17 Burst results for "Bruce Friedrich"

"bruce friedrich" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

07:12 min | 2 months ago

"bruce friedrich" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Forth there again today. That's thera gun dot com slash ritual. They're gun dot com slash rich role. Boom boom okay. Back to the show talk a little bit about the inefficiencies and the food waste that's caused by our current system. I mean you alluded to it in terms of the amount of land required to raise animals for for food for human consumption but when we think about food waste we think about the food that we're tossing out in the garbage or the food that goes down the garbage disposal or into the compost but but food waste is actually a much larger broader issue. Yeah this is actually what turned me. Plant based thirty three years ago. I read diet for a small planet francis. More pay And she makes an argument. That just like had not occurred to me somehow growing up in oklahoma eating basically nothing but meat And that is that. Animals need to eat too So according to the world resources institute the most efficient animal at turning the crops that you grow into meet by feeding those crops to the animal the most efficient animals the chicken and it takes nine calories of soy or wheat or oats or whatever. You're growing takes nine calories into a chicken to get one calorie backout from the chicken so that means nine times as much land nine times as much water. Nine times the pesticides and herbicides. And then you're growing all of this crops and you're shipping them to a feed mill and that is pollution spewing and energy intensive and your operating the female and you're shipping the to the modern industrial farm on gas-guzzling eighteen wheelers that are pollution-spewing and energy intensive and your operating the farm and then you're shipping the animals to the slaughterhouses. And you're operating the slaughterhouse. So it's both the rank inefficiency of nine calories in to get one calorie back out as well as all these other stages of production and with catalyst forty calories in to get one calorie backout. It's horribly inefficient. You have to deal with all the refuse that causes as well yeah. It's a massive amount amount of water. It's a massive amount of manure. The manure is destroying aquatic ecosystems. It's destroying soil. it's rendering soil. Baron essentially and. Yeah i mean it's it's basically cities and cities and cities of untreated waste. Your we're in los angeles like waste is treated. But there's you know harris ranch just up the road and waste your drive by that without knowing what's going on there it's quite a quite a sight and quite a smell when you pass it and You know and also as this accelerates a to climate change me becomes a social justice issue at the same time because the communities that are going to be most heavily impacted by these seismic shifts in climate are going to be you know the sort of underprivileged communities or the this sort of see bearing cities that are on low lying lands. That are just gonna get devastated by this. Yeah i mean in nineteen. We had seven hundred million people in ad jacked poverty globally before nineteen. We have nine hundred million people in abject poverty now after cove in nineteen It's probably even worse. Considering what's happening in india and brazil at the moment and we're probably out of it in the united states and not paying that close attention to what's happening on in places like india brazil there very much not out of it yet so when you're talking about climate change or antibiotic resistance or pandemic prevention on an pandemic adaptation. It's absolutely true that globally the people who can least adapt are the people who are going to be most adversely affected. And they're also the folks who contributed the least to the problems so from a sort of global social justice perspective. The planet is on fire and multiple different ways not just climate change also pandemic risk also. The end of modern medicine through antibiotic resistance in it is an absolute moral imperative that we move in this direction as quickly as possible and back to the idea of something like regenerative agriculture or unionizing slaughter houses or getting rid of agricultural subsidies. Like those are really good things to do but they take a lot of work they take a lot of coordination and we succeed on all three of those in the united states and the ninety five percent of the globe that is not. The united states has not changed at all so Something that the real sort of wonderful thing about shifting to plant based meat and cultivated meat and the reason that it analogize is to electrification of transport and renewable energy. Is that if we can get the numbers right. If we can make the product that people like at a lower cost it simply takes over and becomes how meat is made with all of these massive benefits right. We'll speaking of products that people like. Let's talk about the current state of Plan base meat like focusing on that. At this point i would say the majority of the people who are watching or listening to this have probably try to beyond burger beyond meat or an impossible burger at this point. It's quite something the extent to which this has become ubiquitous and can be found in most of the fast food chains at this point. And you know as. I've started traveling again. And you know there's beyond burgers on the menu at most restaurants that serve hamburgers. Now it's crazy. So where are we at. And what's to come on yeah. It has been extraordinarily gratifying to see the success Of both the beyond burger and the impossible burger and also the success of those companies. So i remember when beyond got into. Tgi fridays like three or four years ago and everybody was so excited. And like you said you know right after that white castle had the impossible burger and then carl's junior had to beyond burger and then burger. King had the impossible burger and It's really it's really really great. And there has been significant displacement even at higher price points. But you're not gonna see massive displacement. You're not gonna see the benefits that could come until we get the price down the taste identical or better and all of the products so Ethan brown at beyond meat in his most recent quarterly call. Because now they've i you can get a lot more Public information and he said they expect to reach price parody with at least one product by the end of twenty twenty four so two and a half years from now right now at grocery you're paying something like eighty percent more on menus your payment twenty to thirty percent more impossible as a little more than twice the cost. It's more expensive and people are still doing it though. It's yeah no it's it's and that.

world resources institute harris ranch brazil francis united states oklahoma india Baron antibiotic los angeles white castle Ethan brown carl King
"bruce friedrich" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

01:59 min | 2 months ago

"bruce friedrich" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Next pandemic goes from significant two zero if you with plant based and cultivated meet and then finally climate change. It's a fraction of the climate change. You eliminate nitrous oxide from newer decomposition and you eliminate methane from ruminant digestion and because it's fewer stages of production you also eliminate a lot of the co two Nitrous oxide is three hundred times as powerful. As greenhouse gas methane twenty times as powerful as carbon dioxide a greenhouse gas and far less land so those are the three things we talk about the most and of course for you know people like you and me the fact that it eliminates the factory farming as well as also a pretty big advantage. That's bruce friedrich and this is the ritual podcast a role hot cast spike the cultural ascension and mainstreaming of all things vegan and plant based the unfortunate reality is that globally meat consumption is actually the highest. It's ever been. And according to the un global meat production is projected to double by twenty fifty at the same time however incredible parallel advances are being made in the plant based and cultivated meet space very exciting developments that hold enormous potential to not only mitigate the incredibly deleterious environmental impact of our food system but to also decrease the risk of zoonotic disease ameliorate animal suffering and ultimately feed more people with fewer resources. Here today to bring us up to speed on this trajectory towards reimagining protein and modernizing me production is my friend. Bruce friedrich for his third appearance on the show his first being episodes to eighty six and four.

Bruce friedrich un
"bruce friedrich" Discussed on Dan Churchill's The Epic Table

Dan Churchill's The Epic Table

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"bruce friedrich" Discussed on Dan Churchill's The Epic Table

"Like is it is it? Just as bad as mate or where we are on that spectrum. Well, more than ninety percent of the global soy crop is fed to farm animals one hundred percent of the Brazilian sway crop. So there probably is very small. It's probably ninety nine, point eight, seven percent or something but all of this way crop that is responsible for burning down the rainforest in Brazil. Is Fed to farm animals either on ranches in Brazil, or in many cases, it shipped to Europe. Infected chickens and pigs and other farm animals Greenpeace a number of years ago unveiled what has to be the largest banner in the history of banners. It's a massive banner in the Amazon rainforest in it said KFC Amazon criminal. And I'm telling that story and I'm realizing actually KFC is doing really awesome stuff on but at the plant based debated meet side. So maybe I need to stop telling that story but what it illustrates. Is that soy fed the Farningham in that relationship where it takes nine calories of soy to get one calorie chicken or fifteen calories of soy to get one coury poor where twenty five calories it's way to get one gallery of beef and I guess that's about the same for CNN salacious a pretty key ingredient in agriculture. And Semen liberal years. So it's probably even worse. It's probably more like fifty dollars. This way to get one calorie of FARM SIMA GAS ON ALTHOUGH I don't know take that as Gospel but on. So and from a climate standpoint on chicken against the least climate change inducing meat and chicken causes forty times as much climate change per calorie a preteen when compared to the way for thousand percent as much climate change when compared to soy. So spoi- is a crop for human consumption is extraordinarily efficient on soy grown as ninety percent of global. So is to be funneled through animals in that vastly inefficient and harmful manner is really Weiss away. Yes. A bad rabbits bad a bad rap as a crop. And there are obviously some some discredited theories around soy health. But I would look to the Harvard School of Public Health and on Health A. That don't have a bias and see what they say about about soy on in there is universal agreement that soy complex carbohydrates high in protein. It is a complete production. It is an extraordinarily healthy. Yeah, absolutely have to grade I'm loving the contentious yet when I speak to people about it and in. Way should be having a KNAUSS and after seeing these studies, I'm just like it's good for you. The only impact I want to know how bad it is on the planet but yeah. Yeah, obviously ultimately. You have to answer that question that will be. It is one of the be it is one of the most efficient crops from planetary standpoint. You know it's not millet but not widespread militarization after from from a sort of fun nutrition in Input Nutrition Matrix. Soyuz tippy top alongside the rest of my gums. So it's not you know better than user black beans lentils read it is as good as chick peas and lentils and black beans and so on. extraordinarily. Environmentally. Friendly. So. They had it. Legend's my my awesome community. If you just just make sure you don't have fourteen servings or more of that day and I continue to joke about it because I don't know anyone has more than fourteen anything today. That you have. So Bruce. Thanks clear that went up might might. I'm I'm really conscious of your time and. Blessed to have had you on..

Brazil Amazon Harvard School of Public Healt KFC CNN Europe spoi Weiss Bruce
"bruce friedrich" Discussed on Dan Churchill's The Epic Table

Dan Churchill's The Epic Table

05:53 min | 1 year ago

"bruce friedrich" Discussed on Dan Churchill's The Epic Table

"Cova could've been a lot more transmissible than it is despite it being pretty transmissible could have also been a lot more lethal. Death rates among the elderly are pretty high, but you can imagine a. Disease with a much higher death rate. You can imagine as a zoonotic disease that is much more transmissible. You can imagine a trend as do not have disease that is both on, and that is very likely to come out of an intensive animal farm the next time around. Yeah, that's that makes a lot of sense particularly. Easy easy example of tomato with the soil only so much shah nutrient soil can give tomato. And if there's a mass amount of tomatoes fighting over that same thing. Will you may get a tomato but it would be less dense nutrients that for the properties is meant to provide you as you can see him as. Well okay. So an interesting point actually as Utah, support upon just ended about. For those who take off tonight with I, guess the NFL I I, find it interesting that the quarterback from new. England. WHO's meant to touch the ball pasta so many people did not spread the disease. Through training and he's the personally touch the ball time and everyone else touches the ball. So again, disappointing what you're talking about with Donald Trump, I found that so interesting, I'm getting a little off topic but. It. Does does make an interesting. and so might I'm interested in food for FI and what you're doing, what what you see happening in the few shaw what a what a you've talked about the three components how you guys take action? What do you say the next five ten years that you we action in in Modell? Over focusing on, is it you're trying to get the government's involves at general your major major focus on other areas of or trends if you will taking place that we have the ahead of yet. Well one thing we're talking more and more about is both whole biomass fermentation out which is very similar. It looks an awful lot like cultivated me except you're using generally fun guy cells there is one company that's doing since one thousand, nine, hundred, five, the Corn Hugh O. R. N.. Which is the largest operating company. In the world actually while doing alternative meets company in the world not as well known in the United. States as it is in. Europe. But it's the dominant. Oprah. Opportunity me in. Europe. Generally, people refer to it as plant based, but it's technically technically guy. Now. It's mushroom not. Based and I think we're GONNA see a lot more on the fermentation side of both biomass fermentation. So companies like corn. But also precision fermentation companies which are using this enhanced fermentation technology to do things like creating actual dairy proteins, actual egg proteins. The company impossible uses. This form of enhanced fermentation to create a hime. which is a soil hime by it doesn't actually require soy. So you get the DNA on of the or the dairy preteens APR Deans you program at into, for example. Yeast on or a variety of other hosts on and then much like beer beer-brewing those hosts. This proteins on that is something that we're pretty excited about..

Cova Europe shaw Donald Trump Modell Corn Hugh O. Utah NFL England
"bruce friedrich" Discussed on Dan Churchill's The Epic Table

Dan Churchill's The Epic Table

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"bruce friedrich" Discussed on Dan Churchill's The Epic Table

"That talks throughout with plant-based reducing being plant buys can reduce COVID can you can use elaborate on that? It's very. Very. Interesting to heat I. Never heard that before. But I'm sure I listened is one more bad. That can you drive into how that was produced I'm sure I mean if you if you Google Pandemics and United Nations Environment Programme I think the title of the of the report was preventing next Theon denic, but it'll pop. came out in July, but essentially, pandemics come from on. Nineteen came from bats obviously on and it was eating bats cost in nineteen We have had African swine fever, which is wiped out like forty percent of Pigs in China on we've had bird flu. Foot and mouth disease. We've had bovine spongiform encephalopathy also known as mad cow disease on so. Animals can have diseases on Ensenada diseases are diseases that jumped the species barrier and infect human beings. So covid nineteen came from a wet market and Wuhan, but it could just as easily and in fact, the the the. Flu The flu that killed millions and millions of people back in nineteen, eighteen, nineteen, nineteen. That actually originated on a chicken farm I think in. North Carolina maybe, Delaware, Virginia. It was called the Spanish flu. And people can dive into on Wikipedia House Spain got the ignominious. Moniker there. But it actually came from the United States and it came from an animal farm. The industrial farming of animals weakens the immune system of the animals. So Ukrainian fifty, thousand chickens into a shed. or thousands of pay into a shed. Or hundreds of thousands of hens into a shed in battery cages, those animals immune systems will be compromise on plus they're living putrid conditions were disease can spread on if that diseases a zoonotic disease, which is to say if it can infect if a the species barrier and the worker. Or in some cases, you eat the meat and there's contamination on the and you end up transmitting the disease that way. That is what the UN has said. number one is animal protein consumption generally because obviously that was not accurate farms that that was just. But so number one is animal protein consumption because of what I just described. Number two is intensive farming of animals because that increases the likelihood that our name will lead to a Sunada disease and coca has been bad right but you can imagine it being both more virulent. So more transmissible we saw Donald Trump got cova and a lot of people around him have not tested positive. Biden. has tested positive and he was pretty nearby. Mike Pence and his wife had tested positive and they were nearby I. Think the trump kids don't have it and they were nearby..

Donald Trump UN COVID Mike Pence Biden. Theon denic Google Wuhan United States Spain Sunada cova North Carolina China Virginia Delaware
"bruce friedrich" Discussed on Dan Churchill's The Epic Table

Dan Churchill's The Epic Table

05:26 min | 1 year ago

"bruce friedrich" Discussed on Dan Churchill's The Epic Table

"In climate in general as respect to sustainability because we had these twenty thirty. Goals. At by. The UN Sustainable Development Goes Yup. Now on our current path, how are we trending and? Do you believe we are currently being you know unless something very drastic changes aware in trouble or we on the path with a lot of modern technology in the stuff that you are talking about with what Jeff does are we how you track? Well, there is a scientific consensus across multiple of sustainability. Sustainable Development Goals. that. We are very much not on track, and in fact early last year on I think it was about thirty of the leading agricultural scientists an economist. Shut were two years of study of the way that we produce food and published in the Journal Lancet, which is one of the top three medical journals in the world alongside alongside Journal of the American Medical Association, New England Journal of Medicine those are the top three pretty consistently rent on and they said it is a literal impossibility that we meet our climate goals by twenty thirty and by twenty fifty on unless meat consumption goes down. But as I was just mentioning meat consumption just keeps going up despite. The fact that we have for fifty years been talking about the inefficiency of producing meet this way book Diet for a small planet which is sold millions of copies in the United States cannot forty nine years ago. So people have been aware of the inefficiency they'd been aware of the environmental harm, the United Nations Food and Agricultural Organisation. Outta a report within four hundred pages livestock long shadow about fifteen years ago, sounding the call on the inefficiency of cycling, crafts animals, and yet meat consumption just keeps going up. And that's because education is not going to create the change. We need people understand the harms. But meet is delicious and meet is an expensive and those are the things that dictate for the vast majority of consumers, what they are going to. So the rain storm of five founding principle of GSI is that. Well, both are true. Meat is also inefficient growing massive amounts of crops even to animals so that we can eat animals. Bat is the reason that those those scientists reported in the Lancet. said that we are not going to be able to meet our climate obligations under Paris and less meat consumption goes down. It's just horribly inefficient, which also means that it is more expensive than it needs to be if instead of growing massive amounts of crops to feed them to animals so we can eat animals we figure out how to turn those crops into client base meet. You're literally talking about nine calories of crops for one calorie. Of Chicken, which is the most efficient animal at turning crops into meet, which means nine times as much land nine times as much water nine times as many pesticides herbicides. So just a lot more efficient to just turn this crops into me, and then similarly cultivating cells growing cells directly Dick six or seven weeks to grow a chicken to slaughter. Weight takes a matter of days to cultivate.

United Nations Food and Agricu Journal Lancet UN New England Journal of Medicin GSI United States Journal of the American Medica Jeff Dick Paris Lancet.
"bruce friedrich" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

03:37 min | 2 years ago

"bruce friedrich" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Is Bruce Friedrich refrigerant. Welcome back to the bug guest. I am delighted to be here as thank you. So how's it going, and it's going incredibly well way? You guys are doing a lot. Now, I feel like when we talked a couple of years ago, your and a half ago something like that good food institute. Sick impressive, but small organization and now it feels like you guys are everywhere. Yeah. We we barely existed when last year when I chatted and now we have sixty staff and five continents, and we have nine directors and four programmatic departments. And. Yeah. So it's going extraordinarily. Well, I want to ask you about a bunch of the work you're doing, but I I sort of want to do some context I because there's competition I've been wanting to have with you for a while something I've been obsessing over a little bit. Which is the way in which this moment in our food system. And in particular, the way, we treat and raise animals is pretty unique fifty sixty years ago speaker somebody's on the technological side of Lata this could we have had the kind of industrial animal agriculture. We have today. Well, no, it was it was using antibiotics in a minute started with chickens. So there was a chicken farmer on the Delmarva peninsula who got way more chickens than she bargained for. She ordered a hundred and got ten thousand or something like that. So she started shoving them into sheds and figured out how to grow more and more chickens and the answer to the question was drugs. So prophylactic antibiotics so he explained why. Yeah. In the conditions the conditions that farm animals are kept in confinement is a breeding ground for disease. The animals are kept in conditions that would compromise their immune systems would create disease. Massive numbers of them would die. By but with antibiotics used prophylactically so used on animals who are not sick. It allows them to live through conditions that would otherwise be lethal. And you can cram a one hundred thousand laying hens into a shed you can cram fifty thousand breeder pearlers into a shed. You can cram thousands of pigs into a shed if they're drugged up, essentially, the numbers on this are something crazy, right? Doesn't animal agricultural use? The bulk of American antibiotics. Yeah. Yeah. According to the union of concerned, scientists it's like seventy percent of antibiotics are used in farm animals, and it's not to treat farm animals who are sick. It's to this prophylactic keeping them from getting sick because of the conditions. Yeah. The the other thing that I think about with this is and I recognize you could have industrial agriculture without by think. But particularly when you're talking about chickens vicinity when you're talking about pigs. There's a huge amount of breeding that's been done and genetic engineering, and you have these animals that they can't reproduce naturally, and they can barely stand up. And like, they they couldn't they don't make sense. They don't make. Fences animals, they're like food with the cardiovascular system, it's like the pre food in very strange way. You know, I know we've been breeding animals forever, right? Like, the human beings, and obviously evolution to does it itself. But the ability to, you know, do artificial insemination in at the scale, we do it now and to do genetic breeding and changing the scale, we do it. Now, there can be a sense that there's something natural about just eating meat. But what we're eating what we're doing? It doesn't seem natural to me. It seems like a very strange technological moment. No. I'm in chickens were, you know, created in order to raise their young and do dust, baths and root in the soil and everything that happens with farm animals today. Well, ninety nine percent of farm animals is extraordinarily unnatural. They never raised their young. They never re route around in the soil. They never do anything..

Bruce Friedrich Delmarva peninsula Lata ninety nine percent fifty sixty years seventy percent
"bruce friedrich" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

04:00 min | 3 years ago

"bruce friedrich" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"They actually will create better livelihood for farmers. It's been go big or go home for such a long time. And so we've gone from what more than fifty percent of people and farming fewer than two percent of people and farming, and they all have to be for the most part, really, really massive. This allows us to open up all kinds of different crops to cultivation you can have smaller farms, you can have farms that you actually are able to crop rotation. Like, this is sort of new agricultual renaissance that will be good for farmers, but are there programs underway to help train these people so that they can say way into a new way of using their their land. This is one of the things that there is some really interesting stuff happening in this regard. I was actually just chatting with Kathy reston, my co author and the clean protein, and she was just out in Arkansas. She got an Email from somebody who read one of her books and emailed her and apparently emailed for people. And Cathy was the only one who replied. And it's a chicken farmer from Arkansas, they have more than one hundred thousand chickens supplying one of the biggest chicken companies in the United States, and Shaun Monson. The film maker was out there with Kathy filming them as they are basically moving out, and they're gonna go to hamp, and there are other farmers were going mushrooms and other farmers going to other crops. So this is the transition that we think is going to have to happen. Our hope is that governments as they fund plant base meat and clean meat research will also fund programs to help people who are currently in the current industry to transition into these new jobs that are actually absolutely coming. That are also just better for the soil, which is something that pharma's care about farmers are not monocropping because they're excited about monocropping monocropping to say alive, essentially, but to the labelling issue there is there are the dairy industry has for decades and trying to convince the government that sway milk should not be called soy and almond milk. Be called almond milk. There have been class action suits, which are really fun to read. The judicial opinions on a class action suits, the judges get very very creative begs credulity that somebody would be buying almond milk. And they're getting milk that comes from cows. And right are they do these almonds lactate? Like it gets really weird. It gets really really weird. But that is all just because these these sorts of endeavors don't pass the smell test. But Mary's they are absolute hail Marys, but they did pass along, Missouri. That says that you can't use meet terminology on the packaging of products. Unless those products come from raised and slaughtered animals. And so we along with the animal legal defense fund, and the of Missouri in the plant based meat company to forty and then by GSI is both one of the lawyers in one of the plaintiffs in the case where suing the state of Missouri to overturn that law and the main the main arguments that it's constitutional unless the. Labels are false or misleading. Missouri. Can't censor speech. We also have the doormat commerce clause argument in there as well as do process clause in there. What does the dormant commerce clause argument commerce clause argument is essentially that it was very clear when the legislation was being passed. It was passed by the cattle industry. So it is to protect Missouri cattle interests against competition from other states. So that's the dormant commerce clause argument. And then the due process is void for vagueness. You read the law. It's very unclear the only way, you know, what it is actually supposed to do if you read the legislative history. And so do process demands that if you're going to be convicted of a crime, you have to know what it looks like violate the crime, and that's become even into starker relief in sort of the conversations that have been had after the law passed. So we're we're doing we're about to be asking for a preliminary injunction to join the government against actually enforcing the law until our lawsuit is over and the defendant. Argument. Curiously is that they do not want consumers to be confused..

Missouri Marys Kathy reston Arkansas Shaun Monson United States Cathy GSI Mary milk fifty percent two percent
"bruce friedrich" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

03:31 min | 3 years ago

"bruce friedrich" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"They released numbers, and they said, according to our numbers more than forty five percent of people would ban swatter houses. So they want slaughter houses band. And so the meat industry said, you know, this true look at the source, so they went to one of their handpicked researchers and researcher at Oklahoma state university, and he did the researcher research, and it was like sure enough and our poll forty seven percent of people want to ban slaughter houses. Two thirds of people are uncomfortable with the way that animals are raised today. So I think people like Dr driving their cars like what they like about driving is not necessarily and only getting from point a to point. I think there's also a control issue of sort of sitting in the back of the car where the car is driving around that is a little harder for people to wrap their minds around. I would say this is more like going from the horse and buggy to a car or going from a standard camera to a digital camera. We're going from dial phone with a cord to go into your cell phone like what you like about taking pictures or talking on the phone or eating me what you like about it with meat. It's taste its texture its experience, its culture. It's whatever it is. But for almost nobody I really want animals to be raised and slaughtered for this. So if we can give people the taste the texture the things that they like about meat, and we can get a lower price point. I really have just absolutely no doubt that it takes off and early polling super good or early pulling on this super super good. I think there was a sauce stat twenty to thirty percents of people are willing to make the switch twenty to thirty percent of people are willing to pay more for clean out people who are willing to try it somewhere on the consistently on the order of seventy percent people are willing to to make the switch like permanently or in the order fifty percent, and this is programming against human physiology, which has for ever told us don't eat something unfamiliar until like lots of other people have eaten it versus. Might kill you like you just basically say if we could grow meet directly from cells without animal slaughter. What would you think of that? And most people are excited about it. And as we were talking about a minute ago, especially younger people are super excited about it and bear in mind right now plant base me is a third of one percent of the meat market. And we're talking seventy percent of people who would eat clean me, which is, you know, three times two hundred ten times as many people before we even have a product like once we actually have these products on sale on shelves, and we're saying do you want the product that might have a whole bunch of bacteria might kill your family? Maybe laced with antibiotics, and here's how the animals were raised in slaughtered. Or do you want this other safer cleaner product that doesn't have all of those ants Larry costs? I don't think like you're not going to have to be a Madison Avenue genius to sell the clean me. Right. Well, if I was a venture capitalist. You just gave me the pitch of all time. Right. I'd be like take all my money. But it also I think there is a little bit of a fear button with people to they're like, well is this genetically engineered and I heard that might not be so good. And what's the long term? You know, we don't know what this is doing to our bodies long-term. In fairness, like I think we have to have those conversations to really make sure that we're doing all of this. Right. But you. Made an interesting analogy in an article you wrote between this movement and kind of. What went down with the in vitro fertilization movement, which I thought was out. Yeah. So forty years ago..

researcher Oklahoma state university seventy percent forty seven percent forty five percent thirty percent fifty percent forty years one percent
"bruce friedrich" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"bruce friedrich" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Click on our team, you can see the caliber people we hired to work for us. It is and all of those people are. Working. I said the thing that was somewhat disparaging the idea people changing their diet on behalf of these factors. But people do want their vocations to be meaningful and Daniel pink in his book drive. He says the things people want out of their vocation. They want self actualization. They want something that's meaningful. They want to be challenged. But not to challenge every six months. We do a an internal anonymous staff survey, and we are knocking it out of the charts on those things it's a phenomenal place to work, but hard place to get a job. Yeah. Well, I think that's we're seeing more and more of that purpose driven young people who really prioritize that. Perhaps even more than salary, and that's a that. That gives me hope for the new generation the next Jenner jen's, e or whatever it is whatever we're calling it the cover the cover letters that. We read are just so inspiring on people. They think they can change the world and be they want to change the world. It is really. Yeah. It's really really good. Yeah. All right. So give me an estimate of how long. It's going to be before clean meat is going to be commercially available to consumers, I think commercially available at a price point that is somewhat reasonable commercial commercially available at a price point that is similar to like grasp grow. Grow grass fed beef probably three or.

Jenner jen Daniel pink six months
"bruce friedrich" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

03:35 min | 3 years ago

"bruce friedrich" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"So that theory of change impossible foods beyond me of just of these companies that theory of changes, let's actually give people everything that they like that meat dairy eggs, except let's make it less expensive. And so it will sell more, and let's just replace it. Because every single survey that's ever been done indicates that what people make their dietary decisions on the basis of its price. It's taste. It's convenience. A lot of us who were having this conversations or like will shop at the farmer's market. Or we shop at whole foods that we shop at our local co op, which my wife, and I do all three cases. And we get this vision of people who are very mindful about the food that they're eating, but even watch what people are eating at whole foods like that entire sector is less than two percent. So ninety eight percent is Albert Sens and target and whole and WalMart, and sort of that sort. Grocery really, big grocery. But even watch what people are eating at whole foods, even that even folks at whole foods. It's like the price matters and the taste matters. And whether it's healthy for them is not that high on the scale, which is why obesity rates, they actually these maps that are sort of color coded for obesity. They have to keep adding new colors getting fatter and veteran fatter and fatter. So you your like, all right. Forget about like trying to educate people. That's that's a nonstarter. We're making for the amount. Like us the nine calories in one calorie out. It's like, you know, a thousand calories into trying to get people to change their habits versus what you're getting out. So instead, you have this focus on on trying to leverage basically market forces to incentivize companies to innovate and to create products that people like that address these problems. Yeah. No, it's markets and technology, and that will be the transformation, and we talk about how do we feed nine point seven billion? People by twenty fifty. We talk in sort of an Uber way about keeping antibiotics working because governments care about those things, and we want governments to be sporting research and development in plant based meat unclean. Me that's a big part of what our policy department does. It's a big part of what our international engagement folks, doing an Indian Israel and China in Singapore in Brazil, which is the areas where we're particularly active and governments these planets meeting clean meet salute there. They are how governments meet their patients under the Paris climate agreement there, how governments provide safe food food safety is a big issue, especially in places like China and India, their how water is conserved their resources are conserved. So we talk about these things, but we talk about them to people aren't doing policy. So fund these things roll out the regulatory red carpet for clean meat if you are a philanthropist or an impact investor what you care about is climate change or sustainability global health. These are things that you should be investing in if you're Dacian, and you do grant making the in these areas, you should be doing grant making on these issues but for individual consumers. It's really go. Try the impossible burger, it tastes incredibly awesome. And then you can also talk about the impact on the climate or the impact on sustainability or whatever wants people are already thinking. Oh, this is like an awesome new food at this. Hot new restaurant at tastes amazing. Oh, and I can also feel good about the fact that I'm doing something. Awesome for the or it's healthier whatever else. Right. Well, this approach seems to be working. I mean, there's a huge upswing in venture capital funds that are investing in the sector. We're seeing a rapidly changing regulatory landscape, which I want to get into with you and the money is flowing and the innovation is happening and it's happening quickly. Yeah. At our conference, we were just delighted to see. So like the biggest plant base makes me company MorningStar farms. They are doing a lot of innovation internally..

obesity Albert Sens WalMart China MorningStar farms Paris Israel Singapore Brazil India ninety eight percent thousand calories nine calories one calorie two percent
"bruce friedrich" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

03:04 min | 3 years ago

"bruce friedrich" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"So those are sort of the big three, and they interlink at least the first to interlink so raising crops to feed them to animals so that we can eat animals is just vastly inefficient. And it's the same as, you know, the vast majority of what we eat doesn't go into gaining. The vast majority of what we eat. Sorry. Okay. The podcast. I know I'm very excited about that. I'm glad it's not live. The vast majority of what we eat goes into just allowing us to lead our lives, and that's true for farm animals as well. So the most efficient meters chicken, and yet it takes nine calories into a chicken to get one calorie backout explain that for people that are unfamiliar with how this whole thing works. Yeah. It makes intuitive sense. Right. So I weigh about one hundred and eighty five pounds if I do nothing, but lay in bed watching bad television. Not even moving I'm gonna burn like twenty four hundred calories every single what if you watch good television. Well, if it gets me excited adrenaline could little that up. I'm shouting at the television. If it sports eyecare who's gonna win or something. But I mean, basically metabolism remind metabolism is going to burn about twenty four hundred calories a day. And that's just busy logically. What I need just to keep my body going the same sort of thing is true for farm animals. The vast majority of the calories that you feed them, they need just to exist. And so that. It takes nine calories into chicken to get one calorie back out in the form of that animal's flesh. Sometimes the industry will do a mass to live weight conversion from mass delight wait, you can get to like two point two or something like that. But about half the calories in go into bones, and blood and feathers and other things that we don't eat. And then you really have to have dense calories to get that mass calorie out conversion what really matters is energy and energy out. We ate those crops directly you get nine calories instead of one calorie if you've done all those crops through a chicken, so that means nine times as much land nine times as much water nine times as much pesticide and urbicide nine times as much fossil fuel to power the combines. And then you're growing all of those crops, you're shipping those crops to feed mill your operating the feed mill you're shipping, the farm operating the farm shipping the animals to the slaughterhouse your operating the slaughterhouse just a vastly inefficient system the nine in one out vastly inefficient. And then you total all of the. Inefficiencies all of the extra stages of production all the gas guzzling pollution-spewing vehicles, all of the extra factories, and what you find is that a conservative estimate is that about thirteen point five percent. According to the United Nations about thirteen point five percent of all climate change is attributable to the meat industry. It's more than all transportation combined on a, and that's a that's a conservative estimate from what I understand. Right. I think in Cal spiracy. They said it was fifteen percent. I think it depends on how you run the numbers. But their team point five is pretty that's that's being conservative, and it still Trump's transportation, which is what we're all focused on. Yeah. And waist, which people are focused on. I mean food waste is forty percent of everything we grow throw away, and obviously that's bad. But this insolent early eight hundred.

Trump United Nations Cal spiracy nine calories one calorie twenty four hundred calories five percent mill eighty five pounds fifteen percent forty percent
"bruce friedrich" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

04:13 min | 3 years ago

"bruce friedrich" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"So p protein was was the first of the proteins to really be optimized for plant based meat and other companies have jumped on board. But there's really no reason it should be people chain. So people are looking at LuPone. They're looking at lentils or looking at oats really kind of any source that has protein and impossible foods is using potato protein. And. And there is optimizing potato protein for for the impossible burgers. So even products that you don't generally think of as being particularly hypertension, really kind of any crop. And this goes back to that Bill Gates line when he tried beyond meets plant base chicken. And he wrote a blog called the future of food. And he said what I just tasted. It's not just a clever meat substitute. It is future food the title. The title of the article said ninety two percent plant protein plants have not been explored for their capacity, but turned into plan basement. So and that's still true. And it's also true that most of the work that's going on in this space is protected by going on in private universities. So one of the things we're doing Jeff is really trying hard through our science team to change that and we're launching fellowship programs. Where identifying the top twenty four universities globally for plant based meeting clean. Meet the top twenty four universities in the US for plant bass, meat and clean. Meet most of these universities are doing nothing now. But they have the they have the basic agriculture. -tural sciences or the basic tissue engineering, biochemistry. They have the right departments. They have the right funding. They have the right research focus, and we're going to be going to them and strongly encouraging them to put some of the resources into plant based meat and clean meat. Yeah. I would think that the universities that have strong agricultural studies programs would would be obvious choices. But I'm wondering whether you get pushback from them because there's a certain status quo, and that perhaps the universities with strong engineering programs and science science focus might be more open to the possibility of the future. You had those kind of conversations. Have you gotten pushback from the academic sector? Not so far it may happen. So but so far there's there's uniform and Jasim him. in this goes to sort of one of the other revelations of space is that the vast majority of people working in the meat industry are not especially excited to be working in the media industry. They have the noble goal of supplying high quality protein to lots of people in expensively. I mean, if that's your goal, and that's what it is for pretty much everybody at a place like Tyson or Purdue or Smithfield. If that's your goal. This is a better way to do that also generally the goal even at the land grant, universities. So I think cattle ranching and regenerative agriculture sort of the two exceptions to that that the vast majority of what happens in the meat industry doesn't have to involve raising live animals, and it doesn't have to involve slaughter. And so we generally meet with enthusiasm, especially when we start talking to people about how this is like there's a lot of discomfiture in the meat industry about undercover investigations about the link to antibiotic resistance about linked to climate change about animal slaughter, and this gets people. Past all of that. Well, doing still what is their fundamental goal? Which is let's let's produce high quality protein for people to eat. Right. Right. Well, it's undeniable that this is on the rise. I mean, I was looking at some of the statistics, and they're pretty staggering. I mean seventeen percent growth in the plant based food sector twenty three percent growth in plant based meets the plant based food sector is now a three point seven billion dollar industry. I mean, these are gigantic numbers. And when you see that growth curve that portends optimism for the future. Yeah. Absolutely. I mean, some of these companies beyond me grew at seventy percent. And if they had been able to supply more, it would have been able to grow a lot more quickly than that. That was literally the match they could produce field roast was just south of that guardian was just south of that. And the entire plant based meat sector as you said grew at a rate of more than twenty percent. If you stay on that trajectory, which is roughly the trajectory that plant based milk. It was on. If you stay on that trajectory literally at one hundred one hundred percent by twenty fifty..

Bill Gates US Purdue Jeff Jasim Smithfield Tyson one hundred one hundred percen seven billion dollar twenty three percent ninety two percent seventeen percent seventy percent twenty percent milk
"bruce friedrich" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

03:43 min | 3 years ago

"bruce friedrich" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"And what is going on? And how we're going to innovate this future. Well, it's not super hard to understand it sort of a basic level. But as with any sort of production scale food supply there is a tremendous amount that you need to understand about sort of each sector. So for plant based knit me we need to be doing crop. Optimization. And we need to figure out what are the proteins. That are going to be best turned into plant base meat, and we need to figure out what that looks like then we need to look figure out how you put all these things together in order to make something that mimics meat, and you need to figure out what the production technology is going to be on thriller sort of fascinating to us when we first started looking at plant-based meat and clean mate. We sort of thought we had plant base meet figured out because they're a bunch of companies doing it and clean. It was going to be really complex and difficult because nobody essentially was doing it. Memphis meets was just getting started. Right. There was super meat and Mosa meets just getting started. None of the three of them had incorporated. But what we found is that the plant based meat is actually a lot more complex than clean meat because clean me we've got cross applica- ability from therapeutics from tissue engineering, so everything happening and George church's lab at Harvard Medical School, and you could just sort of take all of that and say, okay, we're going to food now and start producing cl-. Lean meat with plant basement, you've sort of got the pioneers beyond meat and impossible foods. But there is limitless other stuff that could be happening and even impossible foods and beyond meter pretty tiny. When you compare them to sort of big meat industry or sell their deke's. So a tremendous amount to learn at its most basic level though, plant based meat as let's take plants. There's nothing in meat that doesn't exist in plants Meade is lipids and amino, minerals and water. Let's figure out how we take those constituent parts put them together and process them. So that they buy amendment meet. So that they give people everything they like about me, but using plants and because it's so much more efficient. It will be less expensive. And then clean meats is similar except you take the products of tissue engineering. So how are we going to grow cells? How are we going to put them on scaffold? So that they can grow. How are we going to put them into a bio reactor like what is this look like food grade, which obviously has to be significantly less expensive than tissue engineering. Well, I wanna get into clean me. But let's start with my meet. It seems that p protein has sort of been the protein of choice as a foundational basis for creating these foods are we moving in different directions. Now, like where are we sourcing those nutrients lipids proteins, and what is that future? Look like, yeah. This is one of the sort of interesting aha moments for us when we were thinking about plant based meat and clean meat. And the fact that up until Ethan Brown comes along in two thousand nine so even was working evens, the founder beyond me, and he was working in clean energy. And he read the UN report about the climate change impact of the meat industry, and he pretty much similar Tena slayer at about the same time heard about some people teen research that was going on at the university of Minnesota of Missouri. And the idea of using Ps to basically get you the taste and the texture other things that people like about me, and he jumped in and that was sort of the first time anybody had ever looked at crops with the idea of optimizing them to create. Something that tastes like meat up until that point all of the companies were using either, wheat or soy, and it was the waste product of wheat and soy weed. It was the waste product of carbohydrates for Sawyer. It was a waste product of oil, and it was sort of. Let's cram this stuff together and make vegetarians eat it. Right. So we can just not have to throw stuff away, and maybe created an additional revenue stream. Yeah. Our main business exactly, but it was basically it was basically the waste product..

Ethan Brown Memphis Mosa Harvard Medical School UN George church university of Minnesota Missouri founder
"bruce friedrich" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"bruce friedrich" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Well, also doing very well for themselves if they refocus some of their efforts into plant base meat and clean mate, really excited by Email that I got from Berkeley professor in the plant sciences department. And she said that she came to the conference just sorta to explore what was happening and she walked away completely enthused and talking about how she will be educating students about this and encouraging them to take the class, we designed Berkeley and. Based meat and clean meat and to think about focusing their careers here, and that was just replicated over and over and over again with people that really big food companies people who are in therapy Dicks who are in crop sciences who are thinking about chemical engineering and the chemical engineering currently in the food industry and other thinking about plant based meat and clean meat and how they can plug in. It's very exciting. That's cool. So yeah, you guys created or behind the very first. College course on clean, meet right? And is out of Berkeley, Berkeley. And we're launching when this semester at Stanford Penn State. We've got a Mook that will be coming out in the next six weeks massive on open. Online course. Okay. So it will be an eleven an eleven week sort of crash course implant base meat and clean mate. And it seems like it's it's a subject matter that really is multidisciplinary in right because you have to understand chemistry. You have to understand cell biology. Like, you have to understand engineering, you have to understand, I don't know brewing. What do you need to understand to really wrap your head around what clean meat is?.

Berkeley Stanford Penn State professor eleven week six weeks
"bruce friedrich" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

04:13 min | 3 years ago

"bruce friedrich" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"If you haven't already and the podcast is also now available on Spotify. So enough from the let's Bruce do the talking. My friend. It's really good to be here. Thank you. I think the last time we did this was two years ago. How long ago was it was while ago? Yeah, it was a little while ago. Maybe eighteen months little more. Remember, it was the dead of winter in New York. That's all I remember. It was very cold. Well, much has happened since then. So I'm excited to have you back to bring us up to speed on everything clean, meet everything that's happening in the plant based food movement. You guys just had a big conference. Right. We did tell me about well. It was a conference focused day. One was predominantly on plant base me day to was predominantly unclean meat, and we had kind of everybody who's anybody in the plant base meat and the clean meat market sectors. And then we invited we had two panels on plant based meat in two panels on clean me where we invited people from industry on in the one case, and we invited scientists and the other case where we think they have the capacity to basically move these market sectors forward in a really big way, but they're not currently involved. So for example, people are doing extruders and people are doing crop sciences and people who are doing Zeno free media for therapeutics. And basically the real goal of the conference. We wanted people to network we wanted to connect investors with startups. We wanted to get scientists more excited about the space, but we really wanted the. The market sectors that are currently existing and the scientists who are currently active. They're not looking at plant based meat or clean, meet at the moment. But they would be essential to plant based in clean meat accelerating. So we brought them and it was a phenomenal success in that regard. Yeah. It seems like that's one of one of the good food institute takes multipronged approach to. Developing this new way of thinking about food and how we're going to innovate for the future. But one of the more compelling prongs in your approach is trying to cultivate. Cooperation, not just amongst all of the major players in the clean meat and plant based food movement. But also with the people that are outside of it that can contribute to this rapidly growing. Revolution that we're experiencing right now. So so what came out of that? Like, what what what were you know, what are some of the things that are happening right now in this world that are perhaps news since we last book. There's a tremendous amount that's nuisance. We last spoke. So all of departments are ramping up which I'm very excited about what you just said is true. We see ourselves certainly is helping the current players. So the current startups in the current companies that exist in plant based meat and clean mate to help them all to coordinate across a variety of sectors from science to policy to networking with sort of big corporations big food corporations corporations, but we also really want to create a pipeline of scientists. We really wanna get the therapeutics industry that exists thinking about cross application of what it is that they're doing to food sector in other words to clean meet we want to get people who are currently funding for the environment or sustainability or. Global health thinking about the value of funding plant based meat and clean, meet aren't. So we're doing a lot across our programmatic areas that and there's a tremendous amount that's happened. Since the last time, we talked had thirteen or fourteen staff. Now, we have fifty three probably be more than seventy by the end of the year in the US and hopefully somewhere on the order at twenty internationally. So a lot happening, but the conference really worked for that. There were people who run extruder companies and people who run media companies scientists who are working in tissue engineering and people who are doing plant biology, and they came to the conference, and they learned about how much good they can do in the world..

Spotify Bruce US New York Zeno eighteen months two years
"bruce friedrich" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"bruce friedrich" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Futuristic stuff it's a great conversation about all of this it's also in amazing book with a wonderful forward from you've all know a harari who is the author of sapiens which is an extraordinary book you've got should i'll pick up as well in any event if you enjoyed my podcast with bruce friedrich of the good food institute that was about a year ago then i think you guys are going to really dig the swan but before we dive into it today's episode of the podcast is brought to you by health iq life insurance for the active and healthy you know it's amazing when it comes to life insurance being active being into things like running weightlifting yoga eating plantbased these things have traditionally had zero impact on benefiting your rates which is crazy that's insane right well not anymore introducing health iq this really cool new life insurance company designed to serve and reward those who live an active healthy conscious lifestyle and in so doing inspire health literacy across the world so how do these do it well the use science and data to get lower rates on life insurance for the healthconscious including those who exercise four times a week through cycling weightlifting swimming and running they focus on you non your family history they even help endurance athletes with low resting heart rates get better rates an they offer special rates for vegans for plantbased people which is pretty unique and kinda awesome so don't overpay for life insurance to learn more and get a free quote good health iq dot com four role that health iq the letters iq dot com slash role check it out and see which special plans you qualify for today's episode has also brought to you by the undies meoni's are the most comfortable and fun undies you in your significant other will ever own they're made from the softest materials on earth were talking threetime softer than cotton soft valentine's day it's coming up what are you going to get what are you going to do unity the roses thing going to do the chocolate.

bruce friedrich life insurance