating in Antarctica. Because the hub to all sign this measured protocol. This involves engaging with various nationalities and cultures and understand their history in relation to intrinsic value. If you think about that, this is called culture philosophy in action. Things like this show that skills to be sensitive to a concept in its proper context, while being able to cross the floor to put it in close curator dialog, are sold variable in our daily lives. I would say that's an important lesson to this approach to losing countries about our everyday lives. Koji, thanks so much for joining me to talk about Buddhist logic. You're most welcome. And Koji Tanaka is senior lecturer in philosophy at the Australian national university in Canberra. He was speaking there with Sam baron. Check the website for more info, we are the philosopher's zone and you can find us via the Aryan website. You can also follow us via the ABC listen app or your preferred podcast portal. Next week on the program, a conversation about the philosophy of psychedelic experience. I'm David Rutledge, I hope you can join me for that one and in the meantime, you can hit me up on Twitter at David P zone..

Antarctica committee on Antarctic researc international science council Australia Lisa Koji Tanaka Sam baron Koji Australian national university Canberra David Rutledge ABC Twitter
"buddhist" Discussed on The Philosopher's Zone

The Philosopher's Zone

08:24 min | 6 months ago

"buddhist" Discussed on The Philosopher's Zone

"So in a practical sense, as a scholar, what's involved in taking a Buddhist approach to logic? I think what is important in taking Buddhist approach is that I have to argue against most, if not all of my colleagues. And I guess I'm used to this since I have the habit of disagreeing with any orthodoxy, regardless of the topic. Anyway, more seriously, I have two aims in taking a Buddhist approach to logic. Why is to challenge the current orthodoxy about logic as I have been saying, I'm happy to talk about this more if you're interested. But another aim I have in taking a Buddhist approach to logic is to change the direction of philosophy profession. So in recent years, the lack of diversification in philosophy has been publicly discussed in many places. The problem that I'm particularly concerned with is the lack of representation. The Asian philosophical tradition in philosophy departments globally. I think it is disproportionate to the amount of activities in Asia as well as the labor of interest and interactions with Asian philosophies and characters among our students differently, but also I think among professional philosophers as well. Now, as I see, the problem of diversification is not just the lack of diversification as such. But I think there is a problem with the way that the lack of diversification is probably the least. It just so easy to attribute the problem to racism and time and time again. People are pointing out that each institutional racism within the philosophy profession. Now, I don't deny that there is such institutional racism in your profession. And I'm very sure that the bus philosophers have skipped this episode because they have absolutely no interest in hearing about basic logic. But also, it is clear that when you ask philosophers, who they take to be canonical, they usually pick white guys. And if you say, as David Hume once said, or as David Lewis argued, that often carries some white, whereas if I said, as damaged prime, or if I cite the argument given by someone whose name you can not even pronounce, that would hardly carry any weight. So I certainly don't disagree that there is institutional racism that has passed along over generations. But to identify it as the only problem or even as the main problem is not quite right. I think the problem goes both ways. And that's because I think Buddhist philosophy just hasn't been presented in a way that is digestible for logicians and philosophers. In Buddhist studies, a typical approach to Buddhist philosophy is philological and not philosophical. That means that the dominant form of claim to be debated is such and such a thing are set or meant this or that. But if that's what this colors are debating about, it is irrelevant to asking questions like, is logic about cognition or can we make sense of logic as being able to expand our knowledge? So in order to engage with contemporary logicians and philosophers, we can not just regard state or even just to analyze the text. I do think that we have to take note that text. But the idea is to table and engage with the contemporary relationship philosophers based on those ideas. That because what we have to be able to do is show what we can do with those ideas in our own context. Rather than just to present that here the ideas. You have to be able to demonstrate what you can do with those ideas. And I don't think we'll discuss have been able to do this. So part of what I do by taking with this approach to those seriously, is to bring this idea to the table and show them where the importance of those ideas in contemporary debates. By doing this, I hope to contribute to changing the direction of philosophy profession. Okay, so we've been talking so far about what is logic is and the way it relates to logic in the formal sense that we have in philosophy. I want to zoom out a little bit now. Just think about what a sludge can abroad a context. So what is the connection between Buddhist logic and Buddhism as a way of life? Well, that's a good question, actually. I guess Buddhism is a bus tradition, and I don't even want to pretend that I can comment on Buddhism as such generally. But I do know that debates are very important for intellectuals in India where some originated. Now, it is said, though, I don't know whether this is what actually happens that if you lose a debate or public debate, you'd be obliged to change your interaction as well as religious affiliation. So the best play that key role for India interactions as I understand it. And you can still see a bit of this in the courtyard of a Tibetan monastery, where debates are practiced. Now, Buddhist logic was developed in this backdrop, it was developed to serve as a reliable method to show that Buddhists are right, of course. And everyone else was wrong. What else can not be? Buddhist logic was taking up very seriously. So despite what the contemporary Scottish sometimes say, some of these locations were the biggest names in tar. So Buddhist logic was considered to be a big thing for Buddhism. Now, to think about your question from my own modern perspective, I'm actually doing this on the spot. So I'm not sure what I would say is coherent. But anyway, Buddhism's identified two kinds of inference. Why is called inference for oneself? And this is inference that we perform for oneself to acquire knowledge. Another is called inference for others. And it is essentially a statement of inference rather inference itself. So inference for others is an inference in the form of a statement that you present to others so that they can go through the inference by themselves. Even though the emphasis in the contemporary literature is on inference for others, but it's logic and themselves think that inference for one's surface primary, at least thinks that. And that's because unless you activate your inference in a cognition to expand your knowledge, strictly speaking, you are not making an inference. You might be having another thought, but not inference. So now coming back to your question, one connection between Buddhist logic and Buddhism as a way of life has to do with the experience, I think. From the beginning of Buddhism until the latest developmental Buddhism in Asia, that's generally Japanese Buddhism. Data strong emphasis on experience. If you read the early compositions or what are considered to be the words of the Buddha, you will see that he often tells his disciples to go and see things for themselves. And the Japanese Buddhist door gan tells you to reflect on what you see when you meditate. But his logic was positively developed to refute a number with this Indian idea does some texts are so authoritative that you don't even need any proof beyond the worst content in the text. The thought was that, unless you make an inference by yourself, you wouldn't come to know anything. So if you want to expand your epistemic landscape, you can not just hold up a text as if that does everything for you. You have to do the work by yourself and make it your own. And this emphasis on experience is the impossible and Buddhist visionary. And I guess that's how I connect tattoo. Okay, so I just want to bring us to a close now by thinking about the relationship between what we've been talking about in terms of logic and everyday life, because at some times, thought that there's a connection between Buddhism and everyday life. So what is it that Buddhist approaches to.

David Lewis David Hume Tibetan monastery Asia India
"buddhist" Discussed on The Philosopher's Zone

The Philosopher's Zone

13:20 min | 6 months ago

"buddhist" Discussed on The Philosopher's Zone

"European philosophical bubble can forget that formal logic of this kind is not the only game in town. This week, we're talking about Buddhist logic, where the point of logic is not just to make us argue correctly, but also to help us expand our knowledge about the world. Koji Tanaka is senior lecturer in the school of philosophy at the Australian national university in Canberra, and he's speaking with Sam Barron. We're talking logic today we're talking Buddhist logic, and what I'd like to do to begin with is just get a sense of what logic is for philosophers because it's a little bit different to the way that people ordinarily think about logic. So can you start by just telling me a little bit about what logic is? What logic is, I think is a controversial issue. So I don't think I can give an answer that can satisfy everyone. But what I'm going to say is basically what I tell my students as they first encounter logic at university, and this is the kind of thing that I tell them in my very first lecture. So what I tell my students is something like this. When you decided to study logic or maybe philosophy, you might have made the announcement at family dinner because that's what to be a big thing, that you are now studying logical philosophy. And unless your family is enlightened enough, in which case, obviously, they must have immediately understood why. That's a great idea. They must have asked you why. Why is it a good idea to study at the university? Your family might have accepted whatever the reason you give them, because they usually love you. But some of the reasons make it true that it is a good idea to study logic at the university. So logic as is understood in philosophy is about those reasons. The reasons that make whatever the point you are making true. When you make an announcement at dinner table or you have a brilliant idea and your family starts asking you why. You want to convince them that you know what you are talking about. And one way to do that is to provide reasons. And logic is concerned with the reasons that support a truce of the point you're making. So just to introduce a bit of terminology here, the reasons you give are called a premises, and the statement or IV that you want to prove to be true based on the reasons is called a conclusion. Then, logic is concerned with the relationship between the premises and the conclusion, in particular, the relational that preserved truth as you move from the premises to the conclusion, meaning that if the premises are true, then the conclusion must also be true. And logic is interesting this relationship that preserves from premises to the conclusion. The reasoning that has this property is said to be valid. So that's another terminology. By studying logic, you can come to see which reasons are good ones because they make your idea true, and which ones are not, because they may not make your idea true. And which reasoning is varied and which one invalid. So that's more or less what logic is about. At least, in the way that it is understood in philosophy. And so you've talked about taking a Buddhist approach to logic in your work. What does that exactly mean? And why is taking a Buddhist approach to logic important to you? I think taking a Buddhist approach to logic means different things to different people. So I just going to say what this means to me. So to me, it is to take seriously the Buddhist philosophical tradition called promenade vada. Now, this is a school which is sometimes called the Buddhist school of logical epistemology. Now, I think it's true that this tradition is probably the least known philosophy tradition within Buddhism. If you are coming to Buddhism academic array, but historically, this is a tradition that has been most influential within Buddhist philosophy. At least in India where Buddhism originated. Now, given that background, what this means to take this traditional seriously, at least to me, is to make a conceptual shift. So as I said before, logic is concerned with the relationship between the conclusion, which is the claim you want to make. And the premises, which are the reasons you give for the conclusion, in particular, it is concerned with a relationship that preserves a truth from the premises to the conclusion. Now, this relationship is usually understood to be formal, at least in the so called the west. So logic is predominantly understood to be formal in contemporary west. But this is where conceptual shift comes in. Because a Buddhist approach to logic becomes important when we focus not on the logical rules or print posts as such. But on the cognition that are involved in inferring a conclusion from the premises. Or if you start focusing on the cognition that if you instantiate those logical rules or principles, then you start appreciating the importance of taking a Buddhist approach to logic. So just to articulate a bit more on this, according to the former conception logic, which is the dominant form in the contemporary west, logical relations that preserves from the premise to the conclusion in some sense, obstructed from inferential cognitions. Or I suppose, another way of putting a point is that logic is not about our thoughts themselves, but the relations between them, even though those reasons are not relations between cognitive states. And if people like that, you must start thinking that hang on, what are we talking about? When we are talking about a lot of reasons, what are we talking about when we are talking about truth preserving erections? But the problem is not only about the nature of what's called relations, because if we understand logic according to the former conception, it is not clear how you can improve your inferential practice by losar means, because logic is not about what is involved in fighting on conclusion from the premises. Because it is not about cognitions. In contrast, taking a Buddhist approach to logic is to think of logic in terms of influential cognition. There are various components to this. Firstly, Buddhist logic signs are not talking about anything abstract. When they talk about lots of validity, they are talking about certain influential recognitions. So there is no interest in anything I was struck or anything mysterious. When we talk about Buddhist approach to logic. Second, logic or I guess for them, lots of information cognition can give us new information. So if inference is buried, it's provide new information. Now the third point of consciousness number three, according to the former conception, what inference counts are valid is a matter of truth preservation. So long as the conclusion is true, when the premises are true, the inference counts as bad. But again, that's not the case for Buddhism. For them, the conclusion must arise because of the premises or to put it in cognitive term, the cognition that expresses the conclusion must arise because of the cognition that expresses the premises. Basically, a way of putting this is that conclusion, somehow has to grow out of the premises. Now you asked me a kind of important question about why this is important. And again, I guess why this is important is different for different people. But to me, this is important because I have grown suspicious of contemporary orthodoxy. So presumably, I take it resistant want to say that biological reasoning we can learn something new. But it is not clear how the formal conception can allow rosic to be a means of acquiring new knowledge. Think of it like this. If strictly speaking, logic is not involved in our infrastructure activity, we can not say that logic is what can generate our knowledge. If so, what's the point of studying logic? And that was precisely the reason that I was pressed on when I first started studying Buddhist logic. So I started studying Buddhist logic at the Tibetan university in India. And in the very first meeting, I met my teacher, the teacher that I studied under. And he asked me to explain what I was talking about. When I talked about logics, just to get a sense of what I was getting at by studying Buddhist logic. I basically articulated the formal conception lots since that all I knew about logic at that time. And his response was, well, what's the point of a studying loss? If that's what it is, and I didn't have a good response at that time. And I had come to think that he was right to ask that question so that was the best lesson I have ever had about Buddhist logic actually. And that was even before I learned anything about Buddhist losses from him. So that's why I think taking up this approach to is quite important. So just to put this kind of provocatively, is the idea almost that there's a kind of failure of formal conceptions of logic or logic as it's usually used in philosophy to do what may be logicians or logic has been put forward to do. So you might think that logic is put forward to give us a sense of how reasoning works or how we gain knowledge. But in fact, because it's so abstract and so formal, there's a sense in which you can't really get anything out of the formal systems that people use in philosophy that you don't really put in from the beginning. And that seems to be a way in which we're not really getting any new knowledge out of logic. But what you're saying is that this sort of Buddhist approach brings logic down to earth in some sense by returning it to these kinds of cognitive foundations, the kind of foundations in knowledge and foundations in information production. Is that the idea? I think that's exactly right. So I think as many scholars have pointed out, Buddhist logic is developed within the context of epistemology. So the concern is always, how do we acquire knowledge? And deducing that logic is an important part of acquiring knowledge. And I think that's the aspect that seems to be lacking from the way that logic is usually understood in contemporary west. So I think when we start thinking about what exactly does law school reasoning does and if you try to understand that in a way that people use your understood logic, which is to think of logic to be rather abstract, it's not really about anything and so on. I think you start losing a grip of how something like logical reasoning can be useful can expand our epistemic landscape, so to speak. So yes, I think you got the contrast exactly why. And so I'm just curious as to why it might be that logic in the west has this kind of character. Is it because what happens when philosophers produce these logical systems is they produce a set of rules that really focus on the form or structure of what you say rather than the content? Is it because we have kind of abstracted away all of the information that we've then lost the capacity to generate information or connect up to epistemology? Is that what's going on? Yes, I think that's right. So just to think in terms of the way that the manual can understood logic. And I don't know what exactly happened historically. But I think it's a useful way of understanding how this formal logic came about. So the way that he understand logic is that logic is a structure which is generally applicable to our cognition. By that, he's not talking about cognitions of this or cognition of that. So if I'm looking at my laptop, I have a certain group in the state, but this cognitive state is about this laptop. Now, does not think that logic is about that. But logic is about cognition generally. But that means that it's now we are talking about something which is not about the cognition that I'm having right now, but somehow we have to think of cognitions as such. And then you start understanding the relationship between those cognitions, even though these cognitions are not about anything. So I think what Buddhist logicians are trying to get at is that when we are in a certain situation in everyday life, we have certain cognitions, but these cognitions are about something and the thought is that unless something like logic is about those cognitions, it's better hard to understand what it's got to do with our fault or activities. You're listening to the philosopher's zone this week, Sam.

Koji Tanaka Sam Barron Buddhist school of logical epi school of philosophy Australian national university Canberra rosic Tibetan university India Sam
Enjoying Life Through Our Inevitable Mortality With Journalist Suleika Jaouad

10% Happier with Dan Harris

02:45 min | 8 months ago

Enjoying Life Through Our Inevitable Mortality With Journalist Suleika Jaouad

"We are as the buddhist master pama trojan has said. We are all programmed for denial. There's something about the human condition that doesn't quite let us take in our mortality. I- often compare it to like trying to get one of my cats to look in the mirror. You just do it. You know or trying to put two magnets together. They won't quite touch. And i don't you know i don't quite know why it is and there are lots of practices in buddhism and the catholic tradition memento mori. Were you carry around like a stone in your pocket and touch it to remind yourself you're going to die and so one can get better at this but it requires a lot of work. Have you now that you are out of that situation. We should talk about how that situation resolved your health your health trails but do you find yourself forgetting once in a while that Before death it's all life. Yeah i forget. All the time i have moments like this morning where i knew we were gonna have this conversation and having a bad hair day and i rushed took a shower and then i felt totally ridiculous because a couple years ago i had no hair and so to be worried about a bad hair day. Especially on a podcast. Is you know a level of absurdity. That i'm fully aware of but i also think that there's there's good reason for why we we can't have that heightened awareness of our mortality if we were all live every day as if it were last we'd go bankrupt and probably make terrible decisions in the world but likely implode and so. I've come to delight in those moments of forgetfulness Because they feel like a real marker of of progress in and healing from me the flip side of that is that you know when i wake up in the morning all often remind myself of when i was at my sickest and might energy was so limited that i could do about three things every day. I could answer an email. I could watch a movie. I could see a friend. But i really had only enough energy to do three things three simple things and now when i go into my day i use as a kind of song exercise for myself of if i could only do three things today. What are the things that would feel most important most rewarding most

Pama Trojan
How We Can Bring More Play to Our Lives, and Why It's Worth Doing

This Humean Life with The Philosophical Coach

02:43 min | 8 months ago

How We Can Bring More Play to Our Lives, and Why It's Worth Doing

"Is this philosophical movement that it's like okay. Well if you can survive on like just water and you don't need anything then you can be happier or what around the cats. That doesn't sound like vaughn. At all that that was not my and i looked into like the the buddhist virtual of like. Oh maybe i need to get centered. And i do love mindfulness and meditation and stuff but i figured that that just gets me back to zero right that if i've been stressing myself the heck out trying to optimize my life and every possible way. If a couple times a day i get back to the center and get back to zero. That's great that's really helpful. Helps me kind of recenter and and think about things that are important. But that's not enough either. Getting getting back to zero is not really the goal of where i wanna do. I wanna follow like joy and passion. Play and i wanna like remember what it feels like to be a kid and be that geeked up about stuff that you're like me and i can't wait to get out of bed today and i. I kinda found that no amount of pushing is going to make that happen. You can't force fun. You can't plan and strategize and optimized and schedule play in a way that that's interesting and so i just sort of got to the place rose like i need to give all this up and then i found the play philosophy All kinds of cool people but I just read a ton of books over the last year around Play and enjoyment and enjoy and that really seems to resume of me with somebody who had a really fun playful childhood. I remember riding our bikes out with my brother and our two friends and just spending from sunup to sundown goofing around and playing and having fun or doing wiffle ball or Soccer or Anything whatever this word of mouth was trying to learn how to juggle or ride a unicycle or or something really loving the majority of my life right and when i ran out of something to do we came up with something else. If we got tired we rested and if we were hungry than we found something to eat and we didn't try to schedule those things tried to to live at his and that to me that philosophy made. Yeah i think for me. There's an element of spontaneity. Which you know if you if you try to plan everything in your calendar you know a blank space then you get lost in overwhelm of trying to get it all done right as if you're ever gonna get it all done with just allusion that we've sold ourselves and then you get to feel the guilt and the shame when you're done bad press. I didn't get it all done right. Okay where can you step back. I'm gonna create some. I'm gonna play it both ways. I need to have space for play free.

Vaughn Soccer
Use Your Expectations as a Tool

Developer Tea

01:49 min | 9 months ago

Use Your Expectations as a Tool

"Are the source of suffering. This is according to The buddhist tradition. And whether you believe that that's true whether you follow a buddhist practice or not is not really the point instead. It is to look at this idea of expectation to inspect the concept of expectation. And see what we can pull from it as it turns out. I'll modify what. I believe about expectation for this show. That is an expectation is a useful tool that can be abused and it can be kind of a painful painful tool. If it's abused. So what do i mean by tool when we have expectations when we set expectations when we develop some kind of future thinking or or future can have predicting outcome. We can both set what we believe could happen. We can also kind of set an expectation. For what will happen and then we can test it with. This sounds familiar then. Hopefully hopefully this familiar. Actually hopefully you recognize it. As a hypothesis. An expectation in many ways is simply a hypothesis. What do we think will happen.

A Spiritual Hoax: The Third Eye

Ghost Town

02:21 min | 9 months ago

A Spiritual Hoax: The Third Eye

"Book. The third i by tuesday lobsang rumba was published in nineteen fifty six it was his autobiographical account of growing up in tibet and studying tibetan buddhism very popular book tuesday lobsang rumba was not tuesday. Lobsang rumba oh it was cyril henry hoskins not a tibetan buddhist monk was a plumber from england and i really became a little bit obsessed because it was essentially a hoax but despite it being a hoax and people knowing that it's a hoax and i'm using the word hoax were maybe called something else It really doesn't stop the book from being sold. It doesn't stop it from being a book that people enjoy. Yeah it's just such an interesting cultural thing when it comes to. Especially westerners getting into buddhism Not a ton of avenues especially in the mid nineteen fifties. I mean it's not like a ton of avenues. in general. I guess i mean compared to. Maybe you know. Christianity your urging them. This book has done some good. I guess it's this story of this guy who decided essentially that that's who he was. Yeah he was this tibetan monk and people seem to be like. Hey this is how. I got into buddhism and in nineteen fifty-six what are you comparing it to exactly now you have people that are scholars of tibetan buddhism. That would read it and be like this is Something's off and it's not accurate and it doesn't sound like someone who is actually who they say they are. So it's a very kind of interesting thing like who's really harmed nobody But it's very interesting. How westerners are like a. I love buddhism. It's so great and where they're getting the information from somebody that some plumber that i think it's a thing where maybe he really did think that who he really

Lobsang Rumba Cyril Henry Hoskins Tibet England
Using the Buddhist Concept of Vedana to Improve Your Relationships

10% Happier with Dan Harris

02:13 min | 9 months ago

Using the Buddhist Concept of Vedana to Improve Your Relationships

"Pick up on the fourth of the pillars there which is sort of using this as an opportunity to practice improving our relationships. Does that bring us to this notion of feeling tones or vaden us exactly exactly because i think we can nearly get a bit tweeted in relationship to perceive the other and often to him. The other is this person. Give me plays feeling tool. Or is this person giving me feeling toward always person giving me neutral philly and then thinking that the tonality in the other person because we have the impression that into all the person who gives it to me. And that's why i begin very interested in mindfulness of feeling torn. Because what is it. mindfulness Feeling tour vandana the e. n. a in the ancient language actually referred to the Upon contact through the senses the simplest example is actually kara. Like war paper if we look around us is green blue red n. If we see green than give us a certain personality if we see raid another two ninety if we see creamy give us another to ninety and so what is interesting. Is that colors. As far as i know as not done anything to you. Green has now jumped at you read. That's not kind of giving you a nice present. But why is it that we see green red or cream or yellow and suddenly op. We feel something so vidana for nineties. When can you contract immediately. You of this is very important is to see that the tonality is conditioned by the perception.

Vaden Kara Vidana Green
A Guided Tour of the Four Jhanas, With Kenneth Folk

Buddhist Geeks

01:54 min | 9 months ago

A Guided Tour of the Four Jhanas, With Kenneth Folk

"Now. The first thing. I always wanted to do when i start. A concentration practice is recognized that i'm not yet meditating because of the last thing i want to do is say it's time time myself into a ball into a not which is not conducive to. I'm trying to so what i do. Go to move. I feel what's going on. And i noticed a one of the things that's going on this. I'm distracted selden at all which is fine now mind. But i don't want to lie about it so i fidget a look around cy. Oh jeez meditate. Now in at this point already. I'm starting to feel a little bit. Reigned in in other words to feel like the attention is coalescing little bit because after all i'm trying to find out what's going on and that's that's bringing me Calming me down a feeling. What's going on am i monitoring. I'm asking over and over again. What's my experience feeling. It and if i were to put a label on this kind of experience of having right now pre concentration i could say this is Melted make something up. Call this pre jonah. Jonah flavor and recognize the flavor because it's a particular combination of sensations

Selden Jonah
So What's Being Spent in the Infrastructure Bill?

Mark Levin

01:58 min | 9 months ago

So What's Being Spent in the Infrastructure Bill?

"Abide Administration's infrastructure plan called for $20 billion, a variety of activist groups already demanding more Politicians often accurately cite crumbling roads and bridges to justify infrastructure spending. But in this case, crumbling roads and bridges would be the goal. Giving his largest share of new spending a mass transit and intercity rail as it does for highways, even though transit and rail account for a minuscule share of national travel. Because they're radical Cook base demands an equal amount of funding. For highways as it does for mass transit. The Senate bill spends $55 billion on local water systems. Which in many cases when mean bailing out city governments that neglected one of their core duties. Creates dozens of programs where Buddha says in transportation Department bureaucrats get to decide how to distribute over 100 billion worth of infrastructure grants. And Buddhist has his emphasis. He will prioritize the radical goals related to race and equity in such decisions. The most insidious of all is when the federal government elbows its way into the private sector. The Senate bill does so in two key areas energy and broadband Internet he combined 138 billion will go toward a variety of subsidies mandates government operated enterprise competing with private providers. N gorging the federal of I Athan. It's not just a problem for limited government conservatives, reducing the power of state and local governments turns federal elections into winter to winner take all competitions. Unbelievable. What kind of a Republican will vote for this?

Abide Administration Transportation Department Senate Cook Buddha Federal Government
Dr. Kristen Neff on the Interplay Between Personal Work and Collective Work in Meditation

The Mindful Minute

01:36 min | 10 months ago

Dr. Kristen Neff on the Interplay Between Personal Work and Collective Work in Meditation

"One of the things i noticed in this book was the interplay between personal work and collective work and i think that sometimes that gets lost within just meditation practice. It seem so solitary. You're doing it for the most part in your house by yourself on your own cushion for yourself except that it's not actually for yourself and so how does that interplay show up three. Oh yeah we'll so you know if you come from a perspective that in for me it does come from a buddhist perspective. But it isn't be buddhist if he come from a perspective where you see yourself as a larger interdependent all right then this idea that what we do only if excess or the you know we just turn inward and not outward or we outward tonight inward none of that makes sense right when you when you change your mindset so that you realize for all part of a larger hold then of course you know we. We work with their cells due date set for after work dacian of suffering of others of our planet. We also understand. We have the wisdom to know that what we cultivate inside impacts people outside and vice versa. I that wisdom of inter connection is really key to self compassion or compassion for others. In fact this is what differentiates compassion from assessors. Pity feeling sorry for with is not the understanding of common humanity interconnection and which is essential for compassion

"buddhist" Discussed on Buddhist Society of Western Australia

Buddhist Society of Western Australia

04:16 min | 10 months ago

"buddhist" Discussed on Buddhist Society of Western Australia

"De noah and escape. Niece arianna venable serrano. Who was here. that's where he gets his name from. He escaped back to sri lanka. So the gratification is what is sweet about it. What is the pleasure. Why do we fall for those states. Even though we might think they are pleasant they have something which grabs us. And if we don't understand why we're getting drawn into them again in the game then. We can't learn how to let them go next step. We see the danger so we realize there is a problem. There is a terminal station. We don't wanna get too. There are drawbacks. And then the most important one at the end but at the end once we've done the first steps is the escape the way out the antidote and the cure and basically again. That's the positive mind states that talked about last time. They are the ones that will really pull us out of this mess. Good so as a last little thing to hopefully have it practical for you for your day to day life. I want to take one example and example. Ease anger that. I guess most of us do kind of experience from time to time and i want to go through with you the gratification the danger and escape and i'm hoping that we can actually do that together as group so open it up and will wait for you answers. I do have a few answers here. Myself that i'll offer at the end but to also get you activated a little bit so and also to give you the opportunity to practice so you can practice that in your day to day life later to deal with those unwholesome line states so relating to anger the gratification. What feels good about the anger. What does it promise us. And why do we fall for anger. Any ideas yes correct. Yes i'll just repeat. Everyone hears it so we get a sense of feeling in control when we are angry. Correct what else. Yes sense of release place. Yes yes you mobilize energy. that's correct. Feels good anything else. With anger or hatred. Well yeah i mean. We're just taking anger as an example. But what what feels good about it. Yes you're intending to do that. And it might feel good. Yes in german. We have this word shod and void and it means you're basically happy if someone else's unhappy we don't encouraged at and also this is just to see why it is pleasant. Why we fall for it. But i'm not encouraging you to get angry okay. Don't get me wrong here right. So i think we've covered most of them so i have. We are brave and ready to act so it feels like we are is warrior and we're going to save the world or we're gonna have fight for the good or whatever it is. We are very focused. And we're very goal oriented so what happens it a very narrow mind state and it really narrows dan on this bloody one person north situation that done everything wrong or whatever so it can feel good it can draw us in. We feel right and justified to act and to get really heated outbound heated up about this. That's righteous kind of anger that arises we feel in control. Yes we feel powerful and we feel superior we look for someone or we look for something to blame.

Niece arianna venable serrano sri lanka dan
"buddhist" Discussed on Buddhist Society of Western Australia

Buddhist Society of Western Australia

02:18 min | 10 months ago

"buddhist" Discussed on Buddhist Society of Western Australia

"Stepping back and gaining perspective again with people who struggle with suicide and there was another wonderful story was a manager. Lady i can't remember who were at a bridge or somewhere and once they had enough time to look around they actually saw person passing in a car and just smiling at them or waving them. And that's what kind of gave them perspective again. So very often as i said before it's tiny little things that can have this big effect but we have to create the conditions so that that can actually happen. So that's the three things there but what is really required is wisdom is this a har- moment and east this very clear distinct understanding to let go of these things all together. They will rewrite in the in the future. You will get caught up gain. That's okay that's just the human condition that's what happens but if we can develop more wisdom more understanding then we can get out of these states. Wendy do arise and that's the next three steps. Oh oh yeah. I have another suitor there. Okay relating to unwholesome mind states from tourney kaya three hundred three yes. That's the next three steps explained by buddha's buddha because it occurred to me. The pleasure enjoyed arises independence on the world. This is the gratification in the world that the world is impermanent suffering and subject to change. This is the danger in the world. The removal and abandonment of desire and last for the world. This is the escape from the world. So that's the next three points. I want to have a look into so we have gratification which is called a sod danger de noah and escape. Niece arianna venable serrano. Who was here. that's where he gets his name from. He escaped back to sri lanka. So the gratification is what is sweet about it. What is the pleasure. Why.

Wendy Niece arianna venable serrano sri lanka
"buddhist" Discussed on Buddhist Society of Western Australia

Buddhist Society of Western Australia

03:16 min | 10 months ago

"buddhist" Discussed on Buddhist Society of Western Australia

"If we don't have wisdom. We need a few more steps to develop that wisdom that carmen that wisdom to do that so we have a few questions we can ask ourselves so this is the fuel this is to fire. This is the origin here so we can ask ourselves how are unwholesome mine states created. What actually feels them. What feeds them. And what triggers them and then we get the abrogate in to fight the fires and the question is what diminishes those mind to the mind states. What makes them fade away. And what makes them also actually vanish and disappear altogether that they won't arise anymore in the future. Let's look at this a bit more in detail. The fueling process the people who were here for the an peaceful meditation day. Yesterday they will remember this. So psychologists have wonderful kind of concept of priming trigger and then overreaction so very often happens as we get exposed to certain things and the stress levels they start to load plaque on that on the picture. Here this lady's stress level. They're loading loading loading loading and piling up and what very often happens. Once we get stressed we start to worry. We don't sleep enough. We don't exercise. We don't eat properly. We don't meet our friends we reach out. And that's the vicious cycle. I was kinda describing last year starts to operate. And if we can't break that eight piles up and up and up and up and up so that is depriving and then all that needs to happen. Is something small like this little little fly. that is too noisy. Forty nine on this picture here so we have to realize why things make us angry why we explode with anger or with pushing away. Or what why. We implode with depression with getting down on ourselves with withdrawing with having addictive mind states that we get drawn into. That is all an over reaction. What is happening is actually not that bad but the triggers. Sorry not the trigger. They're priming the fuel that has been put there. That's what makes it so huge. So if you think about the fires again as an example here and you know you have to fuel load in the forests and we try to clear dad. We applied to to burning outside of the fire season for example so the fuel is this piling up wood and then all that has to happen is one lightning strike. If a lightning strike happens by itself it falls somewhere where there's no fuel happens..

carmen depression
"buddhist" Discussed on Buddhist Society of Western Australia

Buddhist Society of Western Australia

02:54 min | 10 months ago

"buddhist" Discussed on Buddhist Society of Western Australia

"Even if you get stuck with one or two three of your limbs you still have one left to pull yourself out with positive mind states. So that's why we can't overemphasize those ones. And so the monkey trapped at five points just lies there screeching he had met with tragedy and disaster and the hunter can do what he wants with him. So that's what very often happens as well with those desires that we might have with addiction that we might have it kind of feels pleasant. We're like are you know just a little bit of this a little bit of that it will be fine and then we get stuck more and more and after while we realized that we are not in control of this anymore that we have actually become the slave of our own cravings and modern days. Maybe that's happening a bit more like that. Then monkey who is who is stuck to the tar. They're here we can kind of go and say like all right. you know. it's very sticky and the monkey are poor monkey. Give him a break. He just got stuck there and it's really hard to get out of this. This is not from the suitors but there is monkey traps that i don't know if they're still used in asia but the monkey traps functioned like this. You take something really nice something sweet and you put it either in coconut or you put it in an entire termite mound or here. It's put in a glass but now it's put in gloss which has a narrow opening so the monkey can see what's in there is tempted. But what is what is in there. He puts in his hand but one the hand is in and he grabs. Whatever is inside. He can't get the hand out and so even though he's not stuck he is actually stuck mentally and toews monkeys that the hunters usually they just hide behind a tree and wade before the monkey goes and grabs it and tries. Get it out and get it out and get it out. And he's so focused so infatuated with what is inside that jar that he can't let go that he can't think so even though there might be the monkey telling him a all you have to do is let go. It's easy he. He's not able to do that. So i found a nice quote from sharon salzberg here all of these difficult feelings. Problematic states are a problem because if we are lost in them we get so separated from how things actually are. We are imprisoned by the force of the very feeling. I have learned that. Sharon actually had a serious health issue problem last weekend. I didn't know that when. I was putting this altogether..

asia sharon salzberg wade Sharon
"buddhist" Discussed on Buddhist Society of Western Australia

Buddhist Society of Western Australia

05:17 min | 10 months ago

"buddhist" Discussed on Buddhist Society of Western Australia

"We're gonna yes have a look at the more kind of messy mind states and how to deal with those so i was trying to find a catchy title so i settled for buddhist mind state management. I've used that in the past. But actually i know you know. Management is a bit of kind of modern term. I think when i was doing my slides i had management management management everywhere as like. Wow this is not a business kind of thing. We're doing here. So i settled for relating to mind states Which is actually. I think much more appropriate anyway. So i was here. Roughly a year ago. I think on the eighteenth february and this is basically a sequel to talk that i've given in the past. I started covering the four great efforts and last time we looked at the positive mind states at the wholesome line states in how we can invite them in our mind how we can grow them and how we can encourage them and that is really the groundwork that needs to be done and i also feel. It's it's much more worthwhile to focus on the positive mind states because they were very very naturally make sure that the unwholesome blondes are avoided. So i do encourage you to have a look at that talk. It's called a virtuous cycle vicious cycle on youtube. So you kind of have the groundwork so now we're more looking at patching up a problem. That has arisen already or making sure we don't fall into it so that means we learn how to let be and we learn how to let go so that will be the topic of today and i will be spending quite a bit of time defining the problem so please bear with me there because these requires quite a lot of wisdom and wisdom can't be developed that easily so we have to have an understanding of what we're dealing with because we can't get let go of things we don't understand that they're even there so i'm basically also just following what the buddha has been doing in his teachings. He usually defines the problem. And then gives you the solution. So what are unwholesome habits. I've taken quite a few things from the ceuta's here. I'll be just also saying where they're from because sometimes day take these talks and just put to audios on the kind of what is it pot or whatever. It's called over in western australia. So people have access to that. So this is from mudgee. Mudgee money kaya seventy eight from the someone on monday car ceuta and it goes as follows number one. These are unwholesome habits number. Two unwholesome habits originate from this number. Three unwholesome habits cease without remainder here and number four one practicing in this way is practicing the way to the cessation of unwholesome habits. If you look at that do you recognize some kind of pattern. That is familiar. Hopefully no he is correct. Yes so the buddha often uses am this kind of framework not just for the four noble truth so for the four noble truths. Of course we first define what suffering is then. We find origin of suffering. Then we find how we can go. How can make sure that it ceases without remainder and then we have the eightfold path which is leading to the cessation of suffering. So he's using the same framework to talk about unwholesome habits. So what are unwholesome habits. They are unwholesome. Bodily actions on wholesome verbal actions and bad livelihood so d.'s are called on wholesome habits. You might notice studying buddhism. We have the three doors that we talk bad. We have the bodily actions. We have the verbal actions and we also have the mental actions. You might be wondering. Where's the mind. And instead we have bad bad livelihood there this is basically what flows out into the world. The mind is kind of inside and very often or actually always it goes through the mind or first and then flows out through the doors at all two. So that's that's where to unwholesome habits exhibit themselves and what do these unwholesome habits originate from now coming to the mind. Their origin is stated they should be said to be a to originate from mind. What mind though mind is multiple varied and of different aspects. There is mind affected by lost by hate and by delusion unwholesome habits originate from this..

mudgee youtube western australia
"buddhist" Discussed on Buddhist Society of Western Australia

Buddhist Society of Western Australia

02:18 min | 11 months ago

"buddhist" Discussed on Buddhist Society of Western Australia

"It'd be <Speech_Male> a little bit depressed. <Speech_Male> even depressed. <Speech_Male> People and <Speech_Male> meditation <Speech_Male> is still <Speech_Male> very good if you have depression <Speech_Male> but <Speech_Male> you're not really going to feel <Speech_Male> that energy in the mind <Speech_Male> right. Depression <Speech_Male> is the opposite <Speech_Male> of energy <Speech_Male> is a flatness of <Speech_Male> the mind where you don't really <Speech_Male> have anything <Speech_Male> and they kind of go <Speech_Male> inside of <Speech_Male> you her <Speech_Male> so if it is <Speech_Male> that you <Speech_Male> haven't got <Speech_Male> enough purity <Speech_Male> then what you <Speech_Male> need to do and everybody <Speech_Male> needs to do this. Any <Speech_Male> way is <Speech_Male> to purify the foundation <Speech_Male> steps <Speech_Male> of the of the <Speech_Male> buddhist path. <Speech_Male> Be more kind. <Speech_Male> Be more <Speech_Male> and avoid <Speech_Male> the bad things. <Speech_Male> Get out of <Speech_Male> those bad habits talking <Speech_Male> mattress before <Speech_Male> right. They <Speech_Male> do those random <Speech_Male> act of kindness. That <Speech_Male> are so powerful in life <Speech_Male> to random <Speech_Male> strangers <Speech_Male> place. <Speech_Male> Sometimes it's <Speech_Male> powerful to be kind <Speech_Male> to a stranger <Speech_Male> because with a stranger <Speech_Male> you have no vested interest. <Speech_Male> You don't <Speech_Male> expect anything in return <Speech_Male> from a stranger <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> right. <Speech_Male> If you're kind to <Speech_Male> family member or <Speech_Male> friend you might expect <Speech_Male> something in return <Speech_Male> but if it is a complete <Speech_Male> stranger <Speech_Male> is very <Speech_Male> pure act <Speech_Male> of kindness. <Speech_Male> Because we don't expect <Speech_Male> anything back <Speech_Male> to do all these <Speech_Male> things and <Speech_Male> then that will also <Speech_Male> help to energize <Speech_Male> the mind and <Speech_Male> then when <Speech_Male> you sit down invitation <Speech_Male> hopefully <Speech_Male> you will feel that <Speech_Male> energy inside <Speech_Male> of you and all kind <Speech_Male> of comes together <SpeakerChange> very <Speech_Male> nicely invade beautifully <Speech_Male> here. <Silence> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> Okay <Speech_Male> so those <Speech_Male> are the <Speech_Male> questions for <Speech_Male> tonight. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Anybody else <Speech_Male> wants to say anything <Speech_Male> last chance to <Speech_Male> to talk <Speech_Male> talk good. <Speech_Male> So let's pay respect to <Speech_Male> the bottom <SpeakerChange> asanga <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Male> <Music> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Music> <Music> somboon <Speech_Music_Male> the <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> time. <Speech_Music_Male> Bob <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Silence> <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Music> come <Music> to <Music> <Music> a <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Music> among <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> me <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> the <Speech_Music_Male> noah <Music> <Music> to <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> go. <Speech_Male>

tonight buddhist
"buddhist" Discussed on Buddhist Geeks

Buddhist Geeks

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"buddhist" Discussed on Buddhist Geeks

"Are kind of taking the lead there and and i don't know if we'd be. We are now without that without some of that sort of hyper entrepreneurial but she smoked people like you unless view who actually had have a vision for that actualized Data's being really important And then you know. There's the consciousness side which which i think is more buddhist geeks is operating in were were probably dovetails And and to me. I go back again to ken wilburs work. I think one of the main missing models that we have right now to understand. The complexity of our current moment is human development is adult human development like that everyone is does not have the same set of capacities or capabilities in terms of their meaning making in terms of their emotional intelligence in terms of their social intelligence in terms of their. You know all these different forms of intelligence. That unions have which are not always at the same place. People are unevenly developed And we're and we change based on our mood. It's not like these things are static either but But i think the conversation about development needs to occur because so many of the problems are facing People at different fundamentally different stages of development talking past each other like i think a lot of the culture war in the polarization is people just like with fundamentally different understandings of the world who cannot see eye to eye or can recognize that. They're not seeing eye-to-eye and so To me what wilbur. Point to with with the whole notion of.

ken wilburs one main buddhist wilbur
"buddhist" Discussed on Buddhist Geeks

Buddhist Geeks

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"buddhist" Discussed on Buddhist Geeks

"Nevada. But that to happen. I care like your i you care. I know a lot here. And it's got we got to figure out how to translate that hearing into action and That's i think that's what we're doing together on the internet. Trying to figure that out and poorly. At times i think on twitter. It's very challenging off. And i don't think that it's the fault of ourselves. I think it's it's also the way these platforms built it's again the dharma of organization of structure platforms like we need to bring these wisdom into technology we build More than anything because they they enemy everything that we do into the systems that we are vetted in two cultures. We swim in and Yeah i down for the challenge. I know you are how everyone listening. It's me too. I obviously no one has a full picture to this because we haven't cracked this yet but You talked about how like the different things that you're offering through. Buddhist geeks are are sort of a part of the solution but not not the whole solution. brian what. What else do you see that you can. You do currently know about as being part of that solution. Obviously some of it's unknown and mysterious and emergent than to be determined but What what else do you see. Kind of outside of the field of dharma as being a part of us fumbling our way in that direction. Yeah i mean again from a limited perspective like of not seeing the whole picture and and having plenty of blind spots. I i'm very. I'm very familiar with the tech space. So i see what's happening right now. The transition from fossil fuel to renewable energy infrastructure. This seems really important. And i see companies again in the for profit space like tesla who.

brian twitter two cultures Nevada tesla Buddhist
"buddhist" Discussed on Blue Lotus Buddhist Temple Podcast

Blue Lotus Buddhist Temple Podcast

06:18 min | 1 year ago

"buddhist" Discussed on Blue Lotus Buddhist Temple Podcast

"Happens. Their grip on us relaxants naming a steady and relaxed mental noting or naming the emotions of the moment chore anger happiness boredom contentment desire and the like encourages us to save present with what is central in our experience. Naming is a powerful way to keep us from identifying with strong emotions. There are many ways that we are caught by emotions. We can feel justified in them. Condemn them feel ashamed of them or enthralled within naming helps us step outside of the densification to a more neutral point of observation observation. It's like this. That's our neutral point to be able to say it's like this folktales tail of the dragon. Losing its power when it is named likewise emotions can lose their power over us when they are named acceptance in mindfulness. We simply allow emotions to be present. Whatever they may be. This does not mean conditioning or justifying feelings. Formal meditation practice offers us. The extraordinary experience opportunity the extraordinary opportunity to practice. Unconditional acceptance of our emotions. This does not mean expressing emotion but letting emotions move through us without inhibitions resistance or encouragement to facilitate acceptance. We can try to see that. The emotion has arisen because certain conditions have come together for example if you had a flat tire on the way to work and your boss gave you a new assignment with a tight deadline. After you finally arrived you might feel frustrated or angry if your boss gave you that same silent on a morning after you've had a good night's sleep and heard about and heard some great news about your stock options. You might feel excited or challenged if we can see emotions as a rising promo particulars from a particular conditions. We can more easily accept them and not take them personally and investigation. This entails dropping any fixed ideas we have about unemotional and looking at it afresh emotions or composite events made up of bodily sensations thoughts feelings. Motivations and attitudes investigation is not abstract analysis instead. It is more of a sensory awareness exercise. We feel our way into the present moment. Experience of the emotions particularly useful is a practice of investigating the bodily sensations of an emotion the correlation between emotions and their physical manifestation manifestation is so strong that when we resist or suppress our emotions. We often do the same with sensations in parts of our bodies waking up to her body through. Mindfulness practice also allows us to wake up to our capacity to feel emotions if we left the body. Be the container for the emotion. We can more easily disentangle from the thoughts around the emotion the stories analysis or attempts to fix the situation and simply rest with the present moment experience. Mindfulness of emotions helps us to come to a place where we don't react vitually to our inner urges and emotions. That place is a good foundation from which to look carefully at situations and make wise decisions. The point of buddhist meditation is not to become emotionally neutral through it. We can open up to our full capacity to feel emotions and be sensitive to the world around us and yet not be overwhelmed by what we feel could so mindfulness of emotions and the next the next one will be mindfulness of thoughts of we can keep going to keep going but i think i think this is one of the most important things we need to be really clear about. Emotions are not a bad thing in the buddhist teachings we we don't own the emotions so we don't have to with every emotion that we consider negative we don't have to take ownership of it but we see it. We need to be aware of it. We need to be able to see clearly. And that's what happens as we begin to sit and be able to be with the stillness and tranquility some of the emotions that we've wanted to suppress well Arise and we can look at them from that more balanced place and not have to be afraid of them. Were not expressing them. Were were seeing them. Excuse me.

one buddhist
"buddhist" Discussed on Harvard Classics

Harvard Classics

05:39 min | 1 year ago

"buddhist" Discussed on Harvard Classics

"The devoted wife translated from the dhammapada and from buddha hostess comment while eagerly man calls. Life's flowers with all his faculties intent of pleasure. Still in satiate. Death comes and overpower him. Why legally man calls lives flowers. This doctrinal instruction was given by the teacher. While dwelling it savvy and it was concerning a woman called husband on her. The affair began in heaven of the suite of the thirty three. They say that. A god of that heaven named garland. Where're went to his pleasure grounds in company with a thousand celestial nymphs. Five hundred of these goddesses ascended trees and threw down flowers while five hundred picked up the flowers that were thrown down and dicta god there with one of these goddesses while on the ballot a tree fell from that existence her body vanishing the flame of a lamb then she was conceived in a high caste family of savvy and was born with a reminiscence of her previous existences and saying to herself. I am the wife of the god garland. Where're she made offerings of perfumes garlands. And the like with the prayer that in her next rebirth shot again. Be with her husband. And when at the age of sixteen years she married into another family with ticket food and four nightly food she continued to give arms saying. May this prove efficacious in bringing about my rebirth with my husband. Thereupon the prese gave her the name of husband honor for they said she works early and late and her only desire as for her husband husband. Honor continually took care of the hall. Where the priests set. She brought forward the drinking water and spread out the mets to sit on and when other people were desirous of giving ticket food and other arms they would bring it to her and say dear lady. Prepare this for the congregation of the priests and by going to and fro in this manner she acquired the fifty six salutary qualities. All at one time then she conceived and at the end of ten lunar month she brought forth a son and when he was old enough to walk another until she had four sons one day after she had given and offerings and had listened to the doctrine and kept the precepts. She died toward nightfall from sudden disease and was reborn into the presence of her husband. The other goddesses had continued to deck the god throughout the whole interval. Not seen you since morning said the god. Where have you been. I fell from this existence. My lord are you in earnest. It was precisely so my lord. Where were you born at spot. The in a family of high caste. How long were.

five hundred Five hundred thirty three sixteen years fifty six salutary qualities four sons a thousand celestial nymphs four nightly food one time one of these goddesses one day after forth a son ten lunar these goddesses
"buddhist" Discussed on Harvard Classics

Harvard Classics

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"buddhist" Discussed on Harvard Classics

"Buddhist writings. The Middle Doctrine translated from the Psalm Utah Meka. The world for the most part. Okay. Econo- hold either to a belief in being or to a belief in non being. But for one who in the light of the highest knowledge Oh. Kekana considers how the world arises belief in the non being of the world passes away and for one who in the light of the highest knowledge. Okay. Kekana considers how the world ceases belief in the being of the world passes away the World Okay Khanna. Is for the most part bound up in a seeking attachment and proclivity for the.

Kekana
"buddhist" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

06:04 min | 1 year ago

"buddhist" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Thank you for making time for this. . Really excited to talk to you. . I really. . WanNa. . Hear your story because I've read a little bit about it and it's fascinating. . Can you tell me how you first encountered Buddhism? ? Yes the first time I encountered Buddhism is in nineteen ninety. . Lift to Uganda in nineteen ninety as <unk> students. . Still mean for not fair Housing Need Gun Die Scholarship to study. . INDIANA. . Headed the government of India through in Yemen, , extent culture program is going to pay for me to study in India. . Business. . That was excited. . I didn't know anything about Buddhism, , but the only thing that is connected to bosoms what Gautama because we studied history about Indian personalities like Mahatma, , Gandhi, , end Gautama Ferretti that good Mohsini Buddha. . So good time. . I have ever happy faintly and my story. . So when I went to India I. . did not that even the religion could Buddhism philosopher David so I just went to study business and until nineteen and arrived. . I'm because when I arrived India, , they had this strike. . And then <hes> we we didn't go to school. . We did started this school immediately. . So then our putting a hostile where there are some people who looked very slim doing and. . They have shaved head the they are putting on robes or rose. . To say hello to them. So . I went there then I sit hot one and the ad it beaming smile had. . Happy so we became friends and in A. . Long Story Short, , the me into the temple I should dig would ask you then they told me about Buddhism there that Buddhists and the they told me don't take Dina just delighted breakfast. . Assault then they are the ones who really told me that yes, , this region called Buddhism and it took me to the temple for the first time and the temples. . Good. . Assure the hand. . I should be behalf either in Chattanooga and that's when I I really got to know that a temple. . So that's how I know about what is him but That Buddhist people edited and those most just wanted to be friends with me. . I wanted to be with him and Cindy. . GimMe Food they give me a minute things slowly slowly they stop telling me about. . What they believe in. . On time I went to <hes>. . Brahma, , cameras, , we just the boost people, , but is meant tradition. . The told me that debilitate Bra Mars. . And I had seen one I was quite or the time in the evening Tony Oh I asked him you. . Calm and peaceful way. . Have you good evening? ? He told me he goes to meditate or. . Meditation then I went there admitted with Matas and then they have discovered this that you focus on lucrative. . And then you really meditated breathing in and breathe out but his commentary, , right so <unk> your story piece food. . Your Com nobody can destroy you. . So when I finished that a mid station, , I went to the monks again I told them that that'd be meditating this. . Who told you to meditate thought that some of the WHO's Viacom common peaceful and told way can meditated. . Then I told him what I've been doing the told me no, , no, , no. . No you should meditate weapon go deep meditation, , and now doesn't fuss time to get to know what meditation you good. . Mom told me the best meditation <unk>. . Vision. . So then I to know mutation literal. . So from Buddhism. . The most yeah. . About Communication Gorby. . I know you were raised Catholic. . So, here , you are in a completely different country encountering this religion for the first time a religion you didn't even know existed what about Buddhism and Meditation spoke to you given your history why was it so appealing this practice send this faith. . Actually for me into the. . Lack. . of Meditation when I went to Meditates it was no Malini evening and then I was so stressed out in India, , it's hot country I was eating hot foods and I was looking for Chatchai filled to see. . Every time I went to look for because I was McCaffery those no jet unfunded when I go to the judge, , this was in Hindi, , a language that I don't understand. . So now we're not going to judge there I was going. . To check. . So that. . Good. . That back. . Then I believe like that. . So now every time I go to check ECHINACEA the English obvious or gotTa salaries so which is my language I was just going to judge People just talking a foreign language and literally I said. . This people have also religion could Hindus I to do what they believe in and then slowly by slowly when I went to. . The fuss medication do not even a Buddhist one I did a Hindu meditation. . So I sat. . And mid I feel so much. . More peaceful than me. . When I was in chat, , you know in chat sometime of silk can now is it new? ? Don they're going to pray things? ? So but that's a short time in a judge acquitted my bring. . But when I was in meditation, , I told really give any and. . When I came out, , it was so peaceful and relied rest of amongst the win admitted. . So peaceful.

India David Ugandan Buddhist Center Dina Gautama Ferretti Ponte Buddharakkita Cindy Africa Chattanooga Thailand West Virginia A. Long Story Short Uganda WanNa Dermot INDIANA ricky Mohsini Buddha Assault Mahatma
"buddhist" Discussed on 5 Minute Dharma

5 Minute Dharma

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"buddhist" Discussed on 5 Minute Dharma

"The Buddhist said. . In the Middle Length Discourse One oh three. . The vegetables agree on the meaning but disagree on the phrasing. . But the venerable should know that this is how such agreement on the meaning disagreement on the phrasing come to be. . But the phrasing is a minor matter. . Please don't get into a fight about something. . So minor. . So this is talking about. . Sharing the Dharma. . On the original language that the Buddhist disciples were sharing it and they were disagreeing about the phrasing. . In other words they understood and agreed upon the meaning of the Dharma but they're having problems with the exact words to use to express it. . And the Buddha don't get hung up on the phrasing. . And this applies. . Directly to. . Translating. . When you're translating the the Ceuta's from the original Pali to. . Modern English wore things you can do is get hung up on phase phrasing. . And phrasing simply means the way that it's put into English the words that are used. . And this is a problem because you can get really hung up on this if you. . Have done translating I did translate in Bible College my background was in Greek and. . Biblical. . Translation. . And I did <hes>. . I've actually translated the gospel of John a couple of times and <hes> I the saloons. . And some parts of <hes> Matthew. . And I think if America did mark too but I can't remember at hand and the beginning of of Luke. . And one of the things that I realized. . Is. . That originally the less you know the more you think a literal translation is the correct way to go. . <hes> problem with a literal translation is that the people the the people who are reading the literal translation aren't getting the message they're not getting the original message. . So which you have to do is come up with a dynamic equivalence so that you understand the message in in this case poly. . And then you translate that message from Pali into English. . And that's hard to do to to use the right words and to convey things because you can get hung up on the correspondence between the words and not understand the correspondence between the connotations. . For an example, , I just just reading a translation from <hes> I B Horner. . <hes> in the Vanilla where she was translating that the Buddha was pacing back and forth worth the word pacing has the connotation of be nervous like you're nervous in your pacing back and forth. . And a better translation would be walking back and forth because that's walking meditation is what the Buddha was doing. . He wasn't pacing he's completely elaborated individual he wouldn't be pacing. . and. So . the word the connotation pacey means going back and forth. . But the connotation has the idea that you're stressed and to bring that across when you're translating is actually much more difficult than people realize and this is what makes translation so difficult. .

Buddha Horner. Bible College America John
"buddhist" Discussed on Buddhist Society of Western Australia

Buddhist Society of Western Australia

05:12 min | 2 years ago

"buddhist" Discussed on Buddhist Society of Western Australia

"Allow the body to relax in a very deep and profound cents and to do that again this to have the positive attitude is so important so just remind yourself how wonderful it is to have this beautiful Buddhist Center homeless the Sacred Space of peace and tranquility place you can kind of withdraw from the world and be with good friends and just have a good time enjoy yourself. What a wonderful thing is how rare. How difficult it is to find this in the world. Wow and as you enjoy that you find relax even more and the mind becomes more peaceful and.

Buddhist Center