18 Burst results for "Bruce Hoffman"

Islamic State 'Beatles' in court over US hostages' deaths

The World

04:18 min | 2 months ago

Islamic State 'Beatles' in court over US hostages' deaths

"Fighters have been charged in U. S Federal Court for the deaths of four American citizens in Syria. Widely reported killings happened six years ago. But it was just today that Alexander Coty and El Shafie L shake were extradited from Iraq to the US so they could stand trial. The world Sharon Jafar has been following the events today for us. What can you tell us? You're in about the charges he's manner facing. Well, Michael with these two men have now being charged the SYRIZA felony offenses unofficial at the Department of Justice today without the charges. Conspiracy to commit hostage taking, resulting in death. Hostage taking, resulting in death. One count for each of the American hostages. James and those Americans Marco are James Foley, Steven Sotloff, Kayla Mueller and Peter Kassig, who were aid workers and journalists in Syria when the Islamic state was operational in the country, and you might remember Marco the gruesome videos off the beheadings that came out at the time. It was really shocking and terrible. Those were horrific videos. What have you heard from the families today? Sharon. I reached out to the family of James Foley, The journalist who was tragically beheaded in Syria on the representative for the family told me that they are inundated with media requests today, but they have put out a statement saying that they welcome these charges on the fact that these men are facing justice in American court. It's been six years since these American citizens were killed in Syria. Why did it take so long to bring these men to the U. S? Well, First of all, it was very difficult to find and capture. These men remember, Syria was in the middle ofthe war. It still is. And these men were captured by Kurdish forces in northern Syria in 2018, and then since then, they've been transferred to Iraq and they were held in U. S military custody in Iraq, but the US couldn't just extradite them because they are British citizens. How did that complicate matters? The British government said it won't cooperate with the U. S. Unless it rules out the possibility of giving these men that death penalty. Here's how Bruce Hoffman, with the Council on Foreign Relations, explained it to me. The United States indicated that if Coty and I'll Shaffi, I'll share Were brought to the United States, They would face the death penalty. Of course, the United Kingdom abolished the death penalty some decades ago. And generally will not extradite persons to other countries where they have the potentiality of facing death. Then what happened? Marko was the attorney General William Board said Fine, We won't seek the death penalty and just hand these guys over and that's how they ended up here in the U. S. Now, I should mention that if convicted, thes men could face life in prison. Sure Intel us more about these two men. Who are they? And what do we know about how they ended up with Isis in Syria? Thes. Two men lived. Invest London and a few years ago, they decided to travel to Syria and join the Islamic state. They ended up being part of a group of four men, all from the UK who allegedly kidnapped, tortured and killed foreigners in Syria. Their captives gave them the nickname the Beatles because they all spoke with British accent. On as to what happened to the other two members of this group. One of them was killed in an air strike in 2015, and another one is in prison in Turkey. So these air two men could these cases serve as precedents for prosecuting more Isis fighters in U. S courts. I had the same question, and I called up Matthew Levitt to get his take his director of the Reinhardt program on counterterrorism at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy. There've been many cases in U. S court involving significant terrorism trials. There has not been a case quite like this. That is involved the kind of brutal not just kidnapping but murder beheading of American citizens. The use of footage from those murders in terrorist propaganda of the type that has been seen around the world. Michael Levitt also pointed out that this required a lot of cooperation between different countries. And it just goes to show just how important these corporations are to bringing Islamic state criminals to justice.

Syria Alexander Coty United States Sharon Jafar Iraq James Foley Michael Levitt U. S U. S Federal Court United Kingdom Department Of Justice El Shafie L Bruce Hoffman American Court Council On Foreign Relations Matthew Levitt Intel British Government Beatles Turkey
"bruce hoffman" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

02:57 min | 6 months ago

"bruce hoffman" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"It's the Catharsis violence that all of a sudden your own frustrations, being given an altruistic veneer that you can strike out. You can also be a vanguard. You can be a champion of whomever you consider your. Your like minded peers or your constituency to be, and unfortunately we see that involves either in a place like the United States. We get firearms or United to resort to firearms, machetes, knives, or even vehicles have been used to attack people in some cases to kill. So how should government go about trying to defuse? Prevent mitigate these sort of attacks. We talked earlier that the nature of these more morpheus groups create challenges for the. The government, because the variety of techniques, we developed in the wake of September eleventh to track money and things like that. Don't actually apply here, and you have this morpheus grouping new communication suing scripted. APPS and we can say that right now. None of these attack says produced death on the scale. We saw September eleventh, but then again before September eleventh knowing intimidated that a terrorist group would be able to produce that much. For essentially relatively small investment, if I can put it in those terms so I don't want to downplay what these groups may be capable of. But how does the government intelligently think about how to deal with this challenge I think it's more challenging now than ever. Because, of course we all want to believe that we've turned a corner in the war on terrorism I mean we've been told repeatedly from the president and others that Al Qaeda is defeated Secretary of state. State very recently issued a statement that effect that the threat from Isis receded, and there is very much an inclination to say that we've won the war on terror to go back to business as usual, I think what the covid nineteen pandemic, and now the the tragic killing of George Floyd. Showing us, is that business as usual? Just it's going to take some time to ever get back to an unfortunately there elements in our society and societies elsewhere that are. Are committed to deepening the divisions and polarization that already exists so I think first and foremost that law enforcement and intelligence half to understand that actually the way we've studied terrorism for several decades now is becoming outmoded. We can't just look at organizations and groups in a hierarchical leadership because they don't exist, and that's what we've been so effective in neutralizing, so we have to understand the dynamics of these new movements, and indeed the role that social media plays I. I think that a lot of this entails a shift in our intelligence capabilities. Until recently the National Counterterrorism Center the NC. TC was focused almost exclusively on external threats. It is now turning very quietly to studying internal wants not least because the distinction between domestic and international terrorism's eroding I talked earlier about this group. The base that's active in the united. States is an American citizen who its leader based in Saint, Petersburg Russia. This is not at all uncommon whichever. Whichever the group's army. Antique is also an international movement as well I mean..

government United States Isis receded National Counterterrorism Cent George Floyd TC president Saint Russia NC
"bruce hoffman" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"bruce hoffman" Discussed on WTMA

"I'm john batchelor this is the john batchelor show bruce hoffman's new book is anonymous soldiers this is the struggle for israel nineteen seventeen to nineteen forty seven what we're looking at here by bruce hoffman what we're looking at here is the rising of the good the most effective of all of the jewish jewish underground the hebrew underground the goodness headed by bacon and it's making decisions with the x committee that are controversial right at the edge of being self defeating at least in terms of the reporting that's going on in the wider world in new york and london and throughout europe we come now to the decision to attack and do attacks spectacularly why do they choose the king david hotel bruce well it wasn't just an ordinary hotel in fact the majority of the hotel have been taken over not only by the british government administering palestine but also by the british army was british military headquarters for both palestine and for what is today jordan and also all the british intelligence agencies both civilian and military had their offices at the hotel so it was seen by begging in the your gun is a bona feeding military target i think the the problem that the british didn't quite understand is that they wanted to maintain this veneer of normality that they're not threatened that they're not cowed by terrorism so that while most of the hotel have been taken over by the government the military they kept it open though to the public so the public there were small amount of rooms they could still rent but mostly it was.

john batchelor bruce hoffman bacon new york london british government palestine british army jordan israel europe king david hotel
"bruce hoffman" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"bruce hoffman" Discussed on WTMA

"I'm john batchelor this is the john batchelor show bruce hoffman spoke is anonymous soldier soldiers the struggle for israel nineteen seventeen to nineteen forty seven and the anonymous soldier now is very well known former prime minister and hero of the state of israel menachem bagan in december first nineteen fortythree at thirty years old he becomes head of the organ the stern gang has reorganized itself and is a sidebar they've renamed themselves the li li high however the irgun is what bagan will use to fight the british right away he's going to war and he's going to war despite the protests of ben gurion and the founders the jewish agency the people who are looking for a state of israel bruce my sense of bagan is that he didn't wait he was a man in a hurry and did he not believe the british is that because he had a vision that everybody else didn't have well i mean don't forget by nineteen nineteen thirty nineteen forty three rather than the beginning of nineteen forty four when he's taking command the tide of war is really shifted i mean the germans have been defeated in north africa the germans have been defeated at stalingrad everyone knows it's only a matter of months before the allied invasion of of western europe begins and he decides you know we can't wait any longer jews are being slaughtered in europe we've got to open up the gates to palestine and his decision is the correct one because as we move through into forty four and he's in charge he is going to attack the british apparatus my note here says brucie attacks the immigration office and the taxation and finance office the stern group by the way is also operating the fighters for freedom of israel lehi but mcmichael the man's supervising all of this declares war on the.

john batchelor bruce hoffman prime minister israel menachem bagan irgun ben gurion europe israel north africa stalingrad palestine brucie thirty years
"bruce hoffman" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"bruce hoffman" Discussed on WTMA

"This is the john batchelor show bruce hoffman his new book is anonymous soldiers which is the struggle for palestine the struggle for israel the struggle for the state of israel nineteen seventeen to nineteen forty seven the world war begins in september of nineteen thirty nine that changes a lot for the mvp of the haganah of the jewish agency of the players who've seen that moderation is a success and those players who see that violence is necessary the surprise to me in your book bruce is that the war underlines the possibility that the jews will fight harder against the british and we're the british ready for this that the that there will soon be players the stern gang of abraham stern in his breakaway group that attack them as if they were the nazis no not really the british assumption was that faced with the greater menace to judaism posed by hitler and nazi germany is that the jews would fall into line which fight alongside the british the british war quite cynical and knowledgeable that you know this would happen and they said well that's fine they expect they'll be given a state but they expect that that will be their reward but we're not going to give it to them and they expect actually the jews to to to to basically fight alongside them and not give them any trouble but stern exactly for the reason we discussed a few minutes ago as a student of the irish rebellion especially the nineteen sixteen easter uprising he says what are you talking about the jewish community basically follows exactly the british script declares a truce the air good suspense offensive operations says they will fight alongside britain against the nazis and stern says and of course the hug it on the mainstream moderate jewish forces do the same and stern says wait a second you know now's the time to revolt now's exactly the time to ratchet up the terrorism because britain is preoccupied with the coming war or actually brockton by now with the war in europe it's a replay of nineteen sixteen when britain was preoccupied with the trench warfare in world war one and the irish nationalists rose up and took advantage of this situation so he leaves the.

bruce hoffman mvp hitler britain europe john batchelor israel abraham stern germany
"bruce hoffman" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"bruce hoffman" Discussed on WTMA

"I'm john bachelor this is the john batchelor show it is december nineteen seventeen jerusalem the joffe gate those of you who have been there or those of you who've seen photographs of these moments when the british army takes control of the old city see a man in the lead walking across the the ground with a horse to his right and that man is general allenby the conquer the success in palestine quite a surprise having having been exiled after his failures on the battlefront in france and belgium that moment begins an epic tragedy the book is anonymous soldiers the struggle for israel nineteen seventeen to nineteen forty seven bruce hoffman is the author bruce is the director of the center for security studies and director of the security studies program at georgetown university as well he has spent a great deal of time probably too much for his family's temperament studying the papers that are now available from the british point of view the mandate especially the c i d the criminal investigation division to look again look fresh at the development of radical resistance to governance revolutionary conduct that both creates a new state the state of israel nineteen forty eight and creates the conditions that lead us to understand now that the middle east is a complicated tangle of demands and desires and crimes doubts and regrets but we begin with allenby bruce congratulations and good evening general allenby walking through the jaffa gate what was he looking to establish what did he believe his mission was given the arabs and the jews and the chris questions president in the old city good evening to good evening it's delight i'm delighted to be with you i think that he had the expectation of bringing all the peoples of palestine together because what was significant to see walk through the gate and actually want us to say a lot of things certainly changed in the middle east but some things stay the same the.

british army france bruce hoffman bruce director georgetown university president middle east john batchelor palestine belgium israel chris
"bruce hoffman" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"bruce hoffman" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"I think africa is really wear particularly in west africa and north africa where we can make the most progress and we're sometimes to the consequences in the stakes are the largest i mean after all north africa's just across the mediterranean from europe in terms of the threat or the force projection that terrorist groups should they become even more entrenched north african the sil could have in europe makes european cooperation much more important and i think one of the really problematical aspects of counterterrorism today is that a very powerful alliance like nato is not doing as much as it could be doing this is exactly a statement that the former secretary general just full rasmussen said last may profound frustration after the attack against a concert in manchester england that killed targeted in particular young girls and their parents he expressed frustration i mean the attack was perpetrated by isis cell based in benghazi in libya and he said nato should be doing more to stabilize these countries to provide the training to restrict the threats to regional threats thing can be countered more effectively but we don't see this happening again we see rather much more of a piecemeal approach to countering terror internationally than at any time since the war on terrorism began almost seventeen years ago part of what i think i'm hearing you saying correct me if i'm wrong is that we need to do more in places like the suhel to beef up the capacity of governments to be able to enforce their own borders enlisted ms or allies in this battle against terrorists that to a lot of people sons lot like nation building or maybe more accurately statebuilding which a lot of americans i think including the president united states are deeply skeptical of how do we square the circle well of course over the years we've had special operations forces that have operated i think affectively to train local forces i think the times when they've strayed into actual combat operations such as occurred in niger for instance last fall the american public has been taken by surprise i think we need to have very strict rules of engagement but we have to understand as i think the president in the current.

mediterranean nato rasmussen benghazi libya president niger africa west africa north africa europe manchester united states seventeen years
"bruce hoffman" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"bruce hoffman" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"There were maybe five to ten thousand we're talking about at least three times that number now at in that may be conservative in other words of the forty thousand or so foreign fighters that we know went to the islamic state about seven thousand are believed to being killed and roughly half of the thirty thousand or so survivors completely accountable we don't know where they are to know who they're in some cases we do but in many cases what happened is isis asked for their passports so there's lots of false documentation has lots of legitimate passports that circulate around so in some instances we have an idea who they are but in you know in other instance they've just disappeared in many respects to this point been talking about terrorist groups on the assumption there nonstate actors operating on their own to what extent are states consciously or unconsciously supporting driving and helping terrorist groups this is exactly another issue where we thought we turned the corner that the arab state sponsor terrorism had firstly entered ended with the demise of the soviet union and the collapse of the communist bloc that didn't appear to be the case we then thought it ended with the overthrow of kaddafi for example and of and of saddam hussein in iraq but what we're seeing is that after a period of a bay it's again emerged certainly iranian sponsorship of a variety of terrorist and militant organizations and popular militias in lebanon and syria in the gulf and elsewhere so here we're talking groups like hezbollah has on particular butts and it's it's innumerable variance let's say many countries they're their carbon copies of if his below and also these particularly places like iraq and syria these large.

soviet union saddam hussein iraq lebanon hezbollah syria
"bruce hoffman" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"bruce hoffman" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"In kurdish forces being redeployed to resist the turks which is create an opening in the u frady's river valley which is now in 'gendering a revival of isis terrorism and guerrilla tax specially in the maya dean area city that was liberated some months ago we see the same thing happening in iraq around kirkuk there's been an upsurge in isis terrorist and guerrilla attacks particularly against government forces so where they have in being completely eliminated they've been able to regroup and reorganize and to carry on the struggle now partly that's a reflection of diversion of international or regional interests but that's the thing about terrorist groups as their consummate survivors and to be survey consummate survivors have to be opportunists they have to recognize and take advantage of opportunities to enhance their survival and unfortunately both al qaeda and now isis her showing that they're rather more expert at that than we imagined they once were salou word seems to be persistent exactly let me ask you about a concern i've seen talked about a lot in the press certainly mung some policymakers that with the defeat of the slavic state that we're likely to see is the return of foreign fighters to their home countries and we're going to see in upsurge or upswing and terrorism in in europe and potentially in the united states is is that the right way to think about this issue is the foreign fighter returning home problem exaggerated no i don't think the foreign fighter returning home problem or migrating to other conflicts is at all zatarain migrate weaned migrating other conflicts well they don't have to come back to their home or even their host countries they can find some new conflict somewhere when you've got almost two dozen alqaeda franchises sixteen or so isis franchises what that suggests is this plenty of battlefields that they can travel to sition to say goodbye to syria and say hello to molly precisely or to europe or to east africa really there's you know there's a wide choice and i think what makes people very concerned as we saw this happened decades ago in the aftermath of the mujahedeen struggle against the soviet occupation of afghanistan the wandering mujahedeen became a phenomenon the nineteen nineties when these people turned up in bosnia for example when they turned up in the caucasus when they turned up in south asia to carry on struggles that we thought had ended now.

river valley europe united states syria bosnia caucasus south asia iraq kirkuk sition molly east africa afghanistan
"bruce hoffman" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"bruce hoffman" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"How long this fifth phase needs to last so we're stuck in the fifth phase or zohari sees himself stuck in the fifth phase i should say the six phase was when the west in the united states begins to weaken to lose interest in prosecuting the war on terrorism when all the franchises join together into creating this powerful holistic force and that leads the seventh phase which is the final confrontation where wall hurry in where l qaeda's acolytes believe they will inevitably triumph over the west now that's completely divorced from reality but it does though dovid their blueprint it's their blueprint does dovetail with their belief that the longer they can continue the struggle despite all odds the more likely it is that they will eventually be victorious cave we'd talked about al qaeda in some of the kite inspired franchises al qaeda and arabian peninsula you talked about groups in kashmir being organized any other significant el al qaeda franchises out there alshabaab in east africa in somalia in particular which is like like the parent organization or the mothership has demonstrated a remarkable resiliency several times we've written off alshabaab said we've defeated it but it sort of rises from the grave to carry on its struggling now has seven to nine thousand fighters kyd in these lama mahgreb has been very successful not only surviving in libya specially to an extent algieria but pushing further south would into the saw hell to mali mauritania and other countries there then of course al qaeda has very close alliances with other terrorist groups such as the taliban for example that are not in the al qaeda fall but to the extent these days it's believed that together alqaeda and the taliban control about roughly half of afghanistan which is remarkable statement given that operation enduring freedom that was designed to liberate afghantistan to expunge both.

united states l qaeda kashmir somalia libya mauritania taliban zohari africa alshabaab afghanistan
"bruce hoffman" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"bruce hoffman" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"That are using violence and spectacular ways to show that no they are the through the cutting edge of terrorism very patiently cultivate and encourage its franchises and help strengthen them across west north east africa for example create new franchises such as the one that was proclaimed this past summer that would focus on the liberation of kashmir sees on hot button issues like that that of long been the fault line dividing alqaeda from the west or from islam stated enemies like india and appear to be relevant but stick to what is what i would argue is a seven stage plan that was presented to be lot in two thousand and five and we're probably about the fifth stage of it ended here that plan and very slowly impatiently patiently take advantage of the preoccupation with isis wall the united states in the west alqaeda hopes becomes militarily exhausted as deep divisions created within pol parties about the prosecution of the war on terrorism as various groups within countries or or demonized or victimized as being particular threats that creates all sorts of fissures in those aside he's and hope and pray as all terrace have throughout history that a strategy of trish in over the long term will prove to be the most effective one and that's what i'm convinced zoa hurry is that hearing too so we're we on usually we're at number five what would step six seventy well it's interesting the stage five which was meant to last from twenty thirteen to twenty sixteen entailed the declaration of the caliphate basically abu bacher all upstaged precisely the founder and leader of isis stole their lunch and did it and that's i think that i think informs us why dadi was in such a rush in june twenty fourteen to declare the caliphate because he wanted to steal a march on alqaeda now it didn't last than qaeda's reassessed how.

kashmir india united states trish founder alqaeda east africa qaeda
"bruce hoffman" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"bruce hoffman" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"His audio tapes or anything like that not to us in the west and not to the united states is enemy but certainly to guide is followers particularly in syria he's intervened many times calling for unity calling for everyone to rally around cod as leadership and this is the kinds of day to day hassles as it ward that i think preoccupied him more than being able to attack the foreign me at the moment and so right now he still has a moratorium on a tax against the west any suspicion as to win that might change a few times in the past years alqaeda's actually broken that moratorium the january twenty fifteen attack on the charlie hebdo this tirico french newspaper in paris last year in two thousand seventeen there was an attack on the saint petersburg metro in russia so this demonstrates that kinda still has that capability and i think that's precisely the problem is that as long as al qaeda's still alive abi it in a completely diminished and degraded form than it was a decade ago oh but as long as it's still alive it is basically pinning its faiths and hopes on or a viable that will enable it to carry out some spectacular terrorist operation that will once again catapulted back into the limelight and make it again relevant threatening refresh the charlie hebdo attack was that directed from call l qaeda headquarters or was it a case of followers you're inspired by the qaeda message somewhere in between it was actually directed by all cod and the rabi peninsula at the time really elk foremost franchise but one that was operating largely independent from day to day orders from alzawawi hurry but certainly conforming to his overall strategic guidance so how does al qaeda in this situation which it's limited its ability to conduct spectacular terrorist attacks like nine eleven maintain its appeal in what i take it from your conversation is a competitive marketplace of other upstart groups use those terms.

united states syria paris russia rabi peninsula alqaeda saint petersburg charlie hebdo l qaeda qaeda
"bruce hoffman" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"bruce hoffman" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"Prohibition on external operations against the west in order to buy all of breathing space room to regroup and rebuild then especially this appear to be very prescient and wise move as isis began its rampage in its barbarity al qaeda then could step back portray itself as quote unquote moderate extremists is a more palatable and acceptable alternative continue to rebuild its strength precisely as we became completely engrossed with isis so that's one i think dimension of this that's why kind has been quite it's delivered policy a second dimension admittedly is a reflection i would say of al qaeda's own challenges and that's the governance it has been trying to achieve in places like syria not all that successfully like yemen much more unevenly where it's tempted because of the challenge impart from these lomb state from its caliphate for all qaeda itself to also exercise some form of governance and sovereignty and it's always bumped up against its inability to transition from abon of terrorist organization committing violence and mayhem to be able to govern to provide the public of its populace that's under its control with services and goods i mean as we've seen in the new york times recent account of isis caliphate that this was a highly effective very well organized and well wrong loved records precisely and was very efficient that's why it had the records that could take action in this was unfortunately one of its straits al qaeda now has been challenged by isis to be much more like that but has found itself in a lot of hot water trying to make that sort of just ment and therefore a lot of its attention is consumed with internecine strife between its allies in various places and with attempting to extend its governance and not be a terrorist group and it hasn't been able to really affect that transition now we haven't heard from zoe hairy recently no message.

syria yemen zoe hairy new york times
"bruce hoffman" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"bruce hoffman" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"And that is separate from alqaeda but the problem with that group is it's taken a leaf exactly from all qaeda's playbook in recent years is it was battered is it was weakened in degraded it to cultivated franchises so it has a roughly sixteen or so franchises throughout the world that similarly ensures its longevity even despite the loss of the caliphate okay so we have three perhaps four sets are you have qaeda al qaeda's affiliates you have isis or the slavic state and then you have groups affiliated with the islamic state sort of walk me through the first set with alqaeda what is the in your sense the sort of the the capacity the capability of alqaeda we furred very little about elkhadr very little about mrs our harry who have disappeared shortly after september eleventh and i'm going to believe to be somewhere in south asia by which i think we're talking pakistan afghanistan perhaps so what is what is the threat that alqaeda presents right now is it more mostly nydia logical one because it can use the internet to reach people in proselytized as it actually have capability what's the nature of the threat well it certainly still in idiological threat i would argue it's more than that also strategic one in the sense that i'll cod is grappling with two challenges one is and has been the challenge from isis which has become really the number one brand but also eclipsed in a sense exactly it's a clip style cod in terms of attention in terms of preoccupying lot of our military and intelligence assets in terms of elbowing its way into the limelight and pushing cod aside but that's also reflection of strategic choice that i'm also all hurry made an absolutely pivotal one that he made in two thousand thirteen when as isis was escalating and gathering momentum he deliberately put.

qaeda south asia harry pakistan afghanistan alqaeda proselytized
"bruce hoffman" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"bruce hoffman" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"Leadership of this movement after thirty years i wanna be careful make sure i'm following what is it you're saying you keep talking about kinda but you haven't mentioned this law mc stater boko haram or alshabaab variety of other terrorist groups is few alqaeda a sort of umbrella name for all of these or you specifically singling out okuda rather than these other groups well i was specifically talking about the qaeda senior leadership in the core alqaeda which is still based in south asia but unfortunately as migrated to the levant to syrian particular and elsewhere the problem we face now is twofold firstly in order to ensure its longevity over decade ago al qaeda entered into a bargain with its franchises in other words it ceded do you mean franchises groups that were affiliated with al qaeda that in fact swore allegiance to osama bin laden and then subsequently renewed that allegiance that bayat i'm also all hurry of bin laden's successor but these are all groups that kite did not create itself these are groups that hitch their fortunes to all star whether it was rising or falling and the problem is that al qaeda entered into a bargain with them and understood very clearly that an order to ensure the survival of the qaeda ideology the cada concept al qaeda as a central organizing principle it had to cede some authority devolve some autonomy to these franchises and that's the problem exists now both providing overall strategic guidance but leaving these franchises in essence to carry on as their own so that's a problem we have now is that i'll cada has about two dozen or so franchises or so around the world that's about three times the number it had a decade ago and that insures that survival secondly the other big problem is that al qaeda because this movement is rather loose spawned an offshoot that became a radical splinter isis these lomb state in syria and iraq and.

south asia syria qaeda osama bin laden iraq thirty years
"bruce hoffman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"bruce hoffman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Critical milestone in the global fight against isis but he also says are workers far from over rocket is in ruins after the defeat of isis the city was their selfdeclared capital bruce hoffman his author of the book inside terrorism and director of the security studies program at georgetown university he joined just nerves studios professor thanks so much for being with us you're welcome and how big blow is this to us it's a significant setback uh it's certainly is deprived him of the place that was once they're capital but i think the challenges that they're still six to ten thousand isis fighters that control about four thousand square miles of the border between iraq and syria and i think more significantly while we've been hammering isis in iraq and syria it's actually spread there's about 8 isis branches in some eighteen countries throughout the world right now is that the nature of a do we call it a movement group an organization like isis fifty th that in a way the more the more and more fish they are if they're not trying to hold onto territory the more they can threatened to strike over a larger area that is precisely the challenge you have to fight them onto levels you have to fight them conventionally and seize their physical sanctuaries in safe havens you off to the also as to counter their ideology their residents their appeal to attract recruits and i would say that certainly as part of isis is falling starts cash a has been damaged but at the same time we know from isis propaganda which up until the summer was calling on followers would be foreign fighters to come help build a state now they're propaganda has pivoted on helpless us exact revenge and retaliate for the destruction and loss of.

isis bruce hoffman director georgetown university professor iraq syria four thousand square miles
"bruce hoffman" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"bruce hoffman" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"Your alqaeda takes a different approach from islamic state wayne night one woman would i hit in this was the ias leader of the book roebuck 33 years ago in loosely announcing the birth of the caliphate bad idea said alqaeda now we have all just present western militaries with a target to attack which is exactly what happened woah bruce hoffman believes there is another important distinction between alqaeda and is the isis is much more promiscuous is at war with violence alqaeda is much more careful and calibrated in its use of violence isis is outrageousness does become part of its brad that i would argue its embrace of ultra violence these hideous scenes of torture of prisoners in their slow executions since in so on has been very effective and useful for isis to attract a certain calibre of fighter to its ranks as it's a calabro fighter that alqaeda largely issues the sadistic gratuitous violence practiced by is has definitely helped them recruit troubled individuals with criminal records but it's also put off thousands of other potential recruits it's these who al qaeda a no looking to attract sara khan is an expert on extremism and the author of the book the battle for british islam who siro nic of course is that the savagery of crisis actually helps increase the pool and support towards al to pick a semi jihadist were put off by not sabah trim on barrett behavior but we've seen four terror attacks in the nazi months in this country three of them have been committed by islamist extremists so we know this problem that always has been a problem so yes alqaeda are going to call and have continued to call for attacks in the west all of the things that worries western intelligence officials the most is alqaeda's ongoing interest in targeting aviation it's why they refer to its yemen branch alkai during the ridden peninsular as being the most dangerous of all.

bruce hoffman brad sara khan alqaeda al qaeda yemen 33 years
"bruce hoffman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"bruce hoffman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To me he isn't just afraid he's in despair he has five kids and he hasn't worked at three years although muscle was said to be liberated there was still gunfire from a nearby neighbourhood i want to do the von bullet boulevard why do you want to die because you're tired reuss wish you because of the situation he says and he walks away most of the city has been liberated but the people are still struggling to survive chanareth npr news mozell iraq's victory over isis in most so is a big deal but it does not mean the end of isis the group still holds territory it launches attacks around the world and it has a robot just presence online to talk more about the future of isis we are joined by bruce hoffman he's a terrorism expert at georgetown university welcome thank you so how big of a loss is most soul for isis symbolically it's it's a significant loss because only about a year ago isis style to access extending from certain libya across north africa through raka and the levant on muscle and within a year it's now lost two of the three legs of that access so symbolically its import uh obviously not every isis fighter was killed in most saw so what do you think happened to those who survived i think isis had a conscious plan paul precisely for this eventuality and the plan was was was in essence lived to fight another day to revert back to its fundamental dna which was after all as a terrorist kubin surgeon group nar approach of state exercising sovereignty and it's doug.

iraq bruce hoffman libya raka isis reuss npr georgetown university north africa three years