20 Episode results for "Bruton"

Bruton Parish

5 Minutes in Church History

04:59 min | 1 year ago

Bruton Parish

"Welcome to five minutes in churches hosted by Dr Stephen Nicholson where we take a little break from the presence to go exploring the past asked traveled back in time as we look the people events and even the places that have shaped the story of Christianity. This is our story family history. Let's get started. Welcome back to another episode of five minutes in Church history on this episode. We are on location in colonial. Williamsburg and I'm here with a good friend of ours on many times Dr Steve Lawson. Stephen is great to be with you. I can't believe for we all right now. We are in a great. We find each other in grades nine nine. That's right so something happened here on December sixteen seventeen thirty nine what happened here well the grand evangelist himself the Grand Randy Tenor at George Whitfield came to Bruton Parish Church and preached a powerful evangelistic message right here. What's the significance of seventeen thirty nine in the life of George Whitfield well it begins his first American tour it will take him through all of seventeen forty and he will leave in January of seventeen forty he won and he was a sensation. I think in his journal he mentioned that people travel on horseback fourteen mile just to hear this one message to hear this sermon yeah and I know they traveled even further and other places in fact when Whitfield would come to preach most cities would just shut down. They would cancel judicial hearings. Ah Shop would close farmers would come out of the field. They would all come flocking to hear Whitfield pre. No one could compete no-one no-one. What was the title the sermon he gave her the title of sermon is what think he of Christ and is drawn from Matthew twenty two forty two and it's intentionally originally evangelistic because he understood this was a very religious place but without regeneration and without the new birth and so he was intentionally probing the heart and the mind to the chase. Let's cut to the chase. He's got one opportunity what Thinki- of Christ and we are standing standing right here at the church yard of Bruton Parish Church outside and we don't know whether what field was inside or outside likely was probably outside yes so so we are here with him in spirit centuries later and I thought if you could read for us near Great George Whitfield voice a choice paragraph from this sermon yeah to treat S. two yeah this is just one paragraph and it's still early in the message and it shows how just energized he was in the very beginning of this message and so here's Whitfield some and I fear a multitude which no man can easily number are among us who call themselves Christians and yet seldom or never ever seriously think of Jesus Christ it all let me just hit the pause the tax what thinking of Christ what Winfield is saying is the problem is you don't even think about Christ it all and so he goes on to elaborate they think of their shops and their farms their plays they're balls their assemblies and Horse Races Bass for Christ the author and finisher of faith the Lord who has bought poor centers with his precious blood and who is the only thing worthy thinking of alas. He is not in at all and their thoughts or at most in very few of their thoughts but believe me. Oh you earthly sensual well Karnal minded professors however little you may think of Christ now or however industriously you may strive to keep him out of your thought by pursuing suing the lust of the flesh the losted the eyes and the pride of life yet there is a time coming when you will wish you had thought of Christ more and of your pleasure is your less so he is driving at the heart that you must give Christ the place of preeminence. You know it's earlier in the sermon in you. We talked about this earlier. Are this great line from Whitfield. He is unworthy of the name of minister who is unwilling to die for the truth of the Lord Jesus and Whitfield certainly was that he he was he was willing to die and he was often attacked for preaching sermons like this there were death threats on his life and actual real threats upon his life as he even be sleeping in bed and people break into the room and try to stab him to death but Whitfield was willing to die for the message to seal it with his own blood if necessary and a preacher who's not willing to die for his message is rarely powerful as he would live for the message and he did all that for the sake of the Gospel Amen Well. That's Dr Steve Lawson. Listen on George Whitfield on location in Williamsburg Virginia and I'm Steve Nichols and thanks for listening to five minutes in Church history for more ordination or to listen to past episodes. Please visit five minutes in Church history dot com.

George Whitfield Bruton Parish Church Dr Stephen Nicholson Dr Steve Lawson Williamsburg Steve Nichols Karnal Virginia Matthew Winfield five minutes
New ICD-10 codes for COVID-19 [PODCAST]

The Hospital Finance Podcast

12:46 min | Last month

New ICD-10 codes for COVID-19 [PODCAST]

"Welcome to the hospital finance. Podcast your go to source for information insights. They can help you. Stay ahead of the challenges. Impacting healthcare finance and now the host of the hospital finance podcast michael naughty. Hi this is not welcome back to the award. Winning hospital finance podcast. As of january first several new icy ten codes for medicare related to covid are effective to tell us more about these new codes and their impact. I'm joined by sandy bruton senior healthcare consultant with panacea healthcare solutions. Sandy welcome to the show. My thanks for having me so sandy as i mentioned. Cms recently announced new diagnosis and procedure codes for covid nineteen. They are now effective. How many new codes have been created in the ever changing world of code nineteen and nine and ten. Coding i tend pcs coating isaac cms has released an additional twenty one new pcs procedure codes. And those are going to apply to treatment for covid nineteen and vaccination for covid nineteen in addition to those twenty one new. pcs procedure code. There are six additional. I see diagnosis codes. And some of those will identify conditions resulting from covert chain. And as you said all of these codes were effective as of january first. Twenty twenty one so twenty one new procedure codes. Sounds like quite a bit. What type of procedures or included in the new procedure codes would be seizure. Codes will be able to capture the vaccination for covid nineteen and. I won't take time to list each and every code during our session today But there are six new vaccine procedure codes there. There are so many of those different codes because the different vaccines are actually administered differently. So for example. Certain vaccines are delivered. Happy changes we Somebody ever vaccines are delivered into the muscle and then the remainder of those vaccine coats actually capture bin number of doses with codes for the first does and then a separate code for the second dose if applicable because some of those vaccine's need two doses than some only one to be administered and then out of those twenty one codes the remaining fifteen new procedure codes will allow us to catch her therapeutic treatments for covid nineteen. There are six covid nineteen treatment that will be able to capture Now when performed on patients in the hospital that are being treated for covid nineteen and so some of those medications are actually in clinical trials at this time as well One of the medications. And i don't know if i will pronounce these all correctly I'm gonna tell you about the six new treatments That we'll be able to catch her now larum email it's a monoclonal antibody and it's actually used to treat hiv as well That particular medication is currently in clinical trials for treatment of kobe. And what the drug does is it. Protects healthy t cells from viral infection. So that's one of the new treatments that we'll be able to capture now At has been mad. That's very hard to say. I'm not sure how to pronounce that one completely. But it is a recombinant fully. Human monoclonal aligning antibody that binds specifically to this sars covid virus. Which is the covid. Nineteen virus attached to that. I like protein receptor and binds that virus another treatment will be able to capture. Is bam lamb the mab. And it's a neutralizing immunoglobulin monoclonal antibody and it's targets. Also this big poaching of the sars virus and neutralizes the virus by blocking the virus and keeping it from attaching and entering into the actual human cells There's an anti viral antibody cocktail and it's r. e. g. n. c. o. v. two and that's been tested on reza's my macaques and golden hamsters. So i don't know if that one is actually being used on humans yet but we do have a code for that now that we can capture that when it is then there's another treatment stack of it and that's an immuno modulator. And it's basically a fusion protein and reduces the incidence of the viral pneumonia to promote faster recovery and to prevent patients from getting the viral pneumonia or code nineteen from progressing to viral pneumonia. And then the last one is one. It's a it's a drug that's Used in combination with from desert air and it actually has been approved by the fda for treatment of covid nineteen when used with remdesivir and it's barris nab and that drug in combination with from desert is actually used to treat patients who require supplemental oxygen invasive mechanical ventilation or ecm. Oh and that that's for the more severe cases of kobe. Nineteen and what this particular do drug does is it blocks the activity of one or more of a specific family of binding interferes with the pathway inflammation so helps calm that down and their long. So it's kind of an overview of some of the new procedure codes. And why we have those why they're being released now to Aid in the capture of what how retreating these. Kobe nineteen patients in the hospital. You did a great job with those drug names and it sounds incredibly complex. I i can't see where this is going to be very easy. So definitely definitely getting a window into that You also mentioned that. Cms released some new diagnosis codes. Are these codes for covid. Nineteen were are they for other conditions so there are six new diagnosis codes That were affected as of january. First three of those new codes are to catch covid nineteen exposure covid nineteen history and covid nineteen screening specifically diagnosis codes z. Eleven fifty two. We'll be used to capture patients that are screened for covid nineteen so typically be for patients who show no symptoms And they're just having a covid nineteen tests say pre surgery or for another reason that they may be needing to be screened for covid nineteen And another one of those diagnosis codes z. Twenty eight you to that will be used to capture patients who've come into contact with someone who is known to have covid nineteen so it's really an exposure to covid nineteen code and this code will be used to report that the patient has been exposed to covid but these patients won't have symptoms and they won't have contracted the illness at this point That third code The six is diagnosis. Codes z eighty six sixteen and. That's for a personal history of covid. Nineteen so that code will be used for patients who have personally had kobe. Nineteen infection and have recovered from that infection. There are three additional codes to round out six new code. These codes will allow us to capture. Covid related condition After implementation of these three new diagnosis codes were now able to specifically catcher pneumonia due to covid nineteen with a diagnosis code. J. twelve eighty two. Kobe nineteen related connective tissue disorders. Will we can capture with 'em thirty five eighty nine and multifamily inflammatory syndrome from covid. Nineteen with 'em thirty five. Eighty one metres caveat though with these three new codes because these three code can only be assigned if the zero seven point one covert nineteen infection code is assigned thirst which of course must be assigned based on the official coding guidelines concerning the sequencing directors for covid nineteen and its manifestation. So no doubt. There's going to be more guidelines clarification of coding guidance to come with the implementation of these new codes and sandy what impact if any will all of this have on coding and reporting in twenty twenty one well of course and so what addition of these codes does is. It gives facilities away to capture more specific information and more specific data concerning covid nineteen. Its manifestations the treatments rendered and vaccinate procedures as far as the procedure codes go as with all procedure codes that are assigned specifically for hospital. Inpatient claims the facilities themselves are going to need to decide whether or not they'll be having their coaching staff assignee's procedure codes or if the data will simply be gleaned from the charge capture details because it can be taken from there But the new diagnosis codes They'll absolutely be assigned by not only in patient coatings staff but also outpacing coaching staff. And it'll be a huge help in reporting some of the most common manifestations of cobra nineteen an example In twenty money we could only catch code related to monja as other viral pneumonia but now After implementation of these new codes we now have pneumonia due to corona virus nineteen code so we can capture specifically kobe related. Specific among these new diagnosis codes. Also gives us the ability to better capture those patients who've already had covert nineteen and who's been exposed without contracting maleness the really helpful and I think it's going to Really gleaned down the data that's being collected and being analyzed and used zandi working someone find more information on these new codes you can find all of the information regarding these new codes and the implementation Vr g information grouping information on the cms website including a complete list of the new diagnosis and procedure codes And they were actually published on the website. I think on december i twenty twenty Additionally these fee back on december third of twenty twenty officially listed the new is that he can see 'em diagnosed with for covid nineteen on their website. So you can visit the cdc website and look under the resources tab if you want to look it up there. But sam's website has all the codes. The cdc website under resources has the diagnosis codes. Excellent as i mentioned at the head of the broadcast sandy as a healthcare consultant with panacea healthcare solutions. If you'd like to find out more about them you can go to panacea inc. that's panacea. I n c dot com for more about what they do. Sandy bruton much for joining us today on the hospital finance podcast. Thank you mike. This concludes today's episode of the hospital. Finance podcast for show notes and additional resources to help you protect and enhance revenue at your hospital. Visit bessler dot com slash podcasts. The hospital finance podcast is a production of bessler smart about revenue to nations about results.

panacea healthcare solutions michael naughty sandy bruton pneumonia viral pneumonia viral infection Cms medicare Sandy Covid reza inflammatory syndrome Kobe fda cdc panacea inc. Sandy bruton sam bessler
23.19  MU Podcast  Jim Bruton

Mysterious Universe

1:29:36 hr | 10 months ago

23.19 MU Podcast Jim Bruton

"Turning great idea into a reality with squarespace squarespace makes it easier than ever to Lonzo passion project. Whether you're showcasing your work selling products of any kind with beautiful templates and the ability to customize just about anything you can easily make a website all by yourself if you do get stuck squarespace. It's twenty four seven winning customer support. Is that a help head. This quest by dot com slash. Mu for a free trial when ready to launch us the offer Code Mu that will save you ten percent off your first purchase of a website autumn looking into mysterious universe season twenty three episode nineteen coming up on the show. We've got confessions from the Blackhawks Dr Satellite Dousing and Jim. Britain joins us to discuss these incredible Nita experience from his new book. The inbetween I'm Benjamin Grundy. Joining me is our rights. We've covered a lot of new death experience stories over the years Ben. But I'm so pleased that we're GONNA be talking to Jim because his story is unlike anything I've ever had before isn't it completely out of left field even for death experience. Yeah and he's life is just so fascinating I mean. The guy is just so interesting to talk to. He was an African wellness. Guide for years is an Emmy Award winning wildlife film director. He's an Ivy Ada. He's an adventurer He's the inventor of the satellite video. He was an NBC News. Middle East war correspondent husband. He's a father buddies passionate as you'll hear in a moment was eventually building and flying replica. World will want crawl yes and it was in one of these replica aircraft that he had a horrific crash basically left him for dead and for an entire week. He went somewhere else He went somewhere else. Is What this interview is GonNa be all about? He went to the inbetween before we speak to Jim. Now we have a huge amount of stuff coming up in applause extension on this episode as well. What have you been working well? I'm so excited because I was holding onto the work of been doing on Phantom black dogs and their connections with electrical phenomena ball lightning and that seemed to have par Connecticut. Abilities is strange kind of unlikely marriage that you have between phenomenon. So that's going to be coming up in the plus extension but I thought four this show. I just wanted to add a little bit to it so I picked up a copy of shape. Shifter Territory by Ryan Patrick Burns and at first when this book out I just found it in this obscure website because it was a Lulu publication. But it's now actually Amazon. I believe it's all only two shots as well so you can pick it out but if you are interested in shape shifting phenomena skin walkers wendy goes. We'd experiences like that. This is one of the go-to books. Okay this has been unlike anything else expecting it but the has plenty of great books out there on skin walkers and that kind of phenomena Ryan's experiences certainly The opposite of bizarre of the things that we've covered including strange men in black that are involved in crash. Croft that might be Blackhawks Kroft The extraterrestrial reengineer all objects all will be revealed in the plus extension coming up at the end of the Columbine trae well. Let's go into the interview with Jim. This is Jim. Bruton book is available. Now it's the inbetween. A trip of a lifetime have enjoyed the interview Welcome to the show. Author filmmaker inventor and former war correspondent. Jim Bruton welcome to the Jim. Thanks for joining us. Hi Ben Hiring how you all tonight It was so fantastic to speak to you. It was funny. We sold this book on our radar and we realized this was a story about. You'll need experience but different again when we started rating first of all we realize just how incredible you'll lie falls before this life changing experience you had and we in the very opening pages of the book we find you in of all places in. Nineteen ninety-three and we soon learn that you have a bit of a history with his part of the world so maybe take us back. Jim Too early years. What led you to Namibia and how you ended up living in the country as a young man absolutely. Yeah when I was a child like a lot of little kids. We Watch television in the evenings. Might have a favorite program that revolved around natural history. Like wildlife filming a very popular one here called Wild Kingdom. It came on Sunday nights. And there's a little boy I'd sit there and watch the pair of men run around the world helping animals endangered species or wildlife parks or things like that and I remember sitting here thinking. How do I do that for a living well in College? I met a young woman whose father made wildlife towns and actually they are Australian. He his name. Is Dan Bartlett? His wife was Jen. And my wife to be was named Julie so I asked her. I said you know filming. Wildlife has always been a dream of mine since childhood. Does your father ever need help. And she said I'll ask. Well Know Beckons Chore. So it took me a couple of months to basically sell all my stuff and pack a bag and head off to Namibia with Julie to join her parents in you know start learning about wildlife filming which as you can imagine in Africa. It's a lot more than just filming. Animals I mean it's how to fix the Landrover Tattoo conserve water. It's it's so it's a very holistic learning process and of course you know learning how to film animals is a big exercise in patients. They don't do anything on cue. You can't hurt while the animal and you could be sitting there for five or six days with your eyes glued to a view finder on camera willing to get an ostrich chick hatching your comeback on the seventh day. And you know something cracked it open as like okay. It's certainly saying that you had a kind of magnetic pull back to that part of the world because you explain lighter you eventually informed the Safari Company to take other people out there. But it's the story gets really interesting when it's nineteen ninety-three and you're in the middle of nowhere in Namibia and of Disney film crew tons up now you explain it. There was a piece of the technology that really You know sparked your interest really a fierce way really kind of changed the path of your life but was that technology in what positive spin down. Absolutely yeah that. That's a great point to bring up. So yes I was in the Skeleton Coast Park which is has the world's tallest sand dunes. I was three hundred miles from anyone and I heard the sound that these vehicles coming into the sand dunes and I looked it was led by a ranger. I knew also lived in the park and is a Disney film crew their scouting location for film. And as I talked to him about young. Who are these people? What are they doing here? they pulled out several cases in one of them. They from one of them. They opened up a Nikolai zed. Polyester it's like an umbrella. A satellite dish made this flexible fabric. And I'm really intrigued now and I mean the thing is they pulled out a telephone. Handset may had this phone call going on with their studios back in Los Angeles and here they are you with the whole planet between the Los Angeles having this insane instantaneous conversation I was thinking holy cow right now if I were to write a letter and somehow get it to town and Mail it in get immediate response if you take me six weeks round trip and these people have instant communication and first of all the look of this little satellite phone on this beautiful clean. Sand Dune just had a really cool science fiction. Look to it and I think that that really got my imagination galling and as a filmmaker or is anyone in media. We're always looking for a new way to tell a story like the application of a new type of technology or maybe we take a surgical land. Something they can go inside your body and we run up through a flower stamps. That when the B- lands on it it's as big as a house in you really catches the viewers attention so when I saw this small satellite phone and they were talking on us. I started wondering. Has anyone ever pushed live video over a system like this and I asked him? They said we don't know and I am at that time. I said I'm going to figure out how to do it and I don't know what made me say that but I was. It was the first person the world to figure out how to do it. And will you were technical guy though I mean did you did you noodle around with electrics as a Kid? Did you have that kind of mind? Had A technical Miami one of my majors. I double majored in double minor in school and one of my majors was physics and I think I was just perpetually curious to be honest and I loved science fiction so I think being able to see something very clearly said that the target or in-state I could work out how to get there one way or the other so I returned to return to the station talk to bell laboratories talked to Inmarsat and I talked to. The people actually made the satellite telephones and they all put together. Gave Me Free Satellite Time? They gave me a free hugely expensive satellite phone and Bell Labs said Yeah however we can help you. Just let us know and off. I went around the world testing my system different locations. Yeah and this part of the book I just found so incredibly assistant amazing career. You had you know you you sort of working with Microsoft. This led you to to NASA. You end up being contacted by the Pentagon the Department of Defense and ultimately wall zones in the Middle East. It's just an amazing story I I do WanNa hear a little bit more about that because To tell us for example how how you got involved with Microsoft. What was the project with them? Let's just say that it took a couple of years to really refine my satellite system to transmit video we had to wait for the digital satellites to launch because until then everything was analog and there were just too many errors in the signal to sustain video but once the digital were launched a my system was ready to rock and roll and I pull the wraps off of it on October. Thirty First Nineteen ninety-six who went live into Harvard Science Center from a forest in Mexico and that got a lot of attention. My next phone call was from the king of Malaysia who wanted to come with his team to Mount Everest and transmit the second the king. 'cause when you wrote that in the book? I thought the King of Malaysia was some movie project you're working on but it was actually the king of Malaysia. Goals you up yes. It was his office working through Intelsat in Washington. Dc and I went down to Washington to meet with them and it was all about being able to use my system to transmit live video back to the Malaysian television stations from the summit of Everest. And of course. I said sure I could do that. Actually I knew. The master cartographer the Matmaker at National Geographic for the Everest region. So we we worked out some of the logistics regarding line of sight and I had to build a couple of video transmitters the size of a pack of cigarettes that were like twenty watts of power. I mean like unbelievable power but we were successful. We did do it. And that got a lot of attention and the next thing. I know I'm getting a call for Microsoft. They wanted to retrace the journey of the Maj. I you know the three wise men I wanted to end at Christmas Eve in Bethlehem in Manger Square. So we went into Iran in them. We went to Syria Jordan Israel and we did and in along the way. We were transmitting using my system. daily journals video clips saw audio interviews. Things like that and that was pretty cool that that we definitely saw some stuff that was like right out of an Indiana Jones movie and then it was really fun to go live on Christmas Eve for Manger Square with the Celebrations Pioneering. This really early part of the Internet. Or something we take the Grand Day back. Then it would have been revolutionary. Well yes because in ninety three. When I first saw a satellite phone the World Wide Web was invented in ninety three to give the Internet some sense of organization talk about the Wild West but the worldwide web started to create graphical interfaces and started to organize information in a way that was more meaningful to more people. So is it that moment that I realized I'll bet I could go live with a system. Like this from waterholes or native villages. Just all kinds of crazy places that have been impossible before and it would be very exciting for people to you. Know more. Virtually participate in Terni. And we discover you you want backup at Mount Everest. But this time I WANNA project with NASA involved A Medical Sada things can. Can you explain that? There was a local Internet company near my home. Forget exactly how we met but once they found out about my system and what my goals were with creating content for the Internet. They were one of the organizations capturing signal from the summit and streaming out onto the Internet for people to see and we had a live interview and that was fun and then one of the founders of the company said you know this might have a lot of application to this new called Tele Medicine and I know somebody over Yale University. Who's involved in it? Would you like to talk to him? Wasatch sure don't live very far from there anyway. So we met over at Yale. We talked about what my system could do and how I already integrated some interesting data acquisition tools to it. I'm giving you an example. We okay in regular television when you see closed captions. That's using a certain part of the signal called the a vertical blanking interval and you can actually use that cord the signal to present data on screen kind of like in the science fiction movies when somebody has a heads up display and then see where they are whether neighbor is and their heart rate. Now let us say so. I showed how I could use the vertical blanking intervals Preserved information on the television screen. And then when I could do is you know with the two audio channels you have. I can actually bust part in old Tele coupler. You might remember what that was. The early days of the Internet it would take a telephone transmit signals over at that were terms. I would use that to transmit of data channel used the remaining audio for the audio in the video. So we had all this stuff going together and it was really pretty cool so when I talked about that I'd done that with some California Sea Lions and had the video to show it. They got really excited and right at that moment. A new surgeon arrived at the Yale University of Surgery Department and he had been a former directorate. Darpa the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency in ALS-. They're the ones with the aliens of the base and had run the advanced biological and medical projects. Division was Colonel Rex Ataba and when he heard about he goes. You know. This sounds pretty cool. Because I'm here to declare to work with recently declassified technology that I found it when I was running Darpa and so I said you know we should go back to Mount Everest and try intest these new systems that you're developing to go up on the space station and so we did These were things like a temperature pilled. You could swallow that had a transmission radius of three meters. And then just all this other crazy stuff that was built into something that almost like a buoyancy compensator harness that you'd go scuba diving with very lightweight they're high tech you your oxygen saturation. Your body temperature. Gps physician all sorts of things. We could tell the climbers what Kinda Day. They were having before they knew. Wow that's fascinating. And that could be monitored from anywhere in the world through the satellite system. And that's exactly what we did. We made it so that we could see it down at dais camp. They went up through The KUNDU ICEFALL IN FROM CAMPS. One two three and four up to the summit and we also were live. Transmitting it back to the Walter Reed Military Hospital out of Washington. Just amazing and this is a part of the book where we very early on. Get a sense that perhaps you'll slightly more sensitive to some things than the average person because you made it clear that you figured out you could almost feel where the satellite signal was coming from Kelley. Dousing know that you've had a Australia because you know it's it's a lot of desert out there in water is very precious so it was a lot like dousing and it's just something. I realized I could do. In the first place I realized it was when I was producing the Titanic Expedition. For DISCOVERY DOT COM. I could just sense when I was having stronger. Satellite signals weaker in. I really can't explain. It was just this feeling in my gut so when I was at Mount Everest we we were stage when you go to Mount Everest hike in to give your body a chance to acclimatise build up more red blood cells. You can't just Kinda helicopter into base camp which is about fifty four hundred fifty five hundred meters oil. Pass out about six hours. So we were at this Tibetan monastery I mean the Tabet Buddhist monastery even into policy Tango and while we were there a few days resting up there was this man from Army Corp engineers and he had a big satellite system with about a three meter dish. I think and I was watching him. Set His blessed. Can I try something? He said what I want as I would like to put the dish together and then I want to steer it by gut. Feel to the satellite. You're looking for and this satellite is like twenty two thousand. Five hundred. Miles was at about forty thousand kilometers above the equator. I said I want you to turn it on looking for that. Particular satellite as you use your spectrum analyzer to identify when the signal has been captured when you're locked on If I don't tell you I'm I think I'm on it. You can tell me if I've missed it. He said okay. That sounds like fun so I put it together and I just kind of stood there and got really quiet comes centered in my gut and I just started steering it be a back and forth on his as Meth at down. Salvation and finally. I just stopped and I looked at MSN. How am I doing he goes? You're only one and a half degrees off of access while degree and degree is if you held your hand straight out. The winter is one degree. Oh my God that's how I was. And what's the feeling like? Can you describe it? You get a tingling sensation some kind of subtle at spider sense. It's really hard to describe it but if I had to say it's almost like a full feeling and it's not like full and hungry. It's just like more full less full. It's kind of hard to say it better than that you know. I don't know that we have the vocabulary to describe some of this. Let's move onto Y. The Pentagon got interested in you. You said you go to Col- from the Pentagon one day. Whoa light trying to figure out from your research. Well this is great so what happened was in the late ninety S. I started thinking I could see the dot com bubble going to burst in about the next year or two just had this feeling about it and so I started reaching out the different news agency saying you know this is kind of like taking a TV truck in shrinking to a backpack and this would allow us to go live with video from places that you can't do that now and so I went down and showed it to CNN. And they got very excited about it. And I'd say be a couple months later. They called me and asked if I could go to the Persian Gulf and I said sure so. I took my system long story short. I was flown out to an aircraft carrier the USS Independence. I think this was like its last voyage before it was decommissioned to and on the stern the back part of the ship down near the water levels place called fantail and the actual runway for the jets was above me. It's an interesting type of architecture. So what I did is. I had shot some video around the ship. They were shooting cruise missiles at Iraq and flying missions. A no-fly zone. They were willing to enforce them all that. So I got about this footage and then I asked the captain of the ship. It could you hold a heading for made for a little while because shore. So this allowed me to set my satellite phones in lock onto satellite and without the shift turning left or right stay locked on during the duration of my transmission. So I didn't lose the connection. Well you have about a degree and a half of latitude so would hold a ship on a heading. It has to really be on it but it worked out. What's really cool? Is He? Issued orders to the bridge to hold that heading and then he came back because he was really interested in what I was doing. Remember no one had really seen this before and this was a real trial with CNN. And obviously I didn't want to fail but what I did is I got a little cocky and I said check this out and what I did is I had. I had a small computer that look like a laptop on Steroids. It was machined out of magnesium and aluminum. It actually came out of a pot of sixteen fighter. But if you come out at well flight at fifty thousand feet covered in is still running. So I said that's what I need and it had a back that and there were some different of you know electronic cards slots you could put in so I had put one in very high end video Basically video conferencing board and another one was very high and communications board that was matched to the communications interface. This of these particular satellite funds. I was using and what I did. Is I hacked the bonding code of the video conference system. That would take one single signal and allow me to divide it into four that were exactly equal to the satellite systems. I was using so in other words I was able to not be limited to one. Satellite System does actually will use to which doubled by Rodin with which improved the video quality substantially. Eventually I did hack it. And I was able to put four satellites systems on but that was in the jungles of the Philippines with the special forces. A few years later I know right. I Love I love. This is the average day in the life of Jim. Bruton I've ended up in the jungles the Philippines during a US carrier hacking aboard on my computer that came out of a casing from an F. Sixteen now I'm controlling these satellites. It's incredible I can imagine what it sounds like. I know but anyway he. I showed him what I could do. I actually split my one video signal up into the two separate satellite signals and I sent one of the signals off to a satellite over the Atlantic Ocean and then down to a lander station in America and then to CNN. The other half of this big signal. I sent over to the Indian Ocean and then down to their station in Malaysia wrapping around the Pacific to meet at CNN. And I was able to make those two halves of the signal neat within a second and a half of tolerance to maintain the video feed and when I did that he must have really thought about how incredible that was because that's actually like built-in Internet Security. If you'd hack either signal only had half of it you'd have garbage. You'd have to get whole thing so he he must have. It was from him. He must have said something to the Pentagon and the Pentagon called me and said. Oh you know Admiral Zone says saw what you were doing just thought it was wonderful. We'd love hear more about what you're up to and why don't you come down to Washington? Dc and have lunch with us. Of course you. I was on the next train down there. Ready to see what this was all about. And we sat there and had a great conversation And it was with the Navy really friendly really great conversation. My Dad was navy so I've always grown up. Respectful appreciative of our military in in this just reinforced. That and When I talked about what I was doing they said you know we'd like to offer several things we'd we'd like to. Have you know any of the news? Correspondents who want to transmit from Our ships we WANNA make. We won't have it where they go through and we'd like to come back and we'll invite them all here in. You can demonstrate your system to am basically. You're doing it as you know are chosen one. That's it that's pretty cool. And then he slid across the table to me a telephone number and said in the meantime wherever you're going in the world whatever you're doing if you get into trouble call this number within twenty four hours we will extract you. I love this. You have a free extraction cod from the Pentagon. Have you ever been tempted to use it like if you had a bad night out and your car breaks down? You don't have any cell signal you been tempted to call the number Newton or no. It's the Pentagon I never needed it by the grace of God. I never needed it but but it did. It did continue to grow into a very nice relationship that was with them and more newtonmore more uniquely. I guess you could say like the Joint Special Operations Command. In incredible couple book that allude to that and your relationship with the military. I guess continued in a way when you went to Iraq. Can you'll also enough Afghanistan but you time and Iraq- who were you embedded with you mentioned the The First Battalion Fourth Marines is where you ended up xactly so okay so I came back from Afghanistan. I shall have to South East Asia for a few weeks right after that to chase Abu Sayyaf terrorists in the jungles in the Philippines and then I came back and took the rest of the year off. We knew we were going to go into Iraq. It was just when where we're going so I was again talking to all the news agencies to see what they're up to a salary embedded with our rejoined with NBC News and is interesting. I A win over to Kuwait. And we were based out of airbase. They're all selene airbase. And I was embedded with the Marines helicopter squadron and that was at the very beginning and I was in a helicopter. You on the night of the assault and then few days later is things were gone seeming to settle down and talk to General Joe Kelley and said. I really need to go and get killed. I'm not doing a good here. So he said you put me on. His helicopter flew me right up to the tip of the spear re embedded me with an infantry division that was the First Battalion Fourth Marines and I stayed with them throughout the rest of my time. There they were just a great bunch of guys. I really really enjoyed this incredible stories from this part of your life but the one that really stood out to us. Was You trying to rescue some nonce? He's going to tell this. This is a crazy story. That's a great is a great story so inventing Baghdad was a little strange for us. We crossed the river. And then we I'd say we invaded the the landfill and then we invaded the sewage. And then we finally took over an abandoned cigarette factory so I mean supply healthy eller on Mike as we got set up there of talking to my fiance back here in the United States in her aunt was a a nun assist her in the order called the Missionaries of Charity. And that was the order that Mother Teresa founded and. She said she'd been talking to her aunt and our onstage. We do have a mission there in Baghdad. No one's heard from them since the bombing and all that we're really concerned about them so when my wife my wife yet my fiance asked me if I could find out anything I went to the kernel that was with and I said you know. Here's the deal. This is what I need. He said hold on a second and he had marine intelligence go and talk to the CIA who controlled whole street in Baghdad. At the time in about an hour they came back with what we call a grid allows longitude point said here. Here's for your nuns are so the kernel literally said yet. Here's my m sixteen years. My sidearm here. Three my best guys. There's an armored Humvee Goto it and so we were driving through Baghdad. Totally unsecured yet only know some people realize we dated big machine guns on top of this thing it was. It was insane but no one got in our way everybody moved. We finally went down the right street. We found the mission. I started to get out and had to take off on my body armor and helmet and I said I don't want to scare these women to death now whip and knocked on the door and One of the nuns answered and I think two of them were from Bangladesh. One was from proper India if you will and they were just so relaxed funny is almost like they were wearing birkenstocks. And we're just kind of really chill and really yep and and I said no one's heard from you. I'm here to check on you if you're all right. Yeah we're fine. What's a problem and I said well you know we were concerned. She sit come in so I went inside and she took me around the corner inside in showed me this room. That had I swear. Like twenty baby beds baby cribs in the end. They're all of these children and the mud. All of these children had either severe mental challenges or physical challenges like flippers instead of arms. I mean we're talking serious stuff here. The people in Baghdad would have these babies and say we don't want this baby and they go literally put it on the doorstep of this mission knock on the door and run away and obviously about swath. I couldn't leave the nuns. Had you got exactly? And so she said where would we go? Where would we have escaped to? We're we couldn't leave all the children here. We couldn't take them all so we just stayed in so I looked at her and said you know I'd like to do a news story on you about this. This was just before Easter on Good Friday. And if I I guess maybe from their naturally being humble people she said now you know we don't really want publicity. This isn't about you. I said this is about your mission and this is an example. People need to see in they taught me said okay. We'll do it so I did a really great story. And you're the marines came in. They were holding the babies. They're almost fighting to hold these babies. It was just so cool to see this and then set up the satellite and I told all the sisters I said okay. Call whoever's important to you and tell them you're okay so They called out told everybody they were fine and we went back and visited several more times like the UN building had been bombed out so the marines rated it to all kinds of stuff from food and curtains and fabric and light bulbs all sorts of things. So I think we outfitted the Mission pretty well we finally. It's really amazing writing about you your time in in the Wolsey incredible stories there. There's a ton more in the book but we should move forward a bit t- The the period in your life Once all this was kind of the once you you laugh at settled down. I think he were. You're back in the United States. You working for a pharmaceutical company at the time and this is when you wife. Dina suggested to to build an airplane to to build an airplane. You'd been fascinated with since your childhood. So which plan was this and why we use so fascinated with it again. You know we were talking a little while ago about as a little boy. Being fascinated by wildlife films in science fiction Another S nation. I'd had was early aviation back when it was almost like the age of chivalry still lived in World War One and things like that and during the pioneer age of aviation every day was a day of discovery so it was just something that really captured my imagination so I had fallen in love with a couple of aircraft way back then one was one thousand nine hundred seventeen walker try playing that means three wings is just like what. Red Baron flew except I didn't want to read when I came up my own color. Scheme of black and white stripes the other one was a very whimsical looking airplanes. Look like more suited to being in a Disney cartoon. It was called a flying flames. Tiniest little fuse allies and two wings a BMW motorcycle engine right in front of your face. Propeller it was actually very cute. So the thing is my my wife realized that having come from a life of you know high adrenaline and Incitement that working in the corporate world might might take its toll so in that. I'm also pilot for fun. She said you know now that you had this free time. Won't you build that airplane? You're always talking about you know that you've thought about since childhood. Not Look there's a you're right. So did it took me a while because I was very faithful to Reproducing it with all the small details I did. Did you use a modern engine? Because they didn't have access to a world war one engine But that's fine and so I built a fluid and then eventually one day I sold it to an air force pilot and once I did. Yeah once I did that. I said well now to build the second plane. Little reproduction of Nineteen thirty-three French flying flea. By Hong Riemann Yeay. He wanted to build a smaller plane. That can be built on the dining room table of your Paris apartment and back in the Thirties. Which is really kind of cool concept and you almost like the birth of the microlight movement so I said well this is the aircraft I'll build and of course you know. I got to know a lot of people who I'd say very knowledgeable in that particular aircraft including the grandson of the man who came up with the design back in the thirties. And I built it and I I flew it on October. Third Twenty sixteen but they really didn't like the way it handled we saw said okay. I'm a few days later. I'M GONNA go back out and master. Its quirks and that was October six. Twenty thousand two thousand sixteen. I made one pass around the field. Everything was fine. It was on my way. Beck around on what we call the downwind leg that I lost my engine and because it was a you know an early design aircraft wasn't very clean aerodynamically so when it lost power it was coming down. Didn't glide just dropped right pretty much. Yeah and so I knew I wasn't gonNA make it back to my grass strip airfield and it was very rocky very hilly and very forest at all around me so the only place that didn't have any of these obstacles was a small very small lake at a nearby boy scout camp so just aimed for that because the the shape of the fuselage was set those almost like a boat. I said Yeah I'll just put it down in the water near the shore and I'll be fine. Well I overshot the bank by about ten feet. Probably about It's probably about six feet high about two meters above the ground. I crashed into all these big tree. Trunks at seventy miles an hour in the equivalent of what we call Soapbox Derby car dot crashing. There was no plane left around you within literally turned into matchsticks and I ruptured both loans Brooklyn. My Ribs My right leg was had multiple fractures. That had a hole in my lower back from a battery hitting me against seventy miles an hour. My was torn up in as I said in my book and You noted like other that I was fine. You just have this huge list of life threatening injuries and the only other that everything's great. Everything's fine but you a conscious want you. Well here's the funny thing I I was certainly I guess in shock after that and there was luckily there was a man fishing That day whose fishing there because it was closed and it was peaceful until I came down and he ran over and he called the emergency number and kept me propped up and I asked him. I said you know was I conscious. Talking was what was my breathing. Like you weren't really breathing. You're gasping and it. Was this phone bloody phone coming out of your mouth because your lungs are ruptured us a while. So if he hadn't get me propped up. I probably just died right there on. The helicopter landed maybe forty five thirty forty five minutes later and they were able to pull me out of the wreckage in flew me up to a our capital city. Hartford Connecticut to the Trauma Center where they took excellent care of me and when my wife got up there a few hours later she found me. I can breathing machine with all kinds of tubing to me and coming out of me was restrained because they didn't want me in my delirium to start grabbing and pulling on them like that so you had a really grueling week ahead of you in terms of the operations that were acquired ryon like some of them with With the chance of success in the two percent range I think I remember writing. Yes this is what she and my oldest daughter told me that They came out and said you know we have multiple six plus our operations all day long operations coming up and we can lose him at any time and it was you know on these day by day determinations of what would be done next that they told my wife. Dr One a couple of them were had only a two percent chance of success which specific operations but that my daughter said we actually started the grieving process before all this because we just thought we were going to lose you. I said well I guess I was just to ornery to stay dead. I was a point where the doctor recommended to your wife to place you in a coma on your wife grade exactly but now this is where this is where we find ourselves at the pivotal point in life. Where you'll no longer in your hospital bed. Jim You your. You'll now somewhere else. Yeah you think it's a wild ride up to now. Just just wait. So yes they put me into a coma and again in my best reckoning when they put me into a coma here I had a near death experience and as opposed to many where the the person who has experience will said they went through a tunnel. They arrived in a beautiful place. You know like heaven or a type of heaven. They may have seen a long lost loved. Ones Grandmother Grandfather that had passed away. Something like that. Or they'll see angelic beings. They'll have a a life review to see how they're doing and then they'll get some big message and then come back. I didn't have any of that. I it was more like for me just appearing somewhere else like I was teleported there and it was up on a terrace of tall building in literally. What looked like a post apocalyptic city imagine New York maybe imagine Sydney after a nuclear blast or after the asteroid hits or something like that it was absolutely it was very gothic looking very foreboding. Everything just looked gray in the sky was heavy in grey as well as if it was getting ready to cut loose with the mother of all storms and I remember just looking around. I wasn't afraid I'm just taking it in accepting this is reality and then all of a sudden this wave of nausea hit me and I kinda doubled over and I said I don't think I can stand this and when I said that I heard this noise off to my left and I looked over there and there was this tall fifteen meter high eg like a sculptor that looked like an egg shape but it was made out of lattice work like strips and bands of material with big open spaces between them and it was inside there. I could see this light movement and that's where the sound coming from so I kind of get bent over with pain. I walked over there and I looked through that lattice work inside. Were these in freely. Suspended HIS SPACE. Where these what are called sector gears we think of gear. We think of a full circle with the little teeth all the way around it. A secular gear is a partial arc about gear. It's like a quarter section if you will and it's designed to move back and forth and you'll find him in clocks for example and I looked at some of them. Were very clear and definite. Some of them were very ghost like in transparent but as they were sort of idling were gently moving and they would just pass through each other physically impossible manner here but it looks natural there in as I looked at them they some were more infocus. Some were very much out of focus is really strange. It's like it's doing a number on my eyes. And even though the degree to which they will be in focus as I looked at them was there. I can see woody twin representatives of video playing in my head and I realized this represents inexperience in my future. Because I knew it hasn't happened yet but I knew it was associated with me so I put my hand through the lattice work to see if I could touch these gears and as I did. So one gear brushed by my hand and again immediately doubled over in even worse pain and it was a reflex. That's really what it was that I grabbed that gear and pulled it out through the lesson. Throw it away and when I did that all of the gears inside. Kinda went crazy and we're spinning around. And then they settled down and that's when I asked the question what is this and that is when I heard a disembodied voice. That pretty much stayed with me throughout the rest of my experience. It said this is the process of becoming. And I said Okay Wha- whereas this what's going on I said you're in the in between us in between what they said everything you're standing inside the eternity of the single moment that said something like that doesn't make any sense in said basically said the past is dusty. Knows it try to remember where you just came from. You know what I've got one of the quotes of going of the courts here in front of me off. You removed the Ghia. The entity said to you h gear is the probability of Fort Word Word or action in your future. Your destiny is resetting itself and what you have removed exactly exactly. And that's what all the spinning around was and so the machine was re basically. This machine was my destiny. This representing my destiny in all the events of that destiny were contained within. And obviously what it's saying. Is that each one of those gears representing a decision point is full of probabilities of how you get to that decision. Point of the kinds of decisions. You could make what would impact it. Who would be impacted? All these things are woven into. Every single moment of decision it would be hard to describe this. If you didn't have a visual I mean as middling is it is know to to sort of reference so you. I kept talking to night. I said well. How did I know I could do that? Reaching here. And move that gear in. It said wild. Saryu here I have no idea where these events occur. When said that's not important? It's not important or where what's important is that. You see how the beauty of things how things fit and refit together. And I understood that and and I think that just convince you that everything that's happening is supposed to happen as part of a pattern and so you learn not to worry. It's such a fascinating visual representation of this idea of. I guess like the egg is almost a quantum state of all these possibilities. And it's interesting this. This conversation goes back and forth in the section of the book of you in this unseen entity. But there's a point where it's it's talking about choices and unintended consequences of choices and the pain h choice brings is your guide and you you ask the entity where the deal is feel. Good I wanna find the ones feel good because you're in so much pain and it essentially says you not here to feel good years how I look at it because a lot of people get when they talk about. Feeling unconditional love. I said. Well I didn't get the hugs. I did not get additional love but look at it this way in that. I I believe I was there for my own good. I was there to remove events in my future. That might be very unfortunate choices to make so. I'm sort of pre removing obstacles from my path in the future that will allow me to be a better person so I think as we look at it that way it becomes clear that again that that everything is pretty much as it should be an unfolding as it should and need to stop pulling gives gear is exactly and I even said one time you. I feel bad that might have a real moral compass for doing this. I don't have any mantra or scripture. Some religious idol to you know want to emulate. It's pain and that's when it said you know that all all choices have unintended consequences. Some unfortunate in some not. And that's where pain is your guide because had I been able to see some of these choices among been very tempted to try to leave them in my life like if I was going to win the lottery and be you know very wealthy but become a real jerk for doing had. I could imagine arguing with God saying Leslie that in I promise. I won't be a jerk but rather than just make it a discussion at all. Why don't we just take into account the pain? You're going to cause if this happens and let that decide for you whether you really want. How badly wanted and obviously whatever my choices were that I wasn't really allowed to say no because again it wasn't important. What was important. Is that a US pain to clean it up now. In sort of a virtual model before it became real actually affected other people and Indus experience in this strange post-apocalyptic Health Cape that you're in a. Did you have any kind of notion that there was your body still lying back in the hospital trying to survive? Did you still have a connection to your old ally for will you just in this singular moment of time completely oscillated from that reference? The second absolutely what you said in the second part of that. I had no memory of this whatsoever. If if they had said to me. If you stay here any longer you can't go back. I would have said go back where well to your family. What family I had no notion. No memory no association with the Earth and life here and honestly is I really dug into. I realized how deep personalized I was everything everything everything that made me. Jam was stripped away from me. I was only aware of being conscious. Baying I wasn't pursuing or trying to avoid a joy or pain I was just I mean other than trying to reduce pain by making better choices But it's not like I wanted to run away. It's not like I was terrified when worried about getting rained on or anything like that it was just a. I'm on a mission and I need to accomplish what I wanted to say regarding. The unconditional love. Is that when when young men and women are preparing Join the military preparing to go to war. They go through like a boot camp a drill drill instructor camper whatever. And that's not a very loving environment. You don't get hugged you. Don't get pampered. You really get almost beat up because the whole idea is to tear you down in order to build you up and you know there are people who probably have wanted to kill the drill or the you know the guy running the place. Because he's putting him through hell but when they go out into war but and because of the training they received they can make more informed and better choices and survive. What's coming next? There are a lot of people who go back to that drill instructor and Follow Their Feet. And say thank you. We suddenly got a sense that the entity was also being slightly gentle with you because it actually made this clear. It said everything is interconnected and pay more attention to your relationships. Be Gentle with everyone as I am gentle with you. And it was funny because he said in the book will. It doesn't really feel gentle. This situation nothing Villes gentle about it but then there was something that I it set off to this which I never quite understood. Maybe I missed it later on in the book but it seemed like a reference to something the entity said you pride something for which is the which being here is the answer and now the man who fell from the skies not the same who flew into it but this this praying for something for which being there as the answer. Is that something? You understood lighter. Did you know what the origin of that was? I think it's a characterization. I think many people especially people who are spiritually inclined who every now and then ran up against the world and see it for what it is in the long for something better. They longed for people to be better. They long for a more evolved way of even dealing with the situation. They find themselves in. I think there comes a point that we call the souls midnight and in that moment in such despair we might call out gods name for help and with the sincerity and humility that call. I'm believe that on that day God turns around and calls your name in on that day. You're going home one way or the other. The matter how many lifetimes your feet are now set to go home and circumstances in the world will align in almost conspire to get you there and this to me was part of the answer of a similar cry. I'm sure I've made in my life. So how did the experience conclude you pulling out gays guided by pain trying to find this? This puth rule that all potentialities was there a conclusion to it. Or how did you find yourself back in the hospital? Yeah that's interesting. You listen to it already with when it said And now the man who fell from the sky is not the same who flew into it. I would say the real partying words. There was when it said everything is interconnected and pay more attention to your relationships because when I said I think I can live with this now and that was its response. It's as if the view of where I was started. Either fade or like zoom out or something like that. It's really hard to say. But it was definitely me separating from it to return here now when I returned here in and again. I'm I missed a meeting. This is when they took me out of the coma week later even though in the in between it was a split second. I didn't have any memory of this place for at least another week. He's think about incoming coming added INTENSE ANESTHESIA. Coming out of basically Coma MAKING DRUGS. A physical shock pain killers. I don't even remember being in the Trauma Center. I just remember waking up in what I would call the rehabilitation hospital that I was transferred to Following surgery and that is interesting is as I was there. I was kind of a good mood. But I guess you know. When you're doped up you you might be a real good mood. I wasn't even aware of that much pain I was and to be honest and I I definitely had this. It's as if it was a video thieves as if it were a video that was on replay of my experience in the in between just kept going over and over and over my head. I'm like what is this. Where did this trump trump? What is it? I have no clue and yet had such gravity. It had such a poll. Had such a push had so much weight behind it. I'm like I have no idea what this is all about that it wouldn't let me go and with each iteration there was more detail. There was more debt. There was more of an emotional connection to it and I finally looked at my morning nurse. Who was really incredible nurse? She was just really she would just hang out in the room. We would talk about life in the universe and everything nothing. I have this weird thing going on in my head. Do you might just share with you. She has sure go ahead. He was quite happy to spend some time. They're talking so I told her my story as it has been printed in the book and she started crying and I said why are you crying and she said? I don't want you to die and I said you're a nurse in a hospital. You see death all the time you said. Yeah but you're magical as what do you mean by that? She said well everybody here gets one doctor and get fifteen minutes of their time of day because medical personnel very busy. For some reason you have three to five doctors in here who stay for an hour. Half I snoop. I walked by and I'm listening. Were you guys talking about? And you're talking about your work your family's your hobbies no one's talking about your medical records or your situation. She said I've never seen anything like that in. That is so this leads to answering a question. That's coming up nets when people have near death experiences as PM. H atwater has said if you weren't psychic before you'LL BE PSYCHIC AFTER. If you were a psychic you'll be more psychic. I wouldn't say whether I was psychic or not but I wouldn't say the attitude or aspect of my personality that we call empathy the volume got totally turned up on. I'm glad you brought that up because it's so true it we've covered hundreds of these near death experience stories of us on our show and we always hear this a recurring experience from people that they have increased psychic changes in my life off the NDA. They also have physical changes as well. It was really telling you described one of the first things you saw when he kind of came to the hospital was that put up a photo of you And I think it was in the Middle East somewhere with to Trouble looking guys and you know you look like you had like Kare Vashon you in the desert like a warrior and you looked at this photo of yourself and felt no connection to this person almost as if you will a completely different person Can you describe how that evolved of time did you? Did you have any connection to your old self at all know and it's interesting because it literally was like one of the first things I saw coming out of my delirium and my wife had put it there because to her the swashbuckling guy on the front lines of Afghanistan. Smoking Cuban cigars you know with fifty caliber machine. Gun belts all over. Everybody was a very very dashing looking at her. That was maybe the best version of myself. Like your perfect match dot com fled. And she I guess she wanted me to see that as encouragement. Want you to heal back to being this person and I remember looking at that picture and I just felt no association to whatsoever and that you might say was my first full indication that things were different now and of course you know everybody who walked in the room and saw the picture head to hear the story so You know thinking a lot of opportunities for conversation but it was obviously a conversation. I was getting very tired of having because it was pretty much all my story and it wasn't even relevant story anymore. But they did get me thinking you know how to her and maybe even to me before the crash this might have been what I would have thought was the best version of myself and yet it now. I'm starting to feel like the best version of myself was essentially on my knees in pain in a hellish landscape. Getting the crap kicked out of me in order to become a better person and you think about it. I mean Joseph Cambell with Hero's journey we love the heroes who are getting the crap kicked out of not the ones who were born with a silver spoon in their mouth but the ones who fall down get knocked down they just keep getting up. They won't take no for an answer because we identify with challenge we identify with adversity. And so when we are shown that someone can keep going and push through and carry on and succeed. These are the stories of heroes and so that instinctively why saw the best version of myself as being in the in between? Will you mentioned the fifth some of the physical attributes that change. Obviously you had a long road to full physical recovery. But you did mention that you vision improved to high sensitivity to smell and the Thais lessened. I WanNa put those aside for a moment and come back to some of the changes in your physical state and also changes in Slavic states as well but to get there. I I WANNA I Discuss how you try to understand what had happened to you I I. I understand that you tried to you. Know rate up as much as he kudo need experiences. You started to research about quantum physics and try and find answers as to what had happened and obviously your experiences atypical. It was very very difficult. But you told an experience of Listening to an audio book. You'll driving the car one day. And you had Pam h waters twenty eleven book near Death Experiences the rest of the story playing then those particular moment in Atwood as book we said was so poignant to your experience that you had to pull over the car and rewind the Audio Book and listen again so what was that particular part of that order research that stood out to you. You know. It's one of the best parts of the story. To be honest. I swear I would go out and drive twice a day for our half. Just you know the in between God and myself just my quiet time to kind of soak it in and I was listening to different audio book saw near Death Experiences and I was listening to. Pm ages the one. You just mentioned. And she said there's a particular condition that occurs for people who have car crashes or suffer from falls. Well that pick to Myers up because I was on a plane crash. I said well. Let's see what she's got to say about that. And she said it creates a what's called a colloidal condition and I believe me. I studied physics. I never heard of it. I thought what is that. Is that some. You know. Woo airy-fairy term. No it's an actual true state where something can be going direction. Suddenly going another. But it's basically a state in which you are between implosion explosion and she said that the state passed the imprint of that state forever less and with people who had that due to these circumstances here are ways in which they are affected or in oil. Here's the kind of near death experience they have and if you see in my book on the website what the inbetween looked like this gothic scary looking place. She said they go to a grand colorless place. At that point I pull off the side of the road because I remember I. I knew that my experience was one in a million within an already when a million population so I was desperately trying to find some familiar frame of reference to anchor me and this was the first I had so I listened very carefully and then she started talking about. You know what it looks like. They're now how it feels on this. And then literally. She started using the terms. I learned when I was on the other side. She said the in between and I looked it up in the book and I think from that moment on she used it thirty one more time in the book and she also I called the impossible now she called it the eternal nail same thing and so I knew at that moment. Not only would we be friends. We were already friends quickly. Reached OUT TOWARDS. Set up a phone call and you think about it. Here's what here's a woman. Who's top of the heat researcher in the world? Eighteen books and you know about. He'll say word chances. Oh I got right through tour in. We spoke and while we were talking. You'RE GONNA love this up here in Connecticut in Nited States it was in February of last year. It was pretty cold and I wanted to go for my dry. You know just like I had when I was listening to book and so I started my car to warm up ahead of time and I came back in the house and we had our call well in terms of our time here at four forty pm while she in our talking. I suddenly just felt my energy shift. I can't really explain it. Goes Right now. You're aware of how much energy you don't feel like you had to get up and do things like you know. D- Feeling rejected enough to go run few miles or maybe dope exactly but you know that it will. I just don't managership the minute. I felt that she said our energies are starting to merge and I said Yeah I can feel it and she said Yeah we just WanNa take that slowly. I said fine and that again at four forty pm our time well at that note we start talking about you know the eternal now possible now in its features and Experience Matt. We hung up the phone. At five o'clock I walk outside to my car. Is I look at my porch light. It blows just immediately blue. Nasa will that's par for the course and then I got in my car. And here's the thing. I have a nice car and it has two clocks. One built into the radio and one up on the dashboard. The one the radio was perfectly normal time as always the one. The dashboard was frozen at four forty. Oh that's when you both experienced that when we had that experience and we started talking about the Impossible now it froze at that time only one other time afterwards. A few weeks later when I was again driving felt the inbetween very close within me. It did it again. It has never did never did it before in his never done it. Since and and then there are a bunch of other electronic anomalies curtis. Well well yeah. I'm I'm glad you brought that up with that experience with at water because this melding of energies that she mentioned and the light bulb blowing and the the clock phrasing it seemed to extend into other parts of your life after the Nda I mean these strange occurrences would pop whenever you would think about the inbetween. Oh Jeez the woods. Whenever you're in touch with the inbetween so festival you know. What is this feeling of being in touch with the in between and can you share some of those other artifacts you notice like at one point you'll blowing up macher wife's love to anytime I've like right now? I'm surprised Siri hasn't gone off on my iphone because when I start time in between Siri wakes up and she starts calling emergency number in. It's like terrible. How many times that's happened. But when I when I really get to talking about I can feel it. One time I said the in between is in a place you'd go to a come from is simply a place you are and I tend to look at life more from there looking here and from here looking there. It's as if the person I was on the other side deep personalized but conscious being does if I'm becoming that person more and more a little bit every day and becoming a little less who I was before the NDA and that's fine. I have no problem with that whatsoever. Yes so some of that. Weird anomalies We have we have a nice home. We have central air and One day around this time our entire h FAC know your heating and air conditioning system. The whole thing blew up the gas furnace. Blew up air conditioner outside. Blew up had to get it replaced and then things still working right in. They had to come back and look and they finally figured out that in our duct. Work where you have. These little thing called Damper Motors and they direct the air and the ducks upstairs downstairs. That four out of five of them were blown up and I said why did that happen in. The guy just shrugged as a power surge. Nothing you think One time with my son we went driving around having a Nice father-son drive and talk about life and stuff and we got back my coffee and my go cut. My Aluminum Cup gotten called. So I put it in the microwave for thirty seconds like all of us do to heat it back up and when I reached back in there the minute my hand now we're talking about the in between because he's fascinated by it the minute my hand touch the cup. The coffee exploded in the microwave. Totally went dead and had to replace that. And what is strangest? Most unusual things was around electronic. Communications The first time I actually drove two PM each at wars house to visit with her. I was twenty minutes out from her house. I have my phone on the dash with a ways popular. Gps program guiding me into her house says about twenty minutes away and suddenly a friend. An indie e friend Was texting me through facebook. Messenger and that popped up and she said I don't know why but I'm thinking about you. You're thinking is on twenty minutes away for PM Ages House. You said. Tell her I said hello. Now if you're familiar with FACEBOOK MESSENGER when after you've typed a message in your your friend. Is typing a message while they are typing? You'll see this little dot dot dot across the bottom indicate. Basically wait for that person finish. They can respond properly well while my friend is typing and I see dot dot dot now remember. I'm driving. Both hands are on wheel. All of a sudden might text field started to fill in with its own words and it literally said thank you for being kind and loving person. I kid you not nothing to gain by telling this lie I can only imagine what it sounds like two rational So you'll you'll fun basically type. That itself will something else. Type that into your phone. Yeah I mean some. Someone made a joke that I guess your spirit guides know how to use your phone. I mean he was the most. We almost went off the road because I was so terrified that maybe somebody had hacked my type something to this friend that I could never recover from. Something could be bad Because hey game from my phone so we're else did come from and I I Almost went off the road and I told her what happened. She laughed when I got two. Pm Ages. I told her and she just laughed and said this is just the beginning. Yeah it's something that we've seen consistent across the topics we cover on the show. Is these strange synchrony cities that seem to be a form of communication from something else? It's giving us a nod and I guess the lost thing I wanted to touch Sean Before we move onto some some questions about how you spiritual life changed was this seems to be something that occurs when two people that have had near death experiences get together and this can take the form of cash registers fouling up or electronics going down and I thought you included a really great example of this when you attended a near death experience conference so so what this conference with all these. Nda's getting together. Yeah so so. I'm standing in line to check into the registration and is taking a long time and this is for the. The International Association of Near Death Studies Annual Conference. It was in Pennsylvania. So everybody's showing up for this big conference and all the workshops on that we want to get checked in so we can meet up with friends. We haven't seen in a while so as line is getting longer and it's just taking forever finally found out. The reason was is because their credit card machines it gone down and I looked and I kinda landed you. Do you're checking in here right in the lady by the counter new. Why said this checking all the hackers and to a hotel for the hacker Elevators aren't GonNa Work Right. Your lights aren't GonNa Work Right. Thermostats GONNA GO CRAZY. I said this is the Association of near Death States. These people have all had near death experiences and these electronic anomalies are normal and she looked at me and she said you're giving me chills and she actually came out from behind the counter and we went and stood in a corner. I told her all about it. She was all ears. Well they so. The credit card machines were working all day Everything manually in our key. Cards to our room for the entire three days we were there. Were just keep going. Everybody was going down to get new cards. There were they would seek their card in there ten times on eleventh time it worked. It was just crazy and we had a big laugh about either really fixing this as just something we gotta deal with. It's funny that this happens. I feel like the needs to be some Understanding from at least the the materialist side of what's going on with physics when these people get together this obviously something there that should be able to be measured. I agree I agree with you. And I've wondered that said you know so. What is this bio electric field for want of a better word? That's going Wacko. And I've definitely seen amplify when other than that when since I have a friend. Who's a screenwriter? She's had an e. Anna shared near death experience when her father passed away. And just when we are talking on the phone or texting stuff happens like one of us will be in a store in the cash registers. Go down in one time As we were texting. She said she'd been listening to music on her phone. Driving tour boyfriends and all of a sudden the music started going crazy in the play. She as talking. She walked in her boyfriend's house. His sound system immediately goes crazy in. It'd been so frequent thing. The boyfriend yelled out from the kitchen. Tell gender stop it. Well all of a sudden her son calls her who's visiting her apartment from college. The holidays and he says mom the audio system here just went crazy in his even in the headphones allow it was just. He just saw him last week and he's still kind of somewhere between laughing and scared about it. So so these things do happen. They do amplify win more than one near death. Experience are there together and I have no idea but I believe there must be a way to measure this and end up better understand it do well. Let's move on to it. I think a big question And I do appreciate you spending as much time with us for the interview but This is something really intriguing with your experience because I started to see that coming out of this. Nda He's started to shed attachments in almost a Buddhist way Almost not as in a conscious way of doing this not having converted for them. I it was oldest coming. Naturally you shedding these attachments to sentimentality and You know things that ground The most people in society was it. D- I WANNA ask. Was it difficult to stay grounded while this was happening? All this these attachments being stripped away you know it was the opposite. I think I gues- Ghanaian. So deeply and stayed so in had the indelible impression of the place upon me of certainly of detachment born of being present and not having any memory of this place at all. That is actually more difficult to re-engage. I realized I could just sit there and stare at wall for six hours and when I really did mind just sit there and as time hadn't passed and then finally my wife you know was concerned in to be honest after a year. She said maybe we need to go. See a marriage counselor and I readily agreed have written a lot about that in my book as well and it is a challenge because indy does introduce ambiguity into the relationship and there's no relationship that welcome such ambiguity so we had such an eye opening stat. You included of people that had death experiences. The divorce rate was incredibly high. Wasn't it yeah? It's like fifty percent higher than our fifty three percent national average. It's like up to seventy eight percent and to me. That's an epidemic and but you can see why you have such a transformational experience. It basically when people do divorce because of it's because you know the person who didn't have the experience of saying where did my spouse go. I didn't necessarily sign on for this out new. This person is their values are different. The way everything about them is different. They react differently to everything. Certainly a big part of that is the detachment others also assert naievety. I mean it sounds like becoming childlike in. Sounds kind of silly to say this but Some of that is expressed through A less a strict observation of social mores and Emmy you. You can be accused of being flirtatious without meaning to be flirtatious. Is just you might have a general sense of love for everybody and you want to help people you WanNa give them attention if they want. Help whatever and you don't think about the fact that those who aren't as inclined her evolved might see that as a misbehavior and yet. There's no misbehavior in your heart. Whatsoever one common saying I'd say it's very true amongst manny if it'd be great to say it's all but I don't know also I'll say. Many in the ears ness. After a near death experience a man will see women as a mother. Sister or daughter in women will see men as a father. A brother or son. And I'll be honest. It's IT'S TRUE. It's been very true for me as very true for the People. I'm close to in the INDIE WORLD. Will the one thing? I just wanted to mention quickly. Put this in my notes because I I was thinking about how to apply like a almost like a broad situation to what what you went through I thought if the Chinese tem Ching and all like the Chinese terms because they often main about ten different English meanings in one word but ching can be translated to be meaning love a passion feeling emotion affection. Sentimentality Having a favor of something preferring one thing over another and this this is kind of an all encompassing term for all those things and if you think of what really bonds human society together often it's Ching. It's it's sentimentality. It's this emotion and passionate capes families together ties everything together and it seemed as though often the this ching just started to fade away and like He. He didn't have that attachment to it anymore. Oh that's great. I can jump right in on this one. The last ions conference. I went to uh someone asked a really great question. They said in in wanting to help people which is a good thing. Do you ever feel like there's a subtle almost ego false paternalism there and I looked your said. That is a great question but right now I don't know your name. I'm not here to get your money. I'm not here to give a job with you. I'm not here to date you. I don't want anything from you. Had to psychologists come up said you've just solved codependence. I guess I didn't want anything from her. And then she came up and really wanted a conversation at that in. I put it this way and maybe this helps a little bit. Think about it if if we do good in life. How often do we do good truly truly truly coming from a place of self less ness? I heard one time Some grew in India. Said you know if somebody even gives you a glass of water. They're expecting something in return. Even if it's thanks and I would say now definitely when I do things I want them to be helpful to people basically I WANNA do good but is I just want to help. But it's because the math says this is what you should do. It's not that I want to be commanded. It's not that I want. You know the executive parking spot. It's not that I want to win the award or be popular. I really could care less about any of that now. It simply because to take it. As a jack of as possible because the objective you can understand the detachment. It's as if you've done the math equation for the situation in the math. Says this should be the answer. And the answer is one in which people have been held in which people are happy in which people have not been taken advantage of in which people feel empowered. And so you just work. According to math to the answer that you know is supposed to be there simply because this is the proper answer to the math quiz and then everybody else is standing around saying well. Maybe we can charge money for this or maybe we can get famous for this earlier. What understand what you're saying? It's a personal thing as well though I think you have to undergo your own transformative experience. You don't necessarily have to have a near death experience to do that. But it's it's a personal inside thing that and this is why people meditate is why people have spiritual practices because it's not an easy thing it takes a lot of effort it takes trials and tribulations to actually get the. We'll walk what Jim is describing. Here is the sentiment side of things like the the love that we have people. It also is part of what I was describing earlier. It's part of that. That Ching that sentimentality. Because this fight it away what's replaced? It is a compassion but in a much bureau. I think the the mathematics analogy that works in that way because it it doesn't have all the emotional strings attached to it. It's a much pure intention comma. That's yeah yeah but Jimmy said you were going to Had this synchronicity story that you had to tell a only. Is this great okay? So I had a cracked window at the Halston in spring. I start getting all excited about getting house spruced up for that coming out of the dark cold winter so I called a local glass company and they came out to repair the window and also take a couple of window screens back to replace the next day on a Friday. They called and said you're your screens. Already nothing okay. Great so I went over there to pick them up around four thirty in the afternoon. I walk inside and it's a husband and wife team and she's on the phone with my invoice and so the husband I were sitting there talking and as is something that happens quite often. If you give me five minutes with people might find a way to We've my near death experience into the story. You can imagine some look on my but but I was talking. He seemed interested in a Nigga. She'd got enough. She's just really listening. And I said you know this gives them out. I said I know this sounds crazy now. Now we want to hear okay so I was telling them more about the crash in all that and In the wife asked me a great question she said well after this experience. Did you find your more intuitive question? Said but it's not really like that for me. I said it's more reflecting on the fact you know. Pay attention relationships and everything's interconnected. I said it's really more about relationships in a really amazing sense of timing of the timing of things is is really fascinating at that moment now. It's five o'clock on Friday. Their daughter walks in the door. Is She looked at me and she said. I remember you. Now look at the mother and the father and I look back at her and she said I am an upper theoretic emergency nursing. I took care of you when you came from a plane crash about three years ago. All like your sh look quite different than than I do right now because yeah and that's incredible the timing and then I looked at the mother and I said that's the answer to your question. That's great yeah the cool thing I said think about it. I said if if I had been able to answer your question like Oh yeah have more intuition in fact I can tell you that if you're going to walk through that door. I said I would've answered your question out of proven my point but in a way I have owned bet moment the right now think about it. You and I both know the chances of this having happened especially on the heels of your question was near to impossible and the fact that it just happened seemingly on Sun means no one can own this moment. It means we all on this moment and we all get to say well. This was amazing and you could just see their gears in their heads trying to turn and figure this out. They knew something of serious magnitude happening. They couldn't figure out what it was but it was just so cool. It was so cool. And that's a norm. Now there's so many moments like that in the book and there is some wonderful Kind of thoughts on what you've learned from your NDA. Throughout the second. Half of it. As well I think it's it's really good that you sharing some of your insights with people. We have ever on picks up the book. It's available now. Jim Brewington with the inbetween. A trip of a lifetime. Jimbo go thank you so much again for time was fantastic to speak with you. Wish you the best with the release of the book and thanks again Ben and Aaron. Thank you so much gracious hosts and in thank you to your listeners for taking the time to listen to my story and I hope I hope people will read the book because I I love it when people write to me with their questions and their insights and share their experiences so I will look forward to the next time we talk. And hopefully when these days we can meet in person Heeds thanks again to Jim. For appearing on the show the inbetween a trip of a lifetime is available now linked to it in the show notes and mysterious universe dot all just look for season twenty-three episode nineteen you can also find Jim. His website at Jim Bruton Dot Com. And if you check out shuts up links to his facebook page and twitter feed and he's Mala if you want to reach out to him especially if you've had a urine near death experience saw nobody's talking about you within the and one incredible life. I mean incredible. Just stories of directing US aircraft carrier and then hacking satellites and the like. Well you know I was thinking about it though. Because I mean being able to douse where a satellite signals coming from. I mean thinking. He already was inclined to have strange experiences. I'm not surprised that he had the most extreme of a near death experience. Yeah you're right. They're always walls. Some kind of inkling of abilities there. Yes Jim Yeah and when we come back in applause extension. I might Let you in on one. That wasn't in the interview. We actually spoke about it in the interview. But I kind of I edited around it because I wanted to talk to you about it. Plus because it causing ties into what you've got coming up again. Earner remind us what's coming up for plus members so we're going to be going into. We'd experiences that people have with Phantom black dogs and this isn't just simply to seeing a black dog hanging around somewhere. These are larger than life almost comical black dogs people encounter but comical as opposes the wrong word because it's comical in the fact that it's like it's too big it shouldn't be shouldn't exist but it's terrifying at the same time and sometimes it can have a positive effect but for the most part it seems to have some type of negative effect now. I found that the phantom black dog phenomenon ties in very nicely with the Phantom big cat phenomenon which then also ties with Wendy goes shoplifters and some of the folklore of native American legends so all of that is gonNA come up in the plus extension. Who's the Blackhawks Dr Phil? That's going up in plus so this is interesting as well because it basically describes this Program this I guess a secret spice program that is allegedly being conducted by the United States military secretary on Nordic secretaries in this one. As far as I'm aware but it does involve possibly The military industrial complex. And this story. That Ryan was tall by that claims that he was responsible. Retrieving the crash. Croft and an interaction he had with the cleanup crew being cool many black. That's all coming up on our plus extension again to get access. Sign-up mysterious universe dot org forward slash. Plus you'll see all the details there. It's nine bucks a month to get access you get these extra long extensions we do on these shows every single Friday. Sometimes the show is just double the length for plus. You're also getting a high bit faith. You're on policy. Get a better forty quality version of the show. You get a totally ad free experience when you're implicit discounts off digital walks in our store Tigres features for plus membership. Make sure you check it out again. Mysterious Universe DOT ORG FORWARD SLASH PLUS. Help support your favorite show and definitely gone support. Jim By checking out his book again the Inbetween trip of a lifetime available now on pipe. Back and on kindle will link to that as well. That's a wrap for this free edition of the show. Thanks for listening. If you're all plus stick around for the great stuff the for everyone else catching next week Welcome back to you plus extension great to have you.

Jim Bruton Mount Everest Pentagon United States Namibia Malaysia Microsoft Iraq NBC News CNN Disney coma NASA Washington Emmy Award Joe Kelley Philippines Dan Bartlett
interview with John Hegarty

Young and Irish Youth Media Team

02:36 min | 2 years ago

interview with John Hegarty

"Hi My name is Carl and I'm Jack. I'm we're part of the youth media team. We're here at S._C. With John Hegarty can you tell us what about yourself. My Name's John Hegarty as you already got a second level teacher in Kildare. I've been teaching for thirty. Ears teach mainly computers on getting into programming and starting to teach the new phase one computer science dental facilitated aware chop off today's conference. What were you what were attendees? He's doing in this workshop so we were doing some programming with a microfiche we use an application called micro bits DOPP phone micro blocks dot phone which is similar to make code but has the advantage that. Breath when you're using it you don't have to download and transfer the any changes that you make all the changes you make happen automatically on the microfiche live programming and it's just another way of programming so. What we were programming was a small two wheeled robots go forwards and backwards turn left and right and teachers generally cope with it very well some of the more brand new to this so they they found challenging somewhere more familiar with what happened used micro blocks before so they got something you have to? I hope you're goes is one of the pilot school for Computer Science. How's this going? It's the. The one I enjoy most during the week it's the class I'm waiting for this for twenty years and it happened really fast when Minister Bruton decided he wanted to computer science at our level came in less than twenty. Twenty four months from initial announcement to being starting in the classroom and I'm thrilled to bits looking for students to join us. I hope so you'd have to ask Obama suppose but no I think they're actively engaged. We've actually two more students apply to join the class after his started. One student has three free classes during the week. He saw that coincided with the computer.

John Hegarty pilot school for Computer Scie Carl Minister Bruton DOPP Kildare Obama Twenty four months twenty years
Squire Bills Inspiration, CC 018

Cassidy Comments

06:08 min | 1 year ago

Squire Bills Inspiration, CC 018

"Welcome to cassidy comments. I'm glad you are joining me today. I hope in today's episode you will find a little fun history history and maybe some inspiration as many of you know. I love quotes. If you do to then you will understand me when I say it's hard to find a place to put them where you can just grab them when you need them one place I have found put them. Recently is on my twitter feed. If you are a quote junkie you can follow me at Living Water J. N.. In the number seven years ago I found a quote on a poster that I liked and I put it on the wall above above my computer. It has never lost my attention. It's a popular quote attributed to Theodore Roosevelt and I think I bought it as inspiration for my kids when we were homeschooling it says do what you can with what you Oh have where you are. This quote has spoken to me many times over the years when I have been frustrated. Sometimes we have trouble figuring out how to do something. Sometimes we do not get the desired results. Were shooting for in sometimes it seems. Seems like we simply do not have what we need to get the job done whether it is money skill time energy or whatever while according to answers dot com which I have no idea if it is accurate read or not Roosevelt spoke these words when his men needed more supplies as they were about to begin the battle for San Juan Hill during the spanish-american war imagine my surprise when out of curiosity as I started digging for information about this quotes history I discovered that it has been misquoted over the years as I continued. My search I discovered that not only is my quote wrong. It should say do what you can with what you've got where you are instead of with what you have it isn't even Roosevelt's quote one online site by Sue Bruton and she backs it up with evidence is that Roosevelt was quoting some guy named Squire Bill widener who I think actually may have been quoting someone else but in checking about squire bill I found on find a grave dot Com who knew there was such a site that he was indeed a friend of Roosevelt's and was is in fact a millwright confederate soldier teacher Sunday School Superintendent Justice of the peace and spiritual adviser so apparently according to Sue Bruton Roosevelt was quoting his friend Squire Bill. She shows a text from Roosevelt's autobiography where he references his friend from Weidner's Valley Virginia and quotes what he calls a bit of homely philosophy quoted by Squire Bill widener Wow who knew that for so many years I have actually been inspired by a popular community figure from Virginia named Squire Bill. I'm beginning to think from learning about Squire bill that the inspirational words of this man man we're exemplified in his life. When I consider all the roles he played in his community? Now I know things were set up differently in the mid to late nineteenth century than they are today but going from soldier to Sunday School Superintendent to spiritual chill adviser says something of the man's broad base of talents okay so back to the quote. I still find squire bills. Do what you can with what you've got. Where you are very inspiring? It feels like at the heart of it. There is a call to humility and action. We have to acknowledge that we can't do it all but that doesn't mean we can't do anything and while we may not have all that we need ideally we start with what we do have and get moving to me. This quote yells do something there are no excuses. What is it that you have put on hold because your situation isn't ideal? What are you planning to learn or do some? Day The older I get the more I appreciate every day that I have in the greater. My desire grows to not waste one of them taking inventory of what you do have and start there. If you don't have a skill you need need. How might you develop it? If you don't have the resources you need who might be able to help you get them if you don't have motivation study motivational speakers and learn from them in and finally in humility recognize that we have a loving father who guides are steps and blesses our efforts so there really is no reason to wait to get moving in the end. I find it interesting that quote vote by a Virginian named Squire bill buried in a cemetery named at Rush Creek in nineteen twenty was used by President of the United States and found its way onto a poster that I used for inspiration when homeschooling my kids at the end of the century I'll leave you with the final quote that was attributed to Theodore Roosevelt in his autobiography of nineteen thirteen just above where he quote Squire Bill in Chapter Nine while talking thing about a life deliberately devoted to pleasure as an end Roosevelt said the greatest happiness is the happiness that comes as a byproduct of striving to do what must be done even though sorrow.

Sue Bruton Roosevelt Squire Bill Theodore Roosevelt Bill widener Roosevelt twitter Sunday School Superintendent cassidy Sue Bruton Valley Virginia Rush Creek Weidner United States San Juan Hill Superintendent President seven years
Monitor Show 11:00 09-11-2020 11:00

Bloomberg Radio New York - Recording Feed

01:42 min | 6 months ago

Monitor Show 11:00 09-11-2020 11:00

"BOOMBERG DOT COM on the Bloomberg business APP and Bloombergradio tape. This is Bloomberg radio. This is Bloomberg Marcus. Glenn and polls sweetie the Fed action essentially unlimited quantitative easing somebody's taking aim at Corona virus vaccines and other treatments. This be lower for longer hit to market selloff. Global. Once again, Bruton Market News and insight from Bloomberg experts off the ball. To, be starring with active, the spread is really showing the they're doing whatever it takes. A lot of people don't expect that the economy will reopen installed is really hitting industrial America and it's a major crisis. Bloomberg markets with funding Quinn. All Sweetie on Bloomberg radio this hour we're going to get the latest on the coronavirus in the race for a vaccine with Lauren Sarah Johns Hopkins University roles are going to have Muniz in focus with the Kazansky and also the latest spikes to the market's first. Let's get a Bloomberg business flash now from Greg Jarrett. Stocks scrutiny to edge higher bunny and remained on track though for a second weekly decline investors are still on edge after volatile stretch. Dollar is weaker. Take a look at these numbers as we do every fifteen minutes throughout the trading day the sap's of a half, a percent of eighteen. The Dow's up seven tenths of a percent up nearly two hundred. The Nasdaq is up a half, a percent fifty. The ten year is up to thirty seconds. The yield point six, six percents, West. Texas intermediate crude is up eight tenths of a percent or thirty seven, sixty, a barrel comex gold's four tenths of a percent nineteen, fifty, seven, forty, an ounce. The dollar yen one zero, six, twenty, the euro, a dollar eighteen thirty in the British found the dollar. Twenty. Seven eighty-six Nicholas shares.

Bloomberg Bloomberg Marcus Bruton Market News Lauren Sarah Johns Hopkins Uni Texas Glenn Greg Jarrett America Nicholas sap Quinn Muniz Kazansky fifteen minutes thirty seconds ten year
081 - Oncternal Therapeutics Drives Complete Responders with First in Class ROR1 Antagonist

Breaking Biotech

44:22 min | Last month

081 - Oncternal Therapeutics Drives Complete Responders with First in Class ROR1 Antagonist

"What's up everybody. Welcome breaking biotech. Thanks for being with me here today. My name is man. If you like the show you can help out. By clicking the like or subscribe button you can also donate using e patriots lincoln the description below and for those of you who have donated already or who've already subscribe. I really appreciate it. The numbers continue to go up. So i'm very excited about that. And as long as i keep getting interested in the show. I'm going to keep doing it so please continue to share it with your friends or anybody who you think might be interested so i'm glad to be back and tear. We're gonna be talking about four different companies. The first one we're going to touch on is carry a farm and they just released some updates at j. p. morgan and they also had some good news from the fda surrounding talk about them. And then we're going to talk about rejects bio and as an aside. We're gonna talk about clear. Side because the two companies are kind of intertwined with the device that clear side has developed. So that rejects bio could use. So we'll talk about them. And then the feature story for today is a company called terminal therapeutics and they have a very cool novel. Molecule for the oncology space. So that'll be the main story for today. And before i get into it i do wanna wish everybody a happy new year hope. Everyone had a great christmas. I definitely did. I was lucky enough to take a vacation to connecticut. And i also spent some time in new york city so i got a sweet picture in front of the wall street bull which was very exciting for me so yeah it was great to get some time off but rape back into it and it's been a pretty crazy year so far but i've got a lot of things to look forward to in terms of the biotech world so With let's just get right into it. And the first thing i want to touch on is carry a farm and the ticker symbol for that company is kp ti and they are now trading at around a one point two billion dollars market cap although after today might be closer to one billion but the reason why i wanted to touch on them is because in december of twenty twenty. We heard that. The fda approved their drug expo. Vio or silla next door for the treatment of multiple myeloma in patients with only one prior therapy so this is very exciting news because it was three months early. The pdf edey wasn't until february and it came in in december and so sonics or was was previously only approved for patients that were at fifth line or higher in multiple myeloma treatments. That now got bumped up to second line or higher and we also heard that in hugh to twenty twenty that they got approval for deal which is a non hodgkin's lymphoma in third-liner higher so this is basically increasing the indications and the eligible patient population for their main molecule called exposure or sonex or. And the start did move up on the news but like what usually happens with this company after the initial rise it just keeps going back down and that was true after this multiple myeloma improvement and so i wanted to outline a little bit. The patient population went from fifth liner higher in multiple myeloma. Which is around sixty. Two hundred patients to second-liner higher which is thirty nine thousand two hundred patients so judging by the model that i've come up with i give that a value today of around one point. Five billion dollars for deal at the line that was approved for third or higher. There's around nine thousand patients that would be eligible. And i give that around half a billion dollar valuation so the company right now trading at around one point one point two billion. I think it's still by now what we heard from j. p. morgan and they presented on monday the eleventh of january. They gave us a little peek into their earnings. And they said that in q four twenty twenty. The expected earnings from expo sales are going to be twenty million to twenty point five million dollars and i'm just blowing that up on screen here so a decline of around four to five percent from q. Three twenty twenty is kind of a disappointment. As we're seeing these indications get approved investors. Really want to see an acceleration in the sales numbers. That really just isn't happening yet. I think that a lot of this stuff just takes time. That investors are just being a little bit too impatient when it comes to this but the reasons that carry a farm said for the decline in sales are that the cove nineteenth surge has prevented cancer patients from being seen by their doctor. And also it's been difficult for their commercial team to interact with patients and now that probably is true but i think that they need to get out the word to doctors so that they could share that information with their patients and convince them that exposure is the right treatment for them. And i think it's gonna come. It's just gonna take a little bit more time. The other reason that they gave is there was increased competition in second line or higher deal vcr and now it is a crowded space. But i still think that. The ezio point five billion dollar valuation that i give that indication is it reasonably conservative valuation. So i think that they're still going to be able to deliver on their sales numbers. And then it's just gonna take time. And i have a position in the company. I'll talk about my position a little bit later. But i think that it's a nice opportunity to buy the company right now. Given that they have all of this potential revenue coming in. And then there's also a number of different readouts. We're gonna see as the companies continuing to develop molecule and different indications so some of catalysts that i saw is that top line phase three data for mutual cancer is gonna come in h two twenty twenty one. They're also looking for approval in europe for heavily pre-treated multiple myeloma. And they're expecting that at twenty twenty one so that's also can increase the potential patient population. And then they're also looking at an nda for differentiated life sarcoma. It's not a huge patient population. So this doesn't bother me too much. But they pushed the day at which they're gonna file until a little bit later and i think they're coming up with a strategy of how they wanna pursue that so the other ones they do have a pretty substantial pipeline just blowing that up on the screen right now. We have sarcoma different gynecological. Cancer mentioned dimitrios cancer. They're going to be looking at solid tumors things like lung cancer brain cancer and colorectal and then they're also considering melanoma so i think that carrier firm it's kind of a underappreciated stock right now because the momentum in it has not been very positive. But i think it's time will come and we just need to be a little bit patient so for that reason. I'm still holding on pretty decent position. And i think it's worth holding onto throughout twenty twenty one with that. Let's move on to another company and rejects bio has been a company that i've been invested in for quite a while. Now they're ticker symbol is urge n ex. And they're trading now at around a two billion dollar market cap and just a bit of background on them. They have out licensing program for their gene therapies. They develop and then they also have an in house program where they're actually developing gene therapies to treat patients. So what we heard is that rejects bio. I think it was in middle of q four. They announced that they were selling the rights to the gentleman milestones for two hundred million dollars. And for those who don't know zule gentleman is a gene therapy treatment for patients with spinal muscular atrophy and the therapy was out licensed to that was then acquired by another company. I think novartis where rejang bio is done. Solo is rights to another company in exchange for two hundred million dollars upfront so this is just boosting their cash balance. The other thing that we heard is that they announced it worth one hundred seventy five million dollars now just before recording this video and i saw they closed the offering today and it was worth two hundred and thirty million dollars so it was oversubscribed and it was priced to the public at forty seven dollars per share. Would you like to see so. They're really padding their balance sheet here so that their nicely set up to roll out all these huge clinical trials that they're going to be undertaking so with that want to touch on a number of the different trials that they're gonna be doing and the things that we can look forward to and their main therapy that i'm most interested in is rtx. Three one four and this gene therapy. That's trying to supersede the need for patients to get a monthly injections for either wet. Amd or diabetic retinopathy. So the state of the are right now is that patients need to get monthly injections of some kind of anti vegf therapy to treat their wet. Amd or diabetic retinopathy. And what this does is it prevents the angiogenesis involved in these conditions from leading to negative effects associated with the condition. So what rejects bio. Is hoping to do is introduce a gene therapy into the cells of the retina in order to allow those retinal cells to produce the anti vegf compounds. And in this case it's an antibody fragment that will then go and inhibit vegf jeff that's being expressed deleteriously in the eyes of these patients. So that's the theory behind their treatment and the way they're going about it is two different routes and the one that they started with the subset injection which is a lot of problems associated with it. We heard maybe about a year ago that there was significant side effects associated with the route of injection zerilli with gene therapy molecule itself. Just the way that it was injected. Because it's an inpatient therapy that requires a lot of resources in order to do properly. So what we're jennings bio has done is they're continuing their sub retinal injections but they're also moving into what's called a supercrew royal injection. That is an outpatient therapy. It's done rate in the doctor's office so this would really lower the barrier to get patients treated and also presumably reduce the amount of negative effects associated with the route of administration so given that this the super-critical technology wasn't quite ready to go. Regina bio started with sub retinal. And they're now at phase three pivotal face three in wet. amd so they're going to continue that clinical trial. They're doing to three hundred patient. Trials in wet aimed would they sub retinal injection. The primary outcome is non. Inferiority to monthly ran a busy mab injections at one year and we are likely to get interim updates through this and the trials were starting in the first half and second half of twenty twenty one now one thing to note and just for those ran a busy mob is some kind of anti vegf therapy. That's normally treated monthly. Now one thing to note here is that we're genetics. Bio is told us is that they're going to be using existing manufacturing processes for the compound that they're going to be treating in the pivotal and then they're going to do a bridging study with the scale that process so one thing that's kind of tricky part of getting a drug to market is that you have one process to produce the drug. That's usually scaled down. And then you have the scale that up if you're going to launch a commercially and make it available to whoever wants it and in that process of scaling up there can be a lot of issues so actually taking a risk here by using a manufacturing process. That's not going to be used for the actual launch. And it doesn't make me feel great that they're doing this but i think any company can handle the scaling up process it is re-genesis bio given that. They have an expertise in gene therapy. So i say that kind of reluctantly because it's totally possible that when they scale up the process there's going to be some issue with energy x three one four but you know there's not much that we can do and this is what they've decided to move forward with so that's one thing to note about their phase three trials in wet. Amd is that they're going to have to do this. Bridging study with the scale that process of the rtx three hundred four development so having said that also finally moving ahead with the supercrew injections and they have a face to and wet amd. The trial is up to forty. Patients called a v. Eight and they're using this. Sas micro injector from clear side bio. And that's a company that i'm also holding in it's gone up. Maybe like one hundred fifty percent in the last two months so it's also done very well lately and the primary outcome here is to evaluate the mean change in for through and four compared to ran a busy matt monthly injections forty and whether the companies told us is that we can expect interim data in q. Three twenty twenty one. So what's great here. Is that the super criminal. Injection will be validated for wet. Amd here and i think that if we see positive data here there's a huge potential increase in the stock because the stock was kinda back for a while due to the side effects associated with sub retinal injection so if they can validate that super-critical injection is able to deliver the virus and see effectiveness. We'd see a big upside in the company so that was wet. Amd now for diabetic retinopathy a condition that has a significantly greater patient population than wet. Amd the company is going straight to super coil injections. So they're not even bothering with the sub retinal injections which i think is great and in this phase two trial. They're doing to forty patients. The trials called altitude and the primary outcome is a equal or greater than two step improvement in severity on the diabetic retinopathy. Severity scale at forty weeks. And they're submitting the i n d in h one twenty twenty one and they told us that we can expect initial date twenty twenty one as well. So that's the most exciting program that i see from jenex file. But they're also looking at a number of different rare diseases specifically to nps one con disease and also detained muscular dystrophy so for 'em ps one ps two. They're just going just getting going with their phase one two trial. I'm with first patients. Being dose and different cohorts being enrolled for sale and to the submission is going to happen in the first half of this year i did mention. Rg five one. Because that was one that i talked about back in the day. And this is for treatment of hypercholesterolemia discontinued. That i'm not totally upset about that. To be honest and then one other thing that they mentioned is a new program. Rg x two. Oh two for shane. Muscular dystrophy and they're going to submit the id for this in mid twenty twenty one. And what's interesting about this and for those of you. Who saw the surrender news that came out but was unable to show very compelling data in their recent update and i think. Srp nine zero one in one of the age groups for some reason. They weren't able to see really good effectiveness of their gene therapy in dmz. So this kind of up. The possibility of another player for d. m. d. and rejects bio is still far behind pfizer. I think as a drug. And i think another company called solid biosciences has a drug so those companies are going to be a head. But it's kind of interesting that rejects by announced. This dm md treatment as rap to news came out about the setbacks seen in their latest update. So i think that's kind of interesting still not worth pricing it in the stock at all just to give everybody an idea on cash so they ended q. Through two hundred and ninety million plus two hundred eighty million from milestones plus general revenue and the two hundred and thirty million from the recent cash offerings. So they're sitting on a huge cash. Eight hundred million dollars without very much debt so if you look at the market cap minus the cash they're sitting on and i think that's the equation for the enterprise value. I don't think they have much debt. So the enterprise value is looking like one point two billion dollars and for all the potential upside that the company could see here. I think it's definitely a buy at this price. And of course they have competitors. I think that might be one thing that is keeping their valuation where it is at very is a company. That's competing with them. Kodiak sciences is another one. So they're not without competition but i think they have a great opportunity here in both wet. Amd diabetic retinopathy to come out on top. The last thing i'll say is that they're presenting at j. p. morgan on thursday january fourteenth at eleven. Forty a m eastern standard time. So they might give us some more insight into what they're doing and Yeah i look forward to that so with that. Let's get to the man of today and that is the feature story which is wrong. Turn therapeutics ticker symbol mcat. They traded on january twelfth at five dollars. Nine cents a share giving them a market cap of around two hundred and forty five million dollars. they're q. Three twenty twenty net loss was four million and their current assets. Sit at twenty three million dollars. Plus a recent shelf offering at eighty six point two million dollars so sitting on a very healthy amount of cash and their current liabilities are eight million dollars as of q. Three twenty twenty and what. The company's doing is developing assets in oncology to target the are are one and their antibody means of doing. This is called tuesday mab and this would be a first in class are one monoclonal antibody and they're also looking at developing an ro are one kerr t and this is still very early. I'm not going to touch on this too much. But presumably they would reengineer car. T-cells to target this are one on cancer cells but because that program is so preclinical. I'm not really gonna touch on that. But to map they're looking at indications in mantle cell lymphoma chronic lymphocytic leukemia as well as breast cancer. So if you remember from previous to talks we've talked non lymphoma quite a bit and mantle. Cell lymphoma is an aggressive non hodgkin lymphoma with cll being an indolent version. So keep that in mind. The other asset that on terminal is looking to develop is called. Tko two on six and this is an inhibitor. And that's a group of transcription factors. That are known to cause cancer when they're deleteriously express and i'll talk about that a little bit later. But they're looking at indications in something called ewing sarcoma acute myeloid leukemia and prostate cancer. So what is the roi are wine. And what it stands for is a receptor terracing. Kindness like orphan receptor one and in via chemistry. When they call something an orphan receptor. It means that they don't know the scientific community doesn't know what the ligand is. But what's most established right now. Is that our are one is the receptor for five a. And the wind pathway. For anybody who's studied. It is extremely complicated. What all just say is that. It's part of the noncanonical wind pathway. Which means that. It doesn't include the protein beta carotene. But i'm not gonna talk about that. There are countless wikipedia articles that go into win signaling and it's a very prominent program in embryo genesis so this receptor is highly expressed in tissues. That are in development and then it's lowly expressed in adult tissues but what we see. Is that in cancer cells. It's highly expressed and this is kind of a feature of cancer cells. That cancer cells will have an increase in stem nece or earlier developmental states. Such that the express receptors that are often seen in developing tissue. So is kind of what's going on with. Rr one and the other thing that i saw was that irwin has a potential role in cancer stem cells and for those who don't know that theory around. The cancer stem cell theory is that cancer develops due to a population of cells. Bet basically act as stem cells for the cancer. So we know that we have stem cells for normal cells. But what happens sometimes. According to the theory is that the stem cells or adult cells will have enough mutation such that they can avoid death and act like cancer cells and then they can give rise to the daughter cells that will actually produce the cancer. But if you're unable to kill those original cancer stem cells even if you kill a bulk amount of the cancer the cancer stem cells will still be able to give to those daughter cells that will lead to a recurrence in the cancer. And this is what causes relapses. So that's kind of a general idea that theory and researchers suggested that are one is expressed on these cancer stem cells and therefore it's a good target because if you kill the cancer stem cell you'll kill any potential relapse so wint five. Am mediated irwin. Signaling enhances proliferation stem nece invasion as well as metastases therefore on terminal is trying to do is through the use of either antibody or carty. They're trying to antagonize are one in hopes of treating cancer. So what does that look. Like and what they i started looking at is mantle cell lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. And so what we see here. Is there phase one to data in combination with a brutal eh. and i don't know. Bruce is a btk inhibitor. Which is a chinese. That's involved in a lot of these hematological malignancies and bruton and is very effective. What they're doing is three different parts. Part aid was a dose escalation and then part two and three were the recommended dose from part one but part three head a control group will say which was just a brunette compared to a bruton it plus twos amount but what everything is here is in combination between certain tuesday mob and bruton ebb. And if you remember what. I talked about with regards to. Lx oncology and trillium. They had two different approaches of treating hematological cancers and we had the mono with trillium and the combination therapy with aol ex and here the route that internal is taking is the combination route with bruton so in a similar way. We need to be able to compare the effectiveness of the combination to some kind of single arm. Data that we've seen in the past and so we're gonna do that right now. But the mc l. data which is the aggressive nhl version in part one and part two. They saw an objective response. Rate of eighty three point three percent part one or one hundred percent in part to but this is a smaller patient population but be exciting. Data here is in part one and what they saw here. Was that you know. The aura was eighty three point three percent but amongst that they saw fifty eight point. Three percent was actually a complete response. So they're seeing high effectiveness in both partial and complete response but the complete responders are out of control and some studies that i dug up of bruton efficacy alone in mc l. The study that i saw. And i got the reference here is sixty six percent objective response rate but the complete responders were only twenty percent with partial responders at forty six percent. So what on terminal is seeing. Here is kind of total flip with that. Where more of the responders are actually complete. Responders and the minority responders are partial responders. So this year is extremely positive data. And i think what absolutely warrant single arm data for approval and what on terminal is doing is discussing with the fda how they can accelerate approval given this data. So i think they're still in the middle of collecting data for part two given that there's only three evaluate patients but so far all three of them have a partial response already. So that's positive. And we'll keep looking forward to increases in the number of patients here when it comes to sell. The data is a little bit less impressive. I would say one thing we saw in part one part two for. Cll is ninety one point two percent objective response rate which is huge and they also got one complete responder comparing this to kind of a single arm version of bruton in cll. The objective response rate is around eighty two percent so the objective response rate is pretty much on par plus they saw complete responder here which is very positive now with part three like i mentioned. It's a bit of a head to head. Study between susan mob plus a brittany compared to it. But what they see here. Is that the abreu alone. Group had a hundred percent objective response rate all of them are partial responders whereas the same amount plus brunette group was ninety three point three percent so a little bit lower because one of the patients was stable disease. So there's still a chance for this patient to become a partial responder and meet the control group here and you know it's just a little bit early so i don't think anything to be concerned about. But basically what they're seeing here is on par between some twos mab brunette compared to bruton it. So it's still say overall it's extremely positive data but right now they haven't shown necessarily that it's better than just brutal below now. One thing i also wanted to mention is that in mc l. Four out of fifteen of them were treated with bruton of alone beforehand so a brunette before then they relapse and then treated with sir. Tuesday anna bruton it. And what they're saying here is that one hundred percent of those patients responded so it definitely seems like some is adding something better than a brunet. There's like a synergistic effect. That could be going on here. as well. whereby inhibiting both are one as well as bt k. has a greater enhancement in effect rather than just one of them. So that's something else that i think is important to note here that i think won't go overlooked by something like the fda so to get a little bit more granular in the data on had this on their corporate presentation. And this is basically the data they showed. Here's some twos amount. Plus a bruton nib in a type of kaplan meier curve with progression free survival. And what they're seeing here is that at thirty months. They're still seeing a nice amount of patients. That are continuing on therapy without progressing. And then when you compare this to single agent bruton ebb at thirty months here. We see that progression free. Survival is sitting around point three around thirty percent so this obviously a big improvement here with the combination therapy than just the single agent and then also here like i mentioned the objective response rate. They're sitting at eighty seven percent the combination compared to bruton which is only sixty six percent and the more interesting thing i think is at the complete response. Rate is forty seven percent compared to just twenty percent and so this is kind of interesting and it kind of goes along with the theory before where maybe this compounds from. Tourism app is actually attacking the cancer stem cells such that. It's having a complete response in preventing the tumor from growing at all leading to more complete responders than just partial responders and. I'm just speculating right now. But that could have something to do with the mechanism here moving onto ceelo. I wanted to show this graph quickly. Because i talked about how the data for ceelo was less impressive than mc l. But one thing we need to note is that in relapsed and refractory patients compared to treatment naive patients. There seems to be a bit of a different so far in how they're responding and we see here is that with a median. Follow up around seventeen months. The median progression free survival is twenty nine point five months and what that means is that at twenty five point nine months half the patients have progressed and half of them are still not progressing and so what we see with the treatment naive group though is that at sixteen point six months so which is about the same. The median progression free survival has still not been reached and what that means is that they're still not at fifty percent of patients progressing and fifty percent not progressing so what the company is gonna do is continue to watch these patients and see how long it takes before fifty percent of them and progressing and that date is actually pretty significant and if they can see a big improvement in the progression free survival numbers i think that would bode very well for the therapy in chronic lymphocytic leukemia. So that's just one thing to keep an eye on so that's not hodgkin lymphoma and i wanted to touch quickly on breast cancer. And they don't have a ton of data and breast cancer yet. But i just want to show it just so we could talk about the potential here. And they're looking specifically at her two negative breast cancer. And they're in phase one b right now and they've shown interim data so what they're doing is some choose amount plus paclitaxel and it's in a single arm trial and they only have seven patients right now but among seven patients they've seen four that have had an objective response. And so it's an objective response rate of around fifty seven percent and if you compare historically to paclitaxel alone objective response. Raiders are on twenty to thirty percent and now of course it's just single arm data and it is very early data so we had to take this with a grain of salt but if they can show really good combination data as they increase the patient population. I think it would bode very well for the company getting an approval in breast cancer and just to give people an idea of the patient population of breast cancer. Her two negative makes up around eighty five percent of the whole breast cancer population. And this around two hundred and fifty total breast cancer cases per year. So if you can imagine the number there it's a very large total addressable market. And i also want to show some data from their corporate presentation is just some preliminary data here showing that in preclinical models the rr one knockout has fewer bone metastasis and the twos amount of treatment. In another model leads to fewer metastatic lesions. So of course this is just a mouse. Xenografts model so it's not a perfect representation of humans but i just want to show that they do have some preliminary data to support this and that the data in her two negative so far is looking pretty good so take this the grain of salt but so far it is encouraging so that is the rr one program. The company is also looking at commercializing. A molecule called not k. Two hundred six and this is an inhibitor. And to give a bit of background on efforts. And i'm seeing e. t. s. is the name on one of their updates. They gave. I was listening in the car to it and they kept saying. It's really quickly and i had no idea what they're talking about. So when i saw the core presentation made a lot more sense but for those of you who are just listening. The abbreviation is et s. And what they are. It's a family of transcription factors and these are also often up regulated in cancer. The name stands for each twenty-six transformation specific oncogene family. They're they're involved. In a number of different cell processes things like differentiation cell cycle control migration proliferation pop tosic cetera and often these targets involved in multiple different processes. And this is no different for this at small. You'll family so one thing that's interesting about. This though is that the f. molecule becomes a problem when it's fuse to another gene deleteriously so in doing sarcoma it's actually a gene fusion from the e w s gene fused to and what ends up happening during this gene fusion is that is expressed deleteriously due to the promoter or something that's going on with the gene that views to and in this case it's e w s and when happens at least two ewing sarcoma. There's other cancers that are associated with fusion events and i just listen here Acute linford kimia is jack to fuse to and prostate cancer. It's your diffused too. So what the company is looking at doing is treating two and six in ewing sarcoma and what this disease is a malignant tumor in bone or soft tissue and the current treatment regimen involves chemotherapy plus local disease control which is either radiation or surgery and unfortunately the five year survival rate of metastatic. Ewing's sarcoma is only thirty three percent so there's definitely room here for another kind of therapy to try and boost this up. The disease is technically a rare disease since fewer than five hundred children are diagnosed per year. So what alternatives looking to do is attempt a targeted therapy treatment by inhibiting at in relapsed. Refractory ewing sarcoma. So let's look at the data and so far they're only in phase one so it's still early and they're doing a dose escalation study to find the recommended phase two dose and. They told us that they've successfully picked a face to recommend does so. That's a good thing. And then the data is presented here so in the low dose concentrations. They don't see much of a response from cohorts one six. There's only one patient that had stable disease of twenty-one patients in doses in court seven and eight they also didn't see much of a response but then when they go to the recommended phase two dose in court nine and expansion of twenty-three evaluate patients of them had an objective response and both of them were completely responders with eight and stable disease so depending on how early. They're in treatment though. Stable diseases could become pressure responders or complete responders but given that the average Therapies is for for these patients. They are heavily pre-treated and so seeing some kind of efficacy here with patients. That don't really have another option. I think is very positive. Data in bodes well for an approval in this area. The company is looking at other cancers. I think i mentioned aml in prostate cancer and prostate cancer in particular because it's due to that fusion event. Sometimes i think the company has really chance of being able to select a patient population within prostate cancer. That would be great candidates for the therapy. So that's kind of where they're at with sarcoma and then i did mention down here that the safety was generally well tolerated and the dose limiting toxicities were managed by mild suppression. So let's get to the model and the current market cap of the company's at two hundred and forty five million dollars and really the more exciting part for me is the are one therapy from this company. So for mc l. ceelo. I'll say from the outset that it's a crowded space. There are btk inhibitors that have been wildly successful in the space. And i was talking about it bruton ebb and this is a abby j. J. drug improve macaca. Astrazeneca has one as well as beijing. There are also three k inhibitors. I've talked about with my bare sam. Talk kapika zaid league. there's also two inhibitor. Called v nato class and that's an abbey genentech drug and then also anti cd twenty drugs like talk some ab or roche's zyppah so suffice to say that it's a pretty crowded space right now but the one thing that the company has going forward is it's a novel space so are one has not been clinically developed yet and on terminal would be first in class and so what. The company has shown us is an example of the abreu of sales. And i'm just blowing them up right now. I don't think brunette is really the best compared to given that it has a number of different indications approved for than just ceelo but the sales twenty thousand nine hundred bruton. It were three point eight billion dollars so that's obviously a tremendous amount of sales right now so i think what's more appropriate in the trajectory to godiva which is roche's anti cd twenty drug and their revenue for twenty nineteen was five hundred and fifty two swiss dollars. I believe that the jeff and it's almost on part of the dollar so just pretend pretended dollars and the initial approval of godiva was in late twenty thirteen but they had a number of different hangups. That prevented the real adoption of the molecule. But one thing that happened in early. Twenty nineteen is that it was approved in first line. Cll or s l. in combination with. Bruton it now. Obviously it takes time for the molecules to get adopted but here we see a. I almost full year of revenue from combination between gonzaga with a brunette which seemingly on turn is gonna look to do so five hundred fifty two million dollars in revenue is still double the market cap that on terminal is trading out right now and i think that if we look at that is kind of a base case right now in terms of revenue that they could start to see i think the on turner should be trading much closer to one or two billion dollars right now and so another piece of data that i think is interesting. Is that the original creator of brunette was pharma psychics. And that was acquired for twenty billion dollars. It's not the same as on terminal necessarily but twenty one billion dollars is a huge price tag. And then i also wanted to mention that it brunette is priced at thirteen thousand dollars per patient per month and the patient population for mc l. is around two thousand per year with cll at twenty one thousand patients per year. And i've got the links there so in terms of what we can expect from the company i think at such a low valuation. Any positive rita is going to have a multiple times effect on the stock price. So i'm estimating here that if they continue to see positively in ceelo. Mto the fair market cap would be between one and two billion dollars positively in doing sarcoma because it is a rare disease. I think also garner a market cap of one or two billion and then if they see positive effects in breast cancer as they continue to collect data that i think deserves a fortified billion dollar market cap given the huge patient population in breast cancer. Her two negative specifically so the negative case on the other hand i give it a maybe fifty percent decline and it would trade it around cash. I think if they happen to see negative outcomes in all these trials for me. i don't really see a reason to not buy at this valuation. I think i've heard some people talk about how the company raised funds at inopportune times. But for me that just increases the amount of cash they have so they can actually develop these products further. The fact that it's a first in class are one antagonise also makes me think that it's a high potential buyout contender now. I hate about manet as everybody knows. But i think that looking at them from that perspective also is very enticing. So for me i'm gonna take a pretty decent position the company and hope to see the readouts come up in twenty twenty one and to look at those readouts. Here's what they have coming up. So i'm tuesday map updates they're going to give for. Cll in h one of this year. They're going to give an update on her two negative breast cancer. Also in each one of this year and they're also going to look at preclinical. Data in additional are one expressing tumors. So that's one thing that i think is very attractive here is that they can select patient populations that are highly expressing our one in their cancers and use them as a criteria to show that. This molecule has effectiveness in these patients. And they do this. Pd one already and they may as well start doing this with rr one in these early trials. So i think doing this is gonna validate and really going to set themselves up for success. In these indications there are one t i and human dosing in china and early going to talk about that. Maybe do follow video touching on the irwin car. T. but right now. I think there's more same with certain twos mab and tk two and six so for tk to six. They're going give an update. In ewing sarcoma for the phase one expansion cohort in the first half of this year. And they're also going to give pre clinical data in other driven tumors so like i prostate cancer. I think it'd be a great candidate there and Hopefully we see an update with that. But i think that the catalysts that are coming up and where the company's trading at really sells the company as a buyer here. So that's what i'm gonna do on the next trading day so in terms of the next week things i'm looking at It looks like mr. Joe biden is going to be inaugurated on january twentieth. I don't think it's going to affect markets too much. Think they've already priced in the fact that it's going to be democratic sweep. We saw that the democrats one in georgia. So we're going to have a democrat executive and legislative branch. I'm not super worried about. It seems like the market is totally shrugged off higher. Taxes are definitely gonna come especially corporate taxes. But i think with all the momentum. The stock market has a tax increase. Doesn't seem like it's gonna slow it down. I'm not super worried about that In terms of biotech specifically j. p. morgan is going on right now. So i'm keeping an eye out for a little tidbits of info that come out and then one thing i wanted to mention. Is that the arrhenius. Pdf day is coming up on january. Twenty second of this year. And i fully expected to be approved. I'm holding a small position. So i'm looking forward to that date and just to give a quick wrap up of my portfolio for twenty twenty. I wanted to just talk about this kind of a quick yearly. Wrap up and then. I'll talk about what i'm looking at for. Twenty twenty one but basically finished off at eleven percent on the year. And this is four or five times lower than the xp i and that's mostly due to all the craziness in the vaccine stocks that propelled the market so much higher. So i did not beat the xp but m happy to come out on top of at least. The dow jones and i mashed the five hundred so it is what it is. I'm still pretty happy with my performance. I think if i didn't have a losses an amarin doubled my performance this year. But you know it is what it is so overall my big winners this year were trillium. Therapeutics moratti io vance and rejects bio. The losers this year were amarin countless bio seo. Gene therapies cycling on a viking. It's not done very well. And bluebird so A few. I'm still holding. And i think that twenty twenty one might see blue skies for them so to give an idea of what that looks like. This is the performance so far and what. I'm going to actually track as long as the other indices to track. Kathy woods are g fund. Because it's so funny in the last two weeks i feel like everybody is talking about capi woods and her henchman. I'm gonna check that performance as well and see if i can beat her twenty twenty one but it might be tough because she so able to drive retail interest in single names. That i don't know if i can do by. That's what i'm gonna look to so so far. I've got a year to date profit and loss of around five percent. This is just the first week. I haven't done it up to wednesday because her middle of the week. But i thought it also include a position weight as opposed to just looking at the volatility because i never really do anything with that anyway but basically my portfolio is heavy cash right now and then it's led by chilean at around twelve percent energetics bio both of them are pretty big run ups in the last little while so that's the reason why they're so overweight. And my portfolio clear side as well as looking at two point six percent so really my re-genesis bio clear side position is closer to thirteen. So it's probably leading. And then i have kind of a middle tier with magical axiom. Ti as well as viking at six point three percent and then my lower-tier ones kp ti bluebird arena. I advanced cyclotron as i gene therapies and happy on so that's kind of how my position is tiered and i think it'll be interesting to see how the position waiting plays out for the rest of the year so i'm going to wrap it up there but thank you again. Everybody for your attention. I appreciate all the support and let me think. Let me know. If i miss anything with on colonel or any of the other companies i covered because invest in it too and i want to know if i miss something and yeah if you liked the show please share it with a friend. Click the like or subscribe button and you can also donate using the patriot description below and with that. I'm going to leave it there but thanks again. Everybody and we'll see next time.

cancers myeloma Amd bruton sarcoma breast cancer hodgkin lymphoma bruton ebb fda morgan edey dimitrios cancer lung cancer brain cancer
EP 210305:  Garage Pass

Garage Pass National Show

03:59 min | Last month

EP 210305: Garage Pass

"Dirk rolling in moving a lot better than what was serving going will took bristol motor speedway. I can't wait to get this place full. And i know the answer gonna love it. Gimme off of herbs. So i was the second arcaro. Npr ins garage pass. Do you use the expensive blue or yellow pills to charge your sex life. Are you thinking about it. What if we can promise you the same results for less than three dollars. A pill if you're paying twenty dollars a pill for the other pills. You're getting taken to the cleaners. Our pills deliver the exact same results for less than three dollars and right now. Radio callers will get forty four blue or yellow pills for one hundred and twenty bucks with free discreet shipping. You can save more than seven hundred dollars off. Pharmacy prices stop overpaying and call right now eight hundred six five one six eight two eight hundred six zero five one six eight two eight hundred six zero five one six eight two. That's eight hundred. Six zero five sixteen eighty two dump. Trucks are now hauling thousands of tons of dirt down into the infield of bristol motor speedway getting ready for the nascar cup series to run its first dirt race in decades on sunday. March twenty eight. Bmx executive vice president and general manager. Jerry caldwell admits it's a big project but nothing is too big for the men who run speedway motorsports bruton and marcus like the things that bruton and marcus have done here whether it's now football field or they'll grandstands sixty thousand seat seven three or four months like we've done in the past or putting the largest outdoor centre hong tv screen in the air. It's just another one of those events where you don't believe it until you see it even when you hear it and then come out and see it. It really is exciting. And i can't wait to get this place full. And i know the fans are going to love it. The man in charge of taking a concrete surface and turning it into a dirt track speedway motorsports senior vice president of operations steve swift. Who believes they'll be ready in plenty of time. you know. naturally it's never a great time to place in the middle of the winter or brighton. Snow and rain. What come in the spring months but so far we've been blessed this week. We started monday and she see the progress. We've made were way ahead of where we we would be with the weather. We've allowed a lot of flow days with weather. So we're on schedule pushing forward. I really kind of getting the bugs worked out. This week was what this week was skated for on her schedule and moving a lot. Better than what we doll servings going really well and kohler generators are going to be ryan newman's primary sponsor for the daytona five hundred as well as seven other cup races in twenty twenty one. You went online to switch your car insurance to progressive so you could save money but then you saw a friend requests from an old summer kip buddy. And now here. You are clicking through photos of his kickball team from twenty eleven. Looks like they won the championship that ear then he moved to tulsa a new tattoo. Yes they said. It was easy to save hundreds on car insurance with progressive but they forgot about the rest of the internet progressive casualty. Insurance company elliott's national meetings when you customer survey to twenty upon retiring from competition. Veteran driver brendan gone was given the chance to name his replacement. In the beard motor sports number sixty two south point chevrolet and he went with las vegas neighbor noah gregson who now hopes to make his cup debut in the season opening daytona five hundred. Who said he called jimmy johnson. I in jimmy deadline date. So i was the second pick which is pretty surreal. But if you wanna tell me. When i was younger race mandola eros when i started about thirteen years old that i'd be racing in the cup series and nine years. Take my up race at your line. The garage pass sponsored by progressive drivers who save with progressive. Save over seven hundred fifty dollars on average.

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91. Plutn, el regenerador

AstroC?bala C?smica

18:43 min | 4 months ago

91. Plutn, el regenerador

"Cover Meka. The. Knowing. He. spoke. Verana guitar almost. The cover, the former Amina, the data this. Because yes or say Miami. I pay US Siga may Rommel's. But. You know as whereas the. Related yes. Twist I still. Are. On Planeta. Trays Yup to a solo coury stacey talk of middle. Daniels measures. Obama simply and PUT Your gardening and you get the in his was get at readers. Yeah. For the only goes comprehend block Bush's out with the. Help. Me and Derek Worthy, okay in backing the stand, your Punta Com idea they must go to support cast. amac.us thrown. Deep Wish Furious. Has got the starchitect. Push The, seven hundred communities legit. I. Come on. Komo money harmony. Lasted until the Stein content. By. Behold that up. But oficial in Michigan. Into this Rachel is a push bleakest and neither was he cautions. gwen damaged. He added. Big Ideas and another prominent. Made Baba investigators. Also. Santa It'd be someway. And Capone. Yesterday. gyns and yeah it I made A. Percentage one. 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Don't come to know for partner so she shot. She know this she stood up or the amount of you. Acquiesced refugees push by most since you've. Pushed the Broader nobody worse outpost ECHINACEA Not In. New Jersey s destroyed. Australia's knee shortening when she. Kamar who knows ought Pluto on Charlotte era that reporters iguanas behavior herself this we. In, any estadio yet ghetto came felonies especially Portland's rock, but I was. Exterior. Bruton in Moist diaorrhea shackle you get asked me to disconnect. Sample of yours by this will give Ladonna, thin she finished frontier he's. For by US. I. Do Know in research showed up or Shia. Pluto serious at least. Bureau here is desperate of Oriental as. You look at Bruton is she Gets. Enough Air Boracay Julia. nope with Attleboro. As if Blue Tony's. Tuna four interviews Jose Tunnel looks at ring. Of of you said, GonNa, our number they added. Ricky's not. Gain weather retaliate afford up. Andrew Urinary Elegance Union Square Bush. 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They imitate guessing if you guys literacy. Dalit doubt format number shows little skits person in secret DOMINA for Cuanto. daime is not their assigned year as I multi. Core stinted episode I'm GonNa that it. Is Up to real yield. Dow is the Scottish. Borders the admitted that the ideal. You PROCACCI and shrieking benefit passive one. Like Easter, Masayoshi or Shia isn't Kayla. was. Either either the heat up at Sufa shop you see in them lousy. Lousy. PARTIC- miserable Proton located. She didn't. It ECHINACEA. Hilda. Leah Bully Fica. SAFE to walk says a lot longer wonderful sponsor. Saito. Years from mother. Bitter Nope. Don't been taught pokey own COSCO. Out of the abyss? In computer if this will be the. Only pupil Limpopo. Apparatus stuff he say, oh they're. Is. Really. In. Beleaguered. In the ASPER, the Alaska Jesse the admitted no continue our. C. Welcome Burmese Analysis Putin. It'll they. WanNa Besigye say's Mrs and let era. is as MRS comfortably. Assisted reality or have premera. In EUBOEA really fear Tanya. CPA Some of seam-bowler coach. As the muskateers. Harare. By. African that without butted exterior. This host. Your. Rochester although she just really steaming. Victor's brutal ended a run. Of. Out of Communist, tourist? Of Ghana Llamas. As. and. It'd be employed operational year Malkovich real. Income. Your Brutal Chevy, I mean the. Nother, story and the Russian. Concrete Hambro. She stumbled ashore I like fuel do Reino. Her orchestral. Ethical set by that the. Former. Luton Impo Nerva your come. Stuff yell. Clerk. UNHEARD OF A. Little Bit. Here's. Ben Matab VASIC windows various miscued on earlier. Today without. Schumann. Laboratory Levian guessing. materialists this integrators informative war. Kit. That goes through. Say. That showed up with realm Asto. been. INELIGIBLE DONOR HEFF DELMONICO's bill city who the visual. Matter. The superdome stadium data, the heat activities that ceremony the. Then there's not necessarily. Enough whereas Brazil you got an hour Heineken UK star. Those in they were active, they panettone the digital. Outlook seconded other other politics. Guido. For five dollars abortion reiter equal. INADA Guelleh. Rotunda in active in show that. You're getting a Winter Houdini that her house remind. You know on the sector of were opponent Liza. Our active capacity I seen. On Rutan Consented Yucky pointing much because more Indian Ocean. Gate. Rows. I mean. This catastrophes, Davis. Second that is. Superb, this. On the Rotunda him respected Cuando. Schwab that more than other extra. Dollars I think sectarian north the US. Know concealed throughout. The motion does this Cape Cod. Spectacular. The headed off. WORTH SCARY AND In with these? Factors. Income, you're here we're just because be. Into Interior for. Tomorrow ownership tackle hit. Here's check. Lifestyle. Shoe Barish. Your Colo Tasha Peter. E. Kit Martinez. Mario got up as an infant touches. Purist I got a historic icon by these. Here's yeah. Raton wished Leonardo's millions matinee. Can they pay me dealer complaint or share loss organized get? The looked real but I gotTA comprehension. Martorana Hubbard Bruton's under the multiple if you sick exist -rageous. GAURAV. Madan. Scorpio yesterday's August signal. Heroes Heroes. Are. Supporting. Bracket Alma. Were says must really think. The. Bit of one, the user's essential. Obviously, we are laboratory. He has a Scorpio income in that I ever. Stop, reported Comoros deputies for commuters. To the mortgage. House. Yesterday for. More. Sean Abby various. Honesty. And practicable most bill came Yoshida. Scorpio by yoke one. Thousand. Genome? Newest Kipruto. Mortar Schwab Challenge and she? She can ask other here. That yesterday Bob. that. Laterna to Australian goes, he, enters. Into theories. Outcome to I into. The only company. Last Prophylaxis Nestle Wilson if. She a comport into musical. Shuffles your. Other up save our, coffee. In Moore's that assured valid. In. Were of uniform on your mood. and. Your name and US airfield for canukus Montage Immune to. menas deform remote of stylish Miami's. MOIGNAN industry. In Denver Star. Star I get in your car. At the End Up Producing Winter. Elevate from morality in Bukhara. I compose. Is. A former. Here now. Beginning, performed. While, the wind and she knows the our Komo. Yuppies and the Wacko bore. Interest Industry now. Laid. To other women that do not minor corrector second-leading of nonsense. One the redundancy knows the Lebron Hem is the canal. Shows. US that in. Interest Salad stunk into their must. qualify. In copy cornea and bureau industrial. Here's a hint Amadeo by land by. US, the Buddha's. What's Almost with you. Commit to don wish Nossa third galleria formerly echoes Meka. Still. Less to yourself chat strength cornerstone stay Mashallah, voiced nurse masculine. US for does. 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US Martorana Hubbard Bruton Leah Russia Portland Derek Worthy Komo Scorpio Miami Sean Abby Alaska Obama Michigan Siga Amina Bush Daniels Capone Stein He.
Wandelnde Kristalle

Pod Cast Away - Gespräche mit Samson

21:21 min | 2 months ago

Wandelnde Kristalle

"So if you don't mind put cost to regiment sums on owned elegant your allow hans on and with the team of bustle. Let's talk into your on. That does the dolphin i. I'm not intervision on var. Is the album. This guy isn't salami on love or and your code is someone's issues. Blanquita seen become or or an muscle plea on and then leaked by whom i can leash each meal. These us to stick. I'm gabe leash. Plus the bombs believed in the rule of what kind of mine us kinds of lucrative reporters team. Also one of us kazakh. Inc give us in the league. Land in completeness is these. I knew my leaders. Zell's does this by fear card. You dot contents then this system. Although abc cute dan decision yatim filer hours plus becomes us is utilized labrada understood visit. Division incline is t mobile apple mirror. Besmertny hatched any optimus feel vaseline class. Lots of most cleaning of kind. File year diminutives poodle or the lamotta cold tea on copies or and clouds muscle bowl is dustin zoo in percent does it might. Disney walked been off and into a common vision. tigers quality. Big is owned as he can star. Be woman to be near on as it was african. Filing this is meant that oklahoma one week is particularly on. that's the ending of wish is allies. Join copy hope believed my plan ric young on the business. Awful guidon on either by these are normally. This muscles is highest is by fear cards us. How does fossil is is well plus misty. Who's the dish in the moment. Realized this is the way it's excellent. Mitchum buzzer is hot by few hot includes minded by god although events so wound is where shwim canister let's talk. Violence lightest so i had one of its. This is sue. Wouldn't up to resolve my mouth feel from comfortable. Basel does so. I'd be kind. What did prestige blows once or co ponzi. Basel form on How blue. I was or and also attracts you. On maza is not truly movies and off working found premium it. Fun vocation so gas niche zoo high but you will league div vases ahead eight and i love lifestyle claw. The visit us was televised back off released when this fleas idiots in the back of all in cupula strike us in on behalf an auction house had their campus flash from being forced this big. Look to my house. All under trenched uber. The poonam amend anga craft by nuns indian. Copy lau bitola. Now order state and dave houghton blyden. So that's how my uber ceo. Experimenting your message dingo class nandana league with swoop dundas on this is then shown that is the how for me your nen albumin cup eating out and washed so visit guns and dune y'all finding aid ocean. Boot doors fleeced owned indian. Stike not actually know what the fluid in deason copy lower and oust ayden went on. Strike this some on the cup. So cooed liden into bloom of each that sweden. Newt vendors in cop is of each fortune's tomb. Want a copy of this warm anger practice. I will be the up. When done mendes bruton up crude give into vida in a who a distant as hong in indian fly. We do not seem when then pilot read us. Blue on their eyed. As i invite who real and is zinc's drift does vomit blue bus fund involvement truth and calm now squad at dealing actualize to ti-tiffany day. Meyer align college. Ba gruner to an end of up because the district wouldn't sue and end effect on and kayce sloughs of the night half often. This law saul spas. Yuban done is cleared. The cop cruiser when diffuser mom. Then these are guys loved loved. Ben dor is pollute. Our hats hits you believe as highest in los outside. I ended up pump arbab blue of of vassal zo. For linux to doors hats fleeced put hats. Chinese garmisch for life is does done feel. Ill are bugle. Hartwall the of to storm in ashdod then to ads the frog on his hobby starvation palm walk in electric energy on uber de have bannon for titled device kinda novel da da kind of video. So i really wasn't. The missile instrument can study gun. Sweeney on from rising his voice. It kid all particularly among this forceful can lesson is will just. I miss my longer. So is the new beleaguered mir. That's unfortunate national on me. Finish and union fire. this is always a sluggish. When doesn't mean it's mild by stinking. Nba visit me for the comfortable this year. Them foods paseo. When cup and martin it's more nba fee plex and glued to new mishmash. Nourish whole foods in young. Didn't stick answer by. Of course there for tool for help visit blue when this was an reminded donna. Auditor zone is brewed is leaking. You wonder what's in bombs. Five routes in senior diarmid to our integration rain. You could janna destroyed bomb it. Yeah think the team is seconds claw is not clich essence how indefeasible blyden went to go on when business. Alphabetize dow click. I'd who's it now. Because after the contract is argument you might try to physically priest eastern. but when you're aligned. John brute brute bruising taste is not truly new and the logger phenomena off to straighten by louisiana of of quintana roo. Indicia and don moose. But i'm kicked us guns. I mundi so darn content. That sumitomo's on this might in boom undulating spun. The visit allah does mid michael and twenty committing on. Hindi's does shuffle moon. One clark inclusion a spill chuffed tyler behold into fries on business today on my not ask. If we're under this tyler into laga the uni- spies as balanced. I am to be the back back. This time to buy or and vassal johan doesn't mandy constantly on chris. Tyler on also is found floozy. Chris tyler can now so in the largest informat spite when vendettas annual for bank dot haydn is this for life. Mile moons okay. Here in the largest to acton flashed. Is this your toddler a household zone on through despise. Your own influence. You in his first in. Nick is in london the invent invent our name and bundle. The crystal on fire realized more. Kunda shirts columnists issue we. We've been in and out. An i in hide in in dolphin does believing that's especially this vassal. Woodlock through windsor useful movement is finally implemented on. Dvd mac is is on the dick autism a household code or mid between muzzle berkeleys. Berkeley music talk much in tokyo. Basel vicious indian violin kind coverage as bush basel waza in tightness in our class. Basel ones are a fish and today and on the kite was it through madden. I voted for president. Is loyd be. When it's my vied for nice liters yao coned due you as newman be dimension. It's so i don't that's that's into of these mosleh house search dish be stunned aiden no so sustainable for columbia when my info motaung how about our high and analyze information bisson yogesh one. Finding footsie didn't clinked us permission. Half would cbo as the blues. Unfold does is. I i saw on. As many as yet. Assume tarver because bush taliban-linked up the whole upset. The national walmart is the neiman thing on them of all the tusk visa muslim tears. Timeline copies of suffering is how how does kranish. Connie mack out of violence linage. our economy is are eligible. Listen should swing four hard when it's often thank you for more visit dembosky basel fired and flashed up on mars old of a line the battalion this fossils supposedly from for one hundred to my few moments that i've spent too much. You have forty oscar to the line. Not mile of let the hub. Ethnic tiv wassall was overtaking fell last night. david fun. Time flew more in following the empire in cobra asked my beautiful live on air you out. It indicates a common well done as low tonight. Mccovey winston bidding signed most clock respect of does being hot som- talk to begin an asked as glass all not for the little glass watson condone dive on spy asia. Spicer for mood or removed should be updated levy. As one hundred system side-on the and talk owned finding haugesund. Tad's h stritch kyd school district in basel household was called philosophizing and in touch on it needs to let it Is thing when we were league. Does it suaza. Essential is fewer guns. But i get. The mouse is listen. Bond him eugene cygnus afoul new carbon improve the issue of pajamas. The ecclesia on does awesome. Damn it encloses. Shits in the of height owned tatra miserably. It a small vida. I-in causes class lightens. Hi maurice link owned last is could gain past of and next month. Let's talk this time.

Basel Blanquita dan decision yatim filer labrada ric young maza lau bitola dave houghton blyden nandana league Stike deason liden mendes bruton Meyer align college Ba gruner Yuban Ben dor Zell Mitchum gabe
#418: A Fake Bank For Money Laundering Run By The Government

Planet Money

20:10 min | 2 years ago

#418: A Fake Bank For Money Laundering Run By The Government

"Support for this NPR podcast and the following message. Come from Yahoo. Finance live, eight hours of free. Live streaming news without cable or a subscription. Tune in for the news. You need about your money accessible wherever you go. Everyone. It Sara Gonzalez here. I have been going to the trial of Joaquin El Chapo, whose Mun infamous drug cartel leader just found guilty of all charges against him international cocaine distribution using firearms and laundering, all of his drug proceeds, which is the one that we're really interested in it reminded us of this classic episode that we're gonna play for you today about the time the United States tried to stop drug traffickers with a pretty sneaky plan that involved a decoy Bank now in the El Chapo trial. We learned about all of the elaborate ways that he moved his drug money around the US government claims that over his career he earned fourteen billion dollars. So we're talking tons and tons of heavy money that takes up a lot of space. L chapel apparently flew a bunch of his drug money out of the. United States on his super stealth private jets that are coded in some material that literally allows them to fly under the radar and then Chapa would hide all of his drug money in these huge underground Bank size of alz because this is not the kind of cash that you can deposit in a regular Bank without people asking where it came from. So they had to laundry they would like fill a bunch of prepaid debit cards with as much money as they could it made it easier to transport, but apparently L chapel didn't like this method because it took a really long time to withdraw a million dollars. Now, the United States has its own tricks. And that's what today's episode is about here is David Kessler bomb and HANA Joffe wall with the story that originally ran into thousand twelve sometime in the early nineties a man walked into the US embassy in Ecuador. He said he had information some. One would wanna hear information on how to go after some of the most powerful drug traffickers in the world. And this guy said he was willing to help. And what happened next was that two special agents in Atlanta got a phone call skip lattes in with the DA the Drug Enforcement Administration and Bill Bruton with the IRS heard about this guy and thought we've got to meet him initial meeting was in Ecuador Kito Kito Ecuador. Did you go on that show? You didn't take me? Do you have a code name for this guy or anything like, yeah? Yeah. He was a it was a codename. This is Dan. At least creative codename. Dan, the informant worked as a currency exchanger. He was the guy you went to if you had pesos, and you wanna dollars or vice versa and dental skip and Bill he was getting a lot of requests from drug traffickers, drug traffickers with a problem, a problem billon skip had never fully appreciated having a very difficult time with just the logistics of laundering millions and millions and millions of dollars every week. Every week. Well, yes, imagine the situation that drug traffickers are smuggling all this cocaine into the United States the cocaine gets sold on the street. But there's this problem. People buying cocaine aren't paying with credit cards. They're paying in small bills tens fives and ones so the drug traffickers have hundreds of thousands or millions of dollars in physical cash, and it just weighs allot Bill. The IRS agent remembers reading a drug traffickers house and finding a huge amount of cash, I think it was like seven or eight suitcases, and it took ten of us to to carry. It was so heavy. That's so funny and never thought about that that just the actual money would be. That's the unique problem. It's it's unique to the illegal industry. The weight of the money is huge. That's absolutely astronomical. This was a huge problem for drug traffickers, a problem. The traffickers needed solved they needed someone to take all that heavy cash and turn it into a check or a wire transfer something that doesn't wait eight hundred pounds. Basically, the Colombian drug traffickers, they needed a Bank. Here's Bill again couple of weeks later skipping. Our sitting down now in Atlanta. And we're saying, well, let's open up a Bank had you ever opened up a Bank before though, this is the first one if you'd never you didn't have any history, and you didn't have you'd never worked for a Bank bankrate never worked for a Bank in my mind tire career was with, you know, the criminal vision of IRS sort of like if only somebody could do this crazy thing, and then you guys are sitting here later thinking like. Maybe we can maybe we can. Hello and welcome to planet money. I'm David Casten vote. And I'm Khanna Jaffe. Well, today's show operation Di Nero to secret government agents. Go offshore create a fake Bank and launder money for some of the largest and most dangerous drug kingpins around. Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from each raid. Are you ready to make moves with your money? Invest with each raid and you'll see how simple investing can be no matter your level of experience each rates easy to use platform keeps you in the know about your money every step of the way, but it's not just their platform that sets them apart. Each rate has the people to offer guidance and support to make your money work hard for you for more information. Visit each raid dot com slash NPR each rate securities LLC member FINRA SIPC. The US any Ron have been at odds for a long time. And we tend to think it all started with the Iranian revolution in nineteen seventy nine. But that's not the whole story this week on through line. We'll take you back to four days in nineteen Fifty-three that changed the US Iran relationship forever through line where we go back in time to understand the present. We came across Bill and skip an operation too narrow because while back we hear it planet money got into the offshore financial world ourselves. We created an offshore company in Belize to try to get inside look at this whole secret world, and when we were doing that we discovered that back in the nineteen nineties the US government had done exactly the same thing except the government went way way further than we did we believe Bill and skip the two government agents wanting to open this fake Bank. They chose and Guelleh an island in the Caribbean. And that is where they imagined their future customers were already banking those areas those offshore accounts or where people under money, so it just made sense to to offer an offshore Bank operation to narrow wasn't the first project Bill and skip had worked on together. They had been working together. For decades. These guys are in each other's brains. They know exactly what the other lakes for lunch every day and the day that we met them. They were wearing match. Matching outfits both in polos, and pleaded khakis and for years billon. Skip have been chasing the same guys guys. Like Pablo Escobar notorious drug kingpin in Columbia a man so dangerous. There are many movies all about just how bad this guy was assassination. A billion dollar gug empire. One of the most wanted outlaws of the twentieth century Pablo Escobar, in my opinion, is the largest biggest criminal the world has ever seen or will ever see? Skip the special agent with the DA thought about Pablo Escobar allot. You remember seeing this article in Forbes magazine Forbes does this list of the richest people in the world and Pablo Escobar was on it. This criminal was a billionaire exactly the kind of guy who needs banking services villain skip that we should be the ones providing those banking services. We'll see where all the money goes. We'll see how the whole operation works and so- operation to narrow was go and billon skip needed a name for their fake Bank to service drug traffickers, and they thought about it, and they thought well, it you definitely have the word trust in the name. And also, we should use initials a lot of Bank name seemed to have initials. So they chose are H M which apparently stands for absolutely nothing and our gem trust Bank was born. And was the first time the that any government agency worldwide had established a Bank. The sole purpose of which was to track Joe track drug traffickers money. I would imagine that doesn't happen. All the time that I I don't know if it's ever happened since. Dug out some old photos. We had a party at our office when our H M trust Bank was finally approved that champagne. Federal facility that's apple juice. Heckling. Billon skipped it everything. You have to do for a Bank before it opens. They printed up brochures, the made some official king ID's and fake business cards, but their Bank was very different from every other Bank in that their plan was to turn away almost all potential customers. It didn't set up branch offices. There are no ATM's no smiling Bank. Tellers just one office in Atlanta with a telephone and a fax number. We didn't want to deal with anybody else's money, except the drug traffickers, you'd want ordinary people coming in Santa like to open a checking account, and you're like, we're not real Bank. Exactly bill. Skip were in business and the way it would work is that the drug traffickers would have this cash that needed to be deposited. So they'd facts are H M trust and account number and they send him a beeper number. Yes. Faxes beepers. Remember, this was the nineties. So then whoever's going to pick the money up Coles, the beeper the guy calls back and says meet me at XYZ street corner at ten o'clock tomorrow morning. And what kind of car are you going to be in? I'm going to be in a blue Chevy. It's supposed to give them a code word that you'd be very something. Very simple this. I have a package for Amanda, then they would call meat and a package would be exchange usually suitcases or packages from trunk to trunk in a public place. It's amazing. How this is just like every cop show I've ever seen except that. Usually the government isn't helping the bad guys launder drug money. Well, what happened next is Bill and skips guys would take the cash to a local Bank deposited into an account owned by gem trust Bank. And then why are the money to wherever the drug traffickers wanted it sent to and it all worked the drug people were very happy with our Agem trust Bank billon skip we're getting closer. There were learning. All this stuff about the money laundering world there. They are wandering around this dark place. And they started bumping into all these other people who exist in the dark like, for instance, turns out they were not the only ones offering financial services to drug dealer. It was a busy place with established rates for doing this kind of thing we were competing against other money pickups. So skip says, I'm gonna charge. You nine percent will then you come to me while I'm gonna charge you eight and a half and you go back to skip and says, I got somebody eight and a half. He's all cow charge eight you're in a competitive marketplace, very competitive market, and we had to make sure we were not so cheap to be suspicious, but not so high that we wouldn't get customers Where'd spread and soon more and more orders were coming in which for Bill and skip meant more information. What what are the tricks that I always laughed at when when skip order to find out who the true owner the money was he would delay by twenty four hours and setting the money, and then we'd get telephone calls and find out. Oh that that person comes out of the woodwork. When it looks like that the money may be in jeopardy. We picked up more information by being a bad Bank who who didn't handle money quickly and effectively. That's high net worth individuals. I net worth individuals. Yes. In in risky adventures, Bill and skip or winning. They had tricked drug dealers. They'd gained their trust. They had them right where they wanted them. But at the same time Bill and skip were becoming more and more aware that they weren't fully understanding the money laundering scheme that they were taking part in like there were constantly things that didn't really make sense they'd pick up money off the street, and then they'd be told to wire it not to Colombia where the drug traffickers were. But to some legitimate American business that was selling like tractor parts or something it was all very confusing. There were a lot of smart people involved in that end of it ex bankers money brokers that have been doing this for generations. And it was to me the complicated system. What billon skip were uncovering is now called the black market peso exchange system is a series of cleverly disguised money transfers to convert the drug money that was stuck in the United States into pay. So's back in Colombia it worked by hiding the money in the normal flow of trade and payments for things like tractor parts. So Bill Inskip were nearly there. They were inside this complicated. Marketplace and close to figuring it all out until at one moment. They came extremely close to being discovered not by the drug traffickers, but by their own people by US Bank regulators. So I have to say David, we don't spend a lot of time in the show talking about how Bank regulators are doing a great job. But in this situation, they did exactly what you want. Bank regulators to do regulators at the office of the comptroller of the currency. This is it US regulatory agency that regulates banks they showed up with some questions about this RA gem trust Bank hidden security. Call me up and said come on over here. The OCC is here, and you're auditing your account you better get over here right now into I walked over there. Talk to the. Order talk to the what did you tell them? I told him that he had uncovered a a covert government operation. Congratulations. And please don't tell anybody. And he said he stopping the audit right then and there, and I by the time, I got back to my car. I got a call from the OCC supervisor saying they were in a processor shredding their notes and everything else that copy, but they had already notified the OCC in Washington in Washington. The next boarding was going to send a fax out to every oh see Bank in the world or in the United States, notifying them that are gem. Trust Bank was not a Bank to do transactions with. But what happened? And so they were going to end up. This fact, stop the facts we got there in time. They stopped the facts and menu cover with almost blown. They're almost within within twenty four hours. We would have been in trouble. We we live in stopped. I trust Bank existed for a little less than a year and the drug guys never figured it out in the end the thing that killed the bang. Think it was success? We got we got to be a little too popular. We were being approached are inform. It was being approached for other offers to do ill illegal things. And that wasn't. I've target eating. They were asking you to do staffing. Like, we do that. Oh, we we were authorized to do a and B and they're asking us to do see. And indeed why can't you do see Indies? And so the correct answer that question is we can't because we're actually undercover agents, and we only got approval to do certain kinds of transactions with you. So we can't give you the loan or whatever else which other it just got to starting to be get a little bit out of hand. So the decision was made to shut the Bank down. And by this point, it had uncovered a drug network that extended to lots of different countries and the Italian government in particular was eager to start making arrests so Bill and skip scramble to coordinate a massive simultaneous bust after the break. The big bust. Support for this NPR podcast and the following message. Come from Microsoft technology is accelerating faster than ever and things that once felt far off are making a real impact in our lives today. See how a I is in power in business innovators at Microsoft dot com slash AI castle mountain high is different from a lot of other high schools this student. He got shot four times stay outside and like Hegel bullets guilt. A gun to my head. I'm Sam Sanders. One year after parkland, we've talked to kids who faced gun violence every single day. Listen on it's been a minute from NPR. Just like in the movies. You wanna pounce on everyone all at once? So one guy can't warn his friends and say, hey, the cops showed up hide. And so at a specific time it began hundred sixteen people connected to RH trust Bank in four different countries. Where arrested Bill video of what happened in Italy? The show the police precinct, and they were like twenty thirty of these little teeny international police cars and all of them scream out of the out of the compound at one time, and they go all different directions like ants, and they then they showed X hours later than bringing all these fugitives or recipe back in. But it was. It was quite quite harrowing. What did it feel like to watch that I was exhausted? I was exhausted was finally over with officials seized nine tons of cocaine and more than ninety million dollars in cash and property, but of the over one hundred people arrested billionaire Pablo Escobar was not in that group. He remained out there. In fact, skip and Bill did not bring down any of the ringleaders. They say what they did do was make the drug is wonder about who they could trust usually the secrecy of the offshore world. That is a problem for the government for guys like Bill and skip because it hides all the legal activity, but this time it hit them from the bad guys. And it hurt the drug traffickers, I know one thing they can't trust a Bank now as a result of of of what happened here, they can't they have to be careful and think twice if they go to a Bank to to to trust them to handle their financial transactions and could be could be another government Bank. Do you guys feel like you're winning the money laundering battle? Or is it just a matter of setting a back for years, and they find some other way to do it. I think we're I think we were winning twenty years ago. And I think we're winning today because a win doesn't necessarily mean you stop it you change their their their methodology for doing it. And I think that was one of the greatest successes of the Bank that we're able to get them off of a very sophisticated process. In the bulk shipments bulk shipments taking all that heavy money and physically sneaking it across the border to do that. You don't need an offshore Bank. You just need a truck. This show originally aired in two thousand twelve and if you want to see that picture of Bill in skip celebrating their fake Bank with sparkling apple cider. You can check out our website, NPR dot org slash money. And let us know what you think you can send us an Email planet money at NPR dot org. And you can find us on Facebook and Twitter and Instagram. We are at planet money. I'm Sarah Gonzalez. Thanks for listening. This message comes from NPR sponsor Comcast. Comcast values your time. That's why you can schedule to our appointment windows, including nights and weekends that way. You can spend more time doing what you love. Comcast working to make things. Simple easy. And awesome.

Bank Bill United States NPR gem trust Bank cocaine government IRS Drug Enforcement Administratio Atlanta Pablo Escobar H M trust Bank US Bank Agem trust Bank decoy Bank Trust Bank Bill Bruton RH trust Bank
 Meet The Listener & Your Feedback on Episode 9

Homo Sapiens

20:50 min | 2 years ago

Meet The Listener & Your Feedback on Episode 9

"We're going to try to right now. Sapiens extra few people have Britain in saying never stop eating. So you know, what I want? What's on the show? What's on the show listener feedback is staple of him sapiens extra? We choose review of the week on apple podcasts and gave a favor of you. That are free t shirts three. And we've got meet the listener where we meet up with one of our listeners and share one of our favorites men of drinks. Hear Ye hear Ye I've caught an inbox. And I'm going to show with you. How does that sound? It sounds delightful. We've had an Email from the navy in the navy day. Chriswell good stop gosh. Exclamation mark. Sitting in my cabinet. See listening to choose as feedback on episode eight podcast, the very last thing. I expected to hear was my jeans review nominated as review the week. I am truly honored or Chris seems to forgotten that he caught himself polyester as his drag name in episode eight. So I cannot take the credit for coining it. I am Jeff to bit that will likes his new name a fever green. Gosh, I look forward to the next video with him in this character or the car video is pretty risque already. Great sung, by the way. Thanks. I feel that you and him going to get along or not use strictly Boreham tickets till available as a senior officer the rural. I think I'm one of the most senior out LGBTQ plus people in the British armed forces. And I just in myself. Bit too, much information. And I inhabit a strange and exciting world of testosterone fueled masculinity. Interlaced with genuine passion. Inclusivity? The Royal Navy enroll marines was fifteenth stonewalls top one hundred employees in two thousand nine hundred nine and although there are frequent references to the village people's in the navy from civilian friends. I can only say I've not received any discrimination adverse comics bullying in over twenty years of service because of my sexuality, so it's better than the record industry. Then. Much better. Having said, I'm afraid that my because of my rank and what my team is doing on live oeprations at the moment. I'm not permitted to give interview without all sorts of senior permission so grateful if and only if you want to choose his Email now, you didn't use my son or job title older name the ship. But otherwise, I'm very happy feet quote away as Jamie in the navy. Okay. So but we can use you coordinate. So he is west one sixty degrees. I think this man, Jamie is marriage material. Oh, can you? Imagine you get married on the boat. Thank you for getting in touch. Again. Thank you book maven has been in touch on Instagram and had a question for you will I couldn't remember the ons to can you tell me the name of the book will read aloud on TV the two puppies. Was it to puppies to find a copy to read my son's poppers to pop? Yes. Two puppies, a different book. Yes. That's about two puppies. Now. Susan B's been in touch. She says subject hitting my worm. Oh, hi will brackets. I love he and Chris brackets. I love you. But I like you I listened to a show at work to get me through the dreariness. I know an appreciate the show is a glorious LGBTQ plus flag flying enterprise, but I'm just plain old straight. And I listened as a human, and I had to all of it yourself guess and the worm oh feature get rid of that plane, but this is forever on this. Because isn't it? Yes. No outside is stepped off HAMAs. So it seems. This week. I got lost in YouTube. Watching candy pushing machines then coin push machines, then people scratching off lottery cards on. It sounds incredibly dry, but now I'm pushing coins and scratching winning lottery cards in my dream. If it intrigues or interests you in the slightest take keep up the good work. Listen to you soon. Love Natori time cuts. Oh my God. That's a phasing. Please everyone else listening. Please righteous in your worm today them. That's really funny one. And then Fraser wrote in quite you're gonna love another name in this Email, which I remember God is it Cassius Cassius. No with I love this. I just thought I would see we say thank you for sharing your friendship through the wonderful hemispheres us. My good friend Dylan said that it's important to reach out and let other people know you appreciate them when they have made a difference to life. So here I am doing exactly that Dennis. I mean, they must surely that I have been an avid listener from the beginning you make talking about LGBTQ, plus matters accessible and give a voice to many pressing subjects that I think about a daily basis say thanks for that and Fraser as any in a photo of himself. Oh, I thought it was with a t shirt, but it's not it's a it's a jumper with Jane McDonald on it can I see? Oh, my God is. It's amazing fill. No names will anyway, Helen Phil's been in touch. Hi, Christian will it's actually Philip. I'm willing call him folks me too. I hope you'll both. Well, people are very polite at the top of their emails on the I started listening to a podcast late last year. And if binge listened since is that a phrase absolutely, it's fell to the whole thing. And I'm loving it. I'm thirty eight year old geic, I happily married to a guy and living in Dubai will. Right as being gays illegal here. There's no gay cultural outlets that I can reach out to. So having your poke costs to listen to has been great. I feel I'm being kept up to date on not any LGBT issues. Poodles stuff that's happening in the UK in general, plus very happy with the limited to complex it. Thank you because neither is not his neck will loving your new single and video come on albums out. And Jude looking forward to the album Jude funny story when you'll second album was released I call the piss take of me for buying it by. CD's how old school a friend reminded me recently when I was challenged with buying. You'll CD item round them said I'm a gay man is my people, and it's my job to support him up and down ten to my Halen walked off like you so much anyway thought it was funny story. Hey, you guys have a great week keep up the good work. Thanks Philip to putting your people, but our solidarity from. Yes. Letty solid. Dougherty. Bloody bloody bloody bloody feeding very with my people to say at the moment. Yeah, I'm feeding a real sense of light because I've been watching lots of LGBT boon. And you know, what the porn is just making me feel very with by winning all five of them. Don't have each other. Well, those are the words written by our listeners read out by Crispin. Now, I think it's time to meet an actual listener. What's his name is names? Chris your Chris he's gonna wonderful name. He runs a thing called the happiness project. So we went in shed a Smirnoff drink with him, Chris fix you drink. I've got Smirnoff vodka creme cranberry of various mixes both curtain, and Tony you have no cranberry. William I'm gonna fix you a Volker soja, and I'm going to have a vote could tonic something it started managing sticks where I'm heading to Europe twenty twenty four you've got this. And I've seen. Weiguang, touch and what you do. So I'm Chris Samsa, I'm positive psychologist, and I specialize in applied neuroscience and about eighteen months ago, a great mate of mine. Robert who I co run and co founded the gay happiness project with we got together, and we really useful to bring some of the stuff that we do with organizations from positive psychology from neuro science and coaching to the gay audience. What is the gay happiness project? It's an eight week mindfulness based program that allows gay men to develop trusting or Fenwick connections. And we designed it because we were really just noticing more and more about the problems that this into be gay men and mental health issues, most notably we had a sort of a twelve month period where each month, we seem to learn about somebody who committed suicide so Roberts best friend took his own life. Unfortunately. And there were a lot of very similar elements in each. Of these cases. So we started to do some research. One of my bits of research was actually listening to your podcasts out there looking at everything. Do we being gay and putting the Trump mental health stuff? No. I've really enjoyed them. I've really enjoyed your female Uber taxi driver should have around show. She's amazing because you've done four cohorts refer gay men. What is it a group it? Yeah. Spot. Nami watched three hundred one or something. Because there's just the two of us. We want to be able to offer it to more and more people. But there's only certain amount of time that we can give ourselves so bringing other people on board to be out to did. How did what you teach them the caused change your life? Like where were you before? Where did you get to? So looking back. I've suffered from some form of depression for love my life. I didn't come out it in my mid twenties. I've had relationships, but never saw very long term relationships. And I got to a point where twice I've had to take medication for my depression. And the last time that that happened. I just got into such a terrible place ended up having to go back to my parents. And through man of a certain age to have to leave your home. It was a real wakeup call to me. So one of the reasons I went back to union did a master's in positive psychology was always looking for some other solution to my own challenges. So when rob and I sat down to start for look what we thought we could do to support other gay men that might be having problems. We said well what's worked for us? So for me, I have gratitude practice. It's what the one thing that's a huge amount of research to backup Martin Seligman who started the positive psychology movement Cousy three good things. So before you go to sleep every night, you recall three positive things that have happened to the day, you keep progress journal. Right move. Right move. Right. Here we go or you. There's hundreds of apps you can use that. So all these things that you enacting were and have worth you. And and those are on the course, and how much has shame come up because I know you mentioned about Selva I listened to you Matthew Todd for me. I really liked the book because it lays out fantastic landscape, it talks about how we've got to where we are what I think both Robert. And I felt about the boot was it didn't offer many solutions. Well, step up Williamsburg on. Shame. You ride the year really resolution anyway. So shame on of the key things that we talk about in the program and from again from a neuroscience perspective when you're hyper vigilant your body is producing a lot more of the stress hormones. We don't get rid of the we're not running around or fighting, especially as go. We're not fighting. So we're not actually. Who? The shape is hyper vigilance because not feeding say, yes, exactly. So if you're through four year old you can't you see yourself or if you come down the stairs at five years old. And you've got rob Khan and your father shouts at us. Then you start to look out for what are the things. I'm doing where I get this reaction. I need to stop doing that the last group that we had come through a number of the men that came on the program were there because anything was wrong. They said they wanted to come along because they miss the company of other game men. So one guy summed up to this is the first time I've been in a room with fourteen game men where sex alcohol drugs haven't been involved. And you know, what is the best time? I've had in a room with fourteen other game. There's something missing in our community. I think sounds all scented connection. I think that's a difficult thing to create full stop for any community. And I think it's. Wonderful. There's a space that you've created where gay men can come and find that authenticity and a safe trusting environment to truly be themselves. How has it changed you impose it to you know, because we talked about what you did. But then how did it change you my life has gone from and for the sake of the puck on joined like a rollercoaster, really amazing highs everything bipolar by imagine what it felt right? And then really awful lows my life now is a little bit. Like that is a mutt. I'm the most content ever been in my life, and I've stopped striving for happiness. One of the things when I did my masters well over a decade ago was this pursuit of happiness in psychology. We call it the head on the treadmill of on this treadmill of hedonism searching for something. And I think that a lot of gay men get caught up in that cycle. And for me. I think the I've managed to get off of that particular. Cycle, and I just feel I've never felt so content. Well, that was Chris and Kristin. And that's what we do. We just rinse joke. Like, no stone unturned. No, no in this area. No. Doc, lonely corner. Hello spied. No. I thought it was a very good initiative that he's doing and it was great to meet him. We like meeting our listening so me one of my favorite parts Costa than eating biscuits. Now. Should we go to rate and review? It's time to hand out t shirt, isn't it? Yes. To a favorite review of the week on apple podcasts. And is not always a good one. Is it William with very even-handed? Some we had teach it to route review review constructive criticism. I believe that cooled question from the back. Please has anyone who's been not so pleasant about our podcast ever written back and given their address rushed to send the t shirt too. Well, because this is such a well oiled machine, I never entirely. No. I can't remember if this person was me. No, not because they wouldn't be listening. They wouldn't be listening. Yeah. But I like the fact that we've prophet. Yeah. We're approach. Oh, yeah. No Terrance says thank you so much discovered. You very recently. And I've listened to the lot so delightful. I've enjoyed every moment. Well done you both turn Terrence. I if I had another dog calling him Terence, it's any time Julie jazz after reading two puppies. Jazz discovered will Chris fire my boyfriend who had them on in the car one day, and I was bowled over by the onus team candidness the conversations with guest. I'm tearing up. I've I've been just the first two seasons while I worked in the garden. And now, I treat myself each week with a long soak in the tub with willing, Chris sweet, boys. You might chills pleasure. Jason treat us is a little magnesium salt bath. Yes. Or rubber Ducky? Yeah. Well, it's a game of to offset. William and got fifty fifty Terrence we go jazz. I'm going to do something. I going to do a Roo pool. It's never been done before. Go on both of them get t shirts. Shut an partners plot twist. What actually Terence's denim go to partner? But yeah. Yeah. T shirts for everyone. I'm excluding this is when Oprah hunter call you have a mental mental so t shirts for T shirts for three people t- shows for jazz or get crazy T shirt for judges husband and a t-shirt Fatone. Yeah. Done please. Send in your address Email us at Hello at home, assay pins, podcast dot com, and give us your sizes, please. And do please rate move you because it helps us, and it makes people think that we're very popular. And for those of you who aren't winning tee shirts left right and center, you can get yourself a t shirt because you all Dimond. Much on ever press dot com forward slash homo sapiens. There's any going to be there for another three weeks twenty one days. It's another flash sale. It is. Such a good wormhole. Geico. I've got so many how did this happen? I say I'm actually had to just go back through my instrument history. So by dining tables at shabby stool, several decided I wanted to table for my kitchen table is very small via how the matrix built a billet proof legacy. So it didn't what happened there. Then I went on a whole thing about looking up the bridge that they're building Battersea power station in London is this whole redevelop Willie's station near you has been redeveloped. And they're building a footbridge from that side of the river to the other side. I didn't know that. And then I ended up on canal boat holidays because I wanted to. Can I just say it's when I went on a canal boat with uncle Tim of the saying keep buggering on Cape. We went on a canal on their canal boat, and it was one of the most beautiful things I've ever done. It's quite a more PA the world we win around Oxford. That's where I was looking beautiful. So there's one where you can start Oxford out towards the worlds type thing difficult to drive. I'm just telling you that. Now have you seen me drive as well? William to do that he'd like it as well. He loved because he'd be happy time Huma into yen. He'd be. Yeah. He'd love that. I couldn't do. I have to say no number of people. You do for four. Really why not six that's what I was thinking. But it depends. How long the boat is forty footer is a Norwegian not at the moment. I mean, I'm going to throw it out. But you don't have to do narrow vote. You could just do Newburgh, and it could be in the Mediterranean, and it could have a crew now, my friend went on an Arab holiday and on day. One six of them someone blocked up blue. Oh, yeah. I will take you through my history now. Okay. I started yourself. I started a French clothing label called debone facture Lauren's or in French debone facture, very nice. I then quickly moved through to relaxing rivers ounce. Love it. He's forest river three hours long. And then the best anxiety PO cost which I never listen to podcast. But I did listen to these confronted them now. But there's one call the hilarious world of depression or something like that. Which is an exile. Crystal bowl shot. Chris I was having a bad day. And then. Through to which we spoke about before Bruton in Somerset, and there is a some sort of gallery. Brady cool space, basically what I do. But never would get round to doing it and probably go broke, and they called Hauser and worth. Oh, yes. Bruton embracing. They're everywhere, Los Angeles. Zero just stunning, but what is house room with because I know the name I thought it was like I'm not house room worth apposite of gallery space in Bruton. And that's where I ended up before. I went night night, which means private browsing. I fell asleep to the river, really three hour river, tones lovely. It's really lovely. And I'm going to do a new thing for we finish crystal bowl. Like sounds and gongs and things you go, and you have a gun bath. It's just a wave is sounds running through you of -ly. Apparently, it's wonderful. I'm going to do that one of those come with me. It's Marla burn in London absolutely for gong birth with a birthday present born when's your birthday? Today. Oh, don't be stupid. It's in may, isn't it? Yes. L go for that. May the thirteenth twenty sevens. So close oh, twenty-six less close. Now that this out. I think that's it for this week's episode of him savings. Thank you for joining us. Thank you for joining us. Chris. Listen, it's my pleasure. Remember miester in the? Spring knocked back. That's what I say. Concert tiny on Thursday. We've got founder of UK black pride filled. Yes. Brilliant pretty interview and outreach with questions. And it's it's cetera. It's my Latin. Teach you stay. Six of the best. Good.

Chris William navy Terrence Robert apple UK rob Khan Bruton London Royal Navy testosterone Philip Britain officer HAMAs Jamie Bruton fever YouTube
17 in 1765

5 Minutes in Church History

04:59 min | 1 year ago

17 in 1765

"Welcome to five minutes in churches hosted by Dr Stephen Nicholson where we take a little break from the presence to go exploring the past asked traveled back in time as we look the people events and even the places that have shaped the story of Christianity. This is our story family history. Let's get started. Welcome back to another episode of five minutes in Church history on this episode. I'm once again on location in colonial oneal Williamsburg in Virginia last time we were together. We were outside of Bruton Parish Church a congregation that was founded an Anglican congregation Gatien that was founded in sixteen seventy four Williamsburg was founded as a town in sixteen thirty eight and of course Jamestown Jamestown was the original capital but in sixteen ninety nine the capital of the colony was moved to here and it held that capital all the way until seventeen eighty when and during the revolutionary war it was deemed that Richmond would be a safer place well we are interested in the year seventeen sixty five in fact a date in seventeen sixty five on June seventeen seventeen sixty five a group of seventeen men got together and petitioned Russian the court here and Williamsburg. This is what they requested. We intend to make use of a house in the city of Williamsburg situated on part of a lot belonging to Mr George Davenport as a place for the public worship of God. According to the Protestant Austin dissenters of the Presbyterian denomination well. This is an Anglican colony. The Anglican Church is the the established church and these seventeen presbyterians wanted an authorized legal Presbyterian church to be established they actually actually added a ps two it and the PS was this as we are unable to obtain a settled minister. We intend this place at present only for occasional worship when we have opportunity to hear any legally qualified minister well. The city of Williamsburg granted their request. They established their church perch. It was just a small little modest meeting houses. They mentioned they're not even able to have a settled minister. I walked it off and it measures about twenty two defeat by thirty six feet and in this very simple meeting house these presbyterians met member how Paul ends Romans by listing listing off a number of people well here are seventeen names William Smith John Connolly Walter Lenox James Holdcroft Robert Burke Nicholson John orchiston James Douglas James Atherton William Gemmell Edward Cummins Thomas Skinner Daniel Hoy John Bell James Smith William Brown John Morris and Charles Hankins. These were carpenters vendor's craftsman. Some of them worked in the courthouse. These were the seventeen who started this church on June. Seventeen seventeen sixty five these presbyterians came out of the great awakening. They were a new side Presbyterian Rian Church that meant that they were not only in favor of the great awakening but many of these were likely converted during the great awakening some of them might have been in converted under the Ministry of George Whitfield. Remember that sermon that we heard a paragraph from by Steve Lawson. Some of them might have been converted by I Samuel Davies Samuel Davies was a Presbyterian Missionary Tha Virginia his first wife died and his second wife was Jane Holt. Her family was a prominent family here Williamsburg and so Samuel Davies made many visits to the capital city not only to see his in laws but also to petition before the Virginia legislature and before the Virginia governor for Religious Freedom and no doubt bolstered these presbyterians that were here in Williamsburg one of those ministers who came occasionally to preach actually to those ministers who came occasionally here to preach once they've established their meeting eating house were trained by Samuel Davies well. That's the Presbyterian meeting house here in the charming quaint colonial Williamsburg and I'm Steve Nichols and thanks for listening to five minutes in churches for more ordination or to listen to past episodes. Please visit five minutes in Church history dot com.

Williamsburg Presbyterian Rian Church legal Presbyterian church Samuel Davies Virginia Bruton Parish Church Dr Stephen Nicholson James Douglas James Atherton W Mr George Davenport Daniel Hoy John Bell James Smi Steve Nichols Jamestown Jane Holt Richmond William Smith George Whitfield Steve Lawson James Holdcroft Religious Freedom John Connolly Walter Lenox
The 7 Perspectives of Effective Leaders with Daniel Harkavy

PDX Executive Podcast

28:42 min | 2 months ago

The 7 Perspectives of Effective Leaders with Daniel Harkavy

"Support for this podcast is provided by kresa. Cra says the occupiers champion world's premark corporate real estate advisory firm exclusively serving startup businesses and major global organizations like as a portland pillar for over twenty five years kresa partners with its clients throughout the entire project. Life cycle the workplace strategy and discovery through the deal transaction and project management delivery of space kresa partners without conflict in applies integrated expertise to make your business better go to cressa dot com slash portland to connect with the portland advisor from that cast creative. I'm dan bruton. And this is the pediatrics executive. Podcast the show where. I talk with inspiring leaders. Who are shaping. The future portland oregon. Every week i sit down with business executives startup founders and community leaders to dive into their career journey and get insights into the impactful work. They're doing our slice of the great pacific northwest. everyone thanks for tuning in the executive podcast. I'm your host. Dan bruton very excited to have a fellow daniel on the podcast. Today daniel harvey. Who is the ceo of building champions and the author of the seven perspectives of effective leaders. A proven framework for improving decisions and increase senior influence. Welcome daniel great to be with you daniel as you as you read the title of my book. I thought you know that's just long. I just call seven perspectives. So that's all. I'm used to but yeah. Yeah it's great to be with you so let's start with the book. There's a lot to talk about. let's talk about. I guess maybe it was backing up. Let's talk about H- how you got into executive coaching and your company and will go into the bucks of love to learn more about that all right. I think that's good. We set a little context for. Where's this guy. Get get any input to write a book so it all comes from my client work so twenty. Five years ago. I moved from southern california appear to oregon and was thirty years old and It was a one year sabbatical between Moving from california. Moving up here After ten years in banking it was a one year sabbatical that led me to launch building. Champions and building champions is an executive coaching and leadership development company where we focus on the beliefs and the behaviors of high performing leaders and You know the the impetus for this was that when i was in mortgage banking in my twenties really early on i was given the opportunity to manage lead and I had no college degree. I had no formal management training. I had learned As one who wanted to work from a very young age. I learned what i didn't want to do as a manager because i had a few of those leaders which everyone has those stories. Now's probably just my immature big ego. At the time. They'd probably were great leaders. And i was just a bit of a an arrogant one but what i did was i developed a a style and strategy around recruiting and developing people and it really worked so my whole deal was i would fill my days with one on ones with the best of the best in the markets in which we serve and my strategy was to add more value to them than did their leader. So i would show up. I would have a notebook. Would take notes on you if i were recruiting you. I would show up with one goal in mind and that was. I'm going to help you to be more successful whether you work for me or my my competitor. I don't really care. I'm not gonna offer you a job. I'm just going to add value and over time. I was twenty two twenty three years old the best in the communities in which we operate it all join my team and fast forward a few years we had a few hundred of these mortgage consultants in the organization and six of the top ten were trained and recruited and coached by me so We did a lot of volume. We did a really great clean. Excellent job high-quality. So you take all of that experience then. I grew to run production. Iran all of the offices throughout the western. Us when i was twenty seven twenty eight years old age. Thirty one year sabbatical and the part of my job that i really loved back in my twenty s was the one on one piece. It was helping people to figure out how to go from where they were to where they could be in business and in life. I love doing that. So i thought you know. This was back in in the nineties. I thought i'll bet. I could make a living just doing this. And it's because management was so broken you know if if managers and leaders did a great job. I'd have no coaching company. You and i wouldn't have work night. Yeah but There's an opportunity for people to grow so today. There's more than twenty coaches. Were team of mid thirties. Headquartered here in oregon coaches throughout the country where we work with leaders. Not just here in the us around the world and and all of that enables me a platform to create content and frameworks to help leaders to think better and then to behave better so that they execute better get better results so it back up a little bit about the sabbatical piece. I think i know a lot of leaders right now. You're going through that either by choice or by not. Yeah and it sounds like you intentionally took that time. I know a little while ago. A what are some of the things you you did during that. And i asked because i think it's valuable for a lot of folks as were through a global pandemic. Some companies are upended. So i think it'd be valuable to hear aso Thanks for asking that question. It's a it's a good one. I have now come to realize that taking a year off with three kids and and moving from one state to another without a job. is not all that common. I'm a surfer and have been my whole life so that was part of my sabbatical. I surf all the time up and down the west coast over and why down in mexico my wife and i. We rented a an rv and we traveled and it was on three kids yard. It was awesome. Yeah kids are at that time. Were one three and five and it was really cool. What i did was you know the the years before. I spent a ton of time on airplanes and in cities. Where i would sleep in hotels motels and my my bride and my kids were really important to me. A few years ago. I wrote a book called living forward. And it's all about life planning And i knew that. If i stayed on the trajectory that i was on back in my twenties that there was a chance that what mattered. Most to me would be jeopardized so in that. One sabbatical really built a lot of reserves in my marriage account in my parenting account in my adventure account. Fresh start in a really a time to explore into to dream and So in that year there was a lot of our time. Really got to grounded. In kind of what kind of days. I wanted to have what i wanted my rhythms to look like what kind of freedoms i wanted to have and i put together. Three different business plans All of them really different a surf snowboard skateboard shop the boardroom a restaurant a bagel shop completely different and then a coaching company and all of them would give me the opportunity to connect with people in the community and to care about them and to you know bring up the best them and and To be who. I was with them. I really like that. People sigh of it. But when i came to realize was was the coaching i had a unique passport for. I could work with leaders. I started off in banking and then over the years grew from banking to just about every industry that we're in right now. We're all over the map and with regards types of businesses. But that sabbatical you know if any of you find yourself in that right now be okay with the uncomfortable be okay with the not structured. It's difficult You do it. You can't fight fear with faith Learn like right now is the time to learn learn about areas or topics that are really interesting. Do you What i have found as you know we've all heard no is if we're passionate about something our odds for success. Just go through the roof. So what could you fill your days with that. You're really passionate about you. Know that is what i did. Building champions his company where our logo is a torch. And i believe we're here to make the the flame burn brighter. We're here to make a positive and lasting difference in the life of each person. We coach one person at a time. I do this for free. I do it all the time. How i like spending my days. Thanks for sure. Like thanks for sharing that. I think it's important Especially it's very timely. So let's fast forward to the book a little bit you've written How books now. I've written three books. That i talk about one that i don't talk about so this kind of three ish sounds good Talk about the book Just in not a huge broad question but Like to ask these questions because shape where we wanna go. But what was the The fire to to write the specific one and then now south. How's it landing. Yeah so the. Seven perspectives of effective leaders is a straight forward. Connect the dots. Leadership book and the impetus for it was that i use the framework in organizations to help leaders to think better and if you can help a leader to think better than to create an environment where his or her teammates can think better You're going to move the needle. I mean absolutely and leadership such a broad topic. So i say that a leader's effectiveness is determined by just two things the decisions you make in the influence you have. That's it and. I've had conversations with ceo's chairman boards Leaders have small to mid size and we get into these debates for six years now. Is it really just decisions and influence and and About a month and a half ago. I was on one of these with of my contributors to the book. If i haven't got you a copy did we get you a copy of it yet. It's it's an. I didn't get a chance to pick it up. Is that my po box. Okay well you know what you're going to really enjoy in is all the different leaders that had to the book. And one of them is frank blake and he's the non-executive of delta airlines. He was the ceo of home depot. Good friend great guy. And frank and i were doing this about a month on month and a half ago and he said you know daniel when you said that leaders effectiveness as determined by just two things decisions and influence. He said. i shook my head. I said you know what you're right. And then he said you said it again and then i started a challenge. It and he said i was having this little intellectual debate. His right isn't he said then the third time he said he said i absolutely agree and he said i think it's bryant because at leadership. It's so confusing but just understand the intellectual part around planning around execution around alignment around strategy decisions decisions. Which ones do you make. Which ones do you delegate out. Which ones do you need. More information on in order for you to be most successful not perfect but most successful all of those decisions and that competence the speed in which you make them the clarity in which you communicate them all of that impacts influence and if you can create great decision making a great decision making culture and if you treat people as if they matter and they have an opinion and a voice and they're needed and they're engaged and they know that you're looking at the right perspectives in the business influence grows so abused the model it used to be the five perspectives and back in twenty fifteen and then we grew up to six and i wasn't ready to write the book and then the seventh was the outsider. Which is the role. You and i get to play where we come alongside leaders and help them to make sense of the other six and once. I saw that it was time to write the book. So it's landing. Well came out october twentieth just a few weeks ago. The reviews are solid the feedback solid. It's crazy time to release a book time or a good time. It just depends. It's like i'm like here's my book. Political book notes this spur in comparison but the message is solid. Let's talk about. I know one of the things i was. You know knowing some folks that work with you on your team One of the frameworks. I believe and you can correct me if i'm wrong. It's just about maybe out of self awareness is the right term itself inquiry just knowing yourself. the importance of that and I don't like. I said i'm sorry. I haven't read the book yet. But how does that play in play into this. Well so you know. Self-awareness emotional intelligence social intelligence. All of these topics have to do with how you feel others right. That's influence so new when you get to my stage in life daniel and you get to the last three decades for decades around amazing leaders. I'm a student. you know. i've never been the sharpest tool in the tool shed I'm a hard worker. And i'm really curious. And what i've learned is that the best leaders They're so comfortable with who they are. They're their identity. It's like they know who they are. And they know who they're not They know who they're not. They're not the superhero. They're not the no at all. they're not the end all be all they can be replaced. They're here for a very specific purpose. They can be used for amazing amazing good but they need to show up in ways to where they bring out the best in others. An exceptional leader takes this diverse group of humans. Aligns them around a mission resources then develops them mobilize them and just stands back and supports and supports and supports right so being really aware of how you feel that others how you interact with others how you affect one. Another is a big deal with regards to influence. You think. some of that is innate. Just who they are is at a process. The best leader g worked with have really spent the time to work on that. I think some of us you know it's an eight. You look at personality or behavioral profile certain behavioral profiles. You're relational prone but that doesn't mean you make the best decisions so just like any thing. From a skill perspective you can grow develop from an identity perspective. You can grow and develop so it's heading hard work you know. You look at all of us as leaders i. I've always shared this with with people. One of the greatest gifts from me daniel in doing what what i've now done for so long as seeing that none of us have it all figured out. I was an insecure young guy. I really was. You know like i said no college degree i would get into a room and i wouldn't i wouldn't feel like i was the smart enough and i'm sitting around all these amazing leaders and they got letters behind their names lead companies and i'm in the room and i don't know how the heck i wound up like might thirties. I'm like if if my thoughts ever got broadcast out. People would just look at me and go man. The guy's going to wet himself. He doesn't belong here. You know and it was true. But what i realized was journeying with amazing leaders all of us. All of us have have our achilles heel you know. All of his fights some demons all of us have some insecurities fears or maybe some sessions and and there's no one who's perfect. We're all trying to figure it out as we move along. The greatest of leaders are guys and gals. Like you and me trying to figure it out. What a lines. The best is they are really passionate about emission. They really care about moving people forward and they really care about the people that they interact with. That are going to help them to go from where they are to where they wanna go right. And it's that head and that heart combination that that humility along with the confidence to know that you are where you are for real reason so step into it like lean into it. You don't have to have it all figured out. You don't have to have all the answers. Your jobs to allow align the best thinkers and put them around the table and extract the goodness from them. And then you make the d. Or you know rush out there but i could go on and on forever. Thanks daniel zoom in this world. Right now. i've been thinking a lot about when i was twenty to come in when i came out of college i i kind of quote unquote professional job not washing dishes or whatever being just the interaction of the face time with different leaders in organization and just building that rapport for the folks that are earlier in the care that are not getting that I have a of empathy. I think it's it's it's tough What's your thoughts on. Not as far as if you're early in your career and maybe you are ambitious or you want to develop that You look down the road. I want to be a leader It's just it's a different type of world now so Curious what you're hearing from clients what you're doing with your own team as well. Yeah so i think what you have to do. Is i think you have to continue to take risks and What one of the things that we do is we. We do a ceo. Roundtable years ago it used to be live and and now it's leaders chime in from businesses all around the world and The advice that some of them give is that you need to be You know i. I think frank blake. Who is the delta chair. A few months ago you like you guys have people over for tea on your porch. That's what i'm doing. He serves on four or five different boards delta being the big one pm g you know some big companies. Yeah an his work with the ceos. He's he's talking to a lot of the executive team members that report to the ceo's and what's missing that one on one piece and and that physical connection piece. I'm not saying be careless. I'm not saying you know have blatant disregard for the health concerns that we have with with covid. But i am saying you can still be together. You can still be together. You're in a you know you're on a virtual no. I'm sorry you're in a shared workspace. And i'm sure you're meeting with people. I'm meeting with people I had a. We started a new organization to help these people. I just started an organization called step. Path and set path is in not for profit. Where we're gonna blink bring mentorship and life planning to america's twenty two year old regardless of collar regardless of faith and belief regardless of wealth status. Demographic i just want to impact every young twenty seven year old. Who need somebody to believe in them and see goodness and then give them a plan that will enable them to live aid an intentional life. So you know that's called set path. We were just launching it right now. Just got it all set up but set path. We had a strategy session over here. And i've got an outdoor pavilion outdoor living area. The house you know. Gentlemen todd mo- zetter. Who's just a stud. He's to content and marketing company. The guy that's awesome. He plays a key role of building champions dude but he and others were all here along with a set path team so building champions or coaching team set path team which is young mentoring team. We sat outside and you know that was more than two weeks ago. Nobody sex so young people you out there take some risks Ask your leaders if they would be willing to go for a walk with you. Ask your leaders if they would be willing to have a coffee with you. people going to restaurants. There's stuff happening so yeah it's great advice myself. I've been ratchet up the the the walking meetings. And i just love it and it gives me now. It gives me excuse. But it's i spent a little more time with with people. I could go hour and a half blocks and it's been great so That's great advice. Was we we kind of wrap it up. I always like to ask about portland. You moved up here. You have your business here you now you can move anywhere. You want probably House portland been for your family. Your business how's it changed in regards to the growth and business and What do you see the future here for. you know. we're talking business related here curious. You know we'll business you know. I uh. my heart breaks k. So you wanna talk truthful. Yeah my heart breaks. I'm so sad about how we humans have responded in how we humans. And i say we. I'm throwing myself in here. You know i i. I drive through downtown portland. It breaks my heart. You know. I don't know how the heck we wound up here Not acceptable not acceptable And i feel bad for the entrepreneurs in the business owners that had the stores on they had them for thirty forty years on those streets and trashed heartbreaks for those people I'm a i have. A restaurant helped launch a restaurant Special interest in one in portland and have some really great friends in the restaurant business. My heart breaks for them. I mean they're it's day to day man. Yeah so. I look at that that the restaurants. That's not a portland issue. That's a. That's a global issue in very much with regards to policy being similar in the united states for the most part. That's tough situation. We find ourselves in. Portland is a place that i had immense taken immense pride in. It's a cool town outdoorsman I like the more casual outdoors professional vibe of portland like the decisions that have been made to keep a lot of the foresty greenery beauty in the midst of the city. In like hacking you can move around so so well that will Continue you know. My business is headquartered outside of portland in lake oswego. I work out a home. Office in west linn. We still have a little office in lake. oswego that gets used for some collaborative meetings and stuff. And i'm seeing clients in portland. I've gotten some large clients that i will go and when they're in town and i'll meet them there and it's weird but i think all of us as a nation are gonna probably climb out the same way. I don't sit there and look at the future for portland any different than i do. San diego or chicago or dallas or atlanta raw gonna crawl out as a result of what really happens with covid and you know right. Now we're watching. You're hearing certain states and certain cities respond in more aggressive ways. You're looking at what's happening in europe and you're seeing lockdowns again. But if. I'm gonna talk to my portland. Fellow leaders There will always be opportunity in portland and You need to be able to shift need to be able to adjust. Keep your teammates really focused right now on the mission of the business. There's a lot of noise. And there's a lot of distraction in our city and the more time we spend talking about this and ending the less time we're talking about the mission of our business less time we're talking about how to wow our customers. Bless time we're talking about what strategies what bets. We need to place in order to move forward. I outlined all of that in the book and you know early on in twenty twenty. We needed to be making sure people really healthy and well protect the team. Protecting preserve the business. Those are two big mantras. At building champions protect the team preserve the business while the clients that those were marching orders from really march fifteenth on. But you you shift when you realize are people are set up well. They're in their home offices or they're you know in the factories or in the plants or in the retail stores with protocol stack the odds in their favor of being healthy. Okay we've done that. Now it's time to move to the offense and focus on the mission and build your plans for twenty twenty one. Be agile and and plan quarter by quarter willing to adjust plan for twenty one. Twenty one to be maybe a little bit more challenging of a year. I don't know how long it takes for us to to get out of this. You know we're in. We're in a recession and And if you plan for a difficult twenty twenty one you might be pleasantly surprised if you plan for a wonderful twenty twenty one. I just can't wait for the calendar. Change from twenty twenty two twenty twenty one and everything's rosie got a rough time you know that emotional rollercoaster for us leaders us. Humans is no bueno. Move to the offense loved that that resonates with me and i'm in that mindset to will daniel. Thanks for being on look forward to reading the book and full. I'll pick it up today from a po box in Again work working folks. Find john line and doubt well you can find the book at the seven. Perspectives dot com. And there's an assessment there you can take for free and see how you how you score and comparison to the database of all the other leaders that are taking the assessment the seven perspectives dot com building champions dot com is our executive coaching and company. In then i'm on linked in daniel harvey h. a. r. k. a. v. as in bicker. Why i'm on facebook. And from time to time. I get a bit loud on social media when i've got something to say about leaders chip or i wanna post pictures of surf trips My grandbaby but That's how you can find me favor sir. Spot in oregon. I'm a pacific city guy. Yeah yeah know. I i have a prop home there. I've been surfing there for for twenty years. The best wave in oregon. If i say i'll get beat up but it's a little further north. Yeah kind of a little secret. Yeah well maybe not so. I grew up in southern oregon. I growing up do crescent city alive and love. I've kind of given it up as i got older but my family and i do At least two weeks a year and pacific city. So maybe i'll see out there. Oh that would be. I think it's time for you to get rid of those cuss words. You just sat me. I got older. I gave up surfing. Not just this is on me. Go and start that. Yeah so. I'll take that advice. Go down my my my twenty year old board in august back out there so that ever want to paddle out again. You let me know to take you out. Sounds good thanks so much. Thank you daniel. The pd ex executive. Podcasts is a production of that cast portland oregon podcast agency that partners with brands to create. Custom podcast you can learn more at that. Cast dot com. Please take a moment to subscribe and rate the podcast as well.

portland daniel daniel harvey oregon kresa kresa partners kresa dan bruton frank blake Dan bruton Cra aso daniel zoom southern california delta airlines west coast Iran us home depot todd mo
Transformation = Opportunity with Allie Magyar, CEO & Founder of Hubb

PDX Executive Podcast

20:33 min | Last month

Transformation = Opportunity with Allie Magyar, CEO & Founder of Hubb

"Support for this podcast is provided by kresa. Cra says the occupiers champion warriors premark corporate real estate advisory firm exclusively serving startup businesses and major global organizations like as a portland pillar for over twenty five years kresa partners with its clients throughout the entire project. Life cycle the workplace strategy and discovery through the deal transaction and project management delivery of space kresa partners without conflict in applies integrated expertise to make your business better go to cressa dot com slash portland to connect with the portland advisory from that cast creative. I'm dan bruton. And this is the pediatrics executive. Podcast the show where. I talk with inspiring leaders. Who are shaping. The future portland oregon. Every week i sit down with business executives startup founders and community leaders to dive into their career journey and get insights into the impactful work. They're doing in our slice of the great pacific northwest. Everyone thanks to pd ex executive podcast twenty. Twenty one were back. I'm really excited to have my next guest. Who was on. She's like two years ago year and a half ago alley. So thanks for coming back. It's allie the ceo and founder of hub. But also you still run dynamic events correct. Yeah both really interesting. Businesses to be a part of over the last year with with cova and the change of our industries. Oh yeah and i want to get into that. 'cause you know events are near and dear to my heart. I run a series of very small meetings. And i've seen how arlington and really leading the charge of this. This transformation of events. And i guess that'd be a good place to start you know looking back. She's almost a year ago where we've been in this this long. How was it when it all went down. Someone in the event industry with clients serving clients that have big events. How was it for you. One word would be terrifying. You know i. I think a lot of people in meetings and events are taipei project. Managers know what to expect. Put in the work and it will all happen. And i've i've never seen anything like it. You in business people often ask you. How is your business recession proof. And that's a pretty common question. Never once in all of my years at anyone asked how is your business pandemic proof improve end that those are two totally different things and that transition can be tough. Transition really just equals opportunity. And so i think there was this moment where we started to see early indicators because our customers are running some largest events in the world so we start see early indicators in february of really large events being cancelled and you know there were a lot of people saying. Oh it's fine. It's going to be like the two thousand eight crash where everything just comes back really quickly but the impact of what we were seeing happen. I didn't see that coming back very lame and even now almost a year later you still hear people saying. I'm just battening down the hatches. I'm waiting for live events to come back. And i look at them and say okay but the world is a different place you know how learn how we communicate how we network. All of those things are so far different that we have to think about how we adapt in meetings events and so there was a short while where i was terrified and i stomped my feet and i cried a lot and i was frustrated and i didn't have a clue what was going on and i allowed myself to grieve the change but then very quickly said okay. How do we come out of this. How do we look at this as an opportunity to be able to change the way that events impact business. And how can hub play a role in helping to transform our industry. You said something really interesting. He said allowing yourself the time to grieve like so that implies that a stage of that is over and so. I think you had the foresight to say like this is not going to. Yeah just leads. Sit on their thumbs gonna come back right. This is really a transformation So fast forward. I fast forward. Nine months with so much has happened but What are some of the learnings you can share about. Just the ah meetings and really our people were doing business with through those you know when people thought about virtual events prior to co bed. They thought nineties video game. You know not not really a lot to be gained in a in a virtual event and there really hasn't been a lot of technology innovation because live events where it was at right. It's about creating that connection that experience And we didn't know how to do that. Virtually and so. I think when all of this happened everyone panicked and said i can't do this. I don't have the skill set. I don't even know what virtual platforms there are. I don't like will people even attend and you saw a lot of webinars happening. A lot of people saying attention. Mike quote virtual event which was a ninety minute webinar or a three up. The god forbid a three hour. And i went out and said why. Why are we limiting ourselves to this events happen because we're creating experiences for people were creating emotional connection we're creating community and so how do we look at this as an opportunity to be able to do those same things. Yes it's a new environment. But the strategy behind why we host events how we host events in the business metrics behind it are all the same. So how do we just reapply that in a different way and what i found in our industry is that there were just a lot of people stuck because of fear and as soon as they went back to their. Oh i know how to do this okay. So now instead of being in a physical venue it's gonna be an zumra or in a virtual event platform. But i still need to think about what's the theme. How do i connect people. And so there was this transformation for me personally and the way i got over it was by saying our industries falling apart. Everyone is calling me. And saying i probably am not going to have a job. Seventy percent of the meetings industry is furlough right now and so they needed to gain experience and to gain skill sets. That allowed them to be able to stop to talk strongly to the executive team. About how events can still help the business to move forward. And so we decided to throw a virtual event and to allow people to get hands on. And so from the moment i had the idea to the actual event date was less than six weeks. I saw you post on linked in and it went like it was a big event that we have five thousand meeting planners from sixty different countries and this was back in may so this was everything started to happen in march april and then we had this event in may and part of that was. I put my meeting planner hat on and this is a founder and as someone that has spent my entire career in meetings and events. This was probably the most rewarding thing. I've ever done in my career. Because i was able to share with people. This is how i thought about planning the event. This is the experiences that i brought. Together this is what worked. This is what didn't work. Here's the data i- measuring business. What i would do differently in the future. It was like komodo wide open. Let me tell you everything. And the event was ran hubs platform. And so i looked at it and said i'm going to be completely independent here and tell people exactly what they need to do. And the response from that is. I've gotten handwritten letters and emails still to this day of people. Saying i didn't feel like i could and then i came. I want my hands on. I learned so much there was so much transparency so much connection and so they were able to then take that and look at how they then transformed their own events and there has been a lot of value of switching to virtual because in the past center live events. We through events with our own notion of this is why people come. You didn't know what people did. And if we wanted to know how much time they were spending sessions versus how much time they spent in the meal hall talking to people versus how much time they spent in the exhibit hall. We didn't know that unless you spent millions of dollars on rfid technology and then people didn't want to be tracked. Now i look at that and say we're sitting on a gold mine. We now know what are people doing. How do they get value. what are they engaging with. How do we help facilitate connection. And so. it's just a completely new world and were able to globalize our brands. Were able to globalize messages. Lead generation is way up even if they don't actually attend the virtual event you're still generating leads for the sales team and so there is so much that has really forced meetings and events into a digital revolution. I think something that has been coming for quite a while but held a lot of resistance and even as we think about the future of hybrid. Because i do think that hybrid will be the future i still see predominant Being put into the virtual experience and the actual in-person being much more curated much more of a personalized experience for people. Because we found that we can do things online. We don't have in person. And i think that's been a big revelation for people just in their day to day. Lives much less than events. And it's really. I mean for someone like me and some of people i know and peers. It's allowed you to step back and say like you were saying what's the the real reason we're doing this and it's not to say we're just an curson like the business reason of connecting people not value and i i that's been so refreshing for for me and fortunately we have platforms like yours and all the other the ones that are out there. Where it's it's folks. That aren't technological savvy Like vietnam sometimes. It's been really great. So so where do you come as far as leading your team through this because you had your leader you have that mindset and your made that transition but communicating that in for some of these folks. I assume have been in. The event is for a long time house i- terrifying just to remain my word you know and it required a lot of transparency. I mean we went into march and we literally had no sales and no renewals. No one knew what was going on. And you see your cash dwindling super-quick without a hope of knowing what's going to happen and we had to furlough almost our entire team. We put one on shared work and we. We didn't know when we were going to be able to bring them back because just nothing was happening in the industry and as a leader you know often. It's your role to lead when times are tough when things are just normal business. Okay fine you know. That's it's a role but when things are really tough when they are terrifying. That's when you have to step up and you have inspire people and it's hard to do that when you're triggered yourself personally add walkway. So how'd you do it. You know it was for me. leaving with. Authenticity is the most important thing. I cried in the meeting. And i said. I don't know what's gonna happen but as a leader here is what i'm going to be watching to see signs of things coming back. It is scary. It is terrifying. We don't know what's going to happen right now. No one does getting into a meeting and telling people a bunch of bs that does nothing but break your credibility got on there and be like it's going to be fine. It's all going to come back in thirty days as your break is going to be really small. You're going to get unemployment. But what would that do besides have people look at me in their heads go will. She doesn't know what the hell she's talking and so for me it was. I'm scared and i've never been through this. Before and industry is totally unraveling however. Here's the plans that we can put in place to measure what we could be doing. That would mean success that would be early indicators of things coming back and so every week i'm committing to you to sending an email update of where the industry stands where we stand on these metrics so that you know when things are going to come back and so that was literally weekly communication with people love. This is what's happening. These are the signs that we're seeing and we started to bring people back with bring everyone back at the same time. And we told people that here's the indicators. This is what we need to be doing to set the company up for success. So we're gonna bring these people in this team back and then next week we're going to revisit whether that was successful in bringing the back so it was a very phased approach but with total transparency. Because people need to know what to expect if they know there's a plan they know the real story they don't create one in their own head retain all of our talent through that and that's an amazing accomplishment thinking about everyone was scrambling going. Do i need to get out of pets. Do i need to get out of this company. Who the hell knows what's gonna go on. And so it's it's it really is about communication could as you such great insight and i could just envision you being like you re like a wartime general right like this thing and i think a lot of your your peers. At founded companies lead companies. Did the same thing. But i also saw some folks conscious disappear. You know some leaders just they went the other way just like ours gonna sit this out for six months. I think that was just unfortunate. Probably a death blow to a lot of that so When she did that and got through it and you know here we are. Did you stopped taking inventory of yourself just as lead in organization and how much you've been through and what you can do for yourself Some self care things Was like either. We can't give to others if we aren't in a place of calm ourselves. And i mentioned the process of grieving we applied for ppp and the first round of p the bank said he. I your set. And then they once everything ran out the called us back and said we made a mistake and we actually didn't get enough numbers back so while we told you were approved. You didn't get for both companies. You didn't get funded and i i mean i i did know how going to get through that and to think about then going and talking to the team and telling them we didn't get this. This was our lifeline. There was a lot that i had to do to be ready to have that. Conversation and grieving was a big piece of it. It really was. I think as leaders. Sometimes we're like we're going to push through this and we're gonna get through it and that's definitely a mentality but sometime is when you do that you don't actually grieve the loss and so all you're pushing it to the background and so for me. It was. I spent a night like stomping in being angry and acting like a two year old and telling myself it was okay to do that and the day it will. I actually felt a lot lighter. Because i had grieved it. And i had let it go and i also then said what do i need to be able to show up for people because it's emotionally draining. I mean i had one on one conversations with each person checking in with them and their family and high risk people that were so terrified. And i wanted to be able to be present but that takes so much energy and so i blocked my calendar and every thursday at six. Am i leave. My house. And i would hike mountain and i blocked. I wouldn't come back to work until three o'clock in the afternoon and those moments for me. I had to know myself. And what gave me energy. But it was the silence. It was being able to process. It was being able to think when. I'm not surrounded by all the emails and all the negativity and all the things that i have to accomplish and so for me it you know. Some people looked at that and said what the hell you're going through this crazy time period and you don't know what's going on and you should be their focus on your company and my comment was i absolutely am because i'm giving myself the space and the time to think and the energy to be able to give back in a massive capacity. I mean that takes a lot of courage to do that and kudos again to her doing that in to get that space because he said it's easy to keep going and being inundated all day long so We'll just a couple more questions. This has been really valuable. And i'm assuming you're team still remote. You had a beautiful office space in vancouver a chance to go to a couple of years ago. How every kind of leaders has their own thoughts on that engagement. I know you're very over communicate. What sounds like that's a great for this kind of remote work that we're doing now. So how's that. Ben with your plays and just to to it. Yeah you know our people champion. Her name is nancy and she is really focused on how we create a culture of connection. Even when we're not in person and it's new for us we've never done that. I we have been so much about the in person interaction and the you know i. I am a person where i don't sit at my desk. I literally walking around off the wall. And engaging and it was very different but what we found. Is you just have to be intentional. And you have to really figure out for your team for the people that are with you. How do they feel valued. We've hired probably over forty people and we've never met them thinking about doing that. And how those people feel. How do they feel a part of the culture. So we don't have a physical office space anymore. We did move into that beautiful space in. It's gorgeous office if anyone's looking for an office it was a perfect face. Move into but you know. We looked at that in our employees said. We're actually getting more done. Were able to Focus a little bit better than being worried about health or safety while we're in an office and we again constantly communicate with them. How do you feel about going back to an office. Do you want to go back to an office. We ended up giving stipends to every person so that they could order food if they wanted or pay for their internet and contributed to their quality of life and so we heard very loudly. We don't want to be back in an office. We can work remote and everyone puts just as much effort as nancy. As in creating that culture connection we have we call it friday fica which is where everyone just comes together. A big microsoft teams call and stories. We've got monday morning coffee where people are coming in like you know. They're sharing pictures and what they did over the weekend. And so there's a lot of ways that we focused on still connecting and a really strong way and not needing to be in person as much and instead of taking some of the those costs and now once we're able to get back in person safely wanna do quarterly out going. Whitewater rafting altogether are bringing families together for an overnight somewhere and so really being intentional about how we're connecting human to human and you know being tech enabled company very easy to get our work done so it's more about. How are we connecting. How are we creating a culture that people want to be a part of and that really has to do with the human to human connection there. We're just focusing in a different way. Y- all comes back to that business that we're in right so ali. Thanks so much for joining the podcast. And it's just great to hear your story and continued success so looking forward to see where you up goes from here. The pd ex-executive podcast is a production of that cast portland oregon podcast agency. That partners with brands to create custom podcast. You can learn more at that. Cash dot com. Please take a moment to subscribe and rate the podcast as well.

portland kresa kresa partners kresa dan bruton cova Cra allie arlington oregon Mike vietnam nancy vancouver Ben microsoft ali
NEJM This Week  August 1, 2019

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

28:22 min | 1 year ago

NEJM This Week August 1, 2019

"Welcome this is the New England Journal of Medicine. I'm Dr Michael Beer this week. August first two thousand nineteen we feature articles on transfusion fusion in African children with severe anemia it Bruton retox Mab or chemo immunotherapy in C._l._l.. A fractional dose use of yellow fever vaccine the response to immune checkpoint inhibition and the long arc of big data in medicine a review article on gene gene therapy a clinical problem solving describing a diagnosis to chew on and perspective articles on it being time for another contraception in revolution on saving the endangered physician scientists on what black face in a yearbook photo means for Medical Education and on creating aiding narratives of race immediate transfusion in African children with uncomplicated severe anemia by Catherine Maitland Maitland from Imperial College London the World Health Organization recommends not performing transfusions in African children hospitalized for uncomplicated uncomplicated severe anemia hemoglobin level of four to six grams per deciliter and no signs of clinical severity however high mortality and and readmission rates suggest that less restrictive transfusion strategies might improve outcomes in the tract trial one thousand five hundred sixty five African children two months to twelve years of age with uncomplicated severe anemia were randomly assigned to receive immediate transfusion Asian twenty milliliters or thirty milliliters of whole blood equivalent per kilogram of body weight or no immediate transfusion during admission transfusion was performed in all the children in the immediate transfusion group and in forty nine percent in the control group death had occurred by Twenty he eight days in zero point nine percent of the children in the immediate transfusion group and in one point seven percent in the control group and by one hundred eighty days he's in four point five percent and six percent of children respectively without evidence of between group differences in readmissions serious adverse events or hemoglobin recovery at one hundred eighty days. The mean length of hospital. Stay was zero point nine days longer in the control group. There was is no evidence of differences in clinical outcomes over six months between the children who received immediate transfusion and those who did not the triggered transfusion infusion strategy in the control group resulted in lower blood use however the length of hospital stay was longer and this strategy required clinical and hemoglobin mclovin monitoring transfusion volume for children with severe anemia in Africa by Catherine Maitland from Imperial College London severe anemia hemoglobin level less than six grams per deciliter is a leading cause of hospital admission and death in children in sub Saharan Africa Orca the World Health Organization recommends transfusion of twenty milliliters of whole blood equivalent per kilogram of body weight for anemia regardless of Haemoglobin mclovin level. This open label tracked trial randomly assigned three thousand one hundred ninety six African children two months to twelve L. years of age with severe anemia to receive immediate blood transfusion with twenty milliliters per kilogram or thirty milliliters per kilogram. The children were followed for one hundred eighty days overall three point four percent of children in the higher volume group and four point five percent of children children in the lower volume group died before twenty eight days this finding masked significant heterogeneity in twenty eight day mortality ready according to the presence or absence of fever at screening among the one thousand nine hundred forty three children sixty point eight percent without without fever mortality was lower with a transfusion volume of thirty milliliters With previously untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia C._l._l.. Were randomly assigned to receive either a bruton and retirement APP for six cycles followed by Bruton until disease progression or six cycles of Chemo immunotherapy with flu Tarabin cyclophosphamide and Redux Mab at a median follow follow up of thirty three point six months the results of the analysis of Progression Free Survival Favored Bruton Deborah taxicab over Chemo immunotherapy therapy eighty nine point four percent versus seventy two point nine percent at three years and the results met the protocol defined efficacy threshold for the interim analysis assist the results of the analysis of overall survival also favored Ibru NIB retox Mab over Chemo immunotherapy ninety eight point eight percent versus ninety one point five percent at three years in a subgroup analysis involving patients without immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region Mutation Bruton <unk> map resulted in better progression free survival than Chemo immunotherapy ninety point seven percent versus sixty two point five percent at three years years. The incidence of adverse events have grade three or higher regardless of attribution was similar in the two groups whereas infectious complications ends of great three or higher were less common with Bruton <unk> toxic Mab than with chemo immunotherapy the Abreu neighbor Tacoma regimen resulted in progression progression free survival and overall survival that were superior to those with a standard chemo immunotherapy regimen among patients seventy years of age age or younger with previously untreated C._l._l.. immunogenetics city of fractional dose vaccine during a yellow fever outbreak final report by Rebecca Casey from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Atlanta in two thousand sixteen. The response wants to a yellow fever outbreak in Angola and the Democratic Republic of Congo led to a global shortage of yellow fever vaccine as a result a fractional national dose of the Seventeen D._d.. Yellow fever vaccine containing one fifth of the standard dose was offered to seven point six million million children two years of age or older and non-pregnant adults in a preemptive campaign in Kinshasa this study assessed the immune response to the fractional actional dose in the large scale campaign among seven hundred sixteen participants who completed the one month follow up ninety eight percent were Ciro zero positive after vaccination among four hundred ninety three participants who are Ciro negative at Baseline Ninety eight percent underwent zero conversion among two hundred twenty three participants who are zero positive at baseline sixty six percent had an immune response lower baseline tigers were associated with a higher probability of having an immune response among six hundred eighty four participants who completed the one year follow up ninety seven percent were Ciro positive for yellow fever antibody the distribution of titles among the participants who are zero negative for yellow fever antibody at baseline varied significantly among age-groups at one month and at one year a fractional dose of the Seventeen D._d.. Yellow fever vaccine was effective at inducing zero conversion in participants who were Ciro negative at Baseline Tigers remained above the threshold for Ciro positively at one year after vaccination in nearly all participants who were Ciro positive at one month after vaccination these findings support the use of fractional dose vaccination for for outbreak control gene therapy a review article by Katherine Hi from Spark Therapeutics Philadelphia the goal full of gene therapy for genetic diseases is to achieve durable expression Two units of packed red cells several months later the patient again presented with severe microscopic anemia. She also had fatigue and my Myalgia. The blood lead level was one hundred eighteen micrograms per deciliter which was dangerous even for an adult on further questioning about lead exposures. She hesitantly revealed that she had been compulsively picking off and eating paint and plaster from her apartment walls predicting tumor response to P._D.. One blockade a clinical implications of basic research article by leading from Washington University School of Medicine Saint Louis the outcomes of traditional therapy targeted therapy or immunotherapy for cancer are influenced by the differences in cancer mutational profiles tumors with mismatch repair deficiency have specific mutational profiles characterized by high microsatellite instability micro-satellites micro-satellites are stretches of D._N._A.. Made up of short tandem repeats scattered throughout the human genome the number of repeats composing any given micro-satellite white varies from person to person a recent study shows that both the degree of microsatellite instability in tumor tissue and the resultant Schumer mutational burden especially the burden of a particular type of mutation correlate with and therefore may help predict a response to antibodies lease against programmed death one immunotherapy digital futures past the long arc of big data in Madison a medicine an and society article by Jeremy Green From Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Baltimore. Big Data may be the future of medicine but it is also. It's passed in nineteen sixty four the inventor Vladimir's Deacon warned that medical data were accumulating at a pace exceeding physicians editions cognitive capacity not only was the amount of information available in hospital records and medical literature far too large to be encompassed by the memory of any a single man declared but the conventional techniques of abstracting summarizing and indexing cannot provide the physician with the needed knowledge in a form readily accessible in his practice fortunately the digital computer which had shrunk from the room sized computer of the nineteen forties to the refrigerator sized mainframe of the nineteen fifties to the mini computers of the nineteen sixties could deploy Algorithm ick search techniques at superhuman speeds. It is thus quite reasonable. He concluded to think of electronic memories as effective supplements and extension of the human memory of of the physician half a century ago. Physicians and engineers shared a dream that computers wielding ultra vast memories and ultra fast processing times could did use diagnoses store medical records and circulate information though today's world of precision medicine neural nets and wearable technologies involves very different objects networks and users than the world of mainframe medicine did many fundamental problems remain unchanged population and the environment time for another contraception revolution a perspective article by Deborah Anderson from Boston University City School of Medicine during the second half of the twentieth century. Many political and academic thought leaders were concerned about the rapid growth of the human population Russian which had increased exponentially from less than one billion in eighteen hundred to five point five billion by nineteen eighty several popular books were published in the nineteen eighteen seventy s and nineteen eighty s forecasting dire consequences of human overpopulation during this time research on contraception was relatively well funded funded by private foundations and government agencies and research on human reproduction was mainstream and highly regarded in respected academic institutions at least a half dozen large U._S. drug companies were spending heavily on contraception research and development by the end of the twentieth century however the mood had changed funding for contraception research from government and private institutions plummeted and pharmaceutical companies and international agencies with innovative contraceptive methods methods in clinical trials stopped their programs yet scientists warn that dangerous atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases produced by human activity activity are causing global warming and climate disruption waste from mega-cities and widespread agriculture and livestock industries pollute the land air and water rapid depletion of resources from forest and oceans is destroying natural habitats and further contributing to climate change change. Many animal species are experiencing catastrophic decline as the global population continues to grow these pressures will increase and become more critical the time seems ripe for another contraception revolution to provide options for the diverse populations that are not not currently being served by modern contraception saving the endangered physician scientists a plan for accelerating medical breakthroughs up perspective article by Mukesh Jane from the University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center on July First These changes aspiring young physician scientists seek careers combining research and patient care as unattainable revitalizing the physician scientists pipeline fine is of critical importance ghosts of our collective subconscious. What black face in a yearbook photo means for for Medical Education A perspective article by Derek Paul Junior from the University of California San Francisco School of Medicine on the Medical School Yearbook Page of Ralph Northam who is now the governor of Virginia? There is a photo of two figures one wears an oversized blazer trousers with matching bow tie and a jauntily positioned hat greasy black shoe Polish is slathered across his hands and face the other figure is garbed in the white robe robe and conical hat of the Ku Klux Klan together they stand holding beers and posing for the camera the way a couple dressed as salt and pepper upper shakers might at a costume party underneath the photo caption reads interest pediatrics as a black medical cool student in California. Mr Paul tuned into the conversation about what the photo meant for Virginia politics but Mr Paul was even more interested in what what it meant for medicine and medical education if it was okay to pose in a nineteen eighty-four medical school yearbook in black face or K._K._k.. Regalia <hes> what did that say about the racial climate in which doctors in North Adams Age group trained the two figures in northern photo remind us that in the not too distant past symbols of racial terror were so normalized in our culture that they could make their way into a medical school yearbook. The fear among students of color is not that our teachers secretly hate us but rather that we are also bathed in a culture of racism that we are blind to the biases that lie hidden within US browner creating narratives of race a perspective article by Tara V. John from the University of California Los Angeles he told Dr John that a black guy gave him the wrong antibiotics he came came in with a foot infection that had crossed several fashion planes to reach bone and although he was black he appeared to mistrust the black doctor who had taken care of him a few days days earlier and who had by no means given him the wrong antibiotic the problem was not the antibiotic but the lack of blood supply and nerve damage from years of poorly controlled diabetes. He's not infrequently. Dr John's race comes up in conversations with patients on rare occasions. They will candidly tell her that they prefer an Indian in doctor because Indian doctors are smart patients make associations whether positive or negative on the basis of race and ethnicity her son once asked her y a black man sitting in a wheelchair outside her clinic was missing a leg is it because he is browner in her son's urban multicultural world some some people were yellow and others were Brown. He was too young to understand that some people who are browner suffer from stressors such as poverty and food insecurity which increased their risk of peripheral vascular disease or are more likely to be victims of gun violence but he had witnessed his own dark skinned grandfather a survivor of childhood polio walk with a limp in his mind older brown men had problems with their legs that her the sun her patient and herself have an impulse to create narratives based on race is not unusual creating narratives based on race is both a cultural troll norm and a primal response to a desire to understand our world but by acknowledging how much race shapes our identities and interactions we can big in documenting our experiences as per perpetuators of these narratives are images in clinical medicine addison features a forty eight year old man who presented to the dermatology clinic with painful hand ulcerations initial symptoms had begun six months earlier. We're and we're associated with new onset shortness of breath on exertion progressively worsening ulcerations on the fingertips and Dorsal surface of the hands elbow and oral ulcerations and violations Perry orbital eruption had developed C._T.. Of the chest revealed. Ill defined modular capacities these that were suggestive of organizing pneumonia the patient received a diagnosis of anti melanoma differentiation associated protein eighteen five anti M._d.. Five D'Amato myositis which was confirmed on antibody testing colonoscopy C. T. Scans ends of the abdomen and chest and prostate specific. Antigen testing showed no evidence of Cancer Anti M._D.. Five D'Amato myositis is a variant hint of dramatic myositis associated with interstitial lung disease that can rapidly progress characteristic cutaneous findings include ulcerations rations of God transpat- Appeals Orel ulcerations painful Palmer pappy bills and Alopicia immunosuppressive and immunomodulators therapies happy's as well as therapies to improve blood flow to the hands were administered with this regimen. The patients hand ulcers healed within five months and his pulmonary

Ciro fever Chemo Catherine Maitland Maitland World Health Organization New England Journal of Medicin Tara V. John Imperial College London Virginia Bruton microsatellite instability Washington University School o Dr Michael Beer D'Amato leukemia Baseline Tigers Myalgia browner Bruton Deborah
Doubling Down on Customer Feedback with David Heller, Co-Founder of Reimbi

PDX Executive Podcast

33:39 min | 3 weeks ago

Doubling Down on Customer Feedback with David Heller, Co-Founder of Reimbi

"Support for this podcast is provided by kresa. Cra says the occupiers champion warriors premark corporate real estate advisory firm exclusively serving startup businesses and major global organizations like as a portland pillar for over twenty five years kresa partners with its clients throughout the entire project. Life cycle the workplace strategy and discovery through the deal transaction and project management delivery of space kresa partners without conflict in applies integrated expertise to make your business better go to cressa dot com slash portland to connect with the portland advisory from that cast creative. I'm dan bruton. And this is the pediatrics executive. Podcast the show where. I talk with inspiring leaders. Who are shaping. The future portland oregon. Every week i sit down with business executives startup founders and community leaders to dive into their career journey and get insights into the impactful work. They're doing our slice of the great pacific north west. Everyone and welcome back to the executive podcast sun is shining finally after big storm a hearing pediatric so Fortunate for that and also looking forward to having next guest on david hiller. Who's the co founder of re nba. David could zoom. Hey thanks for having me here. Yeah you bet we connected ask probably a couple of months ago. I was just really interested in the business and one of the things that i've really enjoyed Through this pandemic is just getting to know different startups in different in new technology companies. Here locally so. I wanted to have you on. It's really interesting platform so to start with love. You just get a quick overview of the company and your background the origin story of it. Sure absolutely and again. Thanks for having me on. So i'm david heller. One of the as you said. One of the founders of ram be and we launched the company my co founder. And i and. I'll talk about paul here a little bit but We launched the company and september of two thousand seventeen. So we've been we've been going out at furrow you know a bit but not not you know So we're not brand new. But also you know definitely still still understanding continuing understand our market and and adjusting which. I'm i'm sure we'll we'll talk about but So september two thousand seventeen was our launch and kind of the origin of how reimb- was started as my background is b. to b. product management. So i've i've you know pretty much sense has been a thing. I've worked in sas and primarily backoffice so procurement accounting supporting hr and then also with that kind of jumping back and forth between Working for software companies as a product manager or in that type of role but also in larger organizations more as a practitioner of in the back office. Actually when the idea came for nba. I was. I was in charge of procurement at At wadham so and i've worked at. I worked at hp as well. Not a purely product manager role but in an internal systems role so so kind of That's my background. Bb be product management But also working in corporate america and and and different size companies and as part of that exposure and experience The the problem of how companies deal with with one time vendors was like a kind of this constant thread through through my experiences. Like how to how do we you know. We have to pay somebody once. How does that happen from an accounting standpoint from a procurement standpoint whatever and even drilling down more narrowly contractors. Were part of that with. How do we reimburse contractors Which you know we might be paying the contractors more than once but maybe we just need them to travel one time for us. How does how does that reimbursement get processed. How do we make sure that. They're following the policies that our employees is how to follow and so the gears started turning on on that idea and that led into some customer development conversations with people and as part of those what came up more often on challenges with reimbursements for for non employees was was reimbursing job candidates and and so so. That's why we kind of focused on on that problem. I and As i'm move talking about this. I realize i haven't even said what does go for it. I mean i think you're alluding to it so yeah yeah so So what re mb does and kinda. I've led up to. This is so we built a saw pollen. I built a software platform that is specifically for non employees reimbursements That was the outcome of that that journey that pass to under to identifying this problem is we're going to build something specifically for non employees reimbursement and So that is that's kind of how started. And you know we can get into how i started working with paul or wherever this takes us but that's that's kind of leads us up to the the launch and that's great. I think initially when we talked to a couple months ago was maybe the initial use case was specifically around candidates reversing then if they had to travel to something. We'll just jump into it. Is the world kinda. Shut down for that. Yeah but you quickly realize there's a greater opportunity for this platform for for other things in even in a virtual world so we'd love for you just to talk about how that transition hit you and kind of what you and your co founder did for the the market i guess of of re re mb. Yeah i can I think there's there's a lot of layers and and what was happening as we all started understanding what was happening with the pandemic the impact it was going to have on on businesses You know it's it's impacted everybody And specific industries have have been nearly wiped out by the pandemic. And i think you know it's It's not in it. It's you know you may not like take that step back to think about these industries. That just you know are not functioning right now so the time line. I think it's there's a few different interesting components of of how we adjusted and continue to just One is we were. We were in the process of seed round and So we had kicked off at the end of Towards the end of twenty nineteen and with the with the goal having closed our seed round in march-april timeframe and so So things were things were going really well. We had a really good story to tell We had we had brought on some really really good logos customers platform with a very small team You know we were. We were dealing with with some very large enterprises You know have worked through and sign them to company-wide contracts and we're really you know. Solving needed. problem are solving a problem that needed to be solved. And so so we had to. So we're raising our seed round that as as we are kind of getting towards the end of that we're actually in due diligence with with investors. That were you know had off into the story done. Everything and for various reasons says as the due diligence was was going on Not having not necessarily having to do with what randy was doing but what was happening with the world. We had to adjust as people backed away from that. We had to downsize our expectations of what was going to happen with that. So so even on the like the funding of the business in our trajectory. Very early we had to make adjustments before just based off of the uncertainty that was happening in march and april started. I'm going to jump in here. They're starting around. I think that's really really something emphasizes and we'll get into how you your background with product development. Relief helped us. But how was that moment. You and your co founder. I mean i wouldn't. I would say me personally my personality be kind of an o. Moment yeah how was it for you. I mean i. I think the again. Or when you just think back. We can all think back to march and april and it was so much uncertainty. Yes so much uncertainty. So how was that for you. Well i'll tell you so. We have this dashboard. That's an internal dashboard. And so it shows transaction counts by week and you know we So you can see like you know from twenty seventeen where you know. There's barely a blip on the screen up to twenty nineteen. I mean it's the hockey stick right like it is. That's what you y. It's the hockey stick from a transaction and a stickiness and no churn whatsoever. So it's the hockey stick and we're like in the holidays you know i'd say like there is a dip in the holidays because people just don't try and we had experienced that in two thousand eighteen twenty nine hundred so so we are expecting a you know a bit of dip there. That's fine and then it was start. Goes back up in january and february back to you know like here comes the hockey stick and then march it and it's just a cliff. I mean like nobody is traveling there. There's you know there's some some late expense reports coming in and stuff like that. But i mean it just stops and you know that was It was brutal iranian. I team because at that point. I mean we had hired. We had hired two sales people at the end of two thousand nineteen had an operations manager. That was was i mean. Her job was just on boarding new customers. And and and dealing with you know just the support and things like that that were coming from this growth and all of a sudden like nothing like the the sales pipeline just just stopped transactions stopped Like i mean it's it's it was it was really hard For the team. I think for me personally. I think this is how i try to. I think his try to approach it the way. It tends to happen just Instead naturally as like there's this brief moment of panic like this is just the worst thing ever and i can actually re. I was at home because then oregon and and early. We pretty locked down pretty. You know it's. I can't remember the exact but i was at home and i just had to go downstairs to get away from everybody and because i just i i knew i mean no i i i assume some epidemiologists and stuff like that knew how bad it was gonna be but i think for the most most of us you know it was like okay this gonna last a few week. You know this is you know it's like oh. It's actually got to get a couple of weeks of downtime here we're gonna we're gonna push out some features but i think just like seeing the transaction count. I knew what was happening with our fund raising. You know it was just it all just piled on there and so so there i. I don't think it was panic but it was just extreme frustration. You know and it's like out of out of out of your control to like you like i can't make the transaction start again right. What's great about that entrepreneur mindset. I think you quickly in. Maybe we can dig into your product background. Because i think you really took back. And maybe some advisers that we mutually now is looked at the business and say know what the feedback. What's the use case. Let's let's You really take that to heart and realize there's actually a your tam. Your market is actually bigger than i was thinking so this could be like a really silver lining right potentially. Yeah so i think you know. At first we were We thought well. This'll the recruiting teams that we generally worked with this. They'll have some downtime and they'll be able to look at products like korea. mb and and you know so. So i think we spent a you know couple months probably thinking that was what we would do. We would just like. Let's just stay on it. Lets you know there's going to be the this period where nobody's doing anything but then they're going to move into this like let's just be prepared for when things open backup That just never came at just. You know. i think The company's customers. I talked to you know were were making the shift. There is more and more of a shift to remote work is probably gonna become more of the standard You know we're we're probably going to have less people coming in for interviews And they weren't sure. And i think people still aren't sure like there's there's no definitive answer on this but So we realized this waiting for people to come to our current product was just not the right approach. It wasn't we. Were going to run out of runway like it was just. It wasn't the right answer and so it was actually an and this is like listening to your customers is is a hardly ever wrong You know one of our customers started. reimbursing people for for meals on a remote interview. They're like even though it's a remote interview we still wanna buy lunch. I mean if we had brought you into the office we bought you lunch. We were you know all of this stuff and so we thought that was interesting You know that that was happening so we did some things in the product. Support them Just some little tweaks and then we shared that with our with our customer base and we saw some other things that were happening in the mb that allowed remote like had intern cohorts now were they. Were doing team building events and everyone was remote and they were using ryobi to reimburse those people very poor apps they would buy or meal kit. So are things like that that they were that these intern cohorts were repurchasing on their own and then they would be quickly reimbursed through the mb. So it just worked really well so so we started doing that. And then. I had this idea that i was going to Kinda eat our own dog. Food of as part of my i was going to offer to buy lunch for recruiting people as part of a demo of ryobi okay. Hey i'm gonna. I'm gonna buy you lunch so that you can see how cool it is to be reimbursed. You know almost instantly through pay pal vereen. Mb and alert like and then. There's like five minutes after that. I was like why wouldn't any salesperson do that like like. Now you've got you know you've got people used to meet up for coffee for line or use or meet up for coffee or lunch as part of the sales process or you know you you would go on site and you'd visit a customer new. Take him out for lunch or something like not. It just can't do that right now and and And who knows when you'll be able to do it with any frequency so so that was when we're like. Hey let's let's let's position. Reimb- is is you know. Let's expand our our our scope into sales and marketing and position and let people know that can be used as an effective sales and marketing tool. I love that and it's almost i mean. Once you had that happen is probably almost like we could even. There's almost so much we can do. So how much do we rain and end a little bit too right. So so you're you're on that path now Where's the business. Add as far as maybe the positioning and again. I just really love the way you really take. Customer feedback in and you really intentional about the things So it's almost like you've got to speed up to slow down a little bit. So yeah data. That i don't want to call it a pivot. It's an expansion because we still love are rooting you know. But it's just an increasing the viewpoint of the non employee reimbursements. So we're i think what we're doing right now primarily is there. Were some things that we wanted to do in the product to make it more Remove the friction even more like we had a very easy process before. But like in the in the model of reimbursing somebody seven hundred dollars for a trip out somewhere to be interviewed versus your reimbursing. Somebody eighteen dollars for lunch like you need. You really need to reduce the friction for that. Eighteen dollar reimbursement will jump through a couple of hoops to get seven hundred dollars back. Probably not gonna jump through much to get eighteen dollars so So there are some things we wanted to do in the application to make that as easy as possible We also on the customer develops as a product manager by trade. I really believe in talking to as many people as possible to really understand what the problem is. And who your who. Your demographic is like like this process does not work for every single salesperson in the entire world or every single marketer every single customer success person. Because there's just different They're selling to different people. And so what. We what i've been spending time on a more recently is is talking to people in different industries have different company sizes so that we can make sure that our messaging correct and we're targeting The right people and with some of the feedback. You've gotten that you can share. Yeah so. I think the where we haven't so far like the signal is not been strong and really large I would say top. Tier high priced enterprise contracts. If if you're if you're selling somebody a two million dollar a year. Annual contract reimbursing somebody fifteen dollars for lunch is not going to move the needle so like you know and and you know you're you're you're generally dealing with the c. suite Where you know. Just you know reimbursing somebody for fifteen dollars is is not the a the best. That's right where it is getting more. Traction is in the. I would say in the partner. Ecosystem like where. You're you're dealing with partners where you know. Maybe they're they're resellers. You're trying to get them on your platform You know they might be you know it it. It is not the the large annual contracts. It's you're trying to build awareness. You're trying to get somebody to attend a demo. You're trying to get somebody to real white paper. You know those staying where it's like. Hey i just need fifteen. You know for fifteen minutes of your time. You know like. I'll buy that coffee and donut that while you're going through that so i think it is going more in that direction Where somebody it's the people that in the past would have said. Hey i'll give you this twenty dollar gift card or this fifty dollars gift card to do something Where they're that felt rather impersonal and did not really a was not memorable and anyway That like competing against the issuance of a gift card is is where things are. Things are moving the timing of that and this is i. Don't know much about that world. But i know that world has just call it like this underground world of bbc sales but it is getting larger and just even you look at if you look at linked in the explosion of just like the sdr the sales developers exactly last summer success the rise of that whole career track. Really timing well with this right. Yeah yeah and that is. I think it is those people that are earlier in the Sales funnel that they're trying to get that initial lead on a call. They're trying to get you know earlier. In the sales funnel is where you know something like a makes sense and this has been specific quotes. That have come up on these are it just helps really helps cut through the noise it because it is different. You know it like. Hey i'm going to give you a twenty dollar gift card to starbucks you might get you know. Attended those offers a month or something like that. But you know when you say. Hey you know you wanna go to your local sandwich shop. I'll buy you lunch. You know like it just stands out and i think that being able to stand out being a you know and maybe it's tied to. Hey once we're on that call like you know. That's when i'll buy lunch. And the show up rate increases in like that so those are the kind of the metrics and the thoughts that are coming out of these these customer development interviews and and and we're seeing early traction with product. That's great david. It's really thanks for sharing that so that was a couple of things i want to touch before we kind of end our conversation i think. Wine is the co founder relationship. I if i remember correctly and i might be totally off your co in a different country. Is that right or with got to talk about policy. Paul lynch okay. Yeah so talk about. How bad just working relationship has been as co founder. yeah so pollen initially man we did not know each other before we nbc. I was I was building the first prototype of ram. I write a little bit of code. But i'm not a professional engineer and i just i was asked if i couldn't solve a problem on you know on my own. There was a python developer slack and paul was on there and he answered a couple of questions and and he then he kind of like. What are you working on. And it just went from there and so So we started working together in the first year of ram be was completely a nights and weekends product but both of us were doing contract work on the side And so Yeah so so started off for that and then you know then eventually became more formal than that. We both went fulltime on the of course The the remote thing. I i think i've been fortunate i had a lot of experience is like my time at. Hp was and at welcome and some of the contract work was used to working remotely. I was used to working across time zones. You know a synchronous work over slack. Works really well. For paul. And i So i think Both of us like to be able to focus on a problem. You know neither one of us like sitting in multiple meetings back to back so I think that our work style is Works very well together. And then we've as we've been hiring people or people that we've brought on Into that something we look for is like this is how reality works. We don't have a lot of meetings we don't we don't you know we're not always on the same time zone He need to be able to write well. Because you know you're posting things in slack or you writing up a requirement so writing skills are important And those are the things that have have allowed. Pollen i to work Well together and the team I will i. I did go to poland And luckily at and in the fall of twenty nineteen And so you know it was pollen. I did meet up and had a really good week of working together in person but that was the first time we met in person. You know and so that that remote work has has been Has been good for us and I some people were surprised by about for us. It just feels. It feels really natural. Yeah well it's not surprising anymore. Because that's just becoming we all your. I'm sure you've hired people or like you've never met in person the and you so you tend to think about this on boarding process and the house can work so i i think that's great and you know the last question and this is a question i ask. Everybody is house. Been for you working here. And then what are your thoughts on. Just continue to stay here to grow the company and in re- regards to the growth of portland business wise and just yeah. I think that Something i i've spent. Especially i'd say these last six months thinking about quite a bit but so we my wife and daughter and i. We moved to portland. I think we're in our seventh year now in portland going on eight okay and We moved here from houston. But i've lived in a lot of places and i love living in portland And coming in. I think one of the things i was impressed like i think having a lot of people close in the density really helps You know for a smaller city. You have a lot of talent that that is you know. Densely populated not and it is pre pandemic. It was easier for people to meet up. Like i was coming. Houston you know exponentially larger city but so much more spread out. It was it was. You'd go to meet ups and there'd be ten people there her member. I went to the. I like a tech crawl. I had been in portland for four days. I think and i went to this tech crawl. And i just could not believe how many people were there. It was just you know just the amount of people that were gathering and the energy around that and a very also very startup friendly culture. I think that Jumped out at me really early Being here and it's something. I kind of expected we done scouting trips up here and new but i was hoping for that. And it i'd say for the most part it did pay off And so so. Those were all very positive things. There are areas where portland needs to work at. I think i would say. I think especially like a guy i've worked at big companies so i i totally understand. You know the the difficulty of know sometimes operating in a big company. I would like to see the larger enterprises larger companies in portland and the surrounding areas Support smaller businesses in the area. Are you know having It only helps the area like it. Builds up talent at at you know just the whole ecosystem in in the portland area benefit from notting engagement of larger companies working with smaller companies. I think that's one area that i think we can do. Better here. I think also Just in general larger companies shifting away so work with smaller companies. And so i. I don't know if that's specific to portland. But it was something i would you know given the culture and portland of of creative and scrappy and everything. I was hoping that you know larger enterprises here would be more startup friendly. But i haven't seen that really well. It's good insight. And i think you know this is just my two cents on it and it sees because there are so few companies here. It's almost like they're just such outliers. There like closed guard walled gardens. A little bit feels like that's not necessarily true. That's just. I think some of my thoughts on a little bit. But that might be that might be. Because you know houston is obviously. I think it's bigger it's sprawled out more. But there are a lot more divisions of bigger companies too so but for sure. We can work on that. Yeah so that's that's one area I think it's going to be interesting to see what happens. You know with with the pandemic and once we know. Come out of it you know. Hopefully as we get through twenty twenty one. It's gonna be interesting to see if that that density and gathering the things that make portland awesome. How quickly that can come back Because you know. I i think one of the reasons i feel portland in oregon in general has been able to whether the pandemic better than other states and other areas. Not that. we've been perfect in any way is there. Are you know. I think people. You don't live here if you're like chasing sunshine all the time being inside i think has it. You know maybe more likely that you're okay with that but there is a strong desire. I think even more introverted people want to meet other people like it's a it's it's a lack of understanding to think that introverts are are not you know not social. You know like. I think those meet ups in that energy that comes from like getting out needs to come back to portland as quickly as we can safely do it. And all all respect to those people that have been organizing those meet ups in the past. And and you know i just hope that the city and the area support dot and and get back to that quickly because it it really was part i think of the dna that makes portland's special four four four for companies and businesses. It's that it's that ease of networking. It's that ease of conversation That comes back. So i think we're all going to have to break out of our are either mandated or self apples and and and get back out there as quickly as we safely can the. It's a great place to end. Because i'm one hundred percent confident knowing some of these people in the community that organiz those and do that that is gonna is gonna come roaring back. It might be you know not just totally open the floodgates open at a quarter of the way. I but i think what makes portland special in that. Regard is is going to continue and get stronger. So we'll david. Thanks so much. For hopping on in its which is r. e. I m b. I dot com dot. Io dot com dot com dot com. Great just thanks for looking forward to saint connected really appreciate you hop it on this and i'm excited to fall along as ugarit thanks. Dan appreciate the time. Thank you the executive. Podcasts is a production of that. Cast portland oregon. Podcasts agency that partners with brands to create custom podcast. You can learn more at that. Cass dot com. Please take a moment to subscribe and rate to podcast as well.

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Taking Advantage of Free Resources as an Entrepreneur with Fritz Brumder, Co-Founder of Zipcan

PDX Executive Podcast

29:12 min | Last month

Taking Advantage of Free Resources as an Entrepreneur with Fritz Brumder, Co-Founder of Zipcan

"Support for this podcast is provided by kresa. Cra says the occupiers champion world's premark corporate real estate advisory firm exclusively serving startup businesses and major global organizations like as a portland pillar for over twenty five years kresa partners with its clients throughout the entire project. Life cycle the workplace strategy and discovery through the deal transaction and project management delivery of space kresa partners without conflict in applies integrated expertise to make your business better go to cressa dot com slash portland to connect with the portland advisory from that cast creative. I'm dan bruton. And this is the pediatrics executive. Podcast the show where. I talk with inspiring leaders. Who are shaping. The future portland oregon. Every week i sit down with business executives startup founders and community leaders to dive into their career journey and get insights into the impactful work. They're doing in our slice of the great pacific northwest. Everyone thanks for listening. Ex-executive podcasts for back for another episode. I think this is the second of twenty twenty one excited to happen next guest fritz bronner. Who's the co founder and ceo of zip can. He's zooming in from his camper. Welcome it thank you you know. It's funny We met once before. And i have a weird memory for these things. It was in the fall. Two thousand ten one of those portland advertising foundation lunches cows. They have like they used to have a little one kind of room above in the speaker was chris murphy. Who is the head of digital marketing at adidas. At the time. And that's the first time i met chris and he actually ten years later become really good friends. And so you. And i sat at the table and i remember you tell me about your first company brand live and you must have probably pretty early days at that point. You know. i wasn't very early days. Yeah and dita's maybe was already a client or in a pilot or something so it's super cool to reconnect over ten years later. Yeah and. I haven't talked to chris recently but that was the first time that chris and i worked with him multiple times after that. So yeah. I love the portland add federation. It seemed like such a great organization A kind of spent less time with them over the years but They're doing great things so glad you remember them. Yeah absolutely and i'm still getting in invites to them. Obviously everything's virtual now. So well. I i would love to kind of hearing about your new company so zip can love few decide to give a little background what it is and it is pretty pretty new to maybe a few months in right. Yeah as soon as you said that. I was thinking in two thousand ten that was about the same timeframe as where i am today with Just getting the product off the ground. Really Michael founders spencer and i came up with the idea and started the company after covid hit so it was like april may timeframe where we just barely had a prototype and started pitching it to customers in then Really started to get serious In the summer of twenty twenty Raised a little bit of capital from a cascade seat fund was lead in that and actually one of our early customers invested in so we had an idea for a product a little bit of funding to customers. And we're starting to make a company out of that in. I guess in a in a short kind of tight st- sentence it would be embedded chat anywhere or bended. Video anywhere is a is that right or imbed. -able video chat is what we do and the idea for that or kind of more. The vision and inspiration came from a couple of different trends. I'm first of all people were already doing. More and more video conferencing obviously wounds cove happen. Everybody's doing video conferencing so we realized people are going to naturally want to be on video understand the power of being on video more often and we figured okay. That's going to happen in more places than just traditional video conferencing. So why don't we make a tool that allows for video chat or video conferencing in lots of different places so one of the things we say is we want to bring video chat to every corner of the web and we're gonna make it easy to embed to do that. So the more websites more applications that say. Hey what if we just couldn't connect our users right here rather scheduling a meeting or not. All conversations need to be meetings in the first place when people just need for a couple of minutes or you need to talk to a support person of video chats should be able to happen there with no profile download. Make it really quick. So that's what zip canceled out. So we'll back up a little bit. I mean you had a successful I guess i start up you. Co-founded brand live which is still running today. Do doing well and You were talking before recorded. You're on a podcast with jerry colona. Who's who runs the reboot reboot dot. Io podcast recommend. Everybody listened to fritz on that. And just that podcast in general and when you left brand live you you took a break and i love just kind of get back into that and this kind of second act and what was that transition light like and you know wanting to throw yourself back into another startup Will have just hear about that. Yeah so also. Give a shoutout to jerry. End the reboot podcasts. Actually the reboot organization. There's a couple of portland found errors that have been in. Either the reboot boot camps. Or the reboot circles. That's how i found out about it. and it became a really valuable asset. Actually during my time at brain live that was helpful to understand. Where are we in this journey. Both myself in the company and things just naturally especially in growth organizations you you grow up and you go through these different phases and so not only. Was the company doing that. But i was also doing that and start. Ups are intense and as the team size grows and the pressure grows as You have more and more investment dollars digger. Revenue numbers in order to generate growth on big revenue. Numbers takes a lot so it was important to kind of decompress from that. And you hear it from everybody else. It's hard to do yourself but taking space is really the only way to figure out and i take stock of what is your interested in why you do what you do. Do you want a total leave. Flip the script and do something totally different or do you wanna take the experiences that you have and build on that. There's really no right answer so you just have to take some time to work on that. And so i of course spent time with my family actually moved my family kind. Put down roots in band rather than portland where had been since two thousand one But i also did a couple side passion projects. One of them was podcast but more as a research project. Basically connect Coaches in leaders of teams in sports and ceo is in leaders of teams in the startup. Or even just try to find out what are the similarities between the two that can be used to create a playbook for a growth in either one of those organizations and so audio interviews and podcast became one of the realizations of that research project. I'm in the other. One was more just like wacky idea that i thought i could just try. It's called whole life. Meditation dot com. Where the idea is to visualize ear entire life in one sitting which can take Four hours it can be up to an hour per decade And so. I have like an audio guide. Basically the takes you through the visualization for your whole life. And what was the site again whole life. Meditation dot com your whole life. Meditation dot com. It's kind of a an adjacent project to magic in the middle which is sports and business project. I have no background in meditation. No background in psychology. I just thought thought of the idea. I tried it myself. I thought it was pretty cool. And then i figured hey. This is like an easy thing. I could launch this in a couple of weeks while you're speaking to your target market here because i'm about the four hour mark for that if it's per decade and i'm gonna i'm gonna check it out. I love that and you know you hear about like you said taking space and how important that is but no one does it and you really took. You really made the leap to do it. And i don't know how long that time period was a. I forget i know you mentioned jerry's podcasts. But was there like appointed a take like two or three months at to take longer or was it almost kind of like immediate once you and you move to. So how was that. It was a solid three to four months. But i book ended it with like the transition time out of brand lives three to four months just nothing and then another three months of kind of slowly starting to build a zip cam so it was a pretty good amount of time in the grand scheme of things and i feel really fortunate that i was able to take that amount of time and some people in the startup world chip in have the benefit of taking even more. Yeah in what do you recommend for people that maybe are unable to take a couple of months or three months even during their working professional career to create that space. 'cause i i'm i'm talking a lot of leaders or they're trying to find. Obviously it's a pretty chaotic time right now just externally with a lot of things jeff any recommendations for that because we're all kind of trying to find that space where were to fit that in. Yeah number one if you can do. It is changed the location Jerry actually mentioned that his transition time. He moved into space that he had lived before suggests creating a new environment for yourself is important And then for me. It was really all about going back to working on the passions Part of the whole life part of the magic in the middle concept was this personal philosophy. Which i had developed based on a book i read by pete carroll and i wanted to basically put that concept into practice in a shortened timeframe so it was a little bit break. It was a little bit like kinda going back to school or like doing something that was going to educate myself in progress myself. Al but i was doing it just by reading interviewing people and working on a project it was research essentially right and having some fun with that so as you kind of start this new company and what are some things you're going to do differently just as a co founder. Ceo lead leading a team point of view. A love to share that to you. Know thinking about the definitely the why why. Why am i doing this in the first place. And it goes back to that the decision to start another company and and redo things over There's a little bit of like Dna you know what i like to do but now having made quite a bit of progress with zip can you know. We've gone from concept to five team members in six seven months and now we have a couple of hundred customers in the kind of feedback. The start to get from our beta customers utilizing the product and providing feedback and sharing what their reaction was as you realize. Whoa i can especially in the technology. Space i can create a product have an impact in a relatively short period of time and that process makes the work kind of fade away. You know it's really becomes sort of a creative endeavor and especially now with the co founder that I'm with now name spencer leigh. He's very different than me. From a skill set perspective he designer front engineer so his ability to design and create product is like i liken it to you know when you're watching a band play the bass player and drummer might like glance at each other able to light either. Stay with the same guy or just totally. Take a right hand. Turn and and develop this whole new music track based on creative understanding of each other and that's kind of how we're operating which is just a really fun process. The great analogy in his is spencer and band as well or an different part of the country or is your team dispersed or he is in we. It's kind of funny. Were were in the same town but leave starting. We started a company together but we have only been in person maybe five times. Okay yes yeah kind of. It's so weird right but you know. We are remote collaboration company. Our engineers are all in different. Lucas actually just hire another one in bend okay. coach was awesome. That we were able find talent that worked well for our team at the rate stage and everything. I'm sure we'll get into this. The differences between bend and portland. That's one of the interesting things bend is there is talent all throughout the woodwork. Here if you dig just a little bit or get connected in any part of the ben community There has been a multi year trend of talent moving to bend and either starting companies. Because there's really cool company starting here Or just working remotely and then once cove it hit that all accelerate you know. I'm meeting more and more people from the bay area. Seattle that have amazing Technical in startup talent living in bend. And you can't find him right away because everybody's obviously working from home right. Why am an undisclosed mukasa for two weeks in band or a vacation community was started with an s. A move here man. This is pretty crazy. Obviously my son is doing zoom school from here which is complete disaster wherever we are so it might be here. But in yeah. Let's let's get into more bandages on know The work side of it but also just the living part of it. I i think you have young kids. Or i'm not sure how old there but okay so you know what's happened like just moving the family and it is a different. You know it's different here. It's a little smaller but there's there still enough where you feel there's activities so how's it been just from a personal standpoint of of living here. We definitely haven't looked back mentioned. We moved to portland. In two thousand one that was from the east coast and and it was like utopia man. I mean portland was so perfect. At that time. It was a collection of small towns. I started in the film production. Business which why portland add. Ration- made sense. I was involved in a lot of agency in content creation. Kind of stuff in portland was just a perfect mecca for that. Lots and lots of people really cool and interesting companies in out of that the community was starting to build as well right in two thousand and was basically intel was the tech company in there was no investors there was a portent seed fund. Didn't exist pie. Didn't exist none of that stuff and so That was a new. That was starting to happen. And that's what excited invigorated me about portland. And then over the years. It just changed. You know portland got a lot bigger. It's not really a collection of small towns anymore It's still obviously a great and beautiful city but it just ted on the time had come for me and my wife and our family to do something. Different and ben was a perfect fit for that because now ben has a lot of the things that portland had in two thousand one. We have some really cool and interesting talent. It's not necessarily like and creative production but definitely technical talent There's investors here there. You know you need money and resources close to the location that you're going to start a company. Band has some of those core ingredients to be able to help. The company grow in the thing. I love about portland and it's still got it. Is everybody's kind of one degree separation from everybody else as far as the business world. Everybody's very welcoming for the most part. You wanna jump on a call or when he could grab a coffee. And i'm assuming benz very much like that as well even with kind of the new quote unquote transplants. It is yeah. I mean it's. It's an interesting place because in portland there are so many organizations and events and And you see a lot of companies that on the outside look competitive. But they're used to my co-founder in brand log has been mckinley. He runs a web development agency cascade development. he's very close with ryan became cannoning runs. What's now thesis of a couple of different names and there was a there was competition but they used to say it was op petition. Yeah we're competitive but we kind of co op and we work together to move both of the organizations forward so that's a great culture aspect of portland. A ben doesn't have that so much not that were competitive but you just things are a little bit more spread out. Like i said it's the people and the companies are kind of in the woodwork. Wouldn't necessarily know that they're there and unless you go looking for them which Which i think is actually another just interesting attribute and fitz My culture a little bit more as well too so right. You've got to work for a little bit. Maybe also you're you're back on your competitive skier right so this is a great place to be as well. Yeah we. We cut our commute time to mountain by about four x. So the that's the only thing. I'm a coast guy. I love going to you. Know i lived on the coast growing out. Then it's hard for me to kind of get away if it more than an hour so i have to give it up to get out here. Wool couple fritz. A couple of things. I love to talk to you about is just kind of advice to founders during this time whether are have companies that are really growing or they're struggling you know. We all know certain industries. We talk to like where they're doing the best they ever have. If they're tech company and some industries at their brewery or something like that having a tough time so the Ice other business owners and founders. Yeah so i the on the startup side. I've been always think about starting a company as just being really resourceful. There's tons of resources out there. Your job as founder. Ceo is to identify what those resources are and try to bring them. The ones that are most appropriate. That can help you move the ball forward and one that i've tapped a lot more. This time around is just the basically free stuff that a lot of companies give. I mean we have twenty five thousand dollars in aws credits. We have months free of our payroll program. We have Credits with all kinds of other technology companies that have dramatically reduced our startup costs. And if you really are resourceful. They're fifty to one hundred thousand dollars in just tools now. Granted these companies want us to get hooked on their stuff and then we're going to be paying later but right now resources are very thin and if i can get it for free for a year or two years in these cases held spot is another great. When we're in the hub hug sought startup program and You know we're paying ten percent of what we will pay long in a couple of years so it really if you get into the right channels And you know about them. There's an amazing startup coupon program out there. I didn't even know that. I mean that's really great advice. So what about. Maybe folks who have like a physical location. Maybe because i think one of your prior investments maybe wasn't a brewery from looking at winked in into you know that world a bit so yeah so that was the tech advice. The more win the business gets hit or the world just changes right there everybody in term more common intact but pivot gotta change things. Obviously and there's so many great stories out there of companies that have been able to tip it on great notion as a fantastic example of that and frankly a lucky or smart one. A friend of mine from business started that company. Few of us that happened live on the same street. Actually the original company is called humboldt. Llc okay because all breed co-founders lived on humboldt anyways they surrounded themselves with some great people One of them was archivists. Capital which is a investor in brand lives and i think through a combination of all of that before the pandemic even hit. They were investing in an app that basically allow people to shop online for near which was kinda not all at the time and pick up. They have a great. I mean just quit my notifications They have a. They had a great following customer base in so they built an app. There's a a android and apple now. A great nation happen nut has really helped them So a lot of beer even though they don't have breweries open. Yeah that's that's great to hear and it's again that's great advice and so where do you go from here. Zip can what's kind of. What can you share about how you're rolling out. I mean are you still in beta or were you kind of at with customers. Yeah we are still in beta. We've made a decision to go very wide in our use cases which is a little bit of a risk. Everybody you know another piece of advice you hear often. As focus focus focus right picks the one set of customers or a small group of customers. Want a service really really well. We decided we're going to be a very good at making video chat work in a lot of places that's going to be our focus expertise or we're going to go very wide on the use cases so we actually have about Ten different types of customers that have already signed up and started utilizing a zip can an obvious. One for example is network websites where they're connecting two sides of the network once they connect those two people They have to schedule a call or a meeting that takes place outside of the network platform which is detrimental to the platform because now the two people are connected outside of the network. Have all this loss in attrition people that end up doing the thing that the network brought two people together for so Adding video chat to that experiences is a value add and so were going deep with those customers and trying to make sure that our product roadmap and our next big release which happened in march. Okay aligns with their use case plus a bunch of others again. We're kind of igna stick to what our customers businesses. We just want to be really good at making video chat work in their website or ecosystem. I'm excited for you. I think it's a huge opportunity. And obviously you know this already and it is it zip. Can dot com or data died. I o or dot com dot com and so again right now we have a free beta. It allows you to embed video chat in your website on. Its really simple another trend. That were building on as the no code tran. I guess about the. But the more i learn about it in the more we talk to customers. It's really quite inspiring. The number of people that are actually building software companies without even having an engineering team. That's wild and basically the idea is yeah like coding. Original coding in engineering is important. Api's are kind of the next extension of that. You don't have to actually build the thing you just have to integrate with thing and the next logical extension is you. Don't even have to write the same or integrate with the thing. You can just read the thing with a graphic user interface rice by setting and connections and things that are you. You're pushing buttons and that's writing code for you in the background yet. So that's what we're doing zip can were making it. So that You can build a video chat. Application goes inside of your software without ever writing single line of code. that's amazing. yeah. I've i've there's one platform i started to mess around with bubble dot. Io which is kind of a no code platform and it's still hard for me not the technical at all but it's It's it's really it's really crazy. How like you said. I've been hearing a lot of startups. They don't even have a technical co founder. Necessarily now so yeah you can do it. There's like the. I've seen quite a few Community sites are another huge trend. Right now people just building micro-communities especially a facebook with all the news. That's happening around. You know facebook and social dilemma. And all of that. They're so many communities popping up and so there's a lot of community site software. It's easy to integrate and connect with and obviously when you have a community creating a space for people to video. Chat inside of that community makes perfect sense and so we've seen quite a few sign ups in that category categories. Well we'll selfishly. I i run a small leadership community in portland. I need to look into this site. I run there's a platform card called mighty networks so i don't know integrates with them but I'm gonna check this out for me. There's there mighty networks member space their circle dot. So for a lot of really good things. That was really cool name literally. We just had one of our customers take zip can embedded into a circle that. So website Run into some problems but their community basically figured that out and one of their forums and then somebody sent me that forum and was like hey these people in circle that us. Our embedding zip. Can you should check this out. Cool novo suddenly started getting sign ups from people in that community and now i'm connected to the founder circle that so we're talking about how to try to very cool. I will fritz. Thanks so much for doing this. It's great to connect ten years later or whatever it is and just very excited for you and your your your new journey and excited for you being banned and i'm looking forward to learn more about the space here too so thanks so much. Thank you dan. Keep doing great thing for the community. The pd ex-executive. Podcasts is a production of that cast portland oregon podcast agency that partners with brands to create. Custom podcast you can learn more at that. Cast dot com. Please take a moment to subscribe and rate the podcast as well.

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Training & Recovery Therapy

MAKINGA"STRETCHING"DIFFERENCE

1:01:55 hr | 11 months ago

Training & Recovery Therapy

"Oh hello guys Eugene here again. Welcome to stretch podcast. I'm your host. We had to do the dog on today. We got a special guests. My man the One and only the myth Carlton Welcome Carnegie. Take Eugene like to call you dot. Jean I appreciate a can so you're trying to accomplish a lot more than a lot of people's intentional effort so you keep trying is a mad to appreciate what statement you shoot for. I think much you superstars shoot the moon. Maybe a bad a bad phrase Basque back quote. I'm sorry so I'm trying to know you. You land among the star. If your goal is the moon and you fall short leash hanging out with star so I get it he would. I do appreciate you help me out there. Hey Man I appreciate you taking time off your day to talk to us and share some jobs some knowledge with us so so so to tell the people who are tell. Tell people about who you are as you know. What's your background okay? Well I'm Carlton. I like to say the fitness engineer. Eugene and I met at a active isolated stretching conference And that's part of what I do. You know the reciprocal inhibition or the body's design. Having opposing muscle groups is how I learned to train my clients and have learned to train myself and keep myself mobile and because I graduated from high school that was known for creating state champions who are track and field I think when I graduated they had eight consecutive state. Titles I did not graduate as state champion so I had hunger from high school. I had hunger from being a kid to be world class athlete and since I did not accomplish that yet. I'm still running at down and I've got twenty nine days. I guess less than a month before I'm fifty and I'm still chasing thing down really as Nice and noticed that I've seen in your linked patriots. You have try full Olympia Olympics. Yes I was in college and I felt that if I joined the track team. I wouldn't have to worry about a coach. I had made a commitment in twenty fourteen to train for the two thousand Sixteen Olympics and I was in Grad School. Twenty fifteen to twenty sixteen Walked onto the track team. Was it the brightest ideal? 'cause they weren't a powerhouse for middle distance. But Hey that was one less thing to worry about had a place to train as Nice Some some folks to run with me Fortunately I had some injuries that hampered my performance and so now I'm looking at Tokyo twenty twenty one. Congratulations Bruton but with the injuries. What kind of injuries did you have? have bilateral fractures or fractures in both my feet of bilateral heel spurs lowering both Achilles and traumatized enough plantar Fascia. Wow ma'am sorry to hear about that man but I know you working through it because I guess what your qualifications. You're able to kind of a manipulating work with your body to figure out how to solve those issues right. Yes and and when I fall short I reach out to people like you Aaron mad is in core. Some some professionals medical professionals sports medicine professionals What do you call them? The OSTEO VAT. I'll have to pass those people that are that do things without drugs and everything. Am I correct on that? Yes now okay okay. So when with those with the Arctic as you come about doing wit so since you have a vast knowledge of fitness what what is your passion you know what brought you to fitness and health and wellness? What got you really caught up in and what. You're what you what you passionate about right now. You know a transition. In the very beginning I wanted to be a world class athlete so as a child I had a lot of athletic ambition but I had a lot of absentee athleticism so I did not have what it took to pursue or to a obtain those ambitions that never died and when I got into the Navy. was in officer Prep school we hadn't take a PT tests every week. So I decided that I was going to get a perfect three hundred point score so that gave me something shoot for and of course we have PT Every Week. You know couple times a week before the test and when they invited me leave their prep school. By way of academic disembowelment. I went onto communications training okay and was recruited to run team and it just kept growing mayor and then they saw well. Hey you're doing it. Well I got aircrew. Orders an Scott my first news station and found out about special support from a communication perspective. So I tried out for that. became one of the first tennis instructors and then left that went to my second command and they started asking me to help my shipmates. Wow I think I still haven't got three hundred. Points is a full time job taking care of myself after some reluctance and some some recommendations out say they they could give me a direct order but they persuaded me to think beyond myself in so I started helping people in into Remedial Program. Say the rest is history. It's so so. Did you have any materials in this in this whole journey were on because like I said you just stated that no you and I have the best but you had to get that that kind of help for someone to of help you move it in direction that you try and special tactics that you putting forth and and then you had the capability to go out and do catch yourself and to help others and to have them move for them what they were trying to do you know they say it takes a village to raise a child My brother you know he was a hero to me so I didn't have to look far in the village. You know. My air quotes to find a support. He excelled academically. He excelled athletically so I wanted to be like my big brother. We're a year and a feud you know maybe a month some change apart. Let's close though. Yeah I was always in tow but I'd be sitting on silent. You heard a three on three or five on five full court yet. They would play five on four and if the other team captain did know anything. It was Ill informed enough to salute at me. They would play six four. Because the captain that Newbie was like he'll be a better service to us on their team. How long he's got this this either. I was sitting around not picked her. I got picked. Last is so I wanted to be like my brother and I had to figure out how to become more marketable athletically. I had to put in a lot of work. Yeah Yeah speaking by him you got to. You got some big shoes feel in it stayed. There wasn't anything whatever he tried to do. I mean this guy. We grew up in inner city. Play Golf Organiz Golf for school. He was on. He was in a summer tennis league. he ran in the Penn relays. When he was in high school he played football. He was. He did wrestling assistant coach or trainer for volleyball team for the prep school. He attended so I mean he was in a national honor. Society National Mass decided. He built his own Speakers made it on a took a frame built his own bicycle. He made this low contraption said it was a lie detector test but it was open circuit. So when you push the button shots so you didn't like the fact that you got shot go ruin it for the next. You know you weren't GonNa ruin your opportunity to look at another kid in neighbourhood sitting there shaking his thank you. Just be quiet and wait for them to push the button and get shot so I is it. It is a real purpose of dyslexia. Either real person to me. He's a mechanical engineer At this point he lives up in Philly. Okay yeah he sees he still edit. I mean his his garage. Looks like Oh Yankee Workshop Okay is he Yankee Fan. He's like oh he's the the. Oh the OH Yankee workshop. Was this Home like what's the guy's name Bob Vila's okay improvement type things he had the big Delta Band Saws and drill presses to me. I helped him finish his basement when we were in. He lives in Maryland And he told the Realtor Day who's going to sell his house for four hundred twenty five thousand dollars. She said You'd be Lucky. To get three hundred seventy five thousand. But she didn't know what was going to do. I helped him finish the basement enough. He got four and twenty. Five thousand dollars brought to seal in and put it in the fireplace. Shut up and that was his hobby. I mean he had a full time. Job Is engineering then on his spare time. He's like redoing his house. Wow so man man so he is guys pretty accomplished in so hey so so so question. Now I've been reading over your stats and you have a book book. I I wouldn't exaggerate. Accomplishments so from the navy seals training person training. I think you did a special ops for the talk about that. A little bit special OPS Endorsement Command Endorsement Parsons Training. That's like a major accomplishment. Okay so you know. I typically say so calm but for the people that I don't know navy. Seals are the navy's special operations pro. You know the air force the Marines and army. They all have special forces programs and the United States Special Operations Command is the umbrella under which all of them exist so I did some work for one of the executives over there and he was pleased with the work I did getting ready for his Wedding typically you got the bride so this was like look. I need to be looking right when I walk down the aisle and so he wrote an endorsement for personal trainer year based on his experience. That's really good with me. That's major major. That's a really big deal. So yeah that's that's not. Everybody can say they they get accomplishment like that you know. I'm really grateful To the most high for the life I've lived and what lies before being the potential that I haven't tapped yet you know there's always room for improvement for all of us. Growth growth is something that we going to continue experience until the day we died. They said if you stop learning then it's time to go ahead and lay down your practice that that long term social distance. You'RE GONNA be six feet underground. You show a will. Hey so no he gets he. I guess he has them where to go. That's more important point. He has right everybody about I really interesting to make an appointment of disappointment. He couldn't run it from He. He wanted to get this on enough really funny because people people ask me. What makes me different from other fitness? And they'll use the word personal trainer. Now try to explain to them. Look I'm I'm a fitness engineering. And if I'M GONNA be obedient to my mom you know they say gun good to say. Don't say anything at all. I'm going to compare the personal trainer to of BMW. Seven fifty ally guy you know. The industry rumor is that vehicle shares the same chassis as a Rolls Royce. Ghost okay. So saint-josse same industry the personal trainers of BMW. On the Rolls Royce goes. There's a lot more attention to detail. There's a lot higher customer service experience when you co- when it comes to the Rolls Royce goes and I don't go to youtube or tick tock or whatever platform and see what what trend is popular and in this throat at my clients. I look at my clients. Where are they number one? Where do they want to go? What's the safest most effective way to get in there? Now I'm not focused on the quickest way. Because it's not always save is not always practical but to customize a program for an individual based on individual needs and goals is not something. I see in the industry. So I don't WanNa be lumped into everyone else when their approach to servicing customers totally different than mine? They're concerned about revenue. I'm concerned about results. Which will bring me revenue. I'll be compensated if I deliver on the promises that I've made to the client and I'm only making promises based on what their goals are. Okay so let let me ask this question so I spoke to a lot of trainers and I know that. A lot of people take trainers coaches as no there. Adama dozen the education level is not there anymore. We're trainer's not to say no one but the education that they're people not a student of their craft so where I'm at is the value of a coach or a trainer is being devalued in people. Do Not Take that that service special no seriously because at one a trainer was an extension of a physician because they were the one. They're the person that helps you. Get your body physically in another better position you post to be in. So what do you see training now when you see coaches engineer professionals? What do you see this? This fitness era right now and also to respect for services rendered because a lot of trainers are not getting devalued. Do not getting what they were. And what do you? What do you think about that if you don't mind? Well I'VE IS I. B I S World Report. Okay there anywhere from a couple of thousand five thousand dollars a report and so. I began looking at the report for the personal training. Category and Twenty fifteen and they made a forecast that there would be three hundred thousand. Twenty sixteen to report came out at the beginning of twenty sixteen or the end of Twenty fifteen so they projected over the next four years up to twenty twenty two. There will be three hundred thousand personal trainers industry now. When I read the first report they were compensated at. I WANNA say two hundred dollars. The highest compensation procession was two hundred dollars. When when I read the next report it had dropped to a hundred and forty dollars so they had already lost sixty dollars in compensation procession and with people coming in through these weekend or our long certification processes online. Where you only pay when you pass the test. They just want to be in the game so they say hey. I can train you for say on ninety nine dollars a month or one hundred forty dollars a month I was being compensated at one hundred sixty per session before I had a degree. Okay I was being compensated under sixty procession. So then I finished my Undergraduate degree in two thousand twelve. I finished my master's degree in two thousand sixteen obtained silver medal from USA Track and feel at twenty sixteen and then I finished another master's degree in twenty eighteen. So I'm I'm bringing the knowledge and the experience and the ability to apply the knowledge that I really don't see in the industry because you cited a couple of important things. The knowledge is not there because the barrier to entry has gotten so low pass and until until we began to carve out a portion or category in the industry or began blazing a trail for another industry. We're GONNA see the continued deminishing of service in the fitness industry. Because it's based on excitement instead of science. Because you know what I've said before I've talked the trains I've listened to other other people talk about training. It's been so diluted in people China's have been taken for granted macos asking. A trainer is one of the most important people that that that's for your body because a trainer is there to on of you. You know you follow me on this Nano. You agree with me but Training is meant to keep your body. It's like a machine so if you have an automobile or car whatever you WANNA call it or or you have a like expensive computer you WanNa make it you WanNa make sure. It's fine tuned to the point. Where you able to perform the best you can every single day at. That's what their training for to keep your body in a position to where your functional every single day you working at the top of your game on a regular basis. Do you agree with me? Well I know not only agree with you. I experienced that firsthand when you came down here and you took me through some movements and I understand that term is very important to us very foundational to you so regardless of my experience my education might qualifications you were able to do in seconds what I could not do you know so I understand with my skill set that I bring to the table for my clients. There's only so much I can do for myself so I need. I need a Finnish professional like you. So imagine if people who don't have my experience yes they need to help them maintain if they have good movement patterns if they have a sound body. They need someone to help them. Maintain that if they have a body. That's you know. They need someone to help them. Return to standard fitness standard. That says okay. Now you can do the things you need to do on a daily basis without feeling like you've been beat up or been out to war and if people want to improve they if they want to enhance their performance because they're an athlete they definitely need someone like you. Yeah so so. Basically this goes into the question is what is movement to people what is movement to the German public. Because I don't think people understand where movement hills I think people just see all getting up. I'm doing I'm doing this or I'm going to jump. I'm GonNa do this do this is it. Your body goes through a lot to actually pick up a spoon being squad. There's a whole lot of play just to do the simplest thing and I think people take that for granted and and don't under stand why they have the the injuries the stuff they have in that losing weight. And not do this because the Greenwich so what what is movement to you. Well it's the the contraction and the releasing must coordinate it process because you have the these integrated systems that the nervous system. That's work in the muscular system. The skeletal system The FASHA his his his contributing to that process of moving. And I look at it. This way you have a ear-nose-and-throat nose which tells me that all three of those are connected. But I seldom see people shove. A burger up their nose to get it through their throat or poor wind down there ear to get it that throat. That's true although they're all connected they all have a specific function and with the body. The fashion has a specific function. The muscles have specific function. The nurse function the skeletal system has a function and the more people might you that understand that and it can help people move and help those systems communicate effectively and synergistically so that movement because more optimal the quality of their life improves the performance. You think about it if I can move without being preoccupied with not getting hurt without being with. Oh I don't WanNa fall. That takes a great load off me. I don't have to stress you know so. Psychologically I'm benefiting to fold because I have the psychological benefit from actually moving and exercise but also have that decrease burnham nervous system or my. You know my mental low. Because I'm not concerned about falling. I'm not concerned about you. Know hurt myself because I've learned how through your teaching to move off to me. Yes how to maintain that and say an saying too because you got your gate you get connected tissues you have you know. The locomotive the movement patterns muscles. How they come about how they adjust to certain situations. Your body adapts really fast and that takes a lot of energy to do that and just a just a sneeze bathroom like going on. So so so. What do you think about? Why did we get engineer? So movement is one portion of it. And so why do we get into? Why do you see people that take for? Granted their ability to get up and some people can't get up wising. Don't you think people take take you know take for granted? Getting up every single day is something like whatever and why do people getting injured? Why do you think that You know just walking up stairs you can blow your knee stumbling grabbing a rail. You tear you pack. I think because you mentioned something earlier that people fail to consider when I look at their bodies that they have expensive computer. They're not going to use the computer as a serving tray. If they're offering wising beverages to company you know people that are visiting their home and if they see the body as a forty five million dollar training in face yeah they were treated differently and so we see people who disregard their body Place they have to check out but if they treat it like a temple instead of a woodshed I think they would seek out more information because people will youtube stuff. They got to figure out how to maximize their computer. How to if it's stalling. I gotTA MAC so if they're little pinwheel comes up. I pulled my phone. I quote a youtube. I what I do. I got to pay. We'll go on what's going on my computer. So if people would be a little more responsive and a little more sensitive to their own bodies they wouldn't get as injured they wouldn't be because the body's GonNa Cheat or compensate or accommodate if there's pain so you're going to overload other joints and systems of the body because you you can't execute this movement pattern property and as far as getting up and sit down. If they're not I love the hip joint you got the gluteus Maximus minimus medias. You got all this muscle around that joint. I look at my neat there is. I can tap on my knee. I can't just poke from the back and find my hip. You know the I can't find the head of the FEMUR that way so if we if we lo that muscle for what is that area for what is designed to do you know through hip. Flex an extension. When people sit down they would have less strain on the knee when they go up the steps. They're moving four taught about the locomotion they haven't elevated their body and they're trying to go forward so you have this sharing effect on the back of the KNEECAP. Yeah so when they climb steps when they sit down when they stand up if if they knew the pattern would help decrease Andrews. There are people who live at me like I'm some genie and they tell me my doctor said I shouldn't squat and I immediately think of is because you have a knee dominant. What's what's the problem with quality. I you gotta you gotta use the bathroom. You got you CA- chair squatting. It hurts them so when I say okay look as you been your drive. Your hips back. You know or better yet star to drive your hips back and then lower your but yes and when you get up. Concentrate on driving your shoulders toward the ceiling from Dr. Your hips up. Yeah your body will go up instead of four when it starts going forward. We we're asking the knees to extend with all that friction behind the kneecap or shearing Dan Nica whereas if they concentrate on DR listen button up instead of trying to go forward. Yeah I tell them I I tell my people that if you're pushing if you push in funding heels you driving your gluts if you're pushing from the tolls the front you drag the knees. So that's that's Mali shoes. Yeah those might does. That's the way I look at it. Also too. If you're not drawn from heels you drawn from flip most nighttime team your Neeson Buchan Leeann. That means you're gluten firing and as you have tight hamstrings or you have Achilles gastric issues as wael dot gene when people tell you like they told me to dumb it down that has already occurred. And that's why we see this increase in injuries. That's why we see people who are frustrated. You know they can't lose weight because no sooner do they. Start a program a week into it. They're injure yeah but see also mashes questions so who I want to say. Whose fault is this but there. There's somebody there does not carrying their weight. What do you think that France from the trainer or is that placed on the actual client because the client don't know what they're coming from China for help? Well I typically ask people if they you know what has been their experience when they google exercise program. The last I did you got over half of the results in less than half a second and so the the the fitness professional should be able to help cut through the confusing and conflicting information. You know when I was in Grad school there was some research said a some researchers say it'd be and the professor said look we can just call it a wash because in some cases these people got work in some cases. These people got do work. So what are the variables and factors that produce success on each side of the argument? Okay and the the professional has to look at the individual and say okay. I see all this information out your. Let's find out where you are in where you want to go okay. So let's discuss okay so question so you say grass goose. Oh now what grass could go to graduate programs. You're apart I don't know if I was working on watch completed a master's degree in exercise nutrition science really. Okay okay okay. So you gives you a professional expert of facilitate on these situations where it's actually good and also too. I think I recall. You have a bio mechanic CH- certification in bio mechanics resistance training. So I'm very. I can't a lot on the movements of the exercises. Okay and nothing to now. I've been at gyms before. Walk working out and it usually I work out myself and I hate going to gym because I don't like traders train. They're not student their craft. And I I give an example. I was at the gym working out now. Seeing these trainer training his client older gentleman and he had a lot of squats but I noticed that everytime he's quite now his knees will roll in in his ankles roll in the doors player rolling. And I'm like why would this guy do ankle were? Why would this guy do gluten? But he doesn't do it. I watched this gentlemen. Trained his client for six sessions during the same exact thing. I was like crying. Tears watching them. Work with clients wanted to tell them. But I'm like that's not my place so I it's crazy that a Lotta trainers will not not still their craft so they kind of bothers me and since the wellness is sentence is since it doesn't send a good size especially when you watching your counterparts performing they have these people Health or trusted in these people to help get to do you. WanNa go to. Nothing does right. What thank you address in that. Because we're fitness professionals. That are collaborating. We're conversation we're we're discussing. We're we're honest enough almost honest enough. We're just honest when we have some integrity and we're not pleased with what we see in our industry and we're calling it out. We're saying this is not right. These people are. They're investing their time which they cannot get back there invest in their heart our money. They'RE NOT GETTING THE RESULTS. Hope that they are pursuing. Yeah yeah so it's important for us to continue and those who want to serve their clients. Better will tune into podcasts. Fight Yours Yeah. Yeah because we all we all have room for growth and I do too. I'm always I'm always every books. Always trying to learn something to Kinda help me be able to help my clients. I know you are too and you know that. So that's that's a rare occurrence in this in his in his fitness area that They were dealing with. That's why I call you dot gene. Because I look at the conferences You're going to look at a books you're reading and I'm like main you. It is refreshing for me because I can learn from talking to you. I can follow what you're saying and I can actually increase the number twos in my bag and I can also be more precautious about how I maintain myself. Yeah Yeah Yeah you know. So if we can get trainers to realize it we can elevate our industry by collaborate. Your competition the more going to deteriorate yeah the public's image of our industry it looks the surface. Yeah it does it does and like I said we're not in competition. We should collaborate with each other and just as called the meeting of the minds suggests just able to put together a plan to help other out because there no patent anything is just information. How would you allies it and you know going from there? And how do you help other people? How do you like I said my my mission now is just to give to give only. I don't want anything return would ever do me become by the universe. And that's what I'm looking for. I said WanNa give given given us some people not really interested in doing the more people wanNA monetize. Things is that Jewish to the profit off of that way. It's yours to give and if you don't give what return do you expect from heaven. I would not consider myself a candidate for a PhD in entrepreneurship. So I'm just going site harbor. I read a report while I was in Grad School for my second. Masters Degree in Entrepreneurship said. The purpose of a business is to serve clients for us to serve a customer. This purpose of businesses not revenue. Yes you need cash flow to keep your doors. But the the analogy or the adage that says a broke clock even abro clock is correct twice a day. You don't get to opportunities as Nice. Floyd customer has nice. I like that we've got you got one shot to begin nurturing relationship for a long term customer client so wash nope. No one likes to be so everyone likes but no one likes to be so so you got you got you got him. You sold them your service or your product. You failed to deliver. And you don't think that they're not going to share an experience with someone else that mandate negative experiences going to impact your revenue so at at some point is gonNA come back on. Yeah it's GonNa come back on because you can you can you? Can you can take advantage one person but like I said in the day when when that when you see that you're not really the person who you are It comes out especially with the results. Your clients if you don't build that credibility in that beliefs and let them know. Hey I'm here for you. I'm here for you only so. Let's move forward what we're doing and why we're here so we can get you into the best shape of your life. I think I've experienced that with you. You know part of what has happened is is the delivery. Yeah I know if I send someone to you. That your morty capable to help them achieve the goals there pursuant. I mean you have your own list of accomplishments you have your own list of pro high profile clients that you work with that pretty much. Sates the proof in your pudding. Yeah you can deliver on things you promised. Yeah and when people experienced that they don't you don't need a sales gimmick if you tell when you talk when you work with me and I was able to engage my glucose and as a runner. I need that. Yeah I'm thinking my goodness for my for Thoracic. Spine me to be able to contract those muscles. That movement has to be coached. Otherwise get into this gross motor movement and over you know. I'm overlooking the muscles. That really need to be trained to really help with my posture to really help with my the rustic mobility so that was mind blowing to have the education to have the experience to have accomplished what have had accomplished but to be on the table. Fallen your structure would be like. Oh my goodness yeah and I've been missing this and that's really important. So that s where it goes back to the knowledge and everything because I guess so. The audience knows How how I met you mccartin. We were at a air mattis workshop stretching USA. I call. He's I'm into her in A. I've been his classes and class has been certified. I mean I think of typically man classes so many times ridiculously. We have a personal relationship. Now's the hey what's going on. Know he knows me I know him. Hey you back again so I broke. You know employees to the to the conference Got Trained and everything else. They both the whole family knows me. So and that's how I met Carlton. That class was pretty intense. You have to know a nanny. You have to know anatomy in that situation about stretching. It's not about that. It's about training your body to respond to things that you know movement that you take for granted stretches as a by product. It's just a movement. But you gotta learn how to activate and certain muscles how to move them to where they fire again. You know you know. It's it's a lot more to it than Jess. Hey I'm a stretch. Somebody put your leg in the air. Hoagie Hamstrings Y. Are You doing that? Why are you stressed? The Person Hamstring. What are you trying to accomplish? Do they have a bag powder day? Hip problems you know. Let's our know how I met Caulton but that was a very intense class. That's how there I pursue more of the program to learn more. I can teach myself and to educate my team members. So what how? Are you still using that type of service? A what what what are you doing you know when I started. I started my service to others beyond the navy's remedial program with massage therapy. Okay so when I went into massage therapy. Of course. You're not getting out without a Nash. Me and says you have to understand anatomy and physiology so when I got certified as a personal trainer or a physical fitness specialist. I had already been doing massage abroad for two years. Okay so when I came back to the states or actually I left. I went to England. That's when I got my bio mechanics resistance training certification which was more of Anatomy kinesiology. So I've always had that appreciation for that knowledge and so I've built my programs based on those fundamental principles. The body has dating payers. I like to say you know you're PECs or dating Iran boys you're BICEPS BICEPS. Biceps and triceps. Dating your hamstrings. So I'm looking for balance bursting. I look at when I get a client. I realized okay. You totally neglected the backside of your body not your behind your lattes your traps. You're Rambo Age your gluts your have strings your soleus. Most people do some work on their calves but they have no idea where you know what that Bitney leg are Cav raises four. Yeah so if they don't know they may not do it. Some people do it because I saw so and do it but I work on balancing the body and those payers guide me. You know the person's the Hilo Ademi is my blueprint in my robot. Yeah when they show up and I see these imbalances okay you got these killer quads hamstrings and your you know. Let's work on your anterior. Tiv- you've done all this work on your calf media. Must we all know the anxious below the knee less work on the front of your you know? Let's create some balance less improve your flexibility and without that knowledge you heiress class. Wouldn't help me you know. I've seen people with his books in height. Yeah I'll understand. What is he talking about? You know so that knowledge is important to my education. That knowledge is important to me. Applying that education to serve my client. Yeah I do. I do agree with you still when I took errands class me personally. I've already had a background in a lot of different STUGZ. I know there's no such thing. There's no one such fixers a lot of components you put together so you have a trainee background and also you have a background. Trx training to and that's more or less a a what's called a stability Movement was Gone Terex suspension trae. Yeah so they was Asian. Because if you set your body motion you can't decelerate in control. You GonNa put an awful lot of stress on joints themselves. Because they're going to have to be breaks. They weren't designed to be braked. They designed to be Hingis. You know two flex to extend so I look at trx the same way. I look at any other apparatus. What is the movement pattern for that exercise? So we're looking at a chest. Press is going to be similar to a bench. Press was the path of motion that the client has to execute to engage the muscles that are GonNa perform that movement or that exercise now. I've ut are man. That's a difficult piece of equipment. I because there's no. There's no stability you you don't have anchors like you do events Chris. The Vince doesn't move. So all you have to do is stabilize the bark. And you've been bench pressing for more than let's say a couple of months. You know how to stabilize the bar pretty much. The bar doesn't move outside of that path down toward the the sternum in backup over your eyes but when you grab a hold of that. Trx You've got to keep your hands from drifting apart. You gotTa keep them kind of even. You gotTA keep your hips from sack. Bellybutton FROM SAGGING. Low your lumbar. There's a lot more St- stabilisation rely realized just to get set up. Let alone to keep maintain that stability while you're moving through said chest press or a Latte row. Yeah so like I said in your correct because I've used tr X. before and I noticed that I was engaging muscles now he'd do a branch brush. You don't really gays the peck properly. Because it's it's a it's a kind of a barbaric movement you pushing wait down in their one dimensional movement normally. Would you actually if you doing something like actually picking up a box it takes you to be Involved Ping box? You've been you legs far gluts and you hold the Bar. The box net close to your body and you walk with it. Chairs and your shoulders has been involved dead. Tr Movement man. I did some some chest press with that in cloud flatmates. In 'cause you're S- The muscles do not find that movement will call you out call. You WOULD WANNA call you and make you make you manhandling and I. I think it's to me. I may be wrong. I think it's similar to the ban because I do a lot of band movements in were you. We get because the band's concentration the TR X. I do not. There is tension there but the detention changes hands when you stop the movement now with the ban it doesn't it continues firing so you may be. I MAY BE WRONG. So you correct on this you. You've you've touched on great points because you have a variable of resistance with the ban so the further you stretch of band the more intensity you can or the more low can create With your tr when you change directions you have instant quadrupling of the force. Okay because you have to stop the movement and then redirect the movement and then re initiate move. You've got you've got a great force production going on with the you know when you change from lowering the body to drop backwards. Say you're doing a low wrote and then now you want to start pulling your body forward. Yeah with your van. I've seen you push ups on the band like you've got that ban across a power cage and you're doing pushups and you're having to save us. Yes stabilize as letting your body lower in the impressive away. What I found with doing my work on the when I go back to an apparatus like a hammer shrines press. I've never flat bench three hundred pounds. I incline bench more than two hundred pounds after using trx. Because all the force that generate to stabilize myself on the Rx generates movement of the apparatus. When I sit on the hammer strength just press machine so I think it's about as versatile as you can get because you can throw it in your bag and take with us it anywhere and it's highly unlikely that they're going to let you check a hammer strength machine on a plane or train or bus you know so the ability to maintain your workout when you're away now even if you're a body builder and you want to overload in the off season most of them way more than they're going to weigh on stage. Yeah so you've gotTa push extra weight so if you go from a regular chest press to a single arm chest press in trx. Your chest is gonNA grow. I've seen it myself. You know so you can still create that go to create my purchasing is just that you're GonNa have. I say it's a more it's a cleaner return on your investment of time. Yeah so so question so since you know your backgrounds fittings. You know you're a training. You still training yes okay So if I come to you I way whatever way I'm trying to get in shape again. What is an I know? You have a protocol that you go through when you when you pick it up when you work new clients to tell us about that and what kind of clients do you like taking on an emmy. Why okay the clients when they come what I do is I sit around and I asked him questions I would say I talk with them but I want to hear what their experience has been what their goals are what type of challenges they currently have and I'm starting to put together a plan in my head as you're talking to me and most of them have tried the cardio's king approach and I'm thinking it's a great way to tr- train your cardiovascular system but is not the best way to change your body composition. I haven't met a Kenyan running champion. That was obese as a was skinny from the job. You know so if you think you will run and ended up looking like some of these elite athletes. You got another thing coming. They didn't get that body composition from running so we set them up for success by giving them resistance training I'll start with thirty seconds. And then we'll transition to the next exercise so as they progress all increase from thirty to save forty five seconds from forty five to fifty maybe from fifty to a minute and at that point they have the ability to make it through the workout with very little rest. So maybe I'll switched into a single arm. Moyo depending on what their goal is they just want. More endurance will then. We'll kind of combine to get. So maybe they'll do a squat and a low wrote on maybe they'll do a cable role and a dumbbell press so I can either work the muscles in sequence so there is something called sequential opposition opposition system. Okay meaning we start with a major mover so say we start with your lattes. Well if you're doing pull ups than your next exercise is going to be oppressed to your chest. Press or your your Dumbbell Press. And then we'll drop to the legs. So you'll do a hamstring exercise in then aquatic exercise and then the simultaneous opposition system is where we get the opposing muscle groups working at the same time. If I'm working your chess on a cable press we're doing a cable Jairo okay. You know we're doing Your BICEP CURL. I'm GonNa give you a Dumbbell and I'm going to give you a cable you're GonNa do tricep extension and a dumbbell curl at the same time. Okay okay so the message the message questions so so if I see it. Are You doing assessments? Before you start your training sessions. Basically the no we're out where clients at and what they're what we started from. You have a center. A reference guide of where progress look like the kind of no know where you're going to end west of the how long it will take you get there and maybe guestimation out of why. I get an over view of an assessment when they walk in their carriages. Outta Gate is and then for me before they do anything As far as resistance training concern. I'll take them through a I s protocol so I'm looking at their range of motion there. I'm looking at any ambitions. They have at their joints and a couple that what they told me as far as their challenges with their knees or their neck litter ankle. And that's the extensive. I assessment. Now I did do. Some courses in functional movement screening And in some cases I'm like people that it's I think for the average person and when I say average. Their fitness levels well below average is very difficult for them to even get in a position to try to execute some of those movements. I think when it comes to athletes is different. Yeah but when you got the general population that has been sedentary for ten to fifteen to twenty years to ask them to. Somebody's like man I can't. I don't even feel comfortable with the with. The stress in pressure's GonNa create some of my joints to try. These exercise movement yet phenomenal for such a long time. Yes so that would be the extent of my assessment. Okay okay I like. I said you astounded at all because I think a lot of people are uneducated about their bodies. No reason why they had the problems you're having and I think everybody should consult someone before they get out there and start doing their own thing. I don't think cargill is king. Arthur Carter was what it is. I think Cardi is I don't like Cardio Cardio people your cardio do cardio. All Carter does burn off. Would you just a couple of minutes ago? And that's no more than that and you're not technically really burning losing the weight off card. What do you think about that? I totally agree because your body composition is is. It's more is worse off than it was before you started because you are asking you to do something that doesn't require extra weight. Yeah so you're an. I don't know that that's the best way to put it. But they're not. They're not preserving or building muscle tissue on muscle. Tissue is active so the less muscle you have and after as twenty five. The body starts losing muscle mass every year. So if you're not doing something to maintain that which would be resistance training. Your metabolism is against Lawrence lower. So if you couple cardio with less calories you're slow your metabolism out even further. Yeah you're right you're right and there's a lot of people use like women say. Hey I'm gonNA work out and we'll get buff but you know what I want. My knees resist training. They need resistant trying to build. Also they need to firm firm the body cardio does not help. No woman lose no way. It does not. Women are scared to want to do this. I think t-rex band work ethic would be ideal for that individual that doesn't want to. Does it feel uncomfortable about stimulating. The muscleman body. Well when when when you look at addressing that fear and you ask them okay. Well let's just try to me. One Lady lost eleven pounds in five sessions. Now the way I train my clients there's a cardio component to it because cardiovascular traditional cardiovascular training pops large volumes of blood to the lungs and lakes if you're running or power walking but what I do is the body is pumping large volumes of blood all Oak. Because once you finish lattes you're going into a chest pressing chest flesh. You're going to a higher when she finished that high row. You're going into a tricep exercises so it's going election extension flecked push pull however you WANNA termine. I'm my best not to overload to me doesn't make sense to go from A lateral to occur. Curls were secondary movers in that lateral so if I go to the chest I don't WanNa go to a tricep exercises. The triceps were secondary. Movers in the chest. Pray okay so I'm structuring it. So that the group I'm working is stretching out the group. I just finished so the rest. They get as an active. Rest when you're doing the high road your chest is is getting stretched out. Oh Yeah Yeah so when you do your tricep. Extension will S- okay. Let's best wallet sequence. So they do a high road to stretch out the chess so the Jairo still has some elbow flex so now. I'm going to your tricep extension which has elbow extension which is stretching the bicep out a little bit but then we go into your bicep curl now the flexing. Your biceps is help stretching out your try set so that sequence one exercise after the other. I've had I've had clients doing low rolls or Squat. Rose and breathe like a train up there not running yet. But they're pumping blood we. You don't have rest there so I think that's a better way to create a cardio environment from ANAEROBIC perspective. Okay you know what I find the same way to learn as for my POPs We don't I take no more than maybe once a thirty second break between movements so if I can our do the maximum amount do and then take myself a thirty minute thirty second break thirty second break it. I go next move again and a lot of people can handle that pay. So I think that's what you're saying because it takes a lot of oxygen rebel increases your red blood cells white blood cells to and to train at the rate. Because you're requiring. You bite work faster and to adjust to the movement and then do the same thing again. You have to do it at even at even more of a higher intensity so you're doing twenty five pounds accent you gotta do fifty five fifty pounds five pounds you studying increasing your Rep. You wait in you. Tom Undertaking to come a hill. The King of time under tension go ahead dot. So that's the way I do it. I'm always about pushing the limits. No that that's the only way I know to train my body the. Let's learn how to do it? I think if people would just assess what they do when they go into Jim Yeah they would tell you what Gina's high workout but if you watch them they gotta stop and take a pitcher for snapchat shoot a video for then they got to readjust their play and then they got a tech somebody you know. So they don't they don't have rest into their workout. They don't even have a workout but say they have a journal there right now. I did you know I did. Three subsidies and then. I would do folks answer this with only thing that's written but what you didn't right is you talk at the at the Y. You refilling your water bottle for ten minutes with this person and then you came back and you ask the person of you could work in and you end up talking to that person and then you went to your phone to. You could take a Selfie with this person because you realized that you know it's all type of rest in there. It takes away from their comedy man. I'd be spending hours in Jim. I'd be going in. Yeah so you'd be wasting time them. Jim groupies Jim Somewhere. What they were and they wasn't doing the work they said they put in is not a hang out. You Know Yeah. It is and it isn't as crazy man it's been it's been really really great to you. I you. I hope my audience out there Enjoyed our conversation. So Hey if anybody is interested in your service Florida Tapa. Did you give them some information about? How can get a hotel you while say this? You know in light of what is going on now this social distancing and people say hey we can train virtually in this. You know I've been doing in home training since two thousand eight. I retired in two thousand eight. You started going to people's home shortly I retired. You know so. I understand how to go into a person's home in train. Understand how to use a device so I had clients Earlier this morning I had a lady out in Oregon. Okay I'm taking her through her Tiara accession. And she has a told her you know. I'm Kinda facetious. I Say I think I hold you back. She said No. I've stuck to the program that you gave me two years ago. And when she moves in the phone I can see the definition in her triceps. I see two separate biceps and triceps when the curls and the rose and things and so they can reach me. The linked via facebook by Carlton Metals. Which is causing with a K. In Meadows is just like the medals in the fields so E. A. D. O. W. S. They can text me at eight one. Three nine four seven three four eight nine and then they can find me on Instagram at the fits. Carlton that's F. I T. Z. And then Carlton with a Kate. Okay guy say this guy's an expert. He knows a lot. He's been around for a long time He has accomplishments out the book. I can't pronounce them. I can't cite them all. So hey if you guys in Tampa area whatever you reach out to these man give him show him some love. And I'm sure he'll be able to help you achieve your goals so to next time. Carlton I appreciate you being here much. Love Hope we have Yona again because like I say we had a great time and I look forward to having another conversation which again while I appreciate a treasure colleague. Such as yourself. You know having time to talk with you in knowing you know that. I'm growing from the exposure in the communication. I have with you so thank you for contributing to my professional development in. Give me an opportunity to with your audience. Okay well hey like. I said I appreciate again. Eugene thoat stretch podcast with signing out. Stay tune already by.

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Smithson on Science

The Dental Hacks Podcast

35:57 min | 1 year ago

Smithson on Science

"The. Welcome to Smith on a new podcast by the dental hacks, featuring one of our favorite clinicians. Teachers storytellers? Dr Jason Smith. Dental x listeners this is this is your host, Allen meet. I have kind of cool thing that we're going to try and start here, I have with me against he's been on the show. A whole bunch of times, really was instrumental in, in Jason I starting the dental hacks, because we, we met at a course in Chicago that he was giving with me today is Dr Jason Smith. I Jason how you doing? I am good. So what I wanna talk to the listeners about is the fact that dental hacks have been going almost five years, we've got we've had some small, spin off, but we're starting to think that we want to have more of a network, a wider wider reach different types of shows in immediately thought of you, because you're episodes on the dental hacks over the years have been some of the highest downloads, we've had so people, people definitely respond to you. But more than that, when you and I have talked you, you actually like it. You actually kind liked the idea of doing podcasts. It tell me a little bit about that. My therapy, I just like talking. Yeah. Which which can't be a bad thing, really. You kind of notice when people start looking away from you. Yeah. Exactly. I like to think of it more is that you have a lot to say about that. Yeah, yeah. Yeah. Definitely. It's kind of I wouldn't say therapy for me, but it's, it's kind of interesting as a dentist to talk about dentistry because for me talking about dentistry will go either one of a couple of ways. I, I took about dentistry to a patient, and it's not really spoken of, in a in a dental, kind of way speak about dentistry to a colleague in my office, because we have multiple specialists in the office and we speak about it in a sense way. And, and it's about a specific patient, who has a specific problem or speak about it in a class to delegate. And that's really about how usually how to do hands on exercise usually, and it's maybe a critique or maybe some encouragement, whatever. But it's quite unusual for me to speak about dentistry in Bruton's, and, and it's kind of an outlet for that. And I kind of enjoy it because you don't really you know, if we have dentists in effect, my wife and I go out for dinner the evening. We're going out with, with three dentists who happened to be friends, but we will not speak in the ball about dentistry in general terms, we'll speak about this stuff so it's do you know what I mean? You, you go surely with dentists and you speak about dentistry than quite commonly. They don't invite you. It is weird because one of the ideas of the dental originally was that particularly the roundtable segments where we'll have multiple regular dentist talking about stuff when you take a c course and you go out to dinner with dentist. A lot of times the talk does fall back to either. What you were the course you're taking or whatever a lot of times. We'll talk about dentistry. But, but I agree in in, you know, if it's something separate from that it is out your office. Yeah. Yeah, or that's what I think. But I on I don't know. I think dentists do enjoy talking about dentistry at times. Some don't I in some ways, sort of envy, the guys that really don't where it's just where it's just the job, but I think our profession is a little famous. I mean, look at the fact that dental town was dental tone. Right. Like literally, people would spend a lot of time away from their office talking about dentistry and talking about that straight xactly. I don't know that physicians do that. I'm not sure that they do like, I don't know. There's not physician town that I know of right? So there is something a little bit special about dentists. I think but the other thing that I thought we cool about new do. Doing this is that because Jason I are both very American in the dental hacks. We don't like to we do have a wide international audience wider than we deserve considering how badly we do accents. We rarely we rarely talk about international issues, and I do think that it's neat because I of you are. Okay, so you're a dentist in the UK you teach in lots of different places, not just the UK. I mean you teach United States you teach you teach in, in other parts of Europe. I mean seen a wide variety of dentistry, but you also can speak, very, very effectively on the differences in how dentistry is done in one place to another. I think that's, that's probably a perspective. We don't get on the show all that often. And why lead this is to be honest, the, the quality generally in classes doesn't widely? But the philosophy of the dentists and the way, the dentist approach is a patient, even though everybody will human beings, and we will have pretty much the same teeth with some Mina differentiations. They approach is often very different around the world in terms of, in terms of how people react in terms of how people conduct themselves in terms of how dense all really, there's a massive difference in the US and the UK in how we conduct the class, just because of the way the way, the dentist, all really in the one thing that you have that, that is an interesting perspective. I think for listeners is that not only your clinical Dennis, but you're also an educator, you see how dentists are educated in lots of different. Relations. You've got these perspectives that I think our listeners would enjoy I they clearly have enjoyed because you've been on the show, a lot of different times in your episodes. Always do really well. And since you like it, we thought, hey, you know what we're gonna spin off show where we get your conversations with Jason. And so here's what we're gonna do. We're diving. Why not? I I love it too. I'm an early riser it works out. Well, time wise. It's kind of perfect, but so for the first episode, we're gonna put out there, I think you'll have lots to say about this. And I have lots to say about this. I, I got into podcasting listening to show called the skeptics guide to the universe in the skeptics guide still going on. I think it's been going on for fifteen years or something like that. I mean, it's one of the longest running podcasts out there in it's it's a show about science and scientific skepticism. And how think like a scientist. It's really, it's really good stuff in. I have to say that in the United States, and maybe the university of Minnesota will pretend that I never went there. But honestly in undergrad dental school, we did not get a really good background in science. It isn't that we didn't take lots of bio, Chem and micro biology and, and all this stuff. But it's that we didn't actually learn much about how sciences done how research is done how a clinician should read a paper how how we how can we apply the science to. The clinic last Bex in frankly, in the US for you to really get a background in that and it talked to any specialists, that's the, that's one of the main differences between, like regular old dental school and going to residency. You literally learn to do literature of you once you get into a residency. So the problem is a lot of undergrad. Dennis Dennis that went to dental school. We don't have a great background in how to read papers now there might be a wide variety from school to school in the US that I don't know about, but in general from people, I've talked to I think we liked to give a lot of lip service to science says this, but I honestly think we don't have rate background in how to evaluate science, and I think that you in the UK and Europe. I think that's probably different. I think you I know that you have you really use a lot of scientific rationale for what you teach. Because we've I've seen that in multiple class. I've taken from you. So why don't you tell us a little bit about that? Well, the I mean, probably the fist major differences in all UK universities. And and suddenly in Europe as well. You do have classes on was cool by statistics when, when I qualified, which was in the early nineties, but it's probably something house is kind of cool now, but they teach you how to read a paper how to read the materials and methods. And the important thing is, is whether the actual opening statement of what they're trying to prove is, is actually matches the conclusion which commonly doesn't, and there's a reason for that, and often, somebody's MSE project and their project even worse. And they sit down and have an idea of what they wanna prove and. It's so true spent two three is trying to do it, and it doesn't actually work out, so they have to make something of that two three years with time. So they come up with a conclusion that doesn't actually match hypothesis beginning just so they get a paper out of it, and that she passed their SEO MS oh, will deal whatever the problem comes when we as dentists, try and read it because the materials and methods and that was what they did. And the experiment is obviously not designed around the around the conclusion, they came up with. And we, we extrapolate from that, that becomes a problem. So in Europe, something in the UK because there's a thing about evidence based, dentistry EBD's in, in the UK, we're actually by statistics as undergraduates, and she think that's really valuable. So basically when, when I when I present in the UK because obviously, I started presenting the UK. You have to present what you're talking about with some evidence backing. So you would typically put reference on your slide on your on your legs of slight, and it really depends on the audience to, to how much would go into that reference, if it were in academe ick setting a university. I might talk through the materials methods an how experimental data was gathered of blah, blah, blah. And how the conclusions would gained whereas if I was in a class with more regular guys, you know, regular general bent they might find that a little bit tedious. I might say, well, okay, this, this is the data which supports that. Leave it at that. But there is some elements of research. They're often semi always every single one of my slide has slice. Have at least one reference, some have as many as twenty in the US, I've noticed. It's very different in much as you present your slide, if you will maybe before and after over resin, or a crown or whatever, and you'll evidence is well, this is how I've always done it. And it works out great. I argue that the evidence is will look at the slide. It's awesome, right? Well, this is the interesting thing. Now, if you did that in Europe and this is why a lot of US than to have struggled in Europe, in terms of lecturing the first thing in the QNA would be and is your data to support that at the end, and you wouldn't have any because most people cannot, really pool literature out there head, and that weakens them as presenter in Europe. Whereas. Interestingly, the older, I get, I think, well, okay, is it more? Valid have my slide kind of endorsed by a research paper that house, perhaps twelve patients in it done by a couple of guys. Or is it more? Valid for a guy who's done tens of thousands of procedures of apps twenty years to say, well, this is how I've always done it, and this works out fine. And it's kind of interesting because in terms of, you know, kind of pyramid of evidence and the bottom is what we call on it, which is what you would get in the I, you know, I've been pricing facility is this is how I how I was done. It took him off his five days a week. I do ten cases a day, and this works great that. That would be considered to be the lowest form of evidence. Whereas if you did around him is control split mask, fry, which would be the top form of evidence on ten patients that would be considered to be the highest though. I'm you know originally when I first came to the US, I was a little bit like a this is just not really very well, evidenced based or well-supported a now I'm as I get older. I'm coming around to the opinion, but actually what I think, is the ultimate is to stand there and say, well, this is how I've always done it. I work in an office. I'm actually a real dentist because not every lecture is, and I've done tens of thousands of cases and this works out. Great. And also, here's the research, which proves it. So I think I actually think it's coming from both angles. I think Nizer neither angle is perfect, but used. I think is perfect. So that's kind of what I hope to do my presentations. What's interesting to me that the science? Okay. So I think a lot of clinicians in. I don't I'm not trying to pick on US clinicians per se. I think people probably do this place. But but I mean like a lot of times scientists brought into the conversation when it supports what you're doing. And if it doesn't then you show the your Endo is gorgeous, or, or your where you've got you've got, you know, five or ten year recalls in you don't have standing on the margins or fill in the blank. Right. Like like the reality is that in that, that is convincing to, to like, it's hard not to be impressed by a lot of stuff like, like I look at. I from what I understood. Okay. So I'm a big fan of John Kadhamy. I've seen him speak a few times. And, and I know that the ended honest ended on might hate him a little bit because I think he picks on the end literature is being a little bit not willing as, as bulletproof as, as we'd like to believe in, and I think that's sure any I'm not sure any Latrobe. Exactly. Exactly. That's, that's one of the problems. The thing is it's funny because you're gonna attack it from both sides for stuff like okay. So a lot of what a lot of what dentists do is not very scientific. It's not very evidence based in frankly, a lot of the lot of stuff is based on what you can market to. I think a lot of cases. I, I mean that's that's somewhat controversial. But I also think everyone kind of knows that a little bit. And so like when you see an advertisement that that sites study. I'm which happens, right? But a lot of times studies are done by the company or the or the, you know, clinically proven, you hear clinically proven. It's also very important, because the timing as well, because, you know, I was teaching a class a month ago on a closure actually, and we were looking at the distance of the slide from Siasi in relation to Pemex minutes. Custom custom position. I had a table of distances. And there were actually three different numbers from those, and there will different interesting. Yeah. But Pete Wilson has quite a good thing, which is if you quote me, date me. Yeah. Yeah. Which I think is very smart because what he's saying is research is kind of label kind of slightly unstable, and it moves with the times, and, you know what, his, what his opinion was, you know, two years ago pops isn't what is opinion is ten years ago. In Papp's change is up to this year. I think. Think that's an I that is a real on. It's actually a very mature at chewed. I think because it, it, it says, I have the ability to change my mind. And I've changed my mind on this date. And this is my new feeling about something rather than being somebody who's very rigid and stuck in the mud and ends up teaching the same things from city is ago, because, you know, times, change everything. Scientists directing that way too. That's what it's about exactly. You know, so from Dawson, picking those, and it took me you know, because I gave the class a month ago, but. It, it strikes me that if you as a present, then you can dig through literature and find something that supports your point of view, even though, you'll point of view might be wrong. So it's really actually important, you know, and I'm doing this, with my own presentations, but moment, twitchy, look at your presentations, and really, look, if the literature in your presentations, as supports your argument, I'm be that literature is actually current. Because oftentimes, you know, I've been sending fifteen years now and I look at some oldest lies and I'm like, oh my God, that's a little bit out today. I might need to just, you know, find Choon that bit. Yeah, I'm gonna tell you that, like cherry picking data's like super easy because anyone with Google anyone with anyone with some high speed internet. Can go to PubMed in, in search something, and the other thing here's this is the United States were notorious for this. Let's say you went to school like I did that really didn't didn't teach you super well on how to how to do the literature, but you're like, look, I wanna be science-based all of a sudden you start feeling pretty good about yourself because you go to PubMed you look stuff up. But here's the thing you don't have. Access to the actual research. You have access to whatever whatever they whatever PubMed showing the I mean, puppet show, some full papers, but not very much in. So the reality is reading your reading the conclusion and in the conclusion in the abstract. Yeah. The abstract fair enough. I notice this on, on often on social media arguments, maybe dente town, maybe Facebook when people arguing the toss about a sentence fact, and then maybe sixty seconds to a minute latest somebody will post a reference. And that references often which was their argument and that references often on page one or two of either Google Scholar PubMed, of course it is. Because that's where I found it. And I only yeah, the first the first one that I found I gotta get it up there fast. Right. Yes. So what, what that person is done is like going just typed in their argument into PubMed scholar and scan through, you know, very impairs until they found one that supports their argument was pissed their gimmick. And then posted that as evidence that the correct, what that puts them often use would often very carefully because this doesn't apply to anybody. Everybody put that person's often just read the abstract this applies to lecturers as well. Now, if you take that paper you may look at the hypothesis, the materials and method and the final conclusion, you might find that you know that paper is frankly, just complete boche. But if you, if you look at the abstract, it kind of says, what you wanted to say, but, but the evidence doesn't really stack up. So I think you know, it's not only important to read the papers, especially important to have an understanding of how scientific method is put together, whether what the papers thing is actually correct, who whether the, you know, the conclusion. Is is. Is matches matches up with with with reality? I was in the first by with reality. I mean like the site close ability is important, because here's the thing, there's a ton of papers that are published that, that have have materials, and methods have data collection have a conclusion that, that all lines up. They all can be. They all can be congruent with each other. Yet, this, the plausibility, like, the, their take on reality. Just like like you look at a lot of anti vaccination type literature, you like there's a literature base for anti vaccine, that, that I mean, if you looked at the, they're put together. But but Goethals dental. Yeah. If we go dental, I mean, the classic is from my end is bonding agent. You know, you, you, you buy a bonding agent and usually before you buy new, bonding agent he make it a leaflet from the manufacturer little Brocha. And there's always this always bounding agents really boring stuff. But there's always lose data. Right. All why that daunting? It's the best usually bum Spence. And it turns out that every single bonding agent from every different. Manufacturer is scientifically proven to be the best now that works. I how can that would well basically they've selectively chosen literature? That's an unsung manufactures use independent data another manufacturers use their own data which introduces even more problems. And then you flip into a really big problem area, which is where dentists get this recommendations from trade, representative's home unle. You know, I get this a lot in classes, they I say to, you know, sometimes pay a dentist or a delegate will say to me. Oh, I'm having this problem. I'm getting sensitivity. I'm getting white lying's, whatever in my resins on the first thing I'll ask. Is a which bonding Asian, which compass as using and be totally specifically what, what stages use an, an how you do each stage because obviously, there's an issue, one of the stages, which is causing this problem. And then the dentist will uncommonly say, well use this bonding agent because my Representative my local Representative of the company, I bought it from said that all the day to stacks up and my next question to the mood, be will. Did you read the data? No. So we've kinda reached a point in dentistry. Where were. We're really supposed to be scientists, and where where where where kind of taking scientific data from guys who not really scientist assignment and, and not really interpreting it in the right way. I mean, that's an extreme example. It is translates. It it's something that everybody can understand. I don't subtle on a subtle level. You often given that from from electric podium. But if there's a veneer veneer of science science, over stuff, that's usually noth- for most dentists to say, okay, this is real because in, especially in the United States, and I'd love listeners to tell me that Ono media wrong. We had a really good background in, in, in how to read the literature and stuff. I did not in, if I did I wasn't paying attention. But I we didn't, you know, the reality is, we didn't I, I suspect most, they're trying to cover so much stuff. That's, that's a hard thing to cover more than that. And the United States. If I wanted to read the actual literature from from. Journal whatever journal, I don't have access to that unless I pay for it specifically. I mean like journal journal journals are expensive to subscribe to especially if you wanna really have a good take on the literary. And I would love it. If listeners is, oh, hey, I've got a solution for you can do this. But I haven't run into that yet. Now I'm curious is that is that the way that it is in the UK. Or do you feel like you have better access to to the literature? I don't think I think we have to some degree a similar problem in the UK and the basically dentist pops don't read as much scientists pops. They should because you know, families busy lifestyle. Run them up lie. You know, life gets in the way. But I think if you wanted to it's reasonably easy in the UK to relay tranship. Because if you're a member of, you know, for example, real colleges surgeon, so something like that you'll membership of that an a penny lodge number of dentists members of these kind of organisations. You would get a kind of an access code so you can access free online med line and things like this, the ADA membership, not give you anything like that. Oh, I you know, I think that I think that it does to some extent, but I've never been able to figure out quite how to do it. I'm eight-member. I should probably dig into this. Like, like, here's the thing, it's almost I'm probably the perfect example. I know that it's important that I'm paying attention to this, but I haven't made the time I haven't made the time to figure it out. And, and I I'm not and I'm not sure like because the other thing is I don't know. I'm not sure it almost seems like that knowledge is sort of privilege knowledge. It shouldn't it shouldn't be it really shouldn't be privileged knowledge one way or the other. Now, whether that's I should have relationship with the university that I graduated from or whatever where I've got an actual connection to this. But I think I think that this isn't something talked about very much because I think we're like you said, we're too busy running are practicing living our lives. So I think it's all real. Real money, paying the mortgage, and blah, blah, blah. I think the other thing is well, you can go crazy with the data that to come at this from a completely different angle. I don't wanna listen to think I'm some sort of full on science nutsy. But if you if you go and see a guy who's maybe showing you a good example would be maybe punishing resin, and they polish resin innocent way. An and they start off with something that's quite dull, and they end up with something with imputable, polish and the guy says, well, I've been doing that for twenty years, and it works out. Well, and it looks good in the office. Maybe two three five years later, D you need scientific data to back that up when you just watched the person with your own eyes. I think probably don't to be on it. Maybe techniques would be similar of implant guys guys like that. But on the flip, if you would go and buy a classic example would be going by you. Bonding agent. Perhaps for guys who play implants, switch implant companies, you might wanna see some dates on that maybe because it's a slightly different thing, you, do you follow me. I totally do. Interestingly, the, the difference might even. Yeah, yeah. Exactly measure that the polish is, is good. Because the guys doing it this way with my eyes and then your own. I exactly. But on the other hand, is the assumption that okay? If I'm seeing that does that mean that I'm qualified to say that. That's the right thing that might be where you look if a science, but the reality is yet you can see that you can see as a human being jerks. You're not a dentist conceded, something's quite well, polished, it's not. So I think, you know, we can we're also guilty as dentistry mix of science and as we will we can, go the complete opposite end of the spectrum kind of over science things when all capital, so that everything has to have everything has to have a science base, which is a little bit like a lot of Endo, and somebody somebo Sadun ticks has that level. Whereas restorative, perhaps quite so much. And you can end up all about silly signs things. If you don't careful funny like CBC technology. I'm going to go back to Kadhamy me, this is my favorite things ever. Now, this is a guy who understands the science. Well, and I think he understands the limitations of the sciences, well as anyone, and he talked about, you know, he literally is, is one of the guys who helped write the software for CBC tea companies. He understands how it works. But he says, you know it's amazing how Endo in Endo, you take a CBC tea and all the sudden you go from you go from perfectly ended on healthy to pathology because you can see stuff on T that you couldn't on radiographs. So at what point is what you're seeing on that CBC t of Endo treatment at what point is that a cult pathology versus something that needs to did? And I mean, I think there's a lot of people who like to place implants who look at who can look at a c t and say that is failing. It needs to be replaced when the reality is like, is that so, so I think, I think, we're, we're sort of looking at it from two different aspects like. In some ways, we really almost ignore the science for our clinical for for clinical outcomes versus versus in some cases. We can we lean on science to, to look at clinical outcomes that are that are not important. It can kind of go both ways basically. Yep. I feel like I feel like there's, there's a lot there and I think that, that it's important to realize that it can go both ways. It's important to realize that when, when people are talking about science that it, I think it'd be great, if we all had a little better understanding on how to how to understand the science of stuff. But also, I don't know I feel like I feel like there's a happy medium in there somewhere. I think I think is an undergraduate dentist. It's very important to have some teaching on, let me call it how to read a paper because then, you know, you're sitting in your office, as a practice ONA, the Representative from whatever company comes in and says you wanna try new. I'm going to bonding agent has kinda my thing. I do want to try this new resin. Do you wanna try agent? You go. Yeah. Now as a practice on an office ONA that there are a number of questions, you're going to ask. First one, probably is how much is it because we will price dependent the next one is going to be, what's his bomb strength, probably. How does it take to apply? How many buffaloes do I have to? And then, then the next one is using what's strength from dentists and the Representative will come up with a number, and you'll go uh-huh. And. Question there is, like, what are you comparing it to, and why have you accepted that person's opinion as to what that number is my question you know, as consumers events would be like. Yeah. Can you show me how you came at number? And then the, the Representative picking on representatives here. It's just a reasonable today scenario the Representative will probably give you a brochure with some references in it. Now, I think the dentist should after completing that DDS with the MD whatever they've done have the ability to pick up that paper and say, okay, this is the well-structured well-thought-out paper with a hypothesis, the beginning matches the conclusion at the end and the materials and methods to get the have been reasonable, so okay. I accept this guy's opinion that the bond strengths with this. So ago I will go and buy this material. Conversely, and this is probably more common. They could look at the paper and say, well, actually this evidence, doesn't really stack up and this guy's selling me a crock. So actually, I won't go buy this product will use this product because a, it's not going to be good for my office, generally because it's not gonna be good for my patience because the thing's gonna fall apart and short order. And I think we have a responsibility as professionals to be able to do that. And if that's not being too and dental schools, and that to me is a problem because. Yes, fine postgraduate degrees, it should be taught. But you need the ability to be able to look at a paper today life, you know, it's just it's just being able to analyze evidence and see if you know, specs up that's a big deal. That's a huge deal. I grid it is a big deal. You know, you can it power is wrong term 'cause it's kind of a negative but it gives you a power. You know, if you're sitting in a lecture and lecturers presenting something to you, you can ask sensible question you can say, well, you know about this paper what, what was your sample size? What, what kind of methods did you use? You know what were the results? How did you analyze the results and unless he can do that? That you just kinda have to take their opinion on jumping to it doesn't make you a weak person, but it makes you very vulnerable to being sold stuff, and all of a sudden, you're, you're, you're taking up a lecture at their personality, or they're or they're. Yeah. They're like, don't, don't pens, how if the techno music and the lectures, great, by the product, this subject, there's a lot of subjective things that Elektra can can portray that are hard to judge. Whereas, you know, the, the realities if you if you understand the science, they're talking about, and you can actually be judge out with the lectures is throwing. I do agree about that. Yeah. For sure and not just lectures, you know, in advertisements for buying products in, in dealing today with representatives for buying products, you know, because prog so big overhead. Oh, yeah. And unless you can unless you can look and say, okay. Am I buying my buying the right implant, not my thing? But my buying the right implant with the right. Sieff. Is on my buying the right wanting Asian, my buying the right resin may not have to be the most expensive, but it may be one that has a good science backing, it's going to be better for your office. Long-term. I agree. Hey jason. This is really cool. This is this is been exactly what I was hoping it would be our thoughts. My thoughts on the podcast is that will, we'll try an aim for around a half an hour or so we're a little over that now. But the reality is, I think will keep it a relatively focused. Focus topic half out. Exactly. So listeners are enjoying this in have thoughts about what we should talk about. We love to hear that too. I've got I got a list of things that I wanna throw a Jason for topics anyhow to start with. But, like I love the idea of kind of a single topic and sort of dissecting it for half an hour. Jason was a blast. I really appreciate. I think there's going to be great. Thank you very much.

United States UK Dr Jason Smith Europe Representative scientist Dennis Dennis Bruton Chicago Endo Allen Mina differentiations Latrobe university of Minnesota Google Siasi John Kadhamy Facebook