35 Burst results for "Brown University"

How Much Did the Afghanistan War Cost the US?

Arizona's Morning News

00:18 sec | 2 months ago

How Much Did the Afghanistan War Cost the US?

"Year ward in Afghanistan cost the U S. A little over $2.3 Trillion. The new figures published this week by the Brown University Cost of war project. Do not include future expenditures, including lifetime care for US veterans or future interest payments on money borrowed to fund the war

Brown University Cost Of War P Afghanistan United States
Florida Governor DeSantis Calls out NIH for Not Studyinf Long-Term Effects of Children Masking

The Dan Bongino Show

01:43 min | 2 months ago

Florida Governor DeSantis Calls out NIH for Not Studyinf Long-Term Effects of Children Masking

"We had a whole year to watch how this is developed in Florida and throughout the United States and throughout the world, and I can tell you in Florida we had school districts that mandated it last year. Others that didn't same with private and charter and there was no statistical difference. In terms of the cases. There was a study done by Emily Oster Brown University looked at New York. Massachusetts in Florida. They found no correlation to force masking and differences in cases. But you also have a situation where a lot of parents have have come that come to me. They've come to the school boards and said This has been very difficult on their young kids to have to sit there for eight hours with this, it's not natural. It's never been studied what the effects of that are. You know, NIH has a $42 billion budget. They've not spent a single penny since Covid started studying. How these mitigations affect kids. Yeah, again again. I woke up this morning saying to myself. How is it that we live with about 100 Million people who identify as being Democrats or liberals that can be this dumb to subject their kids to this without having any idea what it's going to do to their Children? Long term? Listen, I'm asking a serious question to our liberal and Democrat friends out there of which I have none. I'm just saying, pretending I have liberal Democratic friends for just a moment, a very serious question. What kind of parent are you? You're not even interested. And that there may be significant long term downsides and deleterious effects from putting a piece of cloth over your kid's face for 40 hours a

Florida Emily Oster Covid Brown University Massachusetts United States NIH New York
Working Toward a More Inclusive Music Industry

Morning Edition

01:51 min | 2 months ago

Working Toward a More Inclusive Music Industry

"One of the big stories in the music industry right now has been the response to hip hop star two babies homophobic comments, which he made during a festival in Miami late last month. As NPR's Elizabeth Blair reports, the fallout was swift as multiple festivals canceled his shows. With his millions of followers on social media. The baby has a powerful platform. He's one BT awards and been nominated for Grammys. I'm one of the greatest ain't no debate. No, no, I'm still levitated medicated. Ironic I gave him love and they and the painting on me. That's the baby on a Dua Lipa song that's in the top 10 of the Billboard's hot 100 chart. During his concert at the Rolling Loud festival in Miami, he told the audience to put your cell phone light up. If you didn't show up with HIV AIDS, you didn't show up today with HIV AIDS and get up there and essentially transmitted disease making died. 23 weeks put his cell phone right now. The backlash was immediate. Dua Lipa distanced herself from the baby Lollapalooza removed him from the lineup. Then more festivals canceled two shows Elton John and Madonna railed against the misinformation in his comments about HIV. I think there's a new moment. There's definitely a new moment. The baby is a big star and Brown University professor Tricia Rose says The cost to his career is significant. At the same time, she says, the music industry has long tolerated and profited from artists like the baby. There's many, many artists who are promoted by the industry, who are celebrated by the industry because of their quote unquote edgy, extreme behavior. And you know that is a longstanding pattern that has not abated in any way And then you know when they step out of line about when and how they actually live into that identity. Then there's all this sort of, you know we're all about peace, love and

Elizabeth Blair HIV Miami Dua Lipa Grammys Aids NPR Tricia Rose Elton John Madonna Brown University
There’s No Evidence a Covid Booster Shot Is Necessary, Says Doctor

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:19 sec | 3 months ago

There’s No Evidence a Covid Booster Shot Is Necessary, Says Doctor

"The FDA and CDC say there is no need for Covid 19 booster shot even though Pfizer says it would provide added protection at Brown University, Dr Ashish Jha says, Until we see better data that says a third shot is necessary. I remain very comfortable saying we should stick with the two shot regimen and let's see where things

Dr Ashish Jha CDC FDA Pfizer Brown University
Neurosurgery and Poetry With Paul Kaloostian

The Addicted Mind Podcast

02:20 min | 4 months ago

Neurosurgery and Poetry With Paul Kaloostian

"Hello everyone welcome to the addicted. Mind podcast. I have a wonderful guest today who we were just talking. And i have a lot of questions dr paul collusion. Who is a neurosurgeon. And he's going to talk about the brain and addiction and all the different parts of that. And what's going on up there. So paul please introduce yourself. We'll good morning. Thank you so much have me. I'm a big fan of yours and i may neurosurgeon. I deal with a wide variety of problems affecting the brain the spinal cord and variety of our nerves throughout our body of work in for about seventeen years now and the brain has really been such. A fascinating oregon. Just i remember going through training and going through my first few surgeries where the skull was opened up. The the covering of the brain was opened up at you see the actual pulse ation of the brain and the structure of Always fascinated me and to this day. I mean it's just It's really all inspiring and really is so important that we really understand our brain. Our spinal cord functions in really become more appreciative of what they do for us on a daily basis. The question i want to ask is how do you say you know. I'm going to be a neurosurgeon. How did that happen. And how did you start to kind of this is what i what interests me. Yeah first thing that came from a family of physicians. So honestly i think medicine was in was in my dna so to speak sitting at the dinner table. I mean that's what we spoke about. Dna all the time and my brother and sister also physicians as well. But i do recall. A course i took it. Brown university in rhode island was a introductory neuroscience course that was taught by a wonderful professor who actually wrote the textbook used in. That was my first introduction to how our brain spinal cord function we literally learned about the sales of the brain and spinal cord what these cells do how they function newbies. So amazed if you just looked at these books and research articles on how this once a single cell of the brain has so many different functions within it.

Dr Paul Paul Oregon Brown University Rhode Island
New COVID-19 Cases in Nursing Homes Fall Dramatically After Vaccinations

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 5 months ago

New COVID-19 Cases in Nursing Homes Fall Dramatically After Vaccinations

"A new study finds coronavirus vaccines are offering strong protection to the nation's nursing home residents considered the most vulnerable facing the disease studying data from two hundred eighty nursing homes around the country researchers from Brown University in genesis healthcare report only one percent of residents who had just gotten a second vaccine tested positive after two weeks had passed from full vaccination that number dropped to three tenths of one percent and most you did test positive didn't have any symptoms the shots are also helping unvaccinated residents cases dropped to four point three percent after vaccination clinics were held and then a month and a half later dropped below one percent the study published in the New England journal of medicine involves some twenty thousand nursing home residents most having received either the Pfizer or maternal vaccine I'm Jackie Quinn

Brown University In Genesis New England Journal Of Medicin Pfizer Jackie Quinn
"brown university" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

02:02 min | 6 months ago

"brown university" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"An economist at Brown University, argued in the Atlantic in March. That family should plan to take the kids on trips and see friends and relatives this summer. A reader sent an email to her supervisors of the university, suggesting that Oscar be promoted to a leadership role in the field of genocide. Encouragement. Is that a field far too many people are not dying in our current global camp pandemic, and far too many Children are not yet infected, the reader wrote. With the upcoming consequences of global warming about to be felt by a wholly unprepared worldwide community. I believe the time is right to get young scholars ready to follow and Dr Auster's footsteps and share the most uncomfortable places to be white and upper middle class. Oh, for God's sake. You people who are I'm reminded of the fact that then I was just reading about the school quarantines. If one little kid pops up with the covert, Do you shut it down? Who has to stay home for how long that's evolving rapidly and my school very, very well so far every time if something pops up and in every instance and this is in the liberal Wapo, if you'll excuse the tangent in every instance they're loosening the standard there saying, all right now, really, as long as you're not within six ft, or even three FT. For 15 minutes here, find State school will test you next week will be fun. So it's really moving rapidly and that direction, keeping in mind that Callie Cal unit Cornea is still 50th in the nation and getting kids back to school live. It's just unbelievable, but I just want to make the point. Some my progressive friends. We're still keeping kids out of school, and it's really because Donald Trump said You should put the kids in school. You understand that he is calling your tune, right? That he is manipulating you. If you do the opposite of what Trump said. Just reflexively. You're dancing at the end of his chain. How do you not get that anyway? Back to my sense from living in a town That's like this, that there's a competition among a number of towns to kind of be the like the last ones that open up. There's some pride in that. That's.

Trump Donald Trump 15 minutes 50th Oscar March next week three FT Brown University Auster Cornea six ft Dr this summer one little kid Callie Cal Wapo Atlantic
The Great Jewish Refugee Crisis of the Seventeenth Century

Jewish History Matters

02:05 min | 6 months ago

The Great Jewish Refugee Crisis of the Seventeenth Century

"Today i'm joined by adam teller. Who's going to be speaking with us about the century jewish refugee crisis following the sixteen forty eight on. It's key pogroms. Aman how it helps us to understand the transnational transformations of jewish life in early modern times as well as when we want to think more deeply. Broadly about refugee issues on water scale both in history and also this is something which is still very relevant today. Adam teller is a professor of history and judaic studies at brown university. He has written widely on the economic social and cultural history of the jews in early modern pulling lithuania and his most recent book. Which we're going to talk about today is titled rescue the surviving souls the great jewish refugee crisis of the seventeenth century. This is going to be the starting point for our conversation today but in many ways it's not just about the book we're gonna be talking about the big issues that surrounds it. It's really an exciting book. It was recently a finalist for the national. Jewish book award in history is a pleasure to have adam here with us. Thank you so much. Adam for joining us on the podcast. Welcome really glad to have you. Here it's a real pleasure. Thrill pledged to be here. Jason absolutely i want to get us started by thinking about kind of what is this history in the first place when we look at the story of the malinowski pogroms and aftermath in the mid seventeenth century. What is going on here. And why does it matter when we wanna think about early. Modern jewish history well in the early period poland lithuania which was then called. The police between commonwealth was the largest wealthiest most develop jewish center in europe with in world terms. It was only rivaled by the ottoman empire and had gone through about one hundred fifty years very strong social economic cultural development. Making it this powerhouse. In the history of european jewry and the place where all of your looked in a number of different fails perhaps most particularly in terms of the jewish law. But not only that

Adam Teller Aman Lithuania Brown University Adam Jason Poland Europe
CDC, FDA Urge Pause in Johnson and Johnson COVID Vaccine

Brian Mudd

00:56 sec | 6 months ago

CDC, FDA Urge Pause in Johnson and Johnson COVID Vaccine

"Bump in the road on the way to herd immunity to separate regulatory agencies are recommending that immunizations using the popular One shot Cupid vaccine be put on hold CBC's Aaron Carter ski a certain severe blood clot occurs and fewer than one in a million people, but it has to be treated in a special way. So the CDC and the FDA want to temporarily halt the U. Of the Johnson and Johnson vaccine so doctors can learn about it. About seven million doses of the J and J vaccine have been administered. So far, there have been only six women between the ages of 18 and 48, who developed a blood clot about a week after receiving their doses. ABC News Medical contributor. Dr Ashish Joshi, the dean of Brown University School of Public Health, says Despite the pause, I think the Jang jae vaccine is both terrific and its efficacy and it is exceedingly safe based on everything I know I'd feel comfortable having my family get it. Walgreens this morning announced that is putting a hold on the use of the J and J

Aaron Carter Johnson CBC Dr Ashish Joshi CDC Brown University School Of Pub FDA Abc News Walgreens
New York reports its first case of the troubling variant that is dominant in Brazil

Ric Edelman

00:29 sec | 7 months ago

New York reports its first case of the troubling variant that is dominant in Brazil

"Concern about new variants of the coronavirus that one first spotted in the UK is in all 50 states. New York City is now reported its first case of another variant, first seen in Brazil. Doctor She's John dean of Brown University School of Public Health says vaccinated Americans Should have protection. The vaccines. We have particularly the J and J, which was tested against the Brazilian Berry. But I think also modern advisor are going to hold up quite well against Brazilian variant. So I'm not super worried about that 31% of US adults have got at least one dose of the vaccine.

Brown University School Of Pub John Dean New York City Brazil UK United States
"brown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:19 min | 8 months ago

"brown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Do you think That is your highest of optimism in terms of therapy for both estimate in less What type of timothy thing will get to and better Those things ultimately cure or justice. Lloyd don't as on a good track in the sense of. It's clear what we need to put back into the neurons which gene and they're going to get better i think and less invasive slash expensive for the therapy and then for the estimate patients will then be a question of how much better. What else can we do. What else wait add so estimates on a pretty good glide path to not you treatment early not be fatal and to be something where you know. Decades of life with really with good mobility should be expected. Ls is trickier if Fires for maui. It's possible that we'll be able to slow. I think five years will have treatments for some patients especially if they have a gene. we recognize. Were we can you come in to lab or if you know your runs in your family within five years we'll be able to say we're watching you worried about this baby. We can talk about this sort of treatment but the screening. The societal questions are just as big in the sense. Of how easy is it gonna be in. How much do people want to invest as a society in for you could have a mutation in any of these thirty genes. yeah yeah overhanging questions For healthcare in gem rate it seems like acknowledgee is developing lot faster than the regulatory framework or in some sense of signs state and so complex complex thing but good thing is technology. We'd like you should have if you haven't already have another podcast on on that topic of s into that excellent. Thanks so much for spending you do. This is a scientific sense. Podcast providing unscripted conversations with leading academics and researchers on variety of topics. If you liked to sponsor the podcast please reach out to info. At scientific sense dot com..

five years thirty genes both Lloyd scientific sense dot com
"brown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:48 min | 8 months ago

"brown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Job security fearing out. The basic mechanisms is fine. It would be lovely though to figure out an effect infants. Something that could be a therapeutic. And then i'd like to have us killed as fix help. The patients cure them and we can all focus on some other disease estimate airless It looks like a lot of Not common features. They're nudo deacon ridder Gene defects what did we know about the environmental effects Other features from than than saw come with genetic for esa may short answer is probably not for eight. Alas gets much more of a question in the sense. If you start reading you know. Websites are older books or older studies. People would talk about sporadic. Ls just appeared in person and no one else in the family. Had the disease versus mealy a-list where you suddenly realize. Oh that's what the grandmother had as the grand. The father had and now the kids are probably at risk. That's a meal so we used to think that most dale us was rack because we couldn't find g. but now that we know more jeans more and more realize there's a big genetic component to a s but there's still a large section of patients where one can't find one of these genes in so that means a non speculating that either fair or a lot of really rare genes. Each each family is like a unique sort of. We rarely this cause disease or something about the environment that that person's genetic makeup and they were in led to a less and i don't want you know you can now think through your head of all the things that are bad for europe un's and think maybe those combined with specific like aol s mutation might lead to disease and people are testing. That sort of stuck. Yeah so cc. cheerleaders incidents series of also. I mean it's a little more common in males than females like many diseases. But not enough to make you shop. It seems like it might be a little higher incidence in the military and athletes or people who are super athletic. But again it's not. It's not overwhelming back so it could be. Just there's something about aol ass may be This is this is also speculation. Maybe there's something about an someone who's going to less. That makes them more athletic works really well in the beginning. And then there's a crash that we all ls. Maybe they're more prominently. Athletics is exceeded on average more. I don't know you mentioned the estimate being more frequent inculcation police. let's do eat.

eight europe one Each each family
"brown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:32 min | 8 months ago

"brown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"As normal cell and the question becomes Is that all there is to it or is there more and and if we have two types of neurons dying the spinal cord neurons and the neurons in the brain. Those are actually to some different types of neurons. Are they both equally sensitive to this superoxide oxygen stress or is one of the more sensitive than the other. It can't be therapeutically. Sort of add stuff So that the body s nobility to get rid of rankles getting that into the neurons of be tough yes we but so it's not necessarily as systemic if you there's a delicate balance right in ourselves between they have to make deal with use oxygen sucrets all the time. 'cause we were oxygen based for our country if we we. Can't you have to too much because that runs into other problems. The other cells of audie are really affected so much by the s. O d one mutations one. I'd be a little nervous about trying to change your whole global overall in hand oxygen. Just i'd rather we'd rather just try to help the neurons if this is the problem. Right you You to do something. And all the all the sects of data that complex system in other plants out that the system became really focused and and that that ultimately leads its approach. People wanna make usually even some of our even our best drugs right usual. Have off target or other consequences. Yeah i i didn't go and i don't know too much about that. I think the issue exists even force of vitamin c. And things like that. Don't let vitamin a. You'd think it'd be good for you. But no right. Yeah it's the same issue so Handing heading bidders bitsy elegance at you you know have a method by which again many flied league In geneva the disease into elegance we can observe them and became quite different approaches on them. What other things that you're working on two. We are working on a couple things. So this i was a test case saying ooh look. We can engineer models. That are much more precise in to see elegance so we've gone ahead and done that for several other genes and created disease models for them and now we can talk things with all these models first of all.

two both vitamin a. one first two types vitamin c.
"brown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:39 min | 8 months ago

"brown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Now had the opportunity for this to precisely go into the worm jeans and say i want to put that little change. That happens patient. Right there in the worm. G is exactly the same spot in the protein. And then i wanna see what happens so this paper was our first attempt to make what i you know you could call a knock in a more precise a non overexpression model of ls. That might tell us more about why the neurons degenerate die you. Talk about oxidative stress Yes comestible the disease model. We started with was the working at one. Many genes mutation can cause a ls one of them is s. O d one. People have been working on s o d one for a long time. So s o d means superoxide. Dismutase and. I'm not going to go dive deep into that but it it's it's one of the proteins that helps the cell deal with reactive oxygen species rea- oxygen is good until you have too much of it or you change it around a little and then it's actually dangerous free. Oxygen radicals or dangerous. Yoursel has to deal with those. And that's what the s o d one proteins should normally be spending his time doing but with the disease lille comes into play. We think now is done..

first attempt one of proteins lille
"brown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:32 min | 8 months ago

"brown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"There's been beautiful work over the last couple of decades in the al s human genetics field to identify first one. Then a couple more than several more genes. Who when there's a mutation when there's a bad hoppy disease legal the patient will probably get the disease and actually louis in your eyes start out Probably not functioning. Well you have a lot of neurons. The move every muscle in your body is not one neuron must and so you start losing a few. It just starts out being week. That is is is the disease spreads you lose more more. Get more obvious weakness. And in fact it can spread up. The disease can spread to also kill neurons up in the opinion up in the brain which are also in charge of helping move the muscles the motor neurons in the up in the head and so it surfaces late life. I've imagined hawking an unusual case right spend what what one of the frustrating and tough to understand things about a last. Is that some patients. Will you know the average prognosis is death. Within a couple of years patients though will have a disease that progresses super slowly. And they'll live decades. Like hawking swat hawking right yeah So how long it lives He was a young adult so he probably is okay. The you've caught me out here. I don't know if he must've been in his sixties least when he died. I'm hawking is also another example of the the the specificity of disease it affects the neurons to help our muscles move in for many patients. It doesn't affect how well your brain thinks though at all for some patients it does that your brain is in effect doing just fine. You feel you think just as well as you ever did. But it's just that you lose your muscle control right. Yeah caulking talk sure Says the going back to the elegant again. You're using the same moral here solemnity learning here from. Yeah no. it's the if we want to study disease in mice or flies worms. We have to try and find a way to you. Know not gonna save. Give the animals of disease. That's kind of what it is. You have to create a mall. And all of the simplest way that people started making models Especially because there were only you know some. Christopher wasn't available originally when people started making models veil s they would often just take the human disease gene and put it into the mouths to fly the worm in lots of copies. And so there were in. So you'll be lot of disease proteins and the animals would get sick really fast and you know that can be convenient because you wanna be able to test a lot of things that takes a year and a half for your animal to had symptoms. That's a long time to wait to do an experiment. You can also learn something you definitely can learn from these disease models where lots of protein is made and we've had lots of insights but there are other things that can be hidden in that model. It could be that you know. That's not at that because that's not exactly what's happening patient. The patient has a sort of more slow. A lower level of toxic protein from the bad eat and so with the discovery of the groundbreaking techniques of crisper past nine genome editing..

Christopher sixties one neuron first one last couple of decades a year decades more couple of years genome a couple
"brown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:45 min | 8 months ago

"brown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Yeah and so going back to the human stan that would imply But obviously this is only work It has to be mild all has to be pickup bully Pick it up early. Would that be useful. Is as i see it if we could take one of these mod. These was called them. Suppressors one of these juice genes that brin hilda's group is finding and put it in someone else who has a mild case of may then it would help or this is enough impossibility. We now have a treatment for estimated partially helps so ineffective moves up from being severe estimate two mile estimate somme so maybe those all of those patients who were getting the current therapy could regain even more function in their life. If we had this as an adjunct to that as an addition to that it's really fascinating so you talked about one in forty has the gene defect in terms of actual incidents of esa may In the us population all. I think it's well the map and suggested about one out of one thousand six hundred births and i think. I think it's a little less than that. I think it's about one in two thousand. But i'll say you know as a as a faculty member all have in my lab or people who work in my lab and then go off to medical school become of them contacted me after they've been in the clinic for you know their first six months in said by the way. Have anything to help estimate. Because i'm seeing lots of these babies. And so if pretty common if i if you spend a lot of time in pediatrics it's it's probably difficult to seize You know issue because we don't really have a at least A a A cure or treatment. That is that is right so this will be leading the accused that are out there are. They're getting better but they're also pretty invasive they have you want to inject into the spinal cord treatments and i mean it's one level a game changer is like as a whole medical field therapeutic for degenerative disease that really really works but It's it's very expensive the Upside is that we are making progress. Though what is gonna say. When i started working on esa may i was surprised to learn how common it was and then i realized you know kevin to baby the baby is it's a it's a family tragedy personal tragedy. But it's not like ls that so many people have heard of because an l. s. patient is a usually also a young adult who knows a lot of other people in the alarm social circle in so many people more people here of it. Yeah yeah s you have under the on a ls again. The against as a model here. no again To set the context. What exactly is a symptom so. Ls is a disease. It's also known as lou gehrig's disease named after myspace player in the us. It's also but stephen hawking s it's a disease that usually affects young middle aged adults And it's a weakness usually somewhere in like one of the limbs live you know my end then it becomes progressive in spreads to the other limbs. And eventually you know. The patient can become incapacitated. Unable to move there are to their legs in their losing. Same neurons the same That are that are lost in may but this is now happening in adult in jeans are at fault so there are..

kevin first six months one thousand two mile brin hilda forty two thousand six hundred births one level myspace one about one stephen hawking s so
"brown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:52 min | 8 months ago

"brown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Somebody's yeah it is the flies out. These little animals have to solve many of the same problems. The large animals do in the sense that you have to move. To find food you have to move to avoid noxious things you know. You have to find a mate if you're going to be and so see elegance. Has you know jerry. It look they swim along in water or the crawl on the ground and i can just look at a worm and say oh. That's a healthy worm. This moving really well and another if worms has say have mutations we move that you make neurons muscles work less. Well if those are severe. I can look at that. Say oh that's sad. Yes so the new ones engineer a defect into them. Can you repeat that questions. It can be into needed. A defect and yeah. Yeah so we can do this a lot of ways when over the course of the career. Our tools are just getting better and better. You've probably talked to people about crisper. Cast nine in your series where we can go in and make the changes we want so we can do that in seattle and we take advantage of that in studying other diseases and we'll product advantage of that again studying spinal muscular atrophy but at the time i did this work that technology was not so advanced instead. What we can do. We can easily put you know. Insert a chunk of dna in the worms. Gino and that can change how the neurons function or we can express you know proteins using these. You can leaving put proteins into the worm. Neurons that make them be or less active when we turn might soften. Its really cool. Here's what we call up the genetics to make the neurons more or less active and so estimate in humans The they have the neurons. But they just defected. They're producing Unexpected types of proteins. What exactly happens from making a secure so mechanistically..

nine seattle
"brown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:55 min | 8 months ago

"brown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"It gets worse and worse so time. Yes exactly starts. It's the most of the infants are born and they. They seem totally fine but gradually they lose function of neurons and so then they lose ability to move their limbs in a bid eventually respiration because a problem to which is breathing. Okay okay and so you mentioned before we get into it so you're using a more of here and see elegance as the as the model. Yeah i can. I can lean back. Say when i started getting into science and i was interested in neuroscience back when i was in high school in college i didn't think about. I wanted to address questions about how iran's heavens nervous develop in health brain work. What goes wrong diseases. But i really never thought about you. Know working with flies in words because really those don't seem like they would have much influence but all this event that there would be similar but it turns out almost all the animals on the planet have pretty much. The same jeans are neurons. Were pretty much the same way. And so people start must be flies and worms because you can ask questions fast. And easy i guess. Evolution must be true Yeah be have some evidence. I started using. I did my training on using flies. It use the way. But then when i started training to do ma as opposed to my own independent lab. And so that lab. I moved to seattle again. Which is a little worm about the size of a size of a period on printed page law. But you know they have the same types of neurons just in broad strokes humans do they have motor neurons that move their muscles they have other neurons that tell them littering around but to do they use the same signaling molecules. Yeah that's incredible so Muhammad's be so we can actually potentially owned of neurons. Every this is This was groundbreaking work done by john. Y and judd solstice and others in the ceilings ill there were this yelling and the ones we have three hundred and two neurons everywhere has exactly the same ones connected pretty much the same way to each other so this neuron talks to this niran talks to that. You're on these.

judd solstice three hundred Muhammad niran seattle two neurons john. Y
"brown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:07 min | 8 months ago

"brown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Then command. It's a pleasure to be here. thanks for about him. Gill yeah thanks for doing so. I want to start with one of your recent papers Genetic modifiers evaluate End to end sedate and unanimously defects in a more of spinal muscular atrophy before we get into the details on. What exactly is Spinal muscular atrophy will how does it present that one. what are the symptoms. yes spinal. Muscular atrophy is freising lake common in the sense that One and forty of us carries of in the white caucasian population. We'll talk at least in the united states. Most of europe carries the a silent. Lille that has no impact probably on one of their chromosomes. But if you have a child with someone else who has a silent like this the disease lille then the odds are that one of the four children. You have will have this. Disease and child is usually borne seeming quite normal but because they start losing the function and then the neurons in the spinal cord that control. Your musselman's die these motor neurons. The child often will never sit up. It'll become unable to move. Its limbs and before there was any treatment for this disease. The prognosis was really poor. You know decades ago it was like a couple years now with better Palliative and other assisted treatments and understanding how to keep the kids from getting infections often. These kids can live until their teenage years. It's been exciting to watch the field. You find a way to treat the disease as well so now. There's some treatments that can really help people. That's that's so you said one in third one uninformed probably but once you're cook asian population has the defendant. It doesn't materialize Unless you have both copies fat. Yeah if the kid gets two bad copies then will almost almost always give the disease in sometimes usually pretty severe from times. There are families where it's a little where it's less severe symptoms might not show up until the teenage years. Yeah but one in fourteen is pretty high end so we find it only in the caucasian population. Not sorry yes. It's a lower Frequency in yunan caucasians. But it's still out there. It's out there. so one. In forty at least intuitively and feels that highs. Do we have sort of a genetic test that people can take to identify the issue. Good question to With before there was a treatment for esa may because of the way you know insurance and other things are set up and was it. There was not an easy way to test for esa may and it. Wasn't you know done for newborns or families. The i think there are two two reasons for this one is there was no treatment. And so it wasn't clear we could do testing the newborns. You it wasn't going to change the outcome now. There's a pushes their multiple states to get testing done because now there is a treatment so the other thing is it can be a little top to test because let me think about it. One had expected more than one thing and go wrong with the disease gene. And so it's not like you have a magic. Yes no test here. It's might be a little more complicated than that. Okay look at the progressive disease right..

fourteen europe Gill two decades ago forty united states more than one thing both copies One four children two bad copies two reasons caucasian one third one lille asian caucasians Lille
"brown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:54 min | 8 months ago

"brown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we.

"brown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:22 min | 9 months ago

"brown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we.

The Power of Black Female Voters With Marcia Chatelain

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

04:49 min | 9 months ago

The Power of Black Female Voters With Marcia Chatelain

"I recently wrote in forbes about how kamala harris may be able to heal the wounds between black women and white women but i defer to our terrific yesterday on these issues. I'd like you to meet dr. Marcia chatelaine a provost distinguished associate professor of history and african american studies at georgetown university here in washington dc. She's a scholar of american life and culture previously. She was an assistant professor of honors in african american studies at the university of oklahoma in norman. She earned her. Phd at brown university and her undergraduate studies at the university of missouri columbia in journalism and religious studies fellow aspiring journalists. They go. Marsha was a terrific expert featured in the recent pbs series. The vote on how women fought for and won the right to vote over an eighty year struggle or more welcomed green connections radio. Marcia thank you for joining us. Thank you for having me. Oh you're welcome. You're welcome so our start in the heart of this issue. As i said in my introduction i've understood the black and white women had a kind of love hate relationship if you will during the suffrage battles as i understand it. Black women wanted white women to include abolition in their struggle. But the white women leaders believe the combining the two would keep the legislation from. What is your take on it. Tell us the truth. Because you're the historian so the issue at hand between abolition and suffrage are deeply tied. And that's because a number of figures in the suffrage movement were first activists in the fight against slavery and i think the poignancy of the battle for women's suffrage was the fact that many of the white women who were at the lead of the suffrage movement were anti-slavery and they had supported. Abolitionist may have believed that there was a moral reason to end the system of slavery but when it came to suffrage they were divided over the issue of universal suffrage Some do not believe that black women white men should equally have the vote. Some did not believe that black men and black women should have the vote. So i think that the suffrage movement really exposes the limitations of racial solidarity even among people who were on the right side of history one issue were not able to transfer that sense of grace to the issue of suffrage. And that's where you see the fault lines. In the suffrage movement really emerged from it was the fact that they did not want include african american women visibly or prominently or ideologically in their fight for the right to vote because they believed that it would degrade the quality of the vote of degrade the preciousness of the right and a number of these women again. Even though they were morally opposed to slavery they would not immune from white supremacist ideas. Okay so there's so much to unpack in there. You said something really interesting you said and i paraphrase of course but the the the divisions over the vote represented larger divisions in the racial schisms. If you will Racial solidarity behind the vote. Yes so one of the things that i think. A lot of people don't understand from how they're taught history is that we often think of the issue of slavery as one in which people were either pro or anti and it's often presented as a matter of north versus south union versus confederacy. But if you look at the movement to end slavery and look at abolitionists. They all had very different ideas of what happens next. They knew that slavery is a scourge on the nation. But they didn't agree on. What would it mean for african americans to be elevated to the level of status rather the level of a citizen and what that status should mean and so there were people who were abolitionists but they were segregationists. There were abolitionists who believed that african americans should be repatriated to colonies in africa. They were people who believed in complete and total social equality in some people believed in some level of social quality but not marriage and so those debates among the abolitionist movement i think are very much mirrored in the debate among white selfridge's who should get the vote i who should be allowed to vote. And what measures should be taken in order to ensure their desired goals

Marcia Chatelaine University Of Missouri Columbi Kamala Harris University Of Oklahoma Georgetown University Brown University Marsha Marcia PBS Norman DC Washington South Union White Selfridge Africa
Buoyed by Keystone XL, pipeline opponents want Biden to act

WBZ Afternoon News

00:27 sec | 9 months ago

Buoyed by Keystone XL, pipeline opponents want Biden to act

"Infectious South African variant of Corona virus was first discovered in the United States in South Carolina on Thursday, then another case was found in Maryland yesterday. That highly contagious strain again in it now in Maryland in South Carolina doctors she's shot you have Brown University School of Public Health says on ABC is Good Morning America. It's likely these variants, arm or white spread these various or probably everywhere, not just in the states for identifying them. But in others as well. California and Minnesota now reporting cases of a Brazilian variant and hundreds of cases of the UK variant have been found in the police 32 states. Study show Our current vaccines protect against the UK variant, but the South African variant could pose more issues.

South Carolina Brown University School Of Pub Maryland America ABC Minnesota California UK
Johnson & Johnson's vaccine may soon be available

News, Traffic and Weather

00:25 sec | 9 months ago

Johnson & Johnson's vaccine may soon be available

"Ah, third vaccine could soon be available. Johnson and Johnson's vaccine was less effective in trials in the vaccines from Fizer and Moderna. The doctor is she shot, the dean of Brown University School of Public Health tells ABC. We've got to see the full data. We haven't got the FDA authorization that said Goal here is to prevent people from getting really sick and dying, of course, and the Johnson Johnson vaccine based on what we've seen really looks like. It's terrific

Fizer Johnson Brown University School Of Pub Moderna ABC FDA Johnson Johnson
Medical Experts 'Fustrated' by Slow Vaccine Rollout

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:48 sec | 10 months ago

Medical Experts 'Fustrated' by Slow Vaccine Rollout

"Sounding the alarm over the covert vaccine rollout so far at Brown, University renowned pandemic expert As she's Joss says he's incredibly frustrated by a slow rollout asking on Twitter. Did we not know the vaccines were coming states ever see fewer doses than initially expected? Jaws, blaming the federal government for not working with them on delivery over the weekend. New York University's Arthur Caplan was also worried. We've got to get on the ball here, a virus relief bill President Trump signed Sunday includes $69 Billion for vaccine distribution, which Josh says will help. Meantime, Vice President elect Kamila Harris got her first vaccine dose this morning and urged all Americans to follow when their turn comes SOCCER

Brown, University Arthur Caplan Joss Bill President Trump New York University Twitter Federal Government Vice President Elect Kamila Ha Josh Soccer
Virus expert 'frustrated' by slow vaccine rollout, Harris gets first dose

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 10 months ago

Virus expert 'frustrated' by slow vaccine rollout, Harris gets first dose

"Some medical experts are sounding an alarm over the code nineteen vaccine rollout so far at Brown University renowned pandemic expert as she shot says he's incredibly frustrated by a slow rollout asking on Twitter did we not know the vaccines were calming speeds ever see fewer doses than initially expected in jaws blaming the federal government for not working with them on delivery over the weekend New York university's Arthur Kaplan was also worried we've got to get on the ball here a virus relief bill president trump signed Sunday include sixty nine billion dollars for vaccine distribution which Joss says we'll help meantime vice president elect comelec Harris got her first vaccine does this morning and urged all Americans to follow when their turn comes Sager mag ani Washington

Brown University Arthur Kaplan Bill President Trump New York University Federal Government Twitter Vice President Elect Comelec H Joss Sager Mag Ani Washington
CDC says new Covid strain in UK could already be circulating undetected in U.S.

WBZ Afternoon News

00:46 sec | 10 months ago

CDC says new Covid strain in UK could already be circulating undetected in U.S.

"As the United Kingdom celebrates Christmas with some parts under a tighter lockdown, due in part to a new, more transmissible spread strain of cove it. Health officials operate under the assumption that it's already arrived in the US Here's a B C's Aaron Critter ski. The new variant appeared in two people in Britain who came into contact with others who had traveled to South Africa where the mutation was first detected. Doctor and she's jot, the Brown University School of Public Health, told ABC News. The variant is likely in the United States are hospitals are feeling this incredible amount of strain. Already, these variants are going to lead to more people getting infected more people getting hospitalized. Unfortunately, more people dying, just said the U. S. Does a poor job but looking for new variants, he said, though he remains confident vaccines will work against them.

Aaron Critter Brown University School Of Pub United Kingdom United States Britain Abc News South Africa
Pfizer to supply U.S. with 100 million more vaccine doses

Bloomberg Surveillance

00:42 sec | 10 months ago

Pfizer to supply U.S. with 100 million more vaccine doses

"With the U. S to provide millions of vaccine doses to Americans in the first half of next year. Wiser said it would supply the United States with enough Corona virus doses to vaccinate 100 million Americans. There are already millions of doses of the visor and now Madonna vaccines in circulation. At last check the U. S had vaccinated less than 700,000 people. Dina Brown University's school of public health doctor, She's John says That's something to keep an eye on over the next several weeks. I'm hoping that pace picks up this week and next, But if it doesn't I think we're gonna start getting concerned about whether we can get all these vaccines out to people. Quickly, you know or not. As for holiday traveled. The essay is screening more than four million people since Friday live from the Bloomberg Interactive Brokers Studios. This is global news 24 hours a day on the air and on Bloomberg Quick take power by more than 2700, journalists and analysts in more than 120 countries on Michael Barr, and this is Bloomberg.

U. Dina Brown University Wiser Madonna United States Bloomberg Interactive Brokers John Bloomberg Michael Barr
Health Officials Urge Americans Not to Travel

Rush Limbaugh

00:36 sec | 10 months ago

Health Officials Urge Americans Not to Travel

"Be told not to travel there being told again, and they're still doing it. Susie Labor preparing to fly cross country from from L. L. A A X X to to Florida Florida for for Christmas Christmas and and traveling traveling to to see see my my Children Children and and my my granddaughter. granddaughter. And And so so and and to to spend spend two two days days in in Disney Disney world world and and then then sit sit back back and and get get back back to to work. work. Now Now she and all of us once again being urged not to do that by public health experts like Brown University's doctor, she's job given how full our hospitals are right now. I just think it's a very, very risky thing. He s a says more than a million people pass through airport security each day, the weekend before Christmas TBC Sherry Preston Despite

Susie Labor L. L. Disney Disney Florida Brown University Sherry Preston
Failing the Test

Modern Ruhles with Stephanie Ruhle

03:34 min | 11 months ago

Failing the Test

"This week. We watched as the first americans received the covid vaccine heroic healthcare workers who have been on the front lines of this fight for months it was emotional an extraordinary and it is something we should be very excited about but at the same time we cannot forget that most of us will not be getting this vaccine for months and we cannot lose sight of the crisis at hand because the spread of covid never been worse for almost nine months now i have been reporting on cova covering it every day. The stories of healthcare workers families business owners teachers. I thought i understood the chaos of this moment but a few weeks ago. I realized i did. I became one of the more than sixteen million. Americans who've contracted the virus sorted my family and the experience of getting covid made it even more clear to me the we have failed and continued to fail in some very qa's namely testing and tracing. I'm stephanie rule. Msnbc anchor nbc. News senior correspondent and. This is modern rules. A podcast from nbc. Think an iheartradio on this podcast. We're not gonna waste your time. We're interested in getting straight to the point and they were gonna leave you with some time to think and today we are looking at why the us is failing the covid test and how we can use the tools we have at our disposal right now to maybe get things under control. And i've got the perfect guest here to help us. Try and make sense of it. Dr sheesh off. He's the dean of brown university school of public health and he has been a crucial voice of science and reason throughout this pandemic doctors off. Thank you for joining us. I start with covid nineteen tests. Can you explain to us. What kind of tests are available in the united states. The pros the cons. Because i'm gonna tell you when my husband woke up with a scratchy throat not feeling that. Well i foolishly thought. Let's run out and get a test. There's no such thing as let's go out and get a test so we thank you so much for having me on it. And this is a question that confuses people still nine ten months into this pandemic right now if you wanna think about a test to diagnose whether you have the virus or not you have to twice. It's an antigen tests and a pcr tests. Most of the tests we've used over the last nine months are these. Pcr tests the really good They pick up almost anybody who's infected. They have to be running a major lab and they can be turned around twenty four hours but sometimes the a week. Let's talk about that. Other kind of test the antigen tests. That's the rapid test. Yeah that's the rabbit office. Cheap ten to fifteen bucks a test as opposed to a hundred and fifty two hundred dollars for pcr tests. You should be able to get a result in fifteen minutes. So you're thinking cheap and fast. What's wrong with this story. It's a little less sensitive. So let me explain without me the. Pcr tests will pick up somebody with the infection up two weeks. After they've been infected the antigen tests is really a test for business. So if you are in that period of time where you're spreading the virus. Lots of people the antigen tests will be posits but there are other times. Let's say later in the disease course where you may not have a lot of virus. You're still infected. The level of virus you have is very low. 'cause you're kind of on the tail end of your illness the antigen tests will then turn negatives not gonna be as good at picking those people.

NBC Dr Sheesh Brown University School Of Pub Msnbc Stephanie United States
"brown university" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"brown university" Discussed on Cardionerds

"Everyone on the scene like brenda one of the third year. Cardiology fellows in one of the chief fellows with her. My interest is in electrophysiology. Where i hope to be pursuing fellowship in the next two years and i'm greg celebrate the second year fellows here also gonna go into non invasive with the focus on cardiac imaging as seem brinda gregg. Welcome welcome it is so nice to meet you today. So let's dive right in. But before we do. Can you take us to your favourite part of providence rhode island or even tell us a little bit more about providence rhode island so we can get a good feel for where you guys live and where you practice your craft shore so if you guys have never been a providence to beautiful charming small new england town. It's full of amazing restaurants activities beautiful historical sites. It's a college town so it's home to brown university. But we also have johnson and wales providence college. The rhode island school design. It has something for everyone cleaning kids in young families but providence rhode island in general. It's known as the ocean state and that's for good reason. The coastline in the water are probably the two things that rhode islanders love. The most and us cardiology fellows especially in the summer. We love to go out to the water. Sometimes with our attending 's in hang out on the ocean. I don't think you can be a cardiology attending in rhode island without owning a boat so fellows boating night is a summer. Tradition in our program were attending. Take us out on the water. And we kind of anchor oss off somewhere in. Just hang out and talk cardiology on a boat. So intrude rhode island fashion. We're going to grab a few refreshing beverages with us. We'll take you guys out on a boat will anchor off powders. Which is one of our favorite spots. Also prudence island. It's an awesome area. Great spot to fish kayak and we'll hang out and talk some cardiologists. You guys the sounds amazing. Thank you so much for inviting us to partake in such incredible part of being a brown cardiology fellow. Really love this tradition. And let's do what data. And i love doing when we are voting on pristine waters. Let's talk cardiology. Would he has had for us. We will kick things off so to start. This is a seventy five year old gentleman who had a history of hypertension diabetes and former tobacco abuse with a recent diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Who originally presented to one of.

providence rhode island rhode island school rhode islanders cardiology fellow wales providence college brenda brown university greg cardiomyopathy johnson
"brown university" Discussed on WRKO AM680

WRKO AM680

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"brown university" Discussed on WRKO AM680

"Well, according to Brown University, there's such a super spreader that the people that are vulnerable around them. Have a positivity rate of 0.15 again. That's not hospitalized. That's not deathly ill on ventilators. Any of that stuff that's just tested positive for having it. 0.15 What does it all mean? Well, it all leads to pretty basic question, doesn't it? What are we doing? What are we doing across the country? With remote learning in hybrid learning and hopscotch, learning, whatever stupid word you want to use to describe what it is that you're doing if, as we have been told, all along, kids aren't susceptible to the thing. My ultimate take away from this lightning. The people that have made the decisions that we have to have remote learning. They're the ones that tell us to trust the data. Do you know what they didn't do In this case? They didn't trust the data, because if they trusted it, they would have known that this was gonna happen because this is what we've been told. Over and over again. Kids aren't susceptible. And if you take the proper precautions, grown ups aren't real susceptible. The schools have now proven it. Kids aren't getting sick and teachers aren't getting sick either. Never mind dying. They're not getting sick. And yet We gotta do this thing because second wave could be coming by the way. It's not just those schools. It's colleges to. There's another story out about that. I'll discuss that we come back because this is crazy, and then we'll get to what Boston is announced today. It's VD. You're in the middle right here on our couch now. W RKO traffic from the my pillow dot com Traffic center. Thiss report sponsored by Rocket Mortgage heads up those of you.

Brown University Rocket Mortgage Boston
"brown university" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"brown university" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"A freshman at Brown University will have to wait until next spring to come to campus that was part of Browns for turned a school plan laid out yesterday, the Ivy League school will go with a three term calendar undergrads in the fall. We'll have single dorm rooms, all students and employees will have to submit to Corona virus testing. President Trump says his administration is going to put pressure on governors to reopen K through 12 schools in the fall. Everybody wanted the moms wanted the dads wanted the kids wanted. It's time to do it. Speaking at a round table discussion at the White House, the president said they do not want governors to keep schools closed for political reasons, Trump said the mortality rate in the U. S from the China viruses down tenfold and now it's time to reopen schools by its president, Mike Pence, said they're concerned that Children are falling behind in the classroom, not just physically but emotionally because there is no substitute for in class learning. Mark Mayfield, NBC News Radio, The White House Corona virus response coordinator says states that reopened too fast are to blame for the current cove in 19 surge. Dr. Deborah Burkes told the Warren Business Daily podcast that states that re opened much more abruptly ignored the guidelines put out by health officials, equating it to driving 65 miles per hour in a 25 zone. More GOP lawmakers are planning to skip the Republican National Convention. The Hill reports. Alaska's Lisa Murkowski, main Susan Collins and Utah's Mitt Romney won't attend the event and Jacksonville, Florida next month. Colorado State University.

President Trump president Ivy League school Mitt Romney Brown University White House Dr. Deborah Burkes Mike Pence Colorado State University GOP Mark Mayfield Lisa Murkowski Warren Business Daily NBC Susan Collins Alaska Utah Jacksonville coordinator
"brown university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:41 min | 1 year ago

"brown university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Linguistic and psychological sciences at Brown University and that means in a nutshell that you try to understand what they try to understand how people think easy question first how do you get someone to change their mind well first of all there's no silver bullet it's it's really hard but if you're gonna try the first thing you should do is try to get them to change their own minds and you do that by simply asking them to assume your perspective and explain why you might be right if you can get people to step outside themselves and think about the issue not even necessarily from your perspective but from an objective perspective from one that is detached from their own interests people learn a lot so given how hard it is for people to assume other people's perspectives you can see why I started my answer by saying it's very hard when experiments ominous done is asking people to explain not reason as you point out but to actually explain at the nuts and bolts level how something works I don't really like to engage in the kind of mechanistic analysis required for a causal explanation that's true not only for big thorny issues like climate change or income inequality but even for things like toilets zippers and ballpoint pens unless you are a plumber or you make zippers or ballpoint pens you probably can't explain these very well even though before you ask the question you would have thought you could this gap between what you know what you think you know it's called naturally the illusion of explanatory depth so the illusion of explanatory depth was first demonstrated by a couple of psychologist named Rosenblatt and Kyle and they ask people how well they understood how these things work and people gave a number between one and seven and then they said okay how does it work explain in as much detail as you can and how it works and people struggled and struggled and realize they couldn't and so when they were again asked how well they understood their judgments tended to be lower in other words people themselves admitted that they had been living in this illusion that they understand how these things work when in fact they don't where does the solution come from we think the source of the illusion is that people fail to distinguish what they know from what others now we're constantly depending on other people and the actual processing that goes on is distributed among people in our community in other words someone knows how toilet works the plumber and you know the plumber or even if you don't know the time you know how to find a plumber it's as if the sense of understanding is contagious right when other people understand you feel like you understand you can see how the illusion of explanatory depth could be helpful in some scenarios you don't need to know everything for yourself as long as you know someone who knows someone who knows something but you could also imagine scenarios in which the illusion could be problematic so we've shown that that's also true in the political to me foreman and his collaborator Philip fern Bach basically repeated the Rosenbloom Kyle experiment but instead of toilets and zippers they ask people about climate change in gun control we gave people political policies we said how well do you understand them and please explain them unsurprisingly most people were not able to explain climate change policies in much detail but here's what's interesting the level of confidence in their understanding of issues which participants were asked to report at the start of the experiment was drastically reduced after they tried and failed to demonstrate their understanding in other words asking people to explain depolarized the group now was this a case of simply slowing down in thinking the issue through could it be that were often in flexible in our thinking simply because we come to conclusions too quickly currently not if instead of saying explain how the policy works if what we said to them was give us all the reasons you have for your view on this policy then we didn't get that affected all mine that didn't reduce people's sense of understanding it didn't reduce their hubris the ability to change your mind would you say that's really important as a human I see the mind as something that's shared with other people I think the mind is actually something that exists within the community and not within the skull and so when you're changing your mind you know you're doing one of two things here either disassociating yourself from your community and that's really hard and not necessarily good for you or you have to change the mind of the entire community and that is not important well the closer we are to truth the more likely we are to succeed as individuals as a species but it's hard I don't think the solution is give people the information they need.

Brown University
"brown university" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"brown university" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Savings a millions of people who've been plunged into poverty the country was coming apart at the seams control over its nuclear weapons would being strained i mean putin came to power he will always put in power we don't have to go to the story so viewed in terms of history putin's mission wives the pull russia back together to stabilize it to get it back on it st and he's a chief now some people say he's gone too far that's that's a separate issue khrushchev's son that's living here not not so i if if that's right sarah gay koos jaw is i believe a professor at brown university or at least was and ms up there and he has been his father's historian and biographer and published quite a few books and memoirs about his father whose job so you're absolutely right about that news one of them was one of but then back to putin again so he's flexing his muscles but this is what concerns me steven and i'm pretty sure concerns you to we're in a mess with iran right now we've got an administration that does not seem to back down on on things they say and i'm concerned of some kind of military conflict but what really bothers me the most is russia has developed an alliance with iran i don't think putin is gonna let this happen without some kind of involvement on their part way out you don't think putin's what happened i don't think he's going to let us fight with the ram and we're gonna hit a break let's come back and talk about that but i don't think putin's gonna let us battle the ram without rushing getting involved.

putin russia khrushchev professor brown university sarah steven iran