7 Burst results for "Brown University Medical School"

"brown university medical school" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"brown university medical school" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Use that incident is justification to continue the practice of solitary confinement because of that risk that the of the situation that happened many many years ago. And that's you know, justifiable fear, of course, when we're asking people Teo to take on these dangerous jobs, but but one of the things that this group in California has realizes that if you take the correctional officers who are the ones shouldering this fear, and you show them the environment, it's not just academics. It's not just psychiatrists who we're talking about. How to make the situation better. But you actually have prison officer speaking to prison officer talking about how things have improved that that's really a locus for change. And I think that those kinds of situations Ring a lot of promise because the system has to be fixed. The system is broken, but we don't have to reinvent the wheel in order to fix it. There are places that can show us a road map for how to achieve the outcomes we desire without us, starting from scratch. Christine Montrose. Thank you so much for speaking with us. Thank you, Dave. I really enjoyed it. Christine Mantra, is an associate professor of psychiatry and human behavior at the Brown University Medical School and the author of Waiting for an echo the Madness of American Incarceration. Coming up. TV critic David Bianculli reviews the new video streaming service peacock from NBC Universal. This's fresh air. That's 7 48 support comes from the California Department of Public Health, raising awareness that smoking doubles your risk of getting respiratory infections, including Corona virus for how to quit Now when lung health is crucial, go to tobacco.

officer Christine Montrose California Department of Publi Christine Mantra Teo David Bianculli California associate professor of psychia TV critic NBC Brown University Medical Schoo Dave
"brown university medical school" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:00 min | 1 year ago

"brown university medical school" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Ren echo the madness of American incarceration. You're right about Norway, which has adopted a strikingly different model of incarceration. But this is really just in the last 25 years or so you want to just say a little bit about what their penal system used to be like What prompted a search for something different. So in the 19 eighties and nineties, Norway had a prison system that looked very much like our prison system. They had quite a bit of violence within their jails and prisons. They had a high recidivism rate. The recidivism rate at that time was between 60 and 70% which was on a par with The three year recidivism rate in the US right now is 68% so so really similar outcomes and similarly fraud environments within the jails and prisons themselves. They looked at the situation. The government looked at the situation and acknowledge that it wasn't working that they weren't having the outcomes that they desired on DH. They also had a system where there were there were escapes. Correctional officers have been killed. On DH, So they took a very hard look at the prison system to revamp it to see how their outcomes could improve and have the safety of the system could improve. And as I learned more about the system, they assigned a working group within the Justice system. Tau look at changes that could be made and one of the central tenets that came out of that working group was To stop meeting hard with hard and start meeting hard with soft and what I learned they meant by this was that if you take a harsh stance of punishment Toward people When they enter the legal system. You don't get the outcomes that you desire that this idea of a hardened criminal becoming more hardened in a prison setting was something that they really thought. Was true. They also when they say start meeting hard with soft meant that what they were really noticing was that people were coming into the prison system with thes deficiencies in various realms of their lives that were keeping them from succeeding outside of prison. So they decided to dio needs assessment of everyone who came in to prison immediately when they arrived to see. Do you have a substance use problem? Well, then we will use the time that you're incarcerated. To get you mental health treatment for your addiction. Do need job training. Do you need education? Do you need language assistance? Do you need anger management classes or parenting classes? What are the What are the root causes of the behaviours that are getting you arrested that we can try to address Said that when you sew that will use this time in prison constructively is that when you leave prison, you don't come back, and that fundamental shift in philosophy was really fascinating to me. You know what struck me about this. As I read it was that the approach in Norway is to focus on the future. What's going to happen to the inmate in the future? What's going to happen to his relationship with the community as opposed to in the United States where I think you quote Anthony Kennedy of the Justice as saying that you know here we tend to think of the justice system as imposing sentences and don't really think beyond that. Don't really think about what actually happens in the prison system when sentences are imposed. That's right. The principle that really guided some of this decision making was exactly as you say, Dave that we need to be forward looking. So when I talked to people in those systems, they would say the crime is the one thing we cannot change. That's the thing in the past. It's not our job to look backwards to the crime, which we cannot change. What we can change now is the outcome's going forward. Another really key element of this in terms of their approach was to say the punishment is your loss of liberty. That's the entire punishment. You don't get to sleep at home with your family. You don't get to structure your day like you want to. That's the entire punishment of incarceration. There's not additional punishment. That means that you have to suffer more that you have other rights taken away. It's merely your loss of liberty. So then given that that's the punishment that just exists by you being here. And when you are here, let's use the time constructively and the outcomes in this case is not just the outcome for the prisoner. It's the outcome for the community that will. Eventually he'll rejoin. No questions. So, as I said, nor we had this recidivism rate in the 19 eighties and nineties that was between 60 and 70% and that recidivism rate has dropped to 20%. So only 20% of the region prisoners air now arrested in the two years after their release. It's taken a lot of work for them to get to this place, and it isn't just a simple is saying, we're going to provide programming, so a really critical shift occurred in the role of the prison officer, our term for a correctional officer, where they said that instead of just being a guard instead of being purely about security and control That the prison officer was now going to become someone with a really complex role that was assisting in this process of bolstering a person's development and strength as they moved through the prison system, so it was a role that was more akin to a social worker. In addition to the security duties that the person had, they would also have an ability to talk with the person about why they committed the crime that they committed. What kinds of things they needed, moving forward how they could set themselves on a more constructive path moving forward and that role really shifted and changed in a very pronounced way. Christine Mantra, is an associate professor of psychiatry and human behavior at the Brown University Medical School and the author of Waiting for an echo the Madness of American Incarceration. She'll be back and talk more after a break. I'm Dave Davies,.

officer Norway Dave Davies United States Ren Anthony Kennedy fraud Christine Mantra associate professor of psychia Brown University Medical Schoo
"brown university medical school" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:45 min | 1 year ago

"brown university medical school" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In today for Terry Gross. My guest psychiatrist Khristine. Montrose has spent years treating people with serious mental illnesses. And she's noticed that many of her former patients end up in jails were prisons where their conditions inevitably deteriorate. In her new book, Montross notes that in America today there are 10 times as many people with serious mental illness behind bars as there are in our state psychiatric hospitals. Incarceration, she says, usually makes mentally ill people worse and renders stable people psychiatrically on well, making the prison system literally maddening. Dr Montrose. His book explores the reasons people with mental illnesses get arrested and incarcerated. She takes readers too many prisons for a firsthand look at the harm the experience does. Can she explores and alternative model for confinement and rehabilitation in effect in Norway. Christine Mantra, says the 2015 Guggenheim fellow in General nonfiction, an associate professor of psychiatry and human behavior at the Brown University Medical School and the author of two previous books. We spoke about her latest. It's called waiting for an echo the madness of American incarceration. Christine Montrose. Welcome to fresh air. Thanks so much, Dave. I'm delighted to be here. You're a practicing psychiatrists. You freed a lot of patients with serious mental illnesses. What's taking you two so many jails and presence? So I work in an inpatient psychiatric hospital, and I work on floors that are called the intensive care units, which is like the psychiatric version of an icy you. I've been struck over the years that my patients routinely come into contact with police. And sometimes those outcomes are helpful ones. Police bring them to the hospital. And sometimes those outcomes. They're really punitive. One's police take them to jail in prisons, And as I talked to my patients, they would often explained that the circumstances that led them to the police encounter were essentially the same reasons that brought them into the hospital. So undertreated symptoms you know, shouting in the Starbucks are causing a disturbance in the community that really were more about their symptoms of mental illness than about any kind of criminal behavior or intent. So I started to think about how my patients must do in these moments of the police encounter, and then how it must be for them to be in jails and prisons. So I decided I wanted to look for myself and see what those environments were like for the mentally ill people who are held in them. So you visited a lot of correctional facilities doing research. You also do work in court cases, right evaluating psychiatric patients, right. So so I visited a lot of prisons, and I also began working and jails doing competency to stand trial. ERROL evaluation. So when the court asks whether someone is able to understand their court case, the proceedings the charges that they're facing whether they're mentally well enough to work with their attorney, they often ask for the expert opinion of psychiatrists. So I began performing these evaluations as well. TTO learn more about what goes on when mentally ill people are charged with crimes. Right? And I wonder if you could just contrast the experience of Talking to a patient in a treatment in a clinical setting and going to a prison where you're asking questions for a different purpose in a very different atmosphere. So they're there to really remarkable differences in those circumstances. One is the environment and one is what I'm being asked to do, and I had to learn a great deal about the difference in those two things. So so the 1st 1 in terms of what I'm being asked to do when I am seeing patients in a psychiatric hospital. I'm really charged with their care. And it is my job to diagnosis them to treat them to comfort them in the midst of their suffering to work with them and their families and the nurses that are providing their care and really try Tio, help them manage and cope with the symptoms of their illness and help improve that as much as I can when I'm working, doing evaluations in the jails and prisons I'm really asked to be an objective analyst and to ask questions that try to determine almost a snapshot of the person's mental state in that moment, but it's not a clinical or treatment. Encounter on. So that was That was an important thing for me to learn that my job in that role was not to treat but was really to provide an objective analysis of what I was seeing in the moment. The other piece of the question is really A critical one as well. And we're talking about the difference between a punitive environment and a therapeutic one. And one of the things that was so striking to me when I started working in the jails and prisons were that the people that I was seeing in these two places For indistinguishable. So so the patients that I was seeing in my hospital were indistinguishable many times from the men and women that I was evaluating in jail. But the environments were so markedly different one charged with again trying Tio help in hell and the other really designed to control and punish. I want to talk about what you've seen in correctional institutions. But I want to talk a little more about this phenomenon of people with mental illnesses being arrested and incarcerated. Why is it that so often people with mental illnesses who are clearly acting out their symptoms, not intending to necessarily steel or disturb the peace or You know, or make people feel uncomfortable end up in jail. You write that there's a a phenomenon known as a compassionate arrest, which seems like an ironic term. Right, so to really understand the origins of why there are so many mentally ill people in jails and prisons in America. You really have to go back to the sixties and seventies and eighties, when large numbers of people were moved out of our state run hospital's psychiatric hospitals with the goal of shifting mental healthcare from institutions to the communities, And as you said in the opening that was an enormous shift that closed down state psychiatric hospitals. Largely due to the 1963 community Mental Health Centres Act that passed to enact this change of shifting people from hospitalized, institutionalized the lives into the community to receive their care. A great problem with that was that funding for community care was never adequately allocated so people who had required very significant levels of care and support in hospitals and institutions. Or suddenly without.

Christine Montrose America community Mental Health Centre Terry Gross Montross Starbucks Khristine Christine Mantra Norway Tio Dave associate professor of psychia ERROL Brown University Medical Schoo attorney analyst
"brown university medical school" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:02 min | 1 year ago

"brown university medical school" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's called waiting for an echo the madness of American incarceration. You write about Norway, which has adopted a strikingly different model of incarceration. But this is really just in the last 25 years or so you want to just say a little bit about what their penal system used to be like that? What prompted a search for something different? So in the 19 eighties and nineties, Norway had a prison system that looked very much like our prison system. They had quite a bit of violence within their jails and prisons. They had a high recidivism rate. The recidivism rate at that time was between 60 and 70%. Which was on a par with the three year recidivism rate in the US right now is 68% so so really similar outcomes and similarly fraud environments within the jails and prisons themselves. They looked at the situation. The government looked at the situation and acknowledge that it wasn't working that they weren't having the outcomes that they desired on DH. They also had a system where there were there were escapes. A correctional officers have been killed. On DH, So they took a very hard look at the prison system to revamp it to see how their outcomes could improve and had the safety of the system could improve. And as I learned more about the system, they assigned a working group within the Justice system. Tau look at changes that could be made and one of the central tenets that came out of that working group was To stop meeting hard with hard and start meeting hard with soft and what I learned they meant by this was that if you take Ahh! Ahh, harsh stance of punishment toward people When they enter the legal system. You don't get the outcomes that you desire that the this idea of a hardened criminal becoming more hardened in the prison setting was something that they really thought. Was true. They also when they say start meeting hard with soft meant that what they were really noticing was that people were coming into the prison system with thes deficiencies in various realms of their lives that were keeping them from succeeding outside of prison. So they decided to do needs assessment of everyone who came in to prison immediately when they arrived to see. Do you have a substance use problem? Well, then we will use the time that you're incarcerated. To get you mental health treatment for your addiction. Do you need job training? Do you need education? Do you need a language assistance? Do you need anger management classes or parenting classes? What are the What are the root causes of the behaviours that are getting you arrested that we can try to address so that when you sew that will use this time in prison constructively is that when you leave prison You don't come back, and that fundamental shift in philosophy was really fascinating to me. You know what struck me about this. As I read it was that the approach in Norway is to focus on the future. What's going to happen to the inmate in the future? What's going to happen to his relationship with the community as opposed to in the United States where I think you quote Anthony Kennedy of the Justice as saying that you know here we tend to think of the justice system as imposing sentences and don't really think beyond that. Don't really think about what actually happens in the prison system when sentences are imposed. That's right. The principle that really guided some of this decision making was exactly as you say, Dave that we need to be forward looking. So when I talked to people in those systems, they would say Crime is the one thing we cannot change. That's the thing in the past. It's not our job to look backwards to the crime, which we cannot change. What we can change now is the outcome's going forward. Another really key element of this in terms of their approach was to say the punishment is your loss of liberty. That's the entire punishment. You don't get to sleep at home with her family. You don't get to structure your day like you want to. That's the entire punishment of incarceration. There's not additional punishment. That means that you have to suffer more that you have other rights taken away. It's merely your loss of liberty. So then given that that's the punishment that just exists by you being here. And when you are here, let's use the time constructively and the outcomes in this case is not just the outcome for the prisoner. It's the outcome for the community that will. Eventually he'll rejoin. No questions. So, as I said Norway had this recidivism rate in the 19 eighties and nineties that was between 60 and 70% and that recidivism rate has dropped to 20%. So only 20% of the region prisoners air now arrested in the two years after their release. It's taken a lot of work for them to get to this place, and it isn't just a simple is saying, we're going to provide programming, so a really critical shift occurred in the role of the prison officer, our term for a correctional officer, where they said that instead of just being a guard instead of being purely about security and control That the prison officer was now going to become someone with a really complex role that was assisting in this process of bolstering a person's development and strength as they moved through the prison system, so it was a role that was more akin to a social worker. In addition to the security duties that the person had, they would also have an ability to talk with the person about why they committed the crime that they committed. What kinds of things they needed, moving forward how they could set themselves on a more constructive path moving forward and that role really shifted and changed in a very pronounced way. Christine Mantra, is an associate professor of psychiatry and human behavior at the Brown University Medical School and the author of Waiting for an echo the Madness of American Incarceration. She'll be back and talk more after a break. I'm Dave Davies,.

Norway officer Dave Davies United States Anthony Kennedy fraud Christine Mantra associate professor of psychia Brown University Medical Schoo
"brown university medical school" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:33 min | 1 year ago

"brown university medical school" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"My guest psychiatrist Khristine. Montrose has spent years treating people with serious mental illnesses. And she's noticed that many of her former patients end up in jails were prisons where their conditions inevitably deteriorate. In her new book, Montross notes that in America today there are 10 times as many people with serious mental illness behind bars as there are in our state psychiatric hospitals. Incarceration, she says, usually makes mentally ill people worse and renders stable people psychiatrically unwell, making the prison system literally maddening. Dr Montrose. His book explores the reasons people with mental illnesses get arrested and incarcerated. She takes readers too many prisons for a firsthand look at the harm the experience does. And she explores an alternative model for confinement and rehabilitation in effect in Norway. Christine Mantra, says the 2015 Guggenheim fellow in General nonfiction, an associate professor of psychiatry and human behavior at the Brown University Medical School and the author of two previous books. We spoke about her latest. It's called waiting for an echo the madness of American incarceration. Well, Christine Montross. Welcome to fresh air. Thanks so much, Dave. I'm delighted to be here. You're a practicing psychiatrists. You treat a lot of patients with serious mental illnesses. What's taking you two so many jails and presence? So I work in an inpatient psychiatric hospital, and I work on floors that are called the intensive care units, which is like the psychiatric version of an icy you. I've been struck over the years that my patients routinely come into contact with police. And sometimes those outcomes are helpful ones. Police bring them to the hospital. And sometimes those outcomes are really punitive. One's police take them to jail Zim prisons and as I talked to my patients, they would often explained that the circumstances that led them to the police encounter were essentially the same reasons that brought them into the hospital. So undertreated symptoms you know, shouting in the Starbucks are causing a disturbance in the community that really were more about their symptoms of mental illness than about any kind of criminal behavior or intent. So I started to think about how my patients must to do in these moments of the police encounter, and then how it must be for them to be in jails and prisons. So I decided I wanted to look for myself and see what those environments were like for the mentally ill people who are held in them. So you visited a lot of correctional facilities doing research. You also do work in court cases, right evaluating psychiatric patients. Right. So so I visited a lot of prisons, and I also began working and jails doing competency to stand trial evaluation. So when the court asks whether someone is able to understand their court case, the proceedings the charges that they're facing whether they're mentally well enough to work with their attorney, they often ask for the expert opinion of psychiatrists. So I began performing these evaluations as well. TTO learn more about what goes on when mentally ill people are charged with crimes. Right? And I wonder if you could just contrast the experience of Talking to a patient in a treatment in a clinical setting. And going to a prison where you're asking questions for a different purpose in a very different atmosphere, So they're there to really remarkable differences in those circumstances. One is the environment and one is what I'm being asked to do, and I had to learn a great deal about the difference in those two things so So the 1st 1 in terms of what I'm being asked to do when I am seeing patients in a psychiatric hospital. I'm really charged with their care, and it is my job to diagnosis them to treat them. To comfort them in the midst of their suffering to work with them and their families and the nurses that are providing their care and really try Tio, help them manage and cope with the symptoms of their illness and help improve that as much as I can. When I'm working, doing evaluations in the jails and prisons, I'm really asked to be an objective analyst and to ask questions that try to determine almost a snapshot. Of the person's mental state in that moment, but it's not a clinical or treatment encounter on. So that was that was an important thing for me to learn that my job in that role was not to treat but was really to provide an objective analysis of what I was seeing in the moment. The other piece of the question is really a critical one as well. And we're talking about the difference between a punitive environment and a therapeutic one. And one of the things that was so striking to me when I started working in the jails and prisons were that the people that I was seeing in these two places We're indistinguishable. So so the patients that I was seeing in my hospital were indistinguishable many times from the men and women that I was evaluating in jail. But the environments were so markedly different. One charged with again trying Tio help in hell and the other really designed to control and punish I want to talk about what you've seen in correctional institutions. But I want to talk a little more about this phenomenon of people with mental illnesses being arrested and incarcerated. Why is it that so often people with mental illnesses who are clearly acting out their symptoms, not intending to necessarily steel or disturb the peace or You know, or make people feel uncomfortable end up in jail. You write that there's a phenomenon known as a compassionate arrest, which seems like an ironic term. Right. So to really understand the origins of why there are so many mentally ill people in jails and prisons in America. You really have to go back to the sixties and seventies and eighties, when large numbers of people were moved out of our state run hospital psychiatric hospitals with the goal of shifting mental healthcare from institutions to the communities, and, as you said in the opening That was an an enormous shift that closed down state psychiatric hospitals, largely due to the 1963 community Mental Health Centres Act that passed to enact this change of shifting people from hospitalized. Institutionalized the lives into the community to receive their care. The great problem with that was that funding for community care was.

Christine Montross Dr Montrose America community Mental Health Centre Starbucks Khristine Christine Mantra Tio associate professor of psychia Norway Zim Dave Brown University Medical Schoo attorney analyst
"brown university medical school" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"brown university medical school" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"New drive home download of the top stories of the day this is the use radio nine twenty and one oh four seven FM daily rewind withdrawn St Pierre sponsored by Harris senior care services Jane Fonda and Supreme Court justice Sonia Sotomayor among the class of eleven in duck these into the women's hall of fame this year the ladies were honored on Saturday night the list of honorees include civil right activist Angela Davis women's activate Luiz water the eleven women were nominated by the public at judge by experts in their fields for their contributions to American society democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang is defending his campaign contest to give ten families a share of a hundred twenty thousand dollars the entrepreneur tells CNN state of the union he shorts perfectly legal because a team of lawyers signed off on the contest as we told you before Yang announce the contest during last Thursday's democratic did. eight saying he would give the money from his campaign chest as a way to promote his freedom dividend proposal house speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer speak with president trump over the phone on Sunday fox's tomber Gandhi as details the democratic leaders requesting to have a talk with the president over potential gun control measures Sunday March two Hundred Days since the house passed legislation that would expand background checks to include firearms sold at gun shows online and person to person posing sure say they're frustrated by what they call center Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's lack of action they add if the president supports the bill they'll join him in the rose garden for an historic signing ceremony timer gaudy fox news. well innovative approaches to treating cancer being developed at the Brown University oncology research group a consortium of scientists at area hospitals and brown university's medical school they received a dose of financial and public awareness support with the charity bicycle ride the drew some one hundred riders and raise more than fifteen thousand dollars this from pro Joe's G. Wayne Miller Dr Thomas Leland oncologist with the comprehensive cancer center at the Miriam hospital it organize Sundays toward a roadie cycling for Rhode Island cancer research which began its Salas berry farm one.

Majority Leader Mitch McConnel Rhode Island Dr Thomas Leland G. Wayne Miller Nancy Pelosi CNN Luiz Angela Davis Harris Miriam hospital Joe brown university St Pierre president tomber Gandhi Chuck Schumer
"brown university medical school" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

06:34 min | 2 years ago

"brown university medical school" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"On talk radio five, sixty K SFO of all the stories the news that are that have it a catch my attention at this moment has to do with the Brown University med school this in Providence, Rhode Island Brown University medical school. We're using live pigs for training. Live pigs for training in emergency medicine and other people are really really except. He's of course, they are school website says residency education includes hand on animal lab, hand hands on animal labs. So they don't want any testing of any kind. What were they doing with the pigs? That's what I want to know where they poke the pigs. What would they do with the pigs? That really sure but anything with the animals. I mean, you go to some of these. I've seen shampoos. You know, shampoos that we would use for our hair. And the shampoo will have a disclaimer this shampoo was not tested on live animal. Right. I'm thinking, you know, some of those animals would probably smell a lot better. If we do a little shampoo, and what's the problem? It's just shampoo shampoo. Second to kill of a second smell better. But Brian if it gets in there is it might sting. Okay. Next on more serious, topics. Donald Trump was interviewed regarding the wall. By the way, he's been tweeting a lot this morning about the well, I have a feeling so the Democrats and Republicans are sitting down there into Goshi on the wall one of his tweets. Most recently this morning, basically says. He Trump is not encouraged by what's going down with these negotiations. He doesn't think anything's going to come out of the negotiations. In fact, one headline is this morning. Republicans don't even waste your time. Because Nancy Pelosi is dug in the wall, no pun intended. I don't think she's going to budge Donald Trump's not gonna budge and I think this will allow him to go ahead and use his executive authority to build the wall. And when he makes that case before the at he's I believe also he's strategically gold. Use the state of the union to make his case with Nancy Pelosi right over shoulder, the background and his case was articulated. Best buy Lindsey Graham who you're going to hear from just a moment. But the daily caller interview Donald Trump yesterday, and they were asking him about Paul Ryan now one of our criticisms on the case have oh morning show has been this for two years. Trump had a Republican congress. You had Paul Ryan who ran the house of representatives Republican. And you had Mitch McConnell in the Senate Republican they could have done this easily during those first two years, and they didn't that's despicable. So the daily caller asks Donald Trump at a sit down yesterday. It's all transcribed. There's no audio at least that I've been able to find how big of a roadblock to wall. Funding was Paul Ryan, Don Trump response. Well, I was going to veto the omnibus Bill and Paul told me in the strongest of language, please don't do that. I'll get you the wall. And I said, I hope you mean that because I don't like this Bill, although I love the Bill for what it did for the military. And therefore if it weren't for the military. I would have vetoed it suggest you just so you understand our military needed funding desperately. So the deal was signed the omnibus Bill. I don't like the omnibus Bill, but it does fund the military. So I'll also mind this you give me the wall. President Trump said the former house speaker Paul Ryan promised to secure wall funding while Republicans control both houses in exchange for the president's signature on the omnibus spending Bill. So then Trump said I signed it. But another very big factor. Was the fact that Paul told me in the strongest terms that please sign this. If you sign this we will get you that wall, which is desperately needed by our country. And then he went lame duck. I was very disappointed in Paul. So the daily caller says did he lie to you? Did he play you Trump said I don't want to say lied. I think he probably met at the time. I guess I hope but when he went when he went lame duck, meaning is not running again that was it. So and that's exactly what happened. So Paul Ryan. I'd we'd never trusted him. I had him on the program my evening program. I had him on. What's your twice the morning show? I think. I had him on once before I said, that's it. I'm tired of this. And we had him on each one of those occasions here on case of alive. Because I had some complaints. And I wanted to ask why did you do this? Or why are you about to do that? In every case he had this ability to turn it around to make it sound as if I had completely misunderstood what he intended to do. He just he's one of these really tricky guys with the language he could turn things around. So suddenly, you're wondering. Okay. Well, maybe I had it wrong after all, okay. What you're saying? Okay. I got it. Just see we're slick, and then he would turn around and do exactly what I was what I was trying to criticism about criticize him up. So he's a snake. I never trusted the guy. He's gone. And now, we don't have the wall. But regarding the wall. One guy finally articulates a perfectly I've been wondering where is this five point seven billion dollar figure coming from. So I'm Lindsey Graham was on Fox News yesterday. And he talked about this. You'll hear it in just a second. But I'm hoping that as Lindsey Graham points this up in like three or four bullet points. I'm hoping this makes it into Trump's speech. And then he makes the case for why. He's just going to go ahead and build the wall. Because this all makes a lot of sense. And as you listen to this the Democrats have nowhere to run nowhere to hide. So here's cut one. Here's cut one gram talking about the wall. Go ahead to everybody is wondering how this movie and sedans, this way, we're going to build a wall one way or the other. Okay. So this is clearly executive authority 'cause I don't think what's happening with that seventeen. Member paddle. Democrats Republicans Eddie things getting done. So here he is explaining where this five point seven billion dollar figure comes from take a listen, the five.

Donald Trump Paul Ryan Lindsey Graham Don Trump Nancy Pelosi executive Brown University med school Providence Republican congress Rhode Island Brown University Mitch McConnell Democrats Goshi Senate Brian Fox News president Republicans