6 Burst results for "Bruce Gallon"

J&J COVID-19 vaccine could get FDA approval within days

Up First

03:45 min | 1 year ago

J&J COVID-19 vaccine could get FDA approval within days

"The fda is getting ready to authorize a third covid vaccine emergency use in this country. This one this vaccine is from pharmaceutical giant. Johnson and johnson. And if it's authorized it would join vaccines from pfizer and madera in the us vaccination campaign. But here's the thing those other. Vaccines require two doses. This vaccine from johnson and johnson needs only one single dose to be effective. Npr science correspondent. Joe palca is here to tell us how effective good morning joe morning. well one dose. that's exciting. How good is this new vaccine. Oh it's good. It was sixty six percent effect of overall in preventing moderate to severe disease and eighty five percent protective against more severe diseases. Now for people with good memories. They'll say wait. A minute i heard that madonna and pfizer wasn't that closer to ninety five percent effective and the answer is yes they were higher but those vaccines were tested before. Some of the new variants began circulating and prevent any five percent of severe critical. Disease is really good since the goal of the vaccines is to keep people out of the hospital and keep them from dying and the other thing about this vaccine is mentioned in the intro is that it's one dose which makes the logistics of getting it to people a lot easier to remember to come back so public. Health officials are looking forward to being able to distribute the j. vaccine. This is how anthony fauci chief medical adviser to the president. Put it on. Nbc's today show to have them come in and be in the mix with the other. Two is is nothing but good news. Nothing but good news. Foul cheat now. The process usually is before a vaccine gets authorized in advisory board has to approve it right. Well yes well. Though he has to is probably an exaggeration. It doesn't absolutely has to. The fda can approve things on its own lookout but like the other two vaccines. The the fda wanted to be extremely transparent. There were some questions about whether they were rushing the vaccine to the market before they knew it was safe and they want to assure the public that this was being looked at carefully so that committee has been around for a while. it's known in the trade as burg. Pack the vaccines and related biological products. Advisory committee i love that name ver- pack made of scientists and doctors with a variety of specialization relating vaccines before the meeting. Fda provides the committee with its analysis and they also make that analysis of the public So i asked. Bruce gallon president of global immunization at sabin vaccine institute. What he made of the analysis of the johnson and johnson vaccine. I didn't see anything in it. That i would think is going to be a show stopper for packed. Wanna recommend that. Fda act on so gallon is predicting the ver- pack will give the vaccine a thumbs up. How many doses. Johnson and johnson have ready to ship out. Well not as many as people had hoped a year ago when started trying to make these vaccines they all said. All we're gonna do this at risk manufacturing which means we're going to start making vaccine before they even knew it was going to be authorized even if it worked. And then they'd throw away if it didn't work and the government gave the money to do this but even with that company's still don't have the kind of inventory. The country needs in the case of johnson. Johnson they have about four million doses ready to go out the door and expect to have twenty million by the end of march and one hundred million by the end of june and remember. This is a one dose vaccine so one hundred million doses is one hundred million people vaccinated which is very big. Deal leslie and briefly. What is the timeline here. When the fda issued the emergency use authorization it could be any minute. I mean they knew it right after the meeting. They could do it tomorrow. That could do it in a few days. It'll be soon. I think if the committee gives a thumbs

Johnson Joe Palca FDA Pfizer Madera Anthony Fauci NPR Bruce Gallon Madonna Sabin Vaccine Institute JOE NBC Advisory Committee United States
"bruce gallon" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"bruce gallon" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Yeah I just think I mean we're in a short season bullpen is so good Olson's amazing champions Amazing Grossman's really growing on me. I just feel like we need one more guy and one more pitcher to really take this thing and I gotta go is great to hear your voice but I can't wait to sneak into a world series game with you holding out as we get closer to the field. Thanks got these. Are. The number to call eight, hundred, eight, seven, eight play. Getting some good calls today by the way I. Mean I don't. I thought my chest advertise this. This is just about the only radio show in existence where you can call me up and talk all you want about the as. I mean, seriously at least one that's not on an APP. You can you say we'll Rick I'm listening to you on an APP, all right. Well, airplay to you. But. You can talk all you want about it. I used to say when I was ninety, five seven before we have the raiders and I was on Sunday as I said, this is your or post game show because you know my old friend, my buddy Bruce Gallon he would go to a restaurant and he'd be there with like the Great Lake Great David Hammer George Atkinson and they'd. Calls for a half hour. I used to say, Hey, Raider fans over here. I'm here for four hours by myself come over here and. You could talk all you want about it. But yeah, you can talk all you want about us. Right here. But yeah, the Astros you know it. The. The crazy thing is that they are so immensely talented and this is why I picked. The Astros win the divisions because because I had to see it with my own eyes I. I couldn't just take the as who lost yet another wildcard game and just say Oh. Yeah. They'll be better than the Astros I was hoping they would be and we're only a quarter of the way through. It with my eyes and this these last three games you know I'm seeing it. And it's a it's a nice thing to see. But you think about Bregman and I'll to the and correal just goes on and on George Springer that's hurting him right now they've got to play that Guy Jack Straw Centerfield. The Astros are so decimated in their pitching staff. How many rookies did they throughout their creative on Friday night looked amazing but. So many rookies they got pitch in and Scott Said who feel sorry for them right now. Nobody outside of probably Galveston County. You Christian Ali not too many people feel sorry for the Astros right now. When we come back, we're going to talk to filmmaker who's a very interesting documentary about the Philippines Armitage? Do that next on Sports Brown. Using an overpriced trash bag. Pricey Pricey Pricey. A bag that breaks we weighty windy, smelly Bag saggy Yankee Stinky you gotta.

Astros raiders Amazing Grossman George Atkinson Rick I Olson Galveston County Sports Brown George Springer Guy Jack Straw Philippines Bruce Gallon Bregman Christian Ali Scott David Hammer
"bruce gallon" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

07:27 min | 2 years ago

"bruce gallon" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"With safety as we pursue these vaccines, I wondered, and I invite any Panelists who wants to respond to this. If you could, um, compare this cove in vaccine pursuit with what many Americans are familiar with, which is the sort of the flu vaccine and may be compared in terms of the way. The research Happens around the flu vaccine. Um, the way that gets administered the extent of uptake of the flu vaccine in the population. What is the confidence level around the flu vaccine? How do you compare that? To what you're seeing in surveys about a potential um, Corona virus vaccine And what are some of the practical dimensions of how We would be, um, distributing a covert vaccine. At the same time, we would be distributing the seasonal flu vaccine. So since that's the That's the frame. A lot of Americans have in terms of a vaccine. It comes at him on a regular basis. I wondered if you could for awesome comparisons and an analogy is there on those various. This's a rear see spread radio programming from Tuesday double UCSB from Washington. I could address that something so the vaccine The big uncertainty has to do with what strain of the dominant coming. You have to make best gases about that. But the knowledge to produce the antibody response once you identified, what training's gonna be predominant is well established. By contrast, in this case, we don't know how effective the antibody response is from the nexus. And it's so there's less sense. More uncertainty around this vaccine after traditions are the seasonal flu efforts the same time the amount of the number of people in the trials is extraordinary that the FDA A lot of information about whether Dr J. Bhattacharya from Stanford Astonished that even more than the population, so I think there is more and more uncertain about the way we know that you know what the virus is What we don't know, but it's like you know what? I think you've asked a critically important question because, as you said, in people's minds, these air similares we write a lot of great influenza pandemic we've heard about this parallels. And we expect this to someone be like like influenza, And that's an important conversation. Because they're our darkest doesn't think you just heard some of those thiss figure that we've all seen about flattening the curve that comes from our work 15 years ago influenza Dr Bruce Callen occurred to keep people out of the way. The healthcare's until the vaccine arrived because we had decades of experience making influence vaccines. We knew we could do it here. We could get there. It was just matching the strain of the pandemic. This is different were flattened the curve to keep people out of the health care system While we're working on a vaccine that we won't know will work. And so I think there's a key difference. You asked no questions we can into distribution. They perilously simultaneous used on and these are all very important questions. I think that We all need to be working on. So there is confusion about these to thank you for I have 45 seconds If someone could just speak to this question of confidence in the public Relative to the flu vaccine, which is the percentage uptake if we get on a seasonal basis of that vaccine out as it relates to people's perception of whether it's risky or not risky or risk involved, and not paying it compared to what you're hearing about their view of the vaccine. Just quickly have a segment of the population. The confidence is not about how well it performs, and we're there's a lot of work has been done to improve the performance of that vaccine and that people don't get it is probably because of that, and not because of any concern to have about a safety program. Thank you, Mr Chairman. I yield back Thank you so much. I really appreciate everybody who participated in today's hearing. Especially the Panelists. Thank you for A grueling session of question and answers on DH. I also want to just include by saying that you know, we all want a vaccine as soon as possible. I think that goes without saying, and we want to expedite the creation of a safe and effective vaccine. But the only way to do that on I think there's relative unanimity on this particular point. As I heard from everyone on this panel is that We should not cut corners of the FDA. Perhaps there might be some efforts to expedite what we do in the manufacturing. Vaccines. Perhaps we think about the economics and the prioritization of delivery of the vaccine Congressman Raja Christian Murthy. All tediously at the creation of such a vaccine, But we must not cut quarters and do anything that would hurt or harm the conclusion that whatever the FDA ended up approving is safe and effective. And so I hope that coming out of this hearing, we proceed based on those To conclusions. Tio made sure that the FDA does its job. Commissioner Han answers our letter that he assures us that he will continue to maintain the independence of the FDA that we will have 30,000 participants at any stage three. Human trials and that the verb pack be engaged fully in the deliberations surrounding a covert 19 vaccine with that, I'd like to thank you all for participating on DH. This session is adjourned. Thank you. Congressman Christian Marty is a Democrat from Illinois and chairs the House Oversight and Reform subcommittee that held today's hearing. Testifying about a safe and effective vaccine, the pursuit of for Corona virus. Dr J. Bhattacharya from Stanford Health Policy Dr Bruce Gallon of the Saving Vaccine Institute after Jesse Goodman from Georgetown University Center on Medical Product Access the truth..

flu vaccine Saving Vaccine Institute FDA Dr J. Bhattacharya influenza Dr Bruce Callen House Oversight and Reform Congressman Raja Christian Mur Congressman Christian Marty Washington Dr Bruce Gallon Commissioner Han Mr Chairman Illinois Tio Jesse Goodman Georgetown University Center Stanford
"bruce gallon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"bruce gallon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Right a big question here when will a vaccine to be ready scientists around the world are working as quickly as they can yeah and some vaccine developers are already testing on humans but even if these initial tests go smoothly we probably won't have a vaccine for widespread distribution for many months still experts are saying that it is important to start planning right now for the day when a vaccine does become available because not everyone is gonna have access to it right away NPR science correspondent Joe Palca has been covering this Joe let's jump right in vaccine developers are getting ready for the day we have a vaccine what are they getting ready for exactly well they're gonna have to think about how you gonna make it I mean let's say a vaccine sales to the testing okay great we've got a but but certainly we need a billion doses where you can't just press a button overnight you have to start the building manufacturing capacity now and the interesting thing is that companies are doing that but some of them know that the vaccine that they're going to be making will never make it to market but they're still going to build these facilities so you have to build capacity and take risks and then we do have a vaccine is it as easy as just given it to everyone yeah it's not obviously I talked to Bruce gallon about that he's head of global immunization at the Sabin vaccine institute and he says that when the vaccine is first available supplies will be limited but demand obviously will be high so how do you manage that well gallon used to work in government and said that when there was the threat of a major flu pandemic they discussed how to prioritize who goes first clearly among the top where healthcare workers and people who provide community services the things that keeps society going there's the security sector whether that's international security or other military and then there's the people who are part of society's critical infrastructure and as we're learning they may not be people who necessarily spring to mind is critical I mean I'm talking about grocery store employees delivery truck drivers stock shelves so then when you think about in health terms you have to think about who is most vulnerable to infection maybe the elderly should get the vaccine first or maybe it's something to decide on who's the sickest so there's a lot of questions to answer including how you pay for this right because it sounds like it's going to be expensive well obviously yes it's going to be very expensive I mean billions and billions and and that may not be the it's such a huge problem for developed countries but what about low resource countries I mean there are questions of equity there are questions of self interest too I mean the virus doesn't know anything about borders and once global travel starts again people can go anywhere in a matter of hours so you could possibly have it re introduced into this country so there's going to have to be discussions about how how you do it how it's paid for who's going to pay for it and how to make sure that everybody in the world gets a chance to get it get their hands on it and receive it.

Fighting Coronavirus with Dr Bruce Gellin

Inside Jaws

04:23 min | 2 years ago

Fighting Coronavirus with Dr Bruce Gellin

"Bruce Gallon welcome to fight in corona virus from American innovations. Sivas great to be with you. Thanks thank you. You're you're our inaugural guest here and we couldn't have a better. I won So many questions to ask you but I thought we'd just start with a question that everybody is asking everyone which is like how are you doing right? I mean I'm right now. I'm in a closet in my apartment in Brooklyn not for corn reasons. Just 'cause the acoustics are better than here but where are you and what is your day to day life like right now so thanks so. I'm at my home in Washington. Dc and a lot of us. We do a lot of work at home but also going to have to do some other things. I think that probably spring cleaning will never be the same because these endless listed chores seem to be multiple. Glad you're getting something productive. That's that's great. I want to turn to vaccines. You're at the Sabin Vaccine Institute. What is the state of play? Do you think now. In terms of Cova Nineteen vaccine development. This is a very important question is top of mind and there are a number of approaches being taken a you know. That's that's encouraging that the state of technology is such that if people think they have an idea on approach that they could take. Let's go for it and so there are twenty five or thirty or more ideas. What are called candidate vaccines that are at least being considered some have already started? Clinical trials others are still working away into the system. They may be ideas that people haven't thought of before but I think that's where in past investments in science and biotechnology plus ingenuity at a time of crisis. Like this brings out all kinds of ideas. So I'm encouraged by that as a general principle but at the same time. It's important that these vaccines are evaluated. So that they actually should. They be used perform as expected to to provide the immune response that we think will protect people and are safe enough to give to millions and millions if not billions of people around the world. What the breakthroughs that we need to actually radically accelerate this process. Like is there some scenario in ten years or twenty years where we're able to almost simultaneously develop a vaccine? Is there like a machine learning element to this kind of simulation element to it? Where you could actually simulate a clinical trial with enough computing power or something? I mean it. The ideal scenario would be an emerging viruses shows up and you know ten days later were producing a vaccine in in bulk. Is that ever going to be a possibility? You know. I don't want to never and I getting to that. It's GonNa take some time. I think the first part of that is is to make sure that we have as clear understanding of the human immune system in the human immune response to these to these pathogens as possible because while we can design vaccines that we think are the right thing. It's up to the immune system to actually do the right thing to create immune response. That'd be protective on the vaccine side. We need to have as many different approaches. What are referred to platform technologies ways to make vaccines? People are very familiar with influenza. Vaccines that for a long time until very recently were made only eggs and insert as it were quite well. We we knew how to make it. We knew how they performed. We knew that they create an immunity. We knew they were safe. But we needed to have different systems to create that and the idea of different platform technologies. Because not all vaccines can be developed in these same platforms. Corona viruses aren't gonNA work in an egg system for example and developing as many of these different platforms as possible is GonNa be cake. That's beginning to happen now. I was saying somewhere the other day. The idea of beginning the ramp up to mass production while the clinical trials are happening. So yes you may potentially waste some mass production cycles on a vaccine. That doesn't end up performing as well as we'd hoped but when you do have the one that does perform you're ready to go. You don't have the kind of ramp time. Is that a potential scenario. I think you're exactly right and while there is that a clearly the risk of building something. That isn't the right fit Given what's at stake I think that taking you the technologies that seem most promising and beginning to look hard at what the existing global manufacturing capacity is and when it needs to be and to start to fill those gaps. Is really important

Sabin Vaccine Institute Bruce Gallon Brooklyn DC Washington
"bruce gallon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

11:16 min | 3 years ago

"bruce gallon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's the Brian Lehrer show on WNYC. Good morning everyone. If the third and final week now our April series refer managed where we cover all things. We'd through this Friday. April nineteenth ahead of three hour, national call in this Saturday for twenty called escalate state now about that program. I'll be co hosting from noon to three with Ameri Awad from the legal state of Colorado. And we'll see what we can learn around here. Good bad or mixed from the experience of the ten states ahead of us on this. That'll be Saturday this Saturday from noon to three here on WNYC and on public radio stations across the country, including in many legal states now of all the reasons to legalize marijuana. It's the tax revenue expectations that probably United more factions around the idea than any other thing, maybe that and social. Justice. According to a study from new frontier. Data a data analytics firm focused on the cannabis industry nationwide legalization would create about one hundred thirty two billion dollars in tax revenue, but with the illicit cannabis industry still thriving across the country on New York and New Jersey and New Yorkers and New Jersey and going to pay more for we'd because it'll be taxed when obviously black market. We'd is not if it becomes legal. So joining me now to discuss cannabis and taxes. Today's topic is Mark Kleiman professor of public policy at NYU author of the book marijuana legalization what everyone needs to know. And he was a consultant to the state of Washington in their legalization process. I'm welcome back. NYC? It's always a pleasure to be on with you. And in your book, marijuana legalization, what everyone needs to know, you break down the three main ways in which cannabis gets taxed what of the ten legal states done. So far. They used a mix of what I think too bad message with your taxation by price and taxation. Wait, nobody yet has moved to. I think is the appropriate message, which is by THC content, but we're getting into in detail. Listening to your your intro. Thirty two billion dollars in tax revenue. What have they been smoking? And I don't know over what time period. Number. I I don't know if that's supposed to be per year over ten years, actually. Yeah. Well, and the annual mortgage about fifty billion dollars it will be a much smaller market once his legal because it will be much cheaper. And one of the things that we've seen in the news of jump right into this part of it is that California has seen projected tax revenue. Fall short of the revenue goals that then governor Jerry Brown had said when recreational legalization began in January of last year. Can you talk about the California experience? I don't I'm when you very closely, my impressions, what's happening is the industry starting very slowly. And that's not not uncommon BOS legalization, there's usually a shortage of legal product. And the result is that the that listened market grows slowly Bill at high prices for a year or two and then everybody crowds in prices collapse. According to the LA times here the numbers based on taxes collected since January first the state is expected to bring in four hundred seventy one million dollars in revenue this fiscal year, much less than the six hundred thirty million projected in the governor's budget. And according to Forbes as far as the reason the cost of cannabis in many parts of California has risen to between fifteen and twenty five dollars a gram in the recreational industries first quarter last year by contrast in nearby legal states, Colorado, Washington, and Oregon, you can get a gram, but for between one dollar and three dollars at so much less than fifteen to twenty five dollars grand, California. And. And so happened in Washington and Colorado meaning opener stores that's relatively quick. But think about it. You've got a got a license to growers even have to grow and dry. The weed gonna have stores open before these legal supply for them. So they won there's a huge shortage and the stores Georgia, they can get it was thirty dollars a gram in Washington on day one, and you know, overtime the supply catches up and collapses. Dollar to three dollars is Oregon, Oregon completely gone crazy. Putting limits on production. Give a million dollars a million pounds of on saleable pot. Interstate with three million residents. So they're growing more than the market requires and therefore what the price goes way down. And therefore, the tax revenues go. Reagan. Way down precisely California's having the opposite problem, which is the legal market are so high and this applies so limited if people are still buying illegally. I wouldn't if I were California. I would not be concerned about this at all. The notion that you guess first year tax revenues within better than plus or minus fifty percent is the joke, and it's still a lot of money if they're gonna get four hundred seventy million dollars in tax revenue in one fiscal year. Yeah, that's less than the six hundred thirty million that the budget originally projected, but that's still like half a billion dollars in one year, and it'll be more. But look at it the other way to when general fund budget is one hundred thirty billion dollars. So you're looking at less than half a percent of state revenues, right? So he's not a fix for state fiscal problems, which also means. Yeah. So for people who think, wow, this is how we're going to fix criminal Justice. So this is gonna fix the MTA part of the New York money if they do legalize it is supposed to go to the MTA, then it's not a silver bullet. It's just a little extra money. Yeah. It'll be worth a couple of the New York state, which you know, again, it's something. But all the other all the other reasons have to line up people don't really want to do this just for the tax revenue unless they think it's good for the world or good for the people of New York or New Jersey for for other reasons as well. I want to get back to the three different ways of taxing legal recreational marijuana. And why you think one is good and two are bad. Again. They are taxing by weight. Which is what New Jersey is proposing forty two dollars an ounce taxing by dollar value. You know, a percentage of the money that that you pay or the one you like taxing by THC content. What do you like that one the best? Well, people aren't buying plant matter. They're buying Doxa -cation. And so the appropriate tax basis. The intoxicant be taxed by price. The tax goes zero to the price goes two zero. We ended the marketplace of lead is going to be extremely low. Right. He's a little bit of dry land matter. Phillies t. Fancy teeth fairway the other day. Four cents a grant. And you didn't pay forty two dollars an ounce and taxes. So it's it's basically the price of candidates in marketing equilibrium, unless there's supply restriction by state is gonna be Absalon plus tax, right? Is that to say that the state you prefer this because the states are going to take in the most tax revenue that way. Well, they'll take in some tax revenue, but we're important. My view of of the role of taxation is not revenue. It's the keep the price high enough to legal cannabis doesn't get to be a public health minutes. Huh? Cannabis is illegal Bryce is already by far the most cost effective intoxicant. Canada's intoxication will cost you about. Dollar an hour. Right. So part of the street is cheap. Right. I benefit money might go down. If you're one two weeks smoker. You don't care what it costs right that the readers anyway. If you're a heavy smoker you care, but we should care that use smoke less. So raising cannabis prices up level where it's still competing with a black market. But not above that seems to be no-brainer. Just cigarettes are taxed that way. In that they've gone the cigarette. Taxes have been raised so high really for the sake of discouraging us, and then oh, by the way, it provides a stream of revenue for the government's exactly what about alcohol alcohol is more or less tax by I'll go content, so whiskey distilled spirits or explicitly tax by Bruce gallon straightforward. Beer, and wine or tax categorically, but the taxes on those two categories reflect their content less white is under taxed, do you think that the taxes on hall do anything to discourage abuse, which what you're hoping the marijuana taxes will do? Absolutely. I mean, Phil coke has that do done the numbers. You raise alcohol prices by ten percent. Which would be pretty much crippling alkyl taxes alkyl taxes by ten present. Boylan crimes. It was down by percent. The most obvious simple painless crank mechanism. We have and not doing fascinating. We're talking to Mark Kleiman, professor Republic policy at NYU and author of now wanna legalization what everyone needs to know. This is part of our April series refer managed our topic today is legal recreational marijuana and taxation, and we can take some phone calls for professor climate at two one two four three three WNYC four three three nine six nine two and will continue right after this. On the next fresh air, journalist.

cannabis marijuana California New Jersey WNYC New York Mark Kleiman Washington Colorado NYU Brian Lehrer Ameri Awad NYC LA times Oregon Jerry Brown Phil coke