14 Burst results for "Bryce Peterson"

"bryce peterson" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

05:41 min | 1 year ago

"bryce peterson" Discussed on KOMO

"The impeachment process is on pause and will likely remain so until at least the start of the new year in the meantime both sides aren't showing much holiday spirit toward each other correspondent John Laurence reports president trump blasting house speaker Nancy Pelosi over the impeachment process crazy Nancy she's crazy policy has been turned over impeachment articles to the Senate saying she was Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and minority leader Chuck Schumer to agree to rules for the Senate trial Schumer meanwhile is calling on the White House to come clean president trump release the email witnesses testified what are you afraid of I'm John Lawrence reporting now twenty two before the hour on American morning here's Jim beau Hannon we're joined by Bryce Peterson a senior research associate in the justice policy center at the urban institute on line that urban dot org they have included a study of body cameras worn by police officers tell us about your study we conducted a study in the Milwaukee police department style one hundred patrol officers in Milwaukee the receipt body cameras we work with them to conduct what's gonna randomized control trial or be assigned a two hundred fifty officers to receive cameras two hundred fifty they're not receive cameras and we follow them over an eight month period to see how body cameras affected please behaviors and clean the interactions what we found overall was that it's going down so this is a war cameras were less likely to have complaints against them use of force did not change among all officers and interactions with citizens I did change a little bit you would think that this would have a moderating effect on everybody that police would tend to be on their best behavior that the public would not make outrageous claims that there with this camera there yet I understand that there are policies that allow a lot of discretion officers may turn off the cameras the departments may or may not release video it it seems to me that that leaves an awful lot of grounds for perhaps undercutting the credibility of the cameras yeah that's the only concern and one thing to remember here is that even though we've been talking about like him a lot and there's there's still a relatively new technology and a lot of departments are still trying to catch up to best practices of the child so a lot of department simply rolled up body cameras without understanding how to use them bass and so you're talking about the plane cameras to eleven hundred officers training them etcetera etcetera they're still playing catch up a little bit in terms of those policies tonight absolutely correct there's departments are using them perhaps not the most transparent way nomina can undercut their credibility why would it not be in the best interests of the police to do it run the the cameras all the time if I were a conscientious officer I would want everything I did recorded yeah I think the returns on the bench best interest of the department as a whole is simply cost instead subsiding shockingly expensive to many people how much it costs to retain body camera footage typically department have to maintain it for at least thirty days and more often it's minutes ninety two hundred eighty days and and I'm out of a server space you have to have the whole that much high quality video footage is very very expensive and so that's why the women when officers turn on their cameras and sometimes it might limit that too much give losses too much discretion in some cases you you indicated when you appeared on my nighttime talk show that the Milwaukee police force is about eleven hundred officers and that too have continuous coverage by those officers and and the storage that would be several million dollars that that seems awfully high yeah that's correct I mean the I mean even even with the waiter using right now which is you know pretty robust stayed there there and department is to mandated that officers turn on the cameras during most interactions with community members and most officers follow that mandate even in that sense I think they're spending over a million dollars per year just on the video footage retention how that is so they were increased that words there on all the time we're talking about a ten fold or even twenty fold increase in costs because you are buying a certain amount of credibility for the police department that is worth something it is yeah and I think that's where that's where the balancing act is happening they're trying to determine how much they can afford how much officers are more cameras I'm a still meeting the bottom line what is the public response regarding the use of these cameras overall very positive so we did a survey of committee members in Milwaukee and there's been several national surveys I'm asking very similar questions at the national level in every study that's ever been done has found that people are very positive and one lobsters apathy cameras but of course that's usually with the cabbie out that they're actually using them frequently trainer cameras on and using them to improve transparency accountability what recommendations would you make based on on the study the that the police departments around the country should do in in your view cost of course allowing for it to happen yes we do we have a number of recommendations first and foremost is that you have a very well developed policy and everything your police department before you implement the body camera program to be very thoughtful there's a number of resources out there for departments to draw from and they're creating their policies but asked the very thoughtful make sure it's very clear when officers can turn on the cameras are when they when they are when a mustard on the camera's on make sure you have a process in place to actually review and check to make your officers are complying and then of course when we're when we're talking about releasing body camera footage department seem to be very clear what their policies are and be proactive in releasing footage anytime there's a major incident conduct that's only gonna boost again okay credibility and accountability of the department price Peterson from urban dot org seventeen.

John Laurence president
"bryce peterson" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

05:40 min | 1 year ago

"bryce peterson" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"The impeachment process is on pause and will likely remain so until at least the start of the new year in the meantime both sides aren't showing much holiday spirit toward each other correspondent John Laurence reports president trump blasting house speaker Nancy Pelosi over the impeachment process crazy Nancy she's crazy plus he hasn't turned over impeachment articles to the Senate saying she was Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and minority leader Chuck Schumer to agree to rules for the Senate trial Schumer meanwhile is calling on the White House to come clean president trump release the email the witnesses testified what are you afraid of I'm John Lawrence reporting now twenty two before the hour on American morning here's Jim beau Hannon we're joined by Bryce Peterson a senior research associate in the justice policy center at the urban institute online that urban dot org they have included a study of body cameras worn by police officers tell us about your study so we can at this study in the Milwaukee police department just a level under patrol officers in Milwaukee the receive body cameras we work with them to conduct what's gonna randomized control trial or be assigned a two hundred fifty officers to receive cameras two hundred fifty to not receive cameras and we follow them over an eight month period to see how body cameras affected please behaviors and clean the interactions what we found overall was that sitting planes went down so as to the war cameras were less likely to have complaints against them use of force did not change among all officers and the interactions with citizens did change a little bit you would think that this would have a moderating effect on everybody that police wanted to be on their best behavior that the public would not make outrageous claims of there with this camera there yet I understand that there are policies that allow a lot of discretion officers may turn off the cameras the departments may or may not release video it it seems to me that that leaves an awful lot of grounds for perhaps undercutting the credibility of the cameras yeah that's the only concern then and one thing to remember here is that even though we've been talking about like Camelot and there's there's still a relatively new technology and a lot of departments are still trying to catch up to best practices of the time so a lot of department simply rolled up body cameras without understanding how to use them bass and so you're talking about the plane cameras to eleven hundred officers training them etcetera etcetera they're still playing catch up a little bit in terms of those policies so that's absolutely correct there's departments are using them perhaps not the most transparent way and I can undercut their credibility why would it not be in the best interests of the police to do run the the cameras all the time if I were a conscientious officer I would want everything I did recorded yeah I think the returns on the bench that best interests of the department as a whole is simply cost instead subsiding shockingly expensive to many people how much it costs to retain body camera footage integrative Armand have to maintain it for at least thirty days and more often it's it's ninety two hundred eighty days and and I'm out of a server Stacey have to have the whole that much high quality video footage is very very expensive and so that's why the women when officers turn on their cameras and sometimes it might limit that too much again losses too much discretion in cases you you indicated when you appeared on my nighttime talk show that the Milwaukee police force is about eleven hundred officers and that too have continuous coverage by those officers and and the storage that would be several million dollars that that seems awfully high yeah that's correct I mean the I mean even even with the way they're using right now which is you know pretty well busted their day the department is mandated that officers turn on the cameras during most interactions with community members and most officers follow that mandate even in that sense I think they're spending over a million dollars per year just on the video footage retention has it is so they would increase that words there on all the time we're talking about a ten fold or even twenty fold increase in costs because you are buying a certain amount of credibility for the police department that is worth something it is yeah and I think that's where that's where the balancing act is happening to try to determine how much they can afford how much officers are more cameras all still meeting the bottom line what is the public response regarding the use of these cameras overall very positive so we did a survey of committee members in Milwaukee and there's been several national surveys I'm asking very similar questions at the national level and every study that's ever been done has found that people are very positive and one officers have body cameras but of course that's usually what the cabbie out that they're actually using them frequently turning the cameras on and using them to improve transparency accountability what recommendations would you make based on on the study the that the police departments around the country should do it in your view cost of course allowing for it to happen yes we do we have a number of recommendations first and foremost is that you have a very well developed policy and in in your police department before you implement the body camera program so be very stockholders number resources out there for departments to draw from and they're creating their policies but has the very thoughtful make sure it's very clear when officers can turn on the cameras are when a when a when a mustard on the camera's on make sure you have a process in place to actually review and check to make your officers are complying and then of course when we're when we're talking about releasing body camera footage department seem to be very clear what their policies are and be proactive in releasing footage anytime there's a major incident because that that's only gonna boost again okay credibility and accountability of the department Bryce Peterson from urban dot org.

John Laurence president
"bryce peterson" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

05:42 min | 1 year ago

"bryce peterson" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"The impeachment process is on pause and will likely remain so until at least the start of the new year in the meantime both sides aren't showing much holiday spirit toward each other correspondent John Laurence reports president trump blasting house speaker Nancy Pelosi over the impeachment process crazy Nancy she's crazy hello see hasn't turned over impeachment articles to the Senate saying she was Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and minority leader Chuck Schumer to agree to rules for the Senate trial Schumer meanwhile is calling on the White House to come clean president trump release the email let the witnesses testified what are you afraid of I'm John Lawrence reporting now twenty two before the hour on American morning here's Jim beau Hannon we're joined by Bryce Peterson a senior research associate in the justice policy center at the urban institute on line that urban dot org they have included a study of body cameras worn by police officers tell us about your study so we conducted a study in the Milwaukee police department spot eleven hundred patrol officers in Milwaukee the receive body cameras so we work with them to conduct what's gonna randomized control trial were reassigned a two hundred fifty officers to receive cameras two hundred fifty not receive cameras and we follow them over an eight month period to see how body cameras affected please behaviors and community interactions what we found overall was that citizen planes went down so this is a war cameras were less likely to have complaints against them use of force did not change among all officers and that interactions with citizens I did change a little bit you would think that this would have a moderating effect on everybody that police would tend to be on their best behavior that the public would not make outrageous claims that there with this camera there and yet I understand that there are policies that allow a lot of discretion officers may turn off the cameras the departments may or may not release video it it seems to me that that leaves an awful lot of grounds for perhaps undercutting the credibility of the cameras yeah that's the only concern then and one thing to remember here is that even though we've been talking about my Camelot and there's there's still a relatively new technology and a lot of departments are still trying to catch up to best practices that are tried so a lot of department simply wrote a body cameras without understanding how to use them bass and so you're talking about the plane cameras to eleven hundred officers training them etcetera etcetera they're still playing catch up a little bit in terms of those policies so that's absolutely correct a there's departments are using them perhaps not the most transparent way and I can undercut their credibility why would not be in the best interests of the police to do it run the the cameras all the time if I were a conscientious officer I would want everything I did recorded yeah I think the returns on offense at best interests of the department as a whole is simply cost instead subsiding shockingly expensive to many people how much it costs to retain body camera footage integrate apartment have to maintain it for at least thirty days and more often it's minutes ninety two hundred eighty days and and I'm not as a server space you have to have the whole that much high quality video footage is very very expensive and so that's why the women when officers turn on their cameras and sometimes it might limit that too much sugar losses too much discussion some cases you you indicated when you appeared on my nighttime talk show that the Milwaukee police forces about eleven hundred officers and that too have continuous coverage by those officers and and the storage I would be several million dollars that that seems awfully high yeah that's correct I mean the I mean even even with the way they're using right now which is you know pretty well busted there that department is mandated that officers turn on the cameras during most interactions with community members in most officers follow that mandate even in that sense I think they're spending over a million dollars per year just on the video footage retention has it is so if they were to increase that words there on all the time we're talking about a ten fold or even twenty fold increase in costs because you are buying a certain amount of credibility for the police department that is worth something it is yeah and I think that's where that's where the balancing act is happening they're trying to determine how much they can afford how much osrs your work cameras all still meeting the bottom line what is the public response regarding the use of these cameras overall very positive so we did a survey of committee members in Milwaukee and there's been several national surveys I'm asking very similar questions at the national level and every study that's ever been done has found that people are very positive and one loss or to have body cameras but of course that's usually what the cabbie out that they're actually using them frequently trying the cameras on and using them to improve transparency accountability what recommendations would you make based on on the study the that the police departments around the country should do it in your view cost of course allowing for it to happen yes we do we have a number of recommendations first and foremost is that you have a very well developed policy and then your police department before you implement the body camera program so be very stockholders number resources out there for departments to draw from and they're creating their policies but has the very thoughtful make sure it's very clear when officers can turn on the cameras are when they when they are when a mustard on the camera's on make sure you have a process in place to actually review and check to make sure officers are complying and then of course when we're when we're talking about releasing body camera footage department seem to be very clear what their policies are and be proactive in releasing footage anytime there's a major incident because that that's only going to boost again okay credibility and accountability of the department rice Peterson from urban dot org seventeen.

John Laurence president
"bryce peterson" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

05:42 min | 1 year ago

"bryce peterson" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"The impeachment process is on pause and will likely remain so until at least the start of the new year in the meantime both sides aren't showing much holiday spirit toward each other correspondent John Laurence reports president trump blasting house speaker Nancy Pelosi over the impeachment process crazy Nancy she's crazy hello see hasn't turned over impeachment articles to the Senate saying she was Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and minority leader Chuck Schumer to agree to rules for the Senate trial Schumer meanwhile is calling on the White House to come clean president trump release the email let the witnesses testified what are you afraid of I'm John Lawrence reporting now twenty two before the hour on American morning here's Jim beau Hannon we're joined by Bryce Peterson a senior research associate in the justice policy center at the urban institute online at urban dot org they have included a study of body cameras worn by police officers tell us about your study so we conducted a study in the Milwaukee police department just a level under patrol officers in Milwaukee the receipt body cameras so we work with them to conduct what's gonna randomized control trial were reassigned a two hundred fifty officers to receive cameras two hundred fifty not receive cameras and we follow them over an eight month period to see how body cameras affected police behaviors and clean the interactions what we found overall was that citizen planes went down so this is a war cameras were less likely to have complaints against them use of force did not change among all officers and that interactions with citizens I did change a little bit you would think that this would have a moderating effect on everybody that police would tend to be on their best behavior that the public would not make outrageous claims of there with this camera there and yet I understand that there are policies that allow a lot of discretion officers may turn off the cameras the departments may or may not release video it it seems to me that that leaves an awful lot of grounds for perhaps undercutting the credibility of the cameras yeah that's the only concern then and one thing to remember here is that even though we've been talking about I came on the line and there's there's still a relatively new technology and a lot of departments are still trying to catch up to best practices of the tribes so a lot of department simply rolled up body cameras without understanding how to use them bass and so you're talking about the plane cameras to eleven hundred officers training them etcetera etcetera they're still playing catch up a little bit in terms of those policies so that's absolutely correct a there's departments are using them perhaps not the most transparent way nomina can undercut their credibility why would it not be in the best interests of the police to do it run the the cameras all the time if I were a conscientious officer I would want everything I did recorded yeah I think the returns on the fence at best interest of the department as a whole is simply cost instead subsiding shockingly expensive to many people how much it costs to retain body camera footage into clean apartment have to maintain it for at least thirty days and more often it's minutes ninety two hundred eighty days and and I'm out of a server space you have to have the whole that much high quality video footage is very very expensive and so that's why the women when officers turn on the cameras and sometimes it might limit that too much again losses too much discretion in some cases you you indicated when you appeared on my nighttime talk show that the Milwaukee police forces about eleven hundred officers and that too have continuous coverage by those officers and and the storage it would be several million dollars that that seems awfully high yeah that's correct I mean I mean even even with the way they're using right now which is you know pretty well busted there that department is mandated that officers turn on the cameras during most interactions with community members in most officers follow that mandate even in that sense I think they're spending over a million dollars per year just on the video footage retention has it is so if they were to increase that words there on all the time we're talking about a ten fold or even twenty fold increase in costs because you are buying a certain amount of credibility for the police department that is worth something it is yeah and I think that's where that's where the balancing act is happening they're trying to determine how much they can afford how much osrs your work cameras while still meeting the bottom line what is the public response regarding the use of these cameras overall very positive so we did a survey of committee members in Milwaukee and there's been several national surveys I'm asking very similar questions at the national level and every study that's ever been done has found that people are very positive and one officers to have body cameras but of course that's usually what the cabbie out that they're actually using them frequently trying their cameras on and using them to improve transparency accountability what recommendations would you make based on on the study the that the police departments around the country should do in in your view cost of course allowing for it to happen yes we do we have a number of recommendations first and foremost is that you have a very well developed policy and then in your police department before you implement the body camera program so be very stockholders number resource out there for departments to draw from and they're creating their policies but has the very thoughtful make sure it's very clear when officers can turn on the cameras are when they when they are when a mustard on the camera's on make sure you have a process in place to actually review and check to make sure officers are complying and then of course when we're when we're talking about releasing body camera footage department seem to be very clear what their policies are and be proactive in releasing footage anytime there's a major incident I'm good at that's only gonna boost again okay credibility and accountability of the department rice Peterson from urban dot org seventeen.

John Laurence president
"bryce peterson" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

05:40 min | 1 year ago

"bryce peterson" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"The impeachment process is on pause and will likely remain so until at least the start of the new year in the meantime both sides aren't showing much holiday spirit toward each other correspondent John Laurence reports president trump blasting house speaker Nancy Pelosi over the impeachment process crazy Nancy she's crazy hello see hasn't turned over impeachment articles to the Senate saying she was Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and minority leader Chuck Schumer to agree to rules for the Senate trial Schumer meanwhile is calling on the White House to come clean president trump release the email let the witnesses testified what are you afraid of I'm John Lawrence reporting now twenty two before the hour on American morning here's Jim beau Hannon we're joined by Bryce Peterson a senior research associate in the justice policy center at the urban institute online at urban dot org they have included a study of body cameras worn by police officers tell us about your study so we conducted a study in the Milwaukee police department just a level under patrol officers in Milwaukee the receive body cameras so we work with them to conduct what's gonna randomized control trial were reassigned our children fifty officers to receive cameras two hundred fifty to not receive cameras and we follow them over an eight month period to see how body cameras affected police behaviors and clean the interactions what we found overall was that citizen planes went down so hi this is a war cameras were less likely to have complaints against them use of force did not change among all officers and interactions with citizens I did change a little bit you would think that this would have a moderating effect on everybody that police would tend to be on their best behavior that the public would not make outrageous claims of there with this camera there and yet I understand that there are policies that allow a lot of discretion officers may turn off the cameras the departments may or may not release video it it seems to me that that leaves an awful lot of grounds for perhaps undercutting the credibility of the cameras yeah that's one of the concerns and and one thing to remember here is that even though we've been talking about by Camelot and there's there's still a relatively new technology and a lot of departments are still trying to catch up to best practices that are tried so a lot of department simply rolled up body cameras without understanding how to use them bass and so you're talking about the plane cameras to eleven hundred officers training them etcetera etcetera they're still playing catch up a little bit in terms of those policies so that's absolutely correct a there's departments are using them perhaps not the most transparent ways nomina can undercut their credibility why would it not be in the best interests of the police to do it run the the cameras all the time if I were a conscientious officer I would want everything I did recorded yeah I think the returns on the bench at best interest of the department as a whole is simply cost instead subsiding shockingly expensive to many people how much it costs to retain body camera footage integrate apartment have to maintain it for at least thirty days and more often it's minutes ninety two hundred eighty days and and I'm out of a server space you have to have the whole not much high quality video footage is very very expensive and so that's why the women when officers turn on their cameras and sometimes it might limit that too much again losses too much discretion in some cases you you indicated when you appeared on my nighttime talk show that the Milwaukee police force is about eleven hundred officers and that too have continuous coverage by those officers and and the storage I would be several million dollars that that seems awfully high yeah that's correct I mean I mean even even with the way they're using right now which is you know pretty well busted there that department is mandated that officers turn on the cameras during most interactions with community members in most officers follow that mandate even in that sense I think they're spending over a million dollars per year just on the video footage retention has it is so they would increase that words there on all the time we're talking about a ten fold or even twenty fold increase in costs because you are buying a certain amount of credibility for the police department that is worth something it is yeah and I think that's where that's where the balancing act is happening they're trying to determine how much they can afford how much osrs your work cameras while still meeting the bottom line what is the public response regarding the use of these cameras overall very positive so we did a survey of committee members in Milwaukee and there's been several national surveys asking very similar questions at the national level and every study that's ever been done has found that people are very positive and one loss or to have body cameras but of course that's usually what the cabbie out that they're actually using them frequently trying the cameras on and using them to improve transparency accountability what recommendations would you make based on on the study the that the police departments around the country should do in in your view cost of course allowing for it to happen yes we do we have a number of recommendations first and foremost is that you have a very well developed policy and in your police department before you implement the body camera program so be very thoughtful there's a number of resources out there for departments to draw from and they're creating their policies but has to be very thoughtful make sure it's very clear when officers can turn on the cameras are when a when a when a mustard on the camera's on make sure you have a process in place to actually review and check to make sure officers are complying and then of course when we're when we're talking about releasing body camera footage department seem to be very clear what their policies are and be proactive in releasing footage anytime there's a major incident I'm good at that's only going to boost again okay credibility and accountability of the department rice Peterson from urban dot org.

John Laurence president
"bryce peterson" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"bryce peterson" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"DNA so used in the Golden State killer case is getting a new owner San Diego based very Jen wants to make the DNA database available to crime labs nationwide they have agreed to by G. E. D. Max that is a website where genealogy enthusiasts can upload raw data to connect with relatives and fill out family trees the sale of GDP match to marriage and will add another dimension to a complex database over genetic privacy more and more police departments across the country are implementing body cameras for their officers hoping it will increase transparency and reduce use of force but do they actually do what they're advertised is doing we spoke with Bryce Peterson from the justice policy center at the urban institute they did some research on this by looking at two hundred fifty Milwaukee police officers with body cameras and two hundred fifty without cameras and they did this over a period of eight months so what did their research out what we found is that body cameras had no impact on use of force so regardless of whether an officer was wearing a body camera to engage in the same levels of force as officers who did not wear body cameras on but we did find that complaints went down so off to see war body cameras were less likely that's your complaints against them then officers who were not wear body cameras leave that I mean look the public loves the transparency of those camera they do I mean it's the first thing that's asked for after an incident is where's the body camera footage people want to see if they want it released they want to take a look at yeah Peterson says wearing body cameras did change what kind of stops officers decided to make body cameras reduced the amount of subjects stops at nothing gauging notice when the call someone over because in my match the description of a wanted person or they're looking suspicious in the neighborhood in the conduct on either a brief stop for stop and frisk they did fewer of those when they had a body camera compared to officers who were wearing body cameras so doesn't impact use of force does impact the kind of stop that's made yeah but that that is interesting so it is changing behavior right in some ways but but not only does the public like it but a lot of officers do too I mean they want they want how they're making their decisions to be seen if they have nothing to hide why not right right he also says that it just makes sense for officers to be equipped with body cameras we live in a society where technology is evolving anyway and so the police department have an option either to try to stay out of the arctic or to get behind it the reality as most of place or not maybe not most but many many police citizen encounters are being recorded already whether it's by a surveillance Cayman area or is resting more and more frequently now committee members and citizens are taking cell phone recordings off of their encounters with police officers or even you know passer bys in the area are stopping and recording it encounters so officers are going to be recorded their interactions are gonna be recorded anyway and and that's the truth more more people are I mean you can get those I was in a like a Best Buy or something the other day you can get those dash cams metal record everything that happens within a vehicle well and then and then you have your own public record right right exactly so I mean it looks like they are making some changes and some of them for the good of perhaps and some don't have much of an impact at all right exactly okay let's go to Brian right now seals.

San
"bryce peterson" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"bryce peterson" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"You also turn off the oven and all of the burners my mom never let me use the oven I wonder why the geico insurance agency can help keep your personal property protected like if it's your roommates first time operating in often visit geico dot com to see how easy it is to switch and save on renter's insurance round here everyone knows you need the right tool for the job it's the difference between orders filled and orders missed between return customers and product returns that's why I order from Grainger well over two hundred fifty local branches will call product pick up and a time saving mobile app it's easy to get it right when it comes to getting what you need when you need it Grainger's got your back call click Grainger dot com or stop by to see for yourself Grainger for the ones who get it done hi I'm Jay Farner CEO of quicken loans America's largest mortgage lender let's talk credit card debt for a minute if you feel you're carrying too much of it you're not alone the average household in the U. S. carries over eight thousand dollars in credit card debt ready for some good news with a cash out refinance from quicken loans you can quickly and easily put some of the equity in your home to good use by paying off a lot of that high interest credit card debt a great way to take cash out is with our thirty year fixed rate mortgage the rate today in our thirty year fixed rate mortgage is three point nine nine percent APR four point one eight percent call us today at eight hundred quicken to learn how taking cash out with a thirty year fixed mortgage might be the right solution for you and for a record nine years in a row JD power his right quicken loans highest in the nation in customer satisfaction for primary mortgage origination call us today at eight hundred quicken or go to rocket mortgage dot com projects are awarded for mission visited our account rates subject to change a one point three seven five percent features a discounted rate call for cost information and conditions equal housing lender licensed in all fifty states and MLS number thirty thirty I you'll tax problems keeping you up at night hi sax out here from the coast one tax group if you owe ten thousand dollars or more to the I'll wrestle states in back taxes take ten minutes and cool coast one tax group it could save you ninety three percent so more coast one tax group helps people all across America save big amounts of money David from California say forty eight thousand dollars in back taxes James and Lisa from Dallas save one hundred and two thousand dollars cool coast one tax group now at eight eight eight three three seven six nine four nine a ten minute call could save ninety three percent so more so who you guys are cool host one tax group that's who see how much you can cite the consultation is always free what's all you who waiting for relieve your tax stressed today who coached one tax group as a tight tight three three seven six nine four nine that's eight eight eight three three seven six nine four the Jim Bohannon show as we spoke with Bryce Peterson senior research associate in the year justice policy center at the urban institute.

"bryce peterson" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

09:05 min | 1 year ago

"bryce peterson" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"At the urban dot org and I understand that there's been a study made of these body cameras worn by the police is that correct that's correct tell us what's the study to be discovered I'm sure so there's there's a number of different things we looked at so this is a study that was done by myself and some college at the urban institute we work with the marketplace department are fairly large you know mid to large sized police department and we work with them and they brought out body cameras there officers we conducted what's called a randomized control trial which is known as the gold standard research I'm basically were reassigned two hundred fifty officers to receive cameras children fifty officers not receive cameras befall them for about eight months and they looked at differences officer behaviors and other policing outcomes during that period of time so we looked at a number of things we look that use of force that is in planes we'll look at what card proactive activities by the police officers to see how they're engaging with community members I'm not that arrests so I can I can answer any one of those without a number of things absolutely of course the I guess the conventional wisdom going in would be that the presence of the cameras would presumably moderate police behavior and moderate public claims against the police that is to say it would do a little hard for me to exaggerate when all of this is being taken down that would that would be the assumption I guess we would make did the findings of your study letter that out yes although it was mixed actually arm so this that if you're you're exactly right so the conventional measures that people use and and studies of body cameras are typically use of force and complaints so good sitting planes or whatever you know a committee member interacts with the police officer and I think that that police officer did something wrong in a logical planning and some and can sometimes old result in disciplinary measures looking result in termination and use of force I think most people are familiar with and also uses for some other interacting with someone I know either it's justified or in some cases it's on justified if it's expensive to look at both of those things and some interestingly we found that use of force did not change when a body camera was present but we did find that sort of thing on planes went down in other words officers with body cameras and fewer complaints lodged against them than those without body cameras what do the cameras themselves show I I've I've often wondered for example how how good they are in in the event of confrontations do the cameras always show precisely what is happening how do they compare let's say with dashboard cameras which can offer a a a sitting back if you will almost attached to a point of view that may not have close ups but gives perhaps a a a better perspective on everything that was taking place yeah that's a great question so I do decide most apartment have dash cameras they had them for a number of years now decades in some cases and those provide a good a good point of view if the car happens to be set up and pointed towards the incident so in most cases for example traffic stops are captured pretty well by dash cameras I'm not a body camera does is it provides the point of view of the police officer on and there are different places where the body cameras can be mounted and that affects the quality or the point of view of the video so for example cameras can be mounted on the chest of an officer on their shoulder or in some cases directly on their head sort of attached to sunglasses or some other apparatus like that and obviously the ones that are mounted on the head tend to provide very realistic officer point of views because everywhere the officer looking the cameras looking was on on the shoulder or the chest if an officer turns are had but doesn't turn their shoulders of their body that camera might be missing something and that's all based on the officer actually turning on the camera I think we've all heard of cases across the country where a body camera was present but the officer didn't record in time and so the instant wasn't captured while they can also fall off the officer sometimes especially for the struggle happening and so the camera you know malfunctions are gets disconnected or just falls off the officer on the ground a lot of times you're missing footage that way too well disconnected you know it if it if it gets disconnected during a struggle well I guess that happens if it falls off it ought to be obviously ought to be mounted in such a way that that's the very very rare turned off I would assume would would would not not re down to the the benefit of the officer why was it turned off yeah well so are common misperception of of body cameras that the recording all the time but in fact it so that the biggest cost a body cameras is not actually the equipment it's the storage of the video footage and so cameras are only turn on when the officer chooses to activate them of course it's typically mandated by policy that situations in which they must on the cameras by an officer might forget to turn on the camera or in some cases the situation is so serious are so dangerous that they you know are preoccupied and don't turn the camera on time in those cases though most of the cameras have a thirty second buffering period so even if an officer comes on a camera late they'll actually record the previous thirty seconds on most cases as long as Yasser remembers a turn on the camera it'll capture the incident I would think that that most officers will be inclined to the turn that camera on every time they did anything but but go to the bathroom I mean you know went out I'm gonna do it over I mean I would I would think that any time that camera wasn't running that automatically that leaves open the door for charges to be made of if you're if you're a cop who's trying to play by the rules blood run that thing all the time yeah you doing so and that's true for some officers but it does very so for example when the concerns among officers before body cameras rolled out the the push back was that they were afraid that body cameras would give them the worst interactions with people especially if they're trying to get it like have an honest conversation with someone maybe maybe they're working with the committee member who wants to divulge a crime that happened but that person doesn't want to be recorded you know they're afraid of being labeled a snitch or something like that probably can't tell can they I mean if you're talking to an officer you can't tell if it's running can you you can't exactly so they're afraid of having the mon generally date got real most people wouldn't now yeah if you're gonna see if you have it on but the the public can't tell if if I I'm a I'm a potential snitch let's say which I have the thing by the way is is a fine thing to do if you know people are committing crimes and tell the police but but but that fact not withstanding our I mean presumably in a given jurisdiction you know whether or not the the cops in that area have these cameras so therefore said you can't tell if they're running you would always I guess act under the assumption that they are you probably would say anything that didn't want recorded right yeah and what's interesting is that most people actually don't recognize that officers have body cameras so we've done some research and other folks across the country done research on that can people actually rarely remember whether or not there's a body camera presents an interesting you think you'd be very obviously I would think yeah so much equipment on their bodies and they don't always notice the camera yeah let's let's take a call from a Brian the Jamestown New York on the Jim Bohannon show with Bryant with Bryce Peterson he is with the the urban institute good evening and welcome Brian yeah I was just referring to something he was just covering that we've had an incident in a local establishment that their cameras recklessly all got turned off like four officers then they were somebody's rights were being violated I would believe right I wonder why the officer would have control over that yeah I think that what whenever they reached respond or call it whatever that thing ought to be automatically running I would think the Brian's got a really good point why would there be a the discretion a given to the officer I mean I just don't I don't get it well it's not so there's two I guess the chances that the the first of its not that there's necessarily discretion they're not supposed to determine when and how they turn on the camera that usually guided pretty strictly by policy it's a matter of them following policies of the didn't turn on and it was mandated by policy they violated they committed you know they they violated policy in and of itself whether or not they did something else to that person all the cameras are turned off on to your other point though the technology just hasn't been there until very recently where the cameras can automatically be turned on right now hello miss several to camera manufacturers are actually creating technologies but it can be integrated into almost call computer aided dispatch or CAD systems by police departments so as soon as an officer was dispatched to a call on the camera can turn on automatically remotely so it's not up to the officer I'm going to turn it on and off all right very good what is coming up but Adam around until very recently Bryce Peterson I guess he is with the urban institute online at.

urban institute thirty seconds thirty second eight months
"bryce peterson" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

06:09 min | 1 year ago

"bryce peterson" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"Show as we talk with Bryce Peterson research associate in the justice policy center at the urban institute look a study of body cameras worn by the police is focused on the Milwaukee but I guess is no reason to believe that the results will be different anywhere else I how did the study report on let's say a routine traffic stops verses more confrontational things such as fleeing suspects in the light the level of police activity get the revealed in the the wearing of body cancel the operation of the cameras yeah so we we didn't we we actually just very recently released our study where we look at those specifically so we call in the study proctor activities so those are activities in offices are responding to calls or or you know I'm kind of reactive policing activities so when they have their calm cool free time how are they spending that time and what we found is that overall the total number of practice activities didn't change between also you had cameras in those who didn't but the make up of the activities to change so you said specifically traffic stop so we notice that traffic stops didn't change all between the officers but subjects stops that is on an officer pulls over someone either because they look suspicious they might match the description of a wanted person or whatever we found that does actually went down when officers were wearing body cameras so engaged in pure subject stops then we found that there's these activities called park and walks in Milwaukee on that one officer pulled over the vehicle and I walk around a community or neighborhood interact with US citizens and talked and I'm sort of a community oriented for community policing activity and we found that those were not so in other words act things were offices have more discretion and are more likely to lead to these confrontational interactions with people in the community we found that does the activities going down where as more positive prosocial activities going up I'm worried about the reaction of the the people of all that is to say the public on the one hand and the officers on the other hand how they feel about body cameras so we did we did focus groups with officers before and after they received cameras we did focus groups of people in the community and we also did a community survey with about fifteen hundred respondents in Milwaukee and so overall across all groups everyone was pretty supportive of body cameras people in the community really wanted body cameras of course very by groups so black respondents were much less supportive overall of body cameras and why respondents response of other races but even still the majority of people were you know wanted body cameras on the police to use them and then the police were more apprehensive about body cameras before they got them you know there was a new technology they're afraid about how the body cameras can be used but once they actually got the cameras all officers we spoke with wanted to keep them and keep using them why are are those opposed to the use of body cameras it in that opinion I I I must confess to the to the extent that it provides evidence of what's happening it's hard to understand why anybody would be opposed to to evidence of what happens thanks for the reasons we discussed earlier which is they're not and they're not infallible technology so are there still officers can not turn on the cameras or even when they become automated summer in the future you know the people consulting with I think in general mistrust in the please plays into this too so if you don't trust the police as a whole you're not going to trust and uses technology and a transparent and accountable life I don't know what the other you know we sing go ahead we've seen we seen incidents like that across the country I wear something happens it's captured on video but the police department users not to release the video footage right away and that that kind of played against the body camera program because people are viewing that as the officers hiding something of the department hiding something when in reality it might be something different but that's how you can be prisons this is we often discretion involved here where the department releases the video of the officer turns on the cameras I don't get that at all the the only way the system works effectively is if they're on period and and it's released period and and the let the chips fall where they may anything short of that automatically invite invites distrust I I find it hard to understand why anybody of good faith would not want the cameras on all the time and the video will be released regardless yeah I mean I couldn't agree with you more in principle so they're not on the cameras they have to be turned it in order for that to be an effective increase transparency and accountability they have to be turned on every time there's an interaction between member or Lisa and every situation that's mandated by policy and the and we and I completely agree about the release of body camera footage asked to be released upon request and even I think department should be more proactive in releasing footage even before it's requested by the public when there's a major incident they should immediately responded camera footage and we are seeing that but it but it does very by departments and apartments are doing a better job of that I'm I just wanna say quickly the main reason why they're not turn on all the time as I said before is is really just cost it's exponentially more expensive for five games be recording all day long and I can because you have to start of the footage for peer to time and that storage is the most expensive part of the body care program we body camera program the movie do this could really go to a break and come back with another call let let's say that you've got a a police department the size of Milwaukee's and I'm I'm only guessing what maybe five thousand officers are just a stab in the dark you know eleven hundred officers eleven hundred okay widely over shot okay limited officers let's say they have the cameras on all the time you have a ballpark figure of what this would cost because you're buying a lot of public credibility of that's worth something how much will it cost to do on the campus several million dollars up front and then continue cost of a couple million dollars each year is this ballpark what it cost several million that's amazing all.

research associate urban institute Milwaukee Bryce Peterson million dollars one hand
"bryce peterson" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

09:28 min | 1 year ago

"bryce peterson" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"Urban institute online at the urban dot org and I understand that there's been a study made of these body cameras worn by the police is that correct that's correct tell us what's the study discovered I'm sure so there's there's a number of different things we looked at so this is a study that was done by myself and some college at the urban institute we work with a Morgan police department are fairly large you know mid to large sized police department and we work with them and they brought out body cameras there officers we conducted what's called a randomized control trial which is known as the gold standard research I'm basically were reassigned two hundred fifty officers to receive cameras turn fifty officers not receive cameras befall them for about eight months and we looked at differences officer behaviors and other policing outcomes during that period of time so we look at a number of things we ought to use of force servicing planes to look at what's called proactive activities by the police officers to see how they're engaging with community members I'm not that arrests so how can I can answer any one of those without a number of things absolutely of course the I guess the conventional wisdom going in would be that the presence of the cameras would presumably moderate police behavior and moderate public claims against the police that is to say it would do a little hard for me to exaggerate when all of this is being taken down that would that would be the assumption I guess we would make the findings of your study after that out yes although it was mixed actually arm so this that if you're you're exactly right so the conventional measures that people use and and studies of body cameras are typically use of force and complaints so good sitting planes or one a you know a community member interaction a police officer and I think that that police officer did something wrong in a logical planning and some and can sometimes also result in disciplinary measures it can even result in termination and use of force I think most people are familiar with and also uses force other interacting with someone either it's justified or in some cases it's unjustified if it's expensive to look at both of those things and some interestingly we found that use of force did not change when a body Kerr was present so we did find that fencing complaints when down in other words officers with body cameras and fewer complaints lodged against them and those without body cameras what do the cameras themselves show I I've I've often wondered for example how how good they are in in the event of confrontations do the cameras always show precisely what is happening how do they compare let's say with dashboard cameras which can offer a a a sitting back if you will almost attached to point of view that may not have close ups but gives perhaps a a a better perspective on everything that was taking place yeah that's a great question so how do you decide most department have dash cameras that had them for a number of years now decades in some cases and those provide a good a good point of view if the car happens to be set up and pointed towards the incident so in most cases for example traffic stops are captured pretty well by dash cameras I'm not a body camera doesn't provide to the point of view of the police officer on and there are different places where the body cameras can be mounted and that affects the quality or the point of view of the video so for example cameras can be mounted on the chest of an officer on their shoulder or in some cases directly on their head sort of attached to sunglasses or some other apparatus like that and obviously the ones that are mounted on the head tend to provide and very realistic officer point of views because everywhere the officers looking the cameras looking for his own on the shoulder or the chest if an officer turns are had but doesn't turn their shoulders of their body neck and my **** in something and that's all based on the officer actually turning on the camera and I think we've all heard of cases across the country where a body camera was present but the officer didn't recording time and so the instant wasn't captured while they can also fall off the officer sometimes especially there's a struggle happening and so the camera in a malfunctions or gets disconnected or just falls off the officer on the ground a lot of times you're missing footage that way too well disconnected you know if it if it gets disconnected during a struggle well I guess that happens if it falls off it either we obviously are to be mounted in such a way that that's a very very rare turned off I would assume would would would not not re down to the the benefit of the officer why was it turned off yeah well so a common misperception of body cameras at the recording all the time but in fact it so at the biggest cost a body cameras is not actually the equipment it's the storage of the video footage and so cameras are only turn on when the officer chooses to activate them of course it's typically mandated by policy the situations in which they must on the cameras by an officer might forget to turn on the camera or in some cases the situation is so serious is so dangerous that they you know are preoccupied and don't turn the camera on time in those cases though most of the cameras have a thirty second buffering period so even if an officer comes on a camera late they'll actually record the previous thirty seconds on most cases as long as Yasser remembers or turn on the camera capture the incident I would think that that most officers would be inclined to to turn the camera on every time they did anything but but go to the bathroom I mean you know went out I'm gonna I mean I would I would think that any time that camera wasn't running that automatically that leaves open the door for charges to be made of if you're if you're a cop who's trying to play by the rules boy I'd run that thing all the time yeah you would think so and that's true for some officers what it does very so for example when the concerns among officers before body cameras rolled out the the push back was that they were afraid that body cameras would give them worse interactions with people especially if they're trying to get a like have an honest conversation with someone maybe maybe they're working with the community who wants to divulge a crime happened to that person doesn't want to be recorded you know they're afraid of being labeled a snitch or something like that public cancel talking to an officer you can't tell if it's running can you you can't exactly so they're afraid of having them on generally they don't know what I mean most people wouldn't now yeah I was gonna say if you have it on but the the public can't tell if if I I'm a I'm a potential snitch let's say which I am of the by the way is is a fine thing to do if you know people are committing crimes and tell the police but but but that fact notwithstanding I mean presumably in a given jurisdiction you know whether or not the the cops in that area have these cameras so therefore said you can't tell if they're running you would always I guess act under the assumption that they are you probably wouldn't say anything to do in one recorded right yeah and what's interesting is that most people actually don't recognize that officers have body cameras so we've done some research and other folks across the country done research on that can people actually rarely remember whether or not there's a body camera presents an interesting you think you'd be very obviously I would have so much equipment on their bodies and they don't always notice the camera now listen to your call from a Brian in Jamestown New York on the Jim Bohannon show with Bryant with Bryce Peterson he is with the the urban institute good evening and welcome Brian here are was just referring to something he was just covering that we've had an incident at a local establishment that their cameras recklessly all got turned off like four officers then they were somebody's right for being violent that would believe I wonder why the officer would have control over that yeah I think that one whenever they reach respond or call it whatever that thing ought to be automatically running I would think the Brian's got a really good point why would there be at the discretion given to the officer I mean I just don't I don't get it was none so there's two answers changes after the first of its not that there's necessarily discretion in not supposed to determine when and how they turn on the camera that usually guided pretty strictly by policy it's a matter of them following policies of the didn't turn on it was mandated by policy day my late day day committed you know they they violated policy in and of itself whether or not they did something else to that person all the cameras are turned off on to your other point though the technology just hasn't been there until very recently where the cameras can automatically be turned on right now several to caring manufacturers are actually creating technologies but it can be integrated into what's called computer aided dispatch or CAD systems by police departments so as soon as an officer was dispatched to a call on the camera can turn on automatically remotely so it's not up to the officer I'm going to turn it on and off all right very good that is coming up but Adam around until very recently Bryce Peterson I guess he is with the urban institute online at urban dot org and look at the body cameras worn by police an interesting study about which will learn more when we come back in just a moment geico presents again another voice mail from your roommate so I was in a rush to get to work and I left the back door open to Jewish I live well while you're there could you also turn off.

Urban institute thirty seconds thirty second eight months
"bryce peterson" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"bryce peterson" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Twenty two seconds on that Dr Clayton Thorson three for three passing for seventy three yards. Jeremy Larkin sixteen yard catch and run. The five yard touchdown around the cap the drive, and it's fourteen nothing. Northwestern Marken with eighteen touches for seventy seven yards. He's got fourteen as a running back and forth as a receiver. He's very active. Lockable ball will kick off Edwards deep and he will signal fair catch and make it. It's five so Akron will start at twenty five yard line down fourteen. Now think give it out gay ninety two thirty four in total offense. The Ford ops. Sorry, that's just the second quarter. I me correct. That for the gay. They've been out gave hundred seventy five to forty six. Seven twenty one to go in the half. Start from the twenty five yard line. Vessel down. There is keep the pressure on if they eat trailer bet it y to the right slots the right side. Nelson short drop quick throw accord areas Smith at the thirty a little look yet and take it out right away. But the thirtieth mcgeough the stop Smith last year averaged twenty one. One point four yards a reception on thirty four. How's your mouth? Oh that I know you pride yourself on math. I'll get back with you on thanks down and five at the thirty. Sands is running back now Edwards back in there. Now. L handed to him and he'll go nowhere stacked up at the line. Jared Mckee for the ball area heavily market out. And they're shooting themselves in the foot Akron, really giving themselves. No chance. Seems like they get five in the first down. And then they come up on the steak, and now they're going to be second in law. Holding offense number fifty nine ten yard penalty from the previous spot repeat. Second out your whole, Ted. You're supposed to get more than no game. Right. I mean, that's kind of the idea. Yeah. Could give it to to us for. Yeah. For for Wednesday gator. Yeah. All right. So that's the second out of fifty. Back. The twenty six forty wanting to go the first half Wildcats up fourteen all three of their timeouts remade. Rush four. Nelson looks things over like by two back. So now we have more motion in the backfield. Another heavily will be called support. Your back five also Audrey number fifty three five yard penalty. Second out at once. Again was Bryce Peterson rather costly personal foul or their last series as they set Williams motion. So now it's going to be second down and twenty seems like it's been second in nineteen year. Second at twenty for accurate. This tire second quarter. Feels that way to us. I'm sure it feels that way to them eight penalties for seventy yards. It really. We started six minutes to go the half. This time it'll be Nelson avoids one man shifting has left and then cut out across the twentieth. He is shifting JR pace in Jordan Thompson, bring him down at the twenty two yard line. But it brings up third down thirteen here. He's he's the big factor in this game. He's the only really be productive. Their cornerback. Nelson is really been everywhere touch the ball. He's ran it. He's thrown it. But he has got any help from the other guys who have eight penalties are not even half yet to operate from the pistol Edwards running back. Third out a thirteen Akron for their own twenty two at a time out signal. They're going to take time out here. Akron will their second time out with five twenty eight to go in the first half of play Stein out Akron, their second to.

Nelson Akron Edwards Jordan Thompson Smith Wildcats Dr Clayton Thorson Jeremy Larkin Jared Mckee Sands Ted Bryce Peterson Audrey Stein Williams twenty five yard fifty three five yard fifty nine ten yard seventy seven yards seventy three yards
"bryce peterson" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

05:42 min | 2 years ago

"bryce peterson" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"To hear Thorson giving Larkin and Larkin is not going to get their slammed out of the thirty hill losing other yard and Akron defense holds and the zips takeover. L Jesse was the biggest play the game so far that was. Well, they do biggest play the game. And that one comes up empty. You. Can't get two yards in two downs. And the other thing is now you got the excitement here with Akron, Dr sideline there. Silence right in front of us here in the booth, and they now all of a sudden got a little bit more of oxygen and their tanks are all excited. Well, the first quarter they at thirteen plays for twelve yards of offense. But now they have it at the thirty yard line. Thirteen fifty one to go on the first half. Quarterback Nelson with Edwards. His right short drop. Now being flushed from the pocket cuts back to his left to penalty Barker calms down and Nelson taken out of the thirty five yard live by Patty Fisher, brought him down. There is a blackout holding against the zips holding offense number fifty three. Can you penalty from the previous spot repeat? I out. So the defense certainly don't think you can fault the way the defense is playing here so far. Absolutely. They've pretty much continued from where they finished last game. When they just basically shut down in the second half. And then that's that's been the narrative here these guys these guys came to play, and they're showing I in twenty from the twenty Akron moving right to left here, the second quarter and the gun Nelson. Gets the snap gives to add words. He goes nowhere. Gotta cross the twenty to the twenty one. All covered up by Patty Fisher along with. Roar the true freshman out Lincoln way, east to got it there and got a piece of that one brings up second out of nineteen one of the things that they're doing defensively the cats spying their quarterback Kato Nelson. You can see them hanging back at that second level to make sure that if he does get out of the pocket, they got somebody aware of him to set up a slot to the right side without ROY Williams. And Nelson looking over the middle. There's Korea Smith the catch at the thirty five at along down up at the thirty eight yard line. So it got the seventeen yards on that brings up third down to as Pat Fischer made the stop. So this is as close we'll see if they can widely convert a third down here. They're all for four third out. A tube is lot closer now. After that pass. Completion receiver did a nice job of finding the open hole in that defense. They were just playing zone coverage. And that was it. Good thrown. Nice. Catch is one of those twitchy guys your about newborn Williamson a slot to the right? The tide. Curtain to Edwards alludes van the backfield at Nelson takes it. Nelson. Moves it forward for the forty three. I slow zone. Read. Nice job read the defensive add bounced it out picked up the first down. That was a nice recovery. They're deepen their own mpm up. Nice there. And I in twenty after twenty there. I I doubt of the game to the forty three yard line JR pace made the stop on the quarterback Nelson. Burst out from the forty three eleven forty six to go. First half seven nothing northwestern toss to Edwards Edwards running lap. Edwards cuts it across the forty five and paddling. Powell is going to go. Let's see. There are multiple flags. Bryce Peterson the offensive line looked to be the guy. So let's see. This is just a crusher. It's so silly to there's way after the play he did it in front of his own bench. He did when he was two yards beyond the sideline after the play was over personal foul unnecessary roughness number fifty three offense fifteen yard penalty. It'd be second out Peterson our software offensive lineman from mccamley, California and. That's to push the zips back just when they have something go at they had some momentum. And this is but then again they've been in this situation. You're the second time on this drive. Its second in nineteen last time they completed a seventeen yard pass BELTRAN sands checks. They're running back. He's a junior from Fort Lauderdale who started one game a year ago. Nelson on second out of nineteen caps. Rush four they said sands in emotion. Again, there's move and Nelson can't believe it a grabs his helmet with both hands in frustration. He cannot believe it. False start offense number seventy two five yard penalty. Second out second out of twenty four. Now zips day that's a hundred in his first start was last week his very first start of his college career. And I'm sure that he's gonna regret. This little huddle is their charts. Timeout, Akron their first. Right. So a time I'll be on the field media time out eleven twenty six to go to the half, northwestern seven Akron, nothing back in a moment..

Kato Nelson Edwards Edwards Akron Patty Fisher Bryce Peterson Pat Fischer Thorson L Jesse Larkin Fort Lauderdale Korea Smith BELTRAN Lincoln Williamson Powell Barker ROY Williams California
"bryce peterson" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

06:47 min | 2 years ago

"bryce peterson" Discussed on WGN Radio

"The twenty nine yard line of ships leading seven nothing. I hear say this biggest play the game. So far the wild. Guess I think you're right. David momentum. Yeah. Can't stall here had some chances here. We talk about you gotta finish drives. Here's a chance to keep this going here where they started with good field position to western on the Atkins back. Larkin Thorson under salaries got all the way at quarterback so far, and he will give Jeremy l'arcade runs into the line and plunges inside the thirty to the twenty eight did not get the first down a short by about a yard. It's going to be. Looks like it's going to be four down and along one yard line. Oh, one yard to go. So at the twenty eight yard line so forth down. John Lieko was there outside backer there. He didn't make the tackle. But he was a big part of the push. He penetrated there. I had the cats gone for it. They're just two of seven four down. Twenty nine percent fourth at to here north giving. Larkin and Larkin is not going to get their slammed down to the thirty. He'll lose another yard and akrons defense holds and the zips takeover. L suggested it was the biggest play the game so far and that was. Well, he knew biggest play the game. And that one comes up empty. You can't get to yards into downtown. The other thing is now you got the excitement here with Akron, Dr sideline there. Silence right in front of us here in the booth, and they now all of a sudden got a little bit more of oxygen and their tanks. They're all excited. Well, the first quarter they at thirteen plays for twelve yards of offense. But now they have it at the thirty yard line. Thirteen fifty one to go in the first half. Quarterback Nelson with Edwards to his right short drop. Now be flushed from the pocket cuts back to his left a penalty marker calms down and Nelson. Picked up by Patty Fisher, brought him down. There is a blackout holding against the zips holding offense number fifty three penalty from the previous spot repeat. I down. So the defense. I certainly don't think you can fault the way the defense playing here so far. Absolutely. They've pretty much continued from where they finished last game where they just basically shut down in the second half. What the advert? And then that's that's that's been the narrative here. These guys these guys came to play, and they're shown burst and twenty from the twenty Akron moving right to left here, the second quarter and a gun. Nelson. Gets the snap. Gibbs to add words, he goes nowhere got across the twenty to the twenty one. At covered up by Patty Fisher along with. The true freshman outta Lincoln way. East to got their got a piece of that one brings up second out of nineteen one of the things that they're doing defensively the cats spying their quarterback, Cato Elson, you can see them hanging back at that second level to make sure that if he does get out of the pocket, they got somebody aware of him to set up a slot to the right side without very Williams and Nelson looking over the middle there's areas Smith the catch at the thirty five at the lung down the thirty eight yard line. So he got seventeen yards on that play brings up third down to as Pat Fischer made the stop. So this is a yardstick and we'll see if they can finally convert a third down here. They're all for four third out a lot closer now after that pass completion receiver down I shop a the open hole in that defense. They were just playing zone coverage had how's it? Good thrown in ice catches on those twitchy guy. Is your thought about Williams? Williamson a slot to the right? The third to Edwards. Eludes him out of the backfield at Nelson takes it. A Nelson moves it forward for the forty three. Zone. Nice job read the defensive and bounced it out picked up the first down that was a nice recovery. They're they're deepen their own end up. Nice there. They were I in twenty at the twenty and they have their first first down to the game to the forty three yard line is JR pace made to stop while the quarterback Nelson. I out from the forty three eleven forty six to go first half seven nothing northwestern toss to Edwards Edwards running left. Edwards Katsuta across the forty five and paddling Arthur's. Personal Powell is going to go. Let's see Eric multiple flags. Bryce Peterson the offensive line looked to be the guy. So let's see. This is just a crusher. It's so silly too. I mean there's way after the play he did it in front of his own bench. He did when he was two yards beyond the sideline after the play was over her snowfall unnecessary. Ruckus number fifty three offense fifteen yard penalty. It'd be second down Peterson our soft more offensive lineman from McKinley Ville, California and. That's gonna push zips back just when they had something going they had some momentum. And this is but then again, they've been in the situation. For the second time on his drive at second in nineteen last time, they completed a seventeen yard casts BELTRAN sands checks. They're running back. He's a junior from Fort Lauderdale who started one game a year ago. Nelson on second out of nineteen caps. Rush four they said sands emotion. Again, there's move and Nelson can't believe that it grabs his helmet with both hands and frustration. He cannot believe it. False start offense number seventy two five yard penalty. Second second down and twenty four now for the zips, and Dave that's hundred in his first start was last week his very first start of his college career. And I'm sure that he's going to regret. This little huddle is their charts. Timeout. Akron their first, right? So a time outfielder feel media time out eleven twenty six to go and the half, northwestern seven Akron, nothing back in a moment..

Nelson Edwards Edwards Akron Larkin Thorson Patty Fisher Bryce Peterson David momentum Williams Jeremy l'arcade Edwards Katsuta Pat Fischer John Lieko Fort Lauderdale Gibbs Cato Elson Dave Lincoln Williamson California
"bryce peterson" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"bryce peterson" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Quarterback. Kato Nelson out of Hollywood Florida will make his seventh career start here tonight last year. He started five games completed fifty percent of his passes nine hundred eighty nine yards. Eight touchdowns to interceptions. Edwards is they're starting running back a senior from Cape coral, Florida. He ran for one hundred nine yards their win over Morgan state last week. We'll give you the rest of the starters after we pause for the playing of our national anthem. Northwestern wildcat marching band with our national anthem continuing with the starters on offense or Akron Joan Morris and Andre Williams that our top receivers each with four catches on the air Boris transfer from Indiana University their leading receiver last year quad area. Smith a senior for Orlando with thirty four catches last year. He only had one. But it went for a touchdown last week the tight end Newman Williams, a senior from Akron, the other wide receiver Nate stewardess sophomore from Bethlehem Pennsylvania, the tackles Trevor Brown at Brandon council Brown on the left council on the right Hutter corn and Kyle Ritz co captain of the guards rips the right guard making his thirty third star twenty eight in a row tonight and Bryce Peterson is the center Ritz, by the way hails from willow be Ohio today. Same hometown, the Wildcats starting right guard tonight Nick urban cancer led defensively by middle Aker Patty,.

Edwards Kato Nelson Akron Florida Kyle Ritz Trevor Brown Smith Newman Williams Andre Williams Aker Patty Cape coral Hollywood Bryce Peterson Joan Morris Bethlehem Pennsylvania Wildcats Nate Ohio Nick Orlando