4 Burst results for "Buchan Nalia"

"buchan nalia" Discussed on Midnight Double Feature - A Film Podcast

Midnight Double Feature - A Film Podcast

16:11 min | 7 months ago

"buchan nalia" Discussed on Midnight Double Feature - A Film Podcast

"But it's not a musical right but I mean this this sequence here especially feels like a musical where the primary characters unlike in his own world and like the outside world is just kind of indifferent to what they're doing like you know what I mean like. You know if if you if you watch law land not technically musical but still musical. They kind of like dancing and singing and shit like that whereas the outside world is like what the fuck as guys doing they don't even they're not really registering what's going on in my life that bend out his name. Is Bob Baby? He spots Deborah for the first time. But he's too late to catch up with her. And we meet Kevin Spacey's dock here at the post last post I spray F- Great-aunt what babies deal is whether he's retarded. The dog says he's a good kid and the devil behind the wheel Love this line. There's all White Dude. Also just quickly with DOC. He says there's nothing wrong with little quiet and it. Kinda like look into that. You realize that Duck Ambassador. Kind of polar opposites right. Wait SAGAN DOC DOC says here. There's nothing wrong with a little quiet right whereas baby always needs constant constant noise to be uh even even though he's not externally loud. It's again turn. There's always yeah totally. There's always something and one of her lines. Here's all right. You conscious being crime not without banging little criminal like that. That might be a tagline for Pasta right. Well it does that an eighties retro poster. That could be a tackle and under what I like. You know it. It's kind of when you're following like any kind of story writing rescreen writing. It's very you know what that ten minutes into. The movie theme is stated. You CAN'T BE CRIMINAL. You can't do crime yodel criminal and that's it. Would you look at what he's wearing? He's got that jacket that's white and black and white and black because he somewhere in the middle and it's the movie goes on at the end You know his shirt is kind of like you know damn. It's a grey short to show that he's kind of in the middle of like both of these worlds. I really dig it It's it's it's it's really interesting does president. He's a mostly white clean clothing. Yes exactly get off the wide if fines always bug me. Because I'm totally all wireless now with some just lectured does decide many wise everywhere out of that. That's the main thing I know you're right. I have these Jaber a wireless Bluetooth ones. That have no water. You just put one in each one. Yeah basically and so now that it's The chords on here. I do think about like it's like spider webs. You're like yeah we'll do it anytime like when we record. I always do everything like hard light light by computers being charged as I have my headphones play like I might as well I now I might as well be like on a nineteen thirties. Crank phone just took the shot in the elevator. We see all the all five characters in spaces just kind of like staring down the barrel of the camera like he's got God that deadlock in his eyes. He's too old for this shit. Dude bear in Thal scoping on Darlene. Let me get. Hey I if you Jackson stops Wolverine I WANNA be Wolverine Dulling. Buddy make plans buddy says the gun of Buchan. Nalia which calls comes up lighter and buddy gives Baby some advice telling him not to pick up the next time dot calls. This is interesting. Considering how much of a chaotic person body ends up being right like he's giving him like some fatherly advice. Yeah it it actually. It made me WanNa see. John Hammond like punisher short film as I do like. He's he's nice and he's like. Hey you know. What are you listening to later on? He's kind of cool but then like he. I'm not saying his leasing. His reasons are legitimate. But it's like when you take Jamie Foxx who is like that's his image that he portrays like you're not nearly as crazy assisted. It's the quiet guy you gotta worry about the people. The people who talk talk talk talk talk. They can't do the walk walk. Walk Walk Walk. And it's those are the guys who end up getting shot or punched in the face and they fucking like. What did you do John? Barrels Paul's type and dude. I will fucking cut your organs out alphabetically like that of that for him. Warn you exactly and I just looked at him as a damn he would have been a great punisher especially with that haircut as again. That would have been dude short short little story my my mom president of the company that I you know I guess currently working for whatever He was in a predators game and he was just talking to the next to him. This is a couple months ago. You know this is one of the last predators games that went on and he was like. Oh Hey you know and it was like Saint Louis or somebody was playing the natural predators here in Nashville and he said he got to talk to him and he stopped and he was like. Are you Jon Hamm? And he was like yeah. I'm Jon Hamm. He's like Oh my God and he took like three or four pictures for I had no idea like I just I kind of looked at it for a second and I'm sure enough. He showed me the pictures. He's like. Yes I was like dude I gotta get Don Draper drink man. Let me get a fucking limit a couple of scotches over here. And he's like we didn't talk about Shit. We didn't talk about madman. We talk about any of that show. We just talked about hockey and music and shit as a man that is awesome. He said he's really Nice Guy. That's awesome I can. I can say you can say. I'm being an Oscar. I can say him like all sides of blending in like you know you wouldn't be able to pick him up from a crowd if just implying glides and I guess like a baseball hat some Shit Right. Yeah deadly we find out that duck and baby of some kind of understanding. Ab has one more job in this right and we find out that DOC is keeping must have babies cut right mysterious Good set yeah for sure. A lot of questions a lot of questions wearing babies apartment with his foster father whose death that. He's hiding his money under the floorboards and this saying again elgort elbowed his of this charming soft like this same as he makes his as he makes breakfast. He's kind of liking swing around and stuff like that. There's some good energy to it and there's great summer weather great natural performances from the guy plays a really bright colors. It's aesthetically really liked to watch the show. It appears that Joe is aware of babies work and implores him to get out. Because he's better than that baby flip through channels monsters. Inc comes up important right and we just recently watched that do funny. About two years ago we watched it. You know what that means. He's an Alzheimer's care. What anyone says is he gets a craving. His little was he slow. Mix type right some great at garage editing in here with the south down shots and they didn't have to tell you how to use that right that if you watch space or like. Shaun of the dead. That song feels very like like late nineties early. Two thousands like spaced has a lot of music like that in and I was like dude. I like watching episode of space. That's amazing and Sargodha and I just love this. I could earn little little obsession. That keeps you tapes. Yeah turned tastic. Babies are the Donna and we made Deborah right kind of good chemistry off the bat with James. What do we think about Deborah Emily James in maybe they need go for. I think she's just always got this great smile every time she shows up on cameras. She's just always kind of like stealing your attention you know I like the kind of like soft like innocent attention that she's always getting every time that you know she shows up if that was like an a question like could she have been replaced somebody else. I've never asked that until just now did you have somebody. Did you guys envision her being the best person for this opposite Ansel Elgort? Now that you watched it I think I think she's great. I mean like I wasn't really driving anything within the question. I mean I ask because you know seeing this in time movie you know the emotional impact of this major revolves around baby and Deborah's a we we need to. We need to discuss whether these to Kinda hit it off well and like you know. You feel the chemistry. I think it's good chemistry. I don't think it's amazing. I don't think it pops off. Imagine them as a power couple but it works out it works. It works in the sense that they wanna run away together like you know they. They want to get away from from what they're what they're dealing with right now. I can see them can say them back. This kind of like Omar he kinda like Bonnie and Clyde situation from old school like alter Hollywood like with all gone back in the fifties you know what I mean. It makes sense the casting. I like this. Just find. She's very like southern bell kind of thing like she reminds me she. She's like she walked out of Tim. Burton's movie Big Fish. That's all I can think of the whole time. As damn she ruling a character and big fish But as I'm watching it was like man I wish she was the one who was Agent Carter's decent like the winter soldier. And stifling she seeing. Somebody told me she was related to Hayley Atwell or like this is her niece twice or whatever. Well I mean Oh thank you But she's she's also English as well. And I was just looking at as a British as I know you're loyalist curls you British bitch you fucking curly edit British notch. I wished I just took one look and I was like I know that girl English like there's no way she saw but the funny part is until Elgort who's I think he's just Amar even though with that name. I'm pretty sure he's just born in America and like New York but he has like no accent at all. He had to kind of put one on but her southern accent is way better than his And I kind of feel like being from the south like Danny and I don't re- maybe the people from other parts of the world like we might have southern drawl but compared to the people that live here God no we might as well be good morning to you but it really. Us thing. I think if you're yeah I don't think you and I have much of a southern accent compared to people that really have it around here in less go up north for us. They talk so much quicker sometimes it. They're like I can tell you from down south right and the funny thing that cracks me up is how everybody always gets. Southern accents like wrong in movies. You know like like Jodi foster and these are okay. You know. They're not bad. But Daniel Craig Logan. Lucky as much as I love. That movie is not how anybody I think from. A new area of the south sounds that that guy might as well be like foghorn Leghorn. Well we got healed Brock Brock Block block block. Yes same thing. So Yeah Daniel Craig knives out almost the same exact geographical acceptable of more west and probably not anymore accurate. I feel not love. Drought and the movies are great. So that's all I can think is fucking foghorn leghorn and knives out it's like I have not ruled out any of the like like the chicken the chicken lawyer from Futurama like the guy who's always representing fry and Bender Futurama fans out there. Yeah accent stuff tractor like I can. I mean if there isn't a fake Australian accent in an American film I can pick it up immediately. Like Oh hell yeah and my to what you were saying. I have an accent but I don't have anything close to what some people have here like. You know like they will. They will sound like they. Just I don't know like I dunno born and bred. I'm born and bred but just like the salt of the Australian accents right in the south the more like Super Senate is. They moved their cheeks whenever they make words come out of their mouth right talking about work here and what baby doe's work he says. Maybe I'm looking into this. He says I don't know if I ever get off is an impotent jerk..

Deborah Emily James Ansel Elgort president Jon Hamm foghorn Leghorn Bob Baby Kevin Spacey John Hammond Daniel Craig Jamie Foxx Alzheimer baseball southern bell Brock Brock Us Hayley Atwell Daniel Craig Logan Jodi foster Senate Buchan
"buchan nalia" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

11:11 min | 1 year ago

"buchan nalia" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"There's some kind of commentary there to be had about human motivation or human, the human education process, because, like I just. Whenever I do the I, I don't mean this to, to, to be like a, you know, like a psychological unpacking session. But computer science education in the university was was pretty alienating for me because I really wanted to learn like desperately wanted to learn and, like, anybody who listens to the show. They, they know, like what why else would I do a podcast about offer engineering as as kind of like a job? Right. But if you're in the computer science curriculum, and the curriculum doesn't like, doesn't match your learning style, it can be it can be like kind of infuriating because you're like, wow. I'm paying a bunch of money for this. And I just feel marginalized and I feel like not catered to. And I know that that was basically because, like I entered computer science in a time, where there was an increasing and acute difference between what the state of the art of tech of communications technology was. And where the university was I it's almost like, no fault of the university that they got disrupted this, that, just that's just what happens. But I just remember like, hey, I like being on Facebook. I enjoy text messaging during the class, why am I prevented from doing this during the class, and it's just it's just so it's kind of just an amazing lesson technology to see those pleasurable things integrated into what you're actually doing in the educational process, because I'm just thinking about, unlike men, I would have like, I, I kind of wanted to drop out of my job, and go to Lambda school. I. Okay. Do except like graduates are there. Is there a PHD program? We've actually talked about something along those lines nothing to announce today. But like I would love it if we could if we could do something like that. But what you bring up is where that's coming from. His I got into programming because I loved it because I wanted to create things because I thought that the problem solving process was really fun. And I think that's true of a lot of software engineers, but I'm not sure that's usually reflected in the, you know, sort of in the average class. And I think it Lambda school. We want to get that across right? Like you're going to be Atlanta school for nine months. Nine five every day. It's going to be your thing for, you know, for a good chunk of a year, and it shouldn't be drudgery shouldn't be misery. It shouldn't be you have to drag yourself out of bed to do it every day. And you kind of dread it, like, yes, of course, we need to be rigorous, and there are things that we that we teach their difficult concepts for students to wrap their heads around. And, and there's a lot of hard work that every student has put in to be successful and I am not even sort of discounting, those things. In fact, I think from the outside, it's very easy to underestimate. How hard it is for student, but I. Think something being difficult, and requiring commitment and hard work has demeaned that it it's miserable and drudgery. And you just wish you weren't there. Right. You can feel like you're, you're having fun. And you're learning a lot. And you've got friends that are around you learning with you, and supporting you and, and rooting for you and helping you and meanwhile, you're putting in the hard work to get something done, after all, that's the process. I feel like I go through every time I developed something right? I, sometimes, you know, I'm solving really, really hard problems. But if I can find the joy in that than yon doing really. Well, the curriculum lasts nine months. What happens across those nine months? Are there any like midterms or exams or milestone projects? What are the main points to illuminate in, in those nine months? That's a really good question. And the answer, of course, is yes, we split our curriculum up into units. Unit is this is actually going through a small transition. But a unit is for weeks. Three weeks of curriculum in the last week of every four weekend, it is, is what we call a build week. And when we say that what we mean is that you spend that week, building project and exactly what that project looks like varies, depending on where you're at in the course. But in general, it tends to be a real world project often on a cross functional team where, you know, if you're a web developer you might be working on the back end while I was developers working on an IRS app, client. And you build something real. And of course it's only a week. You know, you're not you're not gonna develop something that's incredibly sophisticated and deep but you'd be surprised at what people can come up with. Those are big milestones. Every fourth week students are building something working on a real team with real project management, using source control and, and collaboration tools at cetera. And the other sort of really big milestone project is students do what we call Lambda labs at a at proximate proximity. The halfway point in their time at Lambda and that is an eight week project where they're working on one thing on a cross functional team. With re again real project management and collaboration and our requirement for that is it has to be something that at the end of that. Eight weeks can accept real users, whether they're paid customers, or if you know it can be a free thing, but it can't just be oh, look, here's this thing, and I can show you video and put it on my portfolio, but it's not real. There has to be public. You are L that your friend can go to and sign up for and signing and actually use it or, you know, or the Iowa's app has to actually be on the app store and anybody can download and use it. We've had some really impressive projects come out of that. It's actually, maybe my favorite part of Lambda, and it's, it's, it's a time when students get really excited because they get to take all these skills they've been working on. And, you know, they built some things and really buckled down for two months and work on, on a real project. That's an awesome, stipulation. You know, when I I'm trying to hire a couple people right now a couple of interns in specifically and the first thing I look for like I mean, I asked I asked for resumes, but I. Stop really should just stop doing that. I should just start saying Sinn me three links to things you have built, which are live, because resume honestly, is, it's much less appealing than if you can show that you are actually capable of building and shipping. A full stack piece of software. Yeah. Absolutely. I think one of my favorite interview techniques as an as a interviewer for, for engineers is. Show me something you've built. And then let's talk about it. Tell me tell me about it. You know, it should be something you're proud of and tell me about what went into building it, and, you know, difficulties you encountered in and things that you think are really clever about it. And you can learn a whole whole lot about somebody from that without ever looking at the resume. Can we just take a moment to reflect on the insanity of the midterms and final exams and high stress white boarding situations? That software engineers and kissed a student more broadly have to go through what mass insanity has infected our brains. That has made us believe that this extremely stressful periodic scenario that we that we thrust students and candidates into is in any way productive. Why, why? How do we believe that what I mean? Is there some explanation for that, like, we're all we all need to be prepared to go to war, or something? Like I can imagine that kind of skill that kind of responsiveness being important in, in like a wartime scenario. But I'm just like from a sociological perspective is just baffles me. Because because everyday work is not like that at all. It's very creative. Yeah, that's the part, I don't get right in, in my everyday job as a software engineer. I have never had stand in front of a whiteboard and crank out an algorithm. And if I'm wrong, like I get, you know, not, not the or necessarily rude, but, like I feel like I have just failed and like my life is over. No. Like if I screw something up, or I can't figure it out like I take a walk or I go talk to my co worker, I try again. And like that's fine. That's a completely normal part of the process. So I'm much more interested in can you do the things that you're gonna do day to day? Can you actually like, you know, build ships off wear, and I'm not I'm not concerned if you can do that under a ton of stress and pressure. I want I want to know if you can do it in a normal environment, because I can't do the things I do under ton of stress. Pressure. That's not the ideal situation for anyone in to win the people come out of lamb to school. Do do you encourage them? Like, hey, there's this one other element of the software engineering world that we haven't told you about yet. It's this miserable interview process, and it's not going to be like work. It's not going to be like, your curriculum, but you have to learn to endure this, like atomic kind of zero sum battle between you and interviewer who you have to supplement yourself to just get ready for it like what would when when people exit Lambda school, and they're going on the job hunt? It do they just enter this entire other curriculum of, like learning to do white boarding, you know, that's actually an interesting question, because you just heard me kinda and you were also sort of railing about whiteboard interviews, and sort of this high stress high pressure thing. And I don't think any of us Atlanta school like that paradigm, and I think a lot of people, a lot of other people. Like it either. But the truth is that our students arguing counter that so we do we do work to prepare them for it. And so, yes, students absolutely get curriculum on how to be a good, whiteboard interviewer, and I almost hate that we have to do that because I feel like well, this is not really teaching them how to be a good software engineer, it is literally teaching them, how to be a good interviewer so that they can get a job as software engineer. But the truth is, if we're gonna really set our students up to succeed, we have to live in the world, that is not the one we won't want there to be. And so, yeah, we absolutely have an it is. Well, it's, it's, it's actually integrated throughout the course but it's especially intense at the end where students learn strategies for interviewing. Well, they get practice actually talking about their code and the things that they've done, and they absolutely do practice white boarding and, you know, those, those kind of hard technical interview, skills Lambda school is pretty easy to celebrate. And there is kind of a, like a, a mass celebration of it. Happening on Twitter. It's been like a multi month. Buchan Nalia of people just talking about how much they love Lambda school because what's not to love. But there must be some wrong turns that you as a company have made along the way, either in terms of curriculum. Or maybe you did something wrong with like the way that you had the, the income share agreement stuff configured, what mistakes have you made along the way? Or what incorrect assumptions have you made along the way? I'm glad you brought this up lamb to schools, actually, the first sort of venture back like Silicon Valley startup that I've ever personally worked for. And you know, we're growing really fast. I came in I I've been here a little over a year and was, I don't know, probably under employee number fifteen and we're at about one hundred now and it's been really fun for me to see that grow..

Lambda school software engineer Atlanta school Facebook Lambda labs Twitter communications technology Buchan Nalia Iowa Sinn web developer IRS nine months Eight weeks Three weeks
"buchan nalia" Discussed on GONE

GONE

07:30 min | 2 years ago

"buchan nalia" Discussed on GONE

"Here's something we want you to know about if you are in search of another great storytelling podcast, be sure to check out Richards. Other park cast podcast unexplained mysteries Fags Molly every Thursday on unexplained mysteries my friend Claire, and I dig deep into some of the greatest mysteries of history and life on earth. Already. We've searched for the true subject of the Mona, Lisa and investigated the claims of Shanti Debbie who remembered her past life and they don't take. We don't know for an answer. Some of life's greatest mysteries don't have simple explanations, but does that mean there are no explanations at all and unexplained mysteries is produced by park cast the same team behind gone. So you can expect the same indepth research and high quality audio. You find on our show, be sure to subscribe. See, never miss an episode search for unexplained mysteries on your favorite podcast. Rectory to start listening. Now four, visit park, cast P A R C A S T dot com. Slash unexplained to listen now. Now, let's get back to the story. Let's dive into the theory that all of our Cromwell's head took a bizarre three hundred year journey before being reburied in sixteen sixty. One Oliver Cromwell had been dug up and his remains showcase to the world as a warning, his body tossed into a mass grave and his head placed on a pike is gruesome tale to say the least for twenty five years. Oliver Cromwell's heads stood grotesque indicate atop a pike on Westminster Abbey. During that time, the head was only removed once for roof maintenance before immediately being placed back in its spot. It was at Charles the seconds behest that the head remain unmoved, a symbol for Cromwell, Ian, and Republic sympathizers that the crown was back in charge. What follows is a story put together from various accounts of one man's heads, three hundred year journey, but was the head. Found three hundred years later really Cromwell's or perhaps was it someone else's either way it all began with the storm. Sometime between sixteen eighty five and sixteen eighty nine, a terrible storm hit Westminster as rain and thunder. Pelted the warned building Cromwell's pike started to give the tip of the pike with Cromwell's heads snapped off and tumbled away. Following the realization that Cromwell's head was missing from its perch, a massive hunt and sued posters and pamphlets were issued with the promise of reward yet nothing ever turned up Cromwell's head was lost or was it. Well, it's unclear exactly what happened. Anecdotal evidence suggests that the head was in fact found specifically by a guard at Westminster, though his name is lost time. It is said that this unnamed guard took the head back to his home. Remember his head was embalmed so the flesh would have been more mummified than decayed. Not that that makes the guard taking the head any list disturbing. Rumor had it. The guard who found Cromwell's head was a secret Republic sympathizer and Cromwell fan. The guard feared the head would fall back into the hands of the crown and put back on display. So he hit the head in his chimney where it remained until the year. Seventeen ten. That's Macab. Why not take the head to Cromwell's descendants or even his daughter with her secret tomb? Excellent questions. Keep in mind. This is more anecdotal than proven could be. He didn't know about the secret tomb. Or was just a frayed he'd get in trouble for having it. We can't even be sure that this was Cromwell's head that fell off Westminster Abbey. It could have belonged to either of the two men who were beheaded and piked with Cromwell are ten and Bradshaw though there's no evidence to account for that at the time heads were still being piked, but none had recently been added or removed from Westminster Abbey. So while we can't say for sure, this head is Cromwell's. We do know where the head went next by the turn of the eighteenth century, the old guard was dying. He brought his daughter to his deathbed and confessed that he had Oliver Cromwell's head hidden in a knock in their chimney. He passed the head onto her before finally passing away instead of keeping it. She sold it to a man named Claudius dip. We do que- was a Swiss French collector of rare curiosities and owned a private museum in London. It was internet. Nationally, renowned and popular tourism spot. Do que- displayed the heads starting in his house of oddities around seventeen ten, many famous travelers including Zacharias Conrad von Offenbach known for his world travels in journals, described the head to police museum. When he spoke to about the head deplete claimed he could sell Cromwell's head for sixty Guineas or the equivalent to five thousand pounds today. This astounded Offenbach who couldn't fathom why anyone would want a severed head yet deplete never sold the head and kept it with him until his death in seventeen thirty eight afterwards the head once again changed hands. This time the head fell into the hands of failed comic actor Samuel Russell. He purchased ahead from the latest date of depre- sometime in the seventeen forties Russell claimed to be a descendant citing how the Cromwell's had intermarriage. With the Russell family. Few generations ago for him. Cromwell's head was a family relic despite the bold claim, Russell treated the head more like a prop than sacred. Heirloom Russell would take the head to parties and pass it around over time. The head was damaged further receiving additional fractures and cracks and losing teeth some way to treat your ancestor. I still can't believe he did that with a real human skull. While Russell was using Cromwell as a tool for Buchan Nalia a man named James Cox about the skull and sought to purchase it. Russell refused to part with the skull Cox, persisted as time went on Russell fell, deepened debt. Eventually, he tried to pawn the skull off to Sidney Sussex Cromwell's old alma mater. The school refused not believing the heads off anticipate with nowhere else to turn wrestle finally sold the head to James Cox. Cox was a renowned Goldsmith toy man and clockwork of the time he to owned a museum, but it had closed down by the time he got hold of the skull, many historians who followed Cromwell's head like Jonathan Fitzgibbons who wrote the book Cromwell's head, believe Cox, simply wanted the head to sell it off at a higher price and Cox did salad. So who got the head next you ask? Well, a. Trio of brothers known only as

Oliver Cromwell Sidney Sussex Cromwell Cromwell Samuel Russell Westminster Abbey Westminster James Cox Richards Claire Russell family Shanti Debbie Lisa Zacharias Conrad von Offenbach Charles London Buchan Nalia Macab que Ian Jonathan Fitzgibbons
"buchan nalia" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

Conspiracy Theories

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"buchan nalia" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

"With the russell family a few generations ago for him cromwell's head was a family relic despite the bold claim russell treated the head more like a prop than sacred heirloom russell would take the head to parties and pass it around over time the head was damaged further receiving additional fractures and cracks and losing teeth some way to treat your ancestor i still can't believe he did that with a real human skull well russell was using cromwell as a tool for buchan nalia a man named james cox heard about the skull and sought to purchase it russell refused to part with the skull cox persisted as time went on russell fell deep in debt eventually he tried to pawn the skull off to sidney sussex cromwell's old alma mater the school refused not believing the heads authenticity with nowhere else to turn wrestle finally sold the head to james cox cox was a renowned goldsmith toy man and clockwork of the time he to owned a museum but it had closed down by the time he got hold of the skull many historians who followed cromwell's head like jonathan fitzgibbons who wrote the book cromwell's head believe cox simply wanted the head to sell it off at a higher price and cox did sell it so who got the head next you ask well a trio of brothers known only as the hughes purchase the head in seventeen ninety nine for two hundred and thirty pounds like depre before them they too were curator's of private collections the brothers prided themselves on acquiring artifacts related to cromwell the head was going to be their magnum opus with it they plan to open a big exhibition the hughes brothers handed out flyers and put up posters all across london for their bond street exhibition but most people believe the head was a fake the brothers couldn't truly verify the head was cromwell's or not when they pressed former owner james cox about the matter he was allusive giving only a few details about russell with no credible evidence to back up the head the exhibition failed the head fell back into obscurity with one of the hughes daughters keeping it safe every now and then however people would ask to see the head.

russell cromwell james cox cox jonathan fitzgibbons hughes buchan sidney sussex cromwell cox london james cox thirty pounds