35 Burst results for "Brookings Institution"

C.D.C. Pleads With Americans to Stay Home on Thanksgiving

MSNBC Morning Joe

06:29 min | 4 d ago

C.D.C. Pleads With Americans to Stay Home on Thanksgiving

"Right now. Laboratories are warning shortages of supplies likely will create more delays in getting test results. Out especially as case numbers surged joining us. Now physician and fellow at the brookings institution dr patel. She's a former obama white house. Health policy director in an msnbc medical contributor dr patel. It's good to see this morning. We also heard yesterday from the cdc that said please avoid travel now for thanksgiving a week out and we got our first news briefing in four months from the task force. The white house task force. Dr burks and dr fauci. What did you take away from what they said yesterday. And what's your view of these incredibly stark numbers. We just saw good morning to everyone. I think that take away from yesterday was actually both an incredible dire warning about thanksgiving about the numbers that we can expect and then also a ray of sunshine. If we can actually do what we need to do. Dr fauci spoke about the extraordinary. And casey mentioned it. The extraordinary progress we've made with vaccines from operation warp speed as well as global cooperation. But a vaccine does not mean that you can actually just kind of read the sigh of relief and go about your merry ways. It really does mean is. Dr burke said yesterday that we have to do things today and change behaviors today in order to be able to have a light at the end of the tunnel and benefit from the vaccines and willie looking at those pictures. I can't help but shudder and fear that some of those people in line are actually doing testing so that they can go and celebrate thanksgiving. I i know that a lot of what my patients are saying. And and that is frankly a big concern your task force and the cdc again was clear yesterday. Small groups within your own household and do not even travel at this point for thanksgiving. That's about as serious as that warning could be so dr patel as you rightly. Say great news on the vaccine front but for most people in this country. That's at least what six months away to get that so we have six months. Let's say from here to there where anything can happen. If we don't have further mitigation efforts from your point of view based on these numbers that we're seeing the trajectory you say were on and that we are on should we go further nationally or at least state by state in terms of stay at home. Orders for example mask mandates. What would you like to see. Yes this is absolutely the conversation that i hope every governor again because we have no national strategy what we did not hear yesterday was kind of an announcement or a bold proclamation about what we can count on at the national level. So you're right willie. We do need to have mask. Mandate that the state levels nationally. We just need all except that wearing a mask and make a difference. Especially if you're going to go and celebrate thanksgiving with people who are not normally in your household. Here's something that i think is incredibly controversial. That happening were closing schools. Before we're making mold steps close or reduce indoor capacity of a restaurant than places where we know people are getting together. I would do the reverse. I would not penalize younger children where we have seen that. We have not been having as much of an outbreak as we have in other settings that people are moving towards indoors shops and restaurants and then i really hope that on a policy level that we can resurrect some stimulus funding because these businesses especially during a holiday season are dying on the vine and again. It's all unnecessary. We've had zero ability to offer small business owners an away to have reliable testing to even keep their employees safe. And that's what we've decided to do in this country. So that's what i want to ask you about in terms of testing dr patel's a former white house health and policy director. I know the biden team says on day one. The president plans to invoke the defense production act on things like testing these lines. That we're seeing Football fields of cars people waiting for hours and hours sometimes days to get a false result on testing is a massive almost the number one impediment to mitigation because as they're waiting in line. They're missing work if they have work. They're exposing themselves to people as they're waiting for these tests and these test results that sometimes take days to come and for those who are lucky enough. Maybe they can buy a test. But it's not like that for the rest of america. Who is in this situation right here. Which is so unacceptable. Had president trump invoked the deep on testing. Would we be in this situation right now. No your outrage. I can't tell you how much that outrageous felt by so many healthcare workers around the country. Here here's something to wrap our brains around. We were able to develop to at least two highly efficacious vaccines and cheaper than it is to get a pcr nasal swab which your head around that that is unacceptable that somehow we have decided that the ability to actually offer employers to open safely away to actually keep schools open in a way for americans to feel. Testing does not replace masks and prevention whatsoever but it certainly could be a critical piece in finding those asymptomatic carriers the majority of people we know who are either infected or are able to transmit the coronavirus right now if we had reliable cheap and easy testing. It doesn't even have to be perfect makeup. We could do something every three days. We know that that's probably the time period where we could catch the majority of cases and this is just a system failure on all levels that the fda is cdc initially relying on flawed testing in the beginning and then again no national vocation of the defense production. Act at no pressure to try to identify how we can get testing especially to the hardest hit communities black and brown communities where we still have really pathetic testing eighth and turnaround times stability and the and the needless loss of life here is mind. Boggling dr kavita patel. Thank you very much for being on the show this

Dr Patel Dr Burks Dr Fauci Dr Burke CDC White House Willie Brookings Institution Msnbc Casey Barack Obama Biden Football America FDA
"brookings institution" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:46 min | 3 weeks ago

"brookings institution" Discussed on WTOP

"Posted it. At least three times this year. President Trump's team and his supporters have shared misleading or fake videos, arguing that Biden is not mentally fit for office. This information around voting within minority communities can have an effect on voter turnout, according to researchers at Howard University. They, along with the Brookings Institution, have taken a look at how information around the election Khun spread within black communities. But it's you know, we're talking about robots. These are programmed mechanisms that look at the different information that's tweeted out the language that you use kind of scouring through your post and then replicates it doctor behind Mohammed of Howard University, says a recent report on the 2016 election. Found 19% of all election tweets that year were spread by Bob's Go through your list. The father was and you will identify, you know, at least 20 to 30 bahts that are following and are posting things. Andrea Camryn w T o P News. Despite the recent rise in Corona virus cases, some senior citizens are taking a risk and volunteering at voting sites. Gloria Gati is one of those senior supporting voters at the Buoy Gymnasium in Bowie, Maryland. Volunteer people are people who have love in their hearts, and they're doing a job because they wanted to it. She's with the Democratic Committee Club of Annapolis for first time. I'm 74 years old. I feel like I have a voice and my voice is being heard. She says. No matter what, your political party affiliation she wants your voice Heard to Stephanie gains Bryant w. T o p News Up next in money News. Another restaurant chain is facing bankruptcy. It's 8 54. Montgomery County Board of Elections remind you Tomorrow.

Gloria Gati Howard University President Trump Brookings Institution Andrea Camryn Biden Buoy Gymnasium Democratic Committee Club of A Montgomery County Mohammed Bowie Bob Board of Elections Maryland Stephanie
U.S. And India Sign Military Agreement During Pompeo, Esper Trip

Morning Edition

01:48 min | Last month

U.S. And India Sign Military Agreement During Pompeo, Esper Trip

"The 20 Indian troops killed in a fight with Chinese soldiers this summer on the two countries Himalayan border. And he used his visit to rail against the Chinese Communist Party, or CCP. The CCP is no friend to democracy, the rule of law. Tom Hair, Esper signed a pact with India to share sensitive satellites often used to steer muscles and drones. Big things are happening. As our democracy is aligned to better protect the citizens of our two countries and indeed of the free world. The US has long seen India as a bulwark against China, and the Trump Administration has pushed India to buy more US weapons. But there was an awkward moment when India's defense secretary was asked whether he's willing to stop buying Russian weapons. That depends on negotiations. Demure Tanvi Madan at the Brookings Institution, says it's significant that India hosted Pompeo an Esper Well, tensions are so high with China after that border crisis this summer. At another time, India might have declined to do AH, high profile visit like this with American officials, George a time of crisis in case China was provoked further at a press conference. Indian officials did not mention China by name. Pompeo head's next to Sri Lanka, the Maldives and Indonesia, where the main topic once again will be China. Lauren Frayer NPR news This

India China Chinese Communist Party Esper Pompeo United States Lauren Frayer Brookings Institution Tanvi Madan Sri Lanka Tom Hair Trump Administration Maldives Indonesia George
"brookings institution" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:43 min | Last month

"brookings institution" Discussed on KCRW

"The Brookings Institution. 20 sexual time. I really appreciate it. Thanks for having me. The longer this pandemic lasts, the more likely it seems that those of us who can are going to be working from home forever. Anu S and P Global survey shows nearly two thirds of organizations. It's a significant increase in remote working is going to be permanent. Granted. There are many who love working remotely. No commute more flexibility, pajamas, but his marketplaces Mariel Cigar heard from a lot of people. They have found a real real challenging Richard find began Our conversation with a warning about the hammering sound I was about to hear his downstairs neighbor has recently undertaken some construction. That's just, you know, the joys of working from home. Fine, who talked to me from the bedroom of his Manhattan apartment because his wife and son were working and learning remotely in the other rooms, is an executive at Doc Doc, the doctor appointment booking site. We have committed Tio full company that we will not mandate people to come back until Labor Day of 2021 find doesn't love working from home think it's ah, pretty inferior form ofwork. Remote working is leaving Nyla con kind, afraid to. She's the head of talent at the health care company eating health and a single mom living in a small apartment in Queens with her six year old daughter, who's doing school online. I feel like I'm a meaner mom to her because my patients is immediately low now compared to before, and my stress is incredibly high, and she claps back pretty hard like Mommy, You just yelled at me. That was not nice. She is grateful that she gets to spend more time with her daughter. At the same time she misses interacting with her colleagues in person. So does Kate Adams in Milton, Massachusetts. She's a marketing exec at a tech company called Drift. She has friends at the office. You know, Fridays at four o'clock sent up the bat signal, and we'd go like Joined each other in the kitchen and grab a glass of wine and hang out. And just like decompress like I missed that desperately last, she heard the office probably won't reopen until June. So for now, she and her co worker have come up with this game. We have a contest. Sometimes we're on zooms like if we can make each other laugh, they even keep score. It's not the same, but it's the best they've got right now. Mariel Segarra for marketplace here,.

Kate Adams Mariel Segarra Mariel Cigar Brookings Institution. Doc Doc Anu S Tio Richard Manhattan P Global Queens Massachusetts Milton executive Fine
What Happens If The President Is Incapacitated? The 25th Amendment Charts A Course

Morning Edition

06:53 min | Last month

What Happens If The President Is Incapacitated? The 25th Amendment Charts A Course

"Greene. The story we are covering this morning was first revealed in a tweet from President Trump in the middle of the night. He and first lady Melania Trump have tested positive for the Corona virus. Many people we should say never developed serious symptoms and even if they do they recover, But Trump is 70 for an age group that is more likely to develop serious complications and to be hospitalized. The White House physician says the president is doing well as of now, but will remain in the White House residents. A White House official told NPR's Tamara Keith that the president plans to stay engaged, but that Vice President Mike Pence is ready to step in. As needed. Now, if and when a president falls ill. There are significant questions about how the nation is governed. And John 48 has studied and written about scenarios just like this. He's executive director. Of the continuity of government Commission, which was set up in the wake of the 9 11 attacks. He also runs the government studies program at the bipartisan Policy Center, and he joins us on Skype. Thanks for being here. Mary. Thanks for having me. So I mean, someone who looks at these questions so closely. How did you react when you heard that the president got a positive test? Well, given all that's happened, it was probably the one thing that might stir up some or turmoil in this, this very tumultuous election system season we've had. Look, there are some real questions. Both about a president as president having on illness, especially if it were to get worse but also in terms of a presidential candidate. Those are those are different issues about being on the balance and what happens afterwards. So I do think there are some significant concerns if If things were to worsen. Well, let's separate those things out. Let let's talk about the here and now. I mean, what sort of things are being discussed right now inside the White House and were the president's health to deteriorate. I mean, you've written that there could be confusion there. Khun B. Chaos. I mean, take us inside that building. Well, first, a zoo president, the question would be is the president at some point does he feel that he doesn't isn't able to carry out the duties of the presidency for a time? And there's a pretty clear provisioning the 25th amendment, where he can sign over the power of the presidency to the vice president. And then when recovered, take it back, and that's happened a few times in recent years, basically, for elective surgeries, That would be pretty clear. I think you know what would be a little harder is if the president got sick enough that he wasn't able to make the determination there's still a A vision in the Constitution where you can have the vice president. A majority of the Cabinet say it's time for the vice president to take over and then in the most contentious situation. We have heard about another context that if the president disagreed with that, that Diagnosis. Congress might have to decide whether to keep the president on orto keep the vice president so it could go further down the line. But that would be the more extreme version. Look, we also have The election. And how would President Be on the ballot or not be on the ballot. If it really came to the the point where the president had to withdraw. There is a very difficult procedure and trying to replace him at this time. You know what? Who makes that decision? I mean, how well determine happened earlier. I think it's pretty clear that party could have just stepped in on the party. The party still has a role of selecting a new person. Ah, And that would be the party committee could elevate Mike Pence to the presidency and pick someone else as vice president, But that's a relatively simple vote. We've actually done that once in the in the seventies with vice presidential candidate Bigger place, Tom Eagleton. But the question now that the ballots are out is much more difficult. Could the president's name be removed from the ballot? I think it would be very difficult, but one further complication is in our election of president. We're really not voting for president. But we're voting for these electors in the Electoral college. They're still there in the ballot, even if you don't see them in your states about there, behind those names, and in theory, those people could be elected and then make a choice of another person come December with some complications that have come up recently, the Supreme Court but basically that there is a possibility that that even if Donald Trump's name is still on the ballot, and he were to have withdrawn Um, that those electors could still end up voting for the Republican ticket. Whatever that is, in December, they could actually decide. I mean, you would have electors around the country making a decision that Shouldn't theory be made by health experts, but they would be actually deciding who would who would be president. Assuming if Donald Trump won the election, even though he had withdrawn then there's there's this question in November of well, who's Who of these electors gonna vote for? They're gonna vote for the Republican ticket. Whatever it is. Then again, there are some complications. But the Supreme Court has allowed some states to really bind those electors. But Basically those those electors, many of them at least have the freedom to choose another person. We assume that would be coordinated by the party. And of course, that would be great questions about the legitimacy for the American public. Usually it's possible. I mean this this obviously so so speculative ahs. You said. I mean, these are extreme circumstances we're talking about, but I wonder. I mean, this is your line of work like I wonder if you get people sometimes saying, like, Oh, why do you dedicate so much time to scenarios That might never happen? But I guess there's an argument that these air really important questions that you want answered. You have to plan for for the worst and most chaotic sin areas. You do, And off with some better plans in place for for a lot of these continuity scenarios. I mean, obviously, questions of national security might matter if if we're not absolutely sure if the president is is Well, we had cases well before the 25th amendment, Woodrow Wilson, who was essentially incapacitated for his last almost a year and a half in the White House, and you know the real is a real question as to who was really running the government, the vice president ahead and stepped in and so you know, there are these questions. We don't want uncertainty in times of trouble. And you're saying that that you're not satisfied with the plans that are that are in place that the government could do a better job planning for scenarios like this. Well in some, I do think there's a very clear transfer power to the vice president. That's the 25th amendment has made that very clear if we get into much more public ated scenarios like they're both sick or the question of how you get somebody on the ballot and how the electors were picked because it happens this close to the election. Look, I think we could have more clarity. John 48 is executive director of the Continuity of Government Commission, a nonpartisan think tanks set up by the conservative leading American Enterprise Institute and the liberal leaning Brookings Institution. Thank you so much for helping us work through some of these Something big questions that you know, we hope don't have to come up. We hope the president remains healthy, but things we have to think about. We really appreciate it. Thank you.

President Trump Vice President Melania Trump White House Mike Pence Government Commission John Executive Director Supreme Court Bipartisan Policy Center Tamara Keith Tom Eagleton Greene. Khun B. Chaos NPR Congress Official Brookings Institution
Women's earnings drop after having a child—but men's do not

Motley Fool Answers

01:33 min | 3 months ago

Women's earnings drop after having a child—but men's do not

"Retiree planning isn't easy for anyone, but it's particularly challenging for women. They generally earn less more likely to spend time out of the workforce caring for family members and live longer, which is a good thing in general, but it means a tyrant savings have to last longer. A recent report from the Brookings Institution qualified some of these challenges first off, they cite study, which found that women with one child earns twenty percent less on average over her career that a woman without a child in contrast becoming a father typically does not reduce man's earnings. A women are also likely to then men to care for their aging parents responsibility that predominantly falls a women over the age of fifty. So. People who leave the labor force early to care for a parent or other elderly relatives. Lose on average one, hundred, forty, two, thousand dollars in wages. So obviously people who earn less can't save as much. So that's one reason why they might be behind in retirement savings, but the report also quantified the impact until security benefits, which is the number one source of income for most retirees. Here's what the report concluded. Women Receive Social Security benefits that are on average. Eighty percent of those that men receive and having a first child reduces a woman social security benefits through durst earnings than average of sixteen percent and each additional kid increases gap a two percent and then women who leave work to care for an elderly family member not only lose wages but they also lose an average one, hundred, thirty, one thousand in lifetime social security benefits.

Brookings Institution
Sorry, boomers: millennials and younger are new US majority

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 4 months ago

Sorry, boomers: millennials and younger are new US majority

"Move over baby boomers you're not in the majority anymore millennials and their younger siblings and kids now make up a majority of the U. S. population a new analysis by the Brookings Institution shows that fifty point seven percent of US residents were under the age of forty that as of July of last year the analysis of population estimates released this summer by the U. S. census bureau shows that the combined millennial Gen Z. and younger generations numbered one hundred and sixty six million but combine Gen X. baby boomer and older cohorts represented one hundred and sixty two million US residents I Shelley handler

Brookings Institution U. S. Census Bureau United States Shelley
Income Share Agreements - Good For Students or Investors?

Money For the Rest of Us

05:58 min | 4 months ago

Income Share Agreements - Good For Students or Investors?

"Welcome money for the rest of us. This is a personal finance show on money how it works, how to invest it and how to live without worrying about it. We host David Stein today's episode three seven. It's titled Income Share Agreements. Good for students. Or. Investors. Over five years ago and upset forty-five of money for the rest of us. I introduced income share agreement as a way to partially fund college. An income share agreement is a contract where individuals agree to pay a certain percentage of their income for a set period of time in exchange for an upfront payment that is usually used to pay for education cost but can be used for other things. For example, a line income share funding says that you can get an essay for home repairs, debt consolidation, paying a medical bill or even planning your wedding. Not sure I would do it income share agreement for most of those things. They are traditionally us to invest in what is known as human capital, our ability to earn money by getting more. Education. Another name for income share agreements is human capital contracts. Income share agreements were first proposed by the economist Milton Freeman in a nineteen, fifty, five essay titled The Role of Government in education. He wrote vocational or professional education is a form of investment in human capital precisely analogous to investment in machinery buildings are forms, of non human capital. Its function is to raise economic productivity of the human being. If it does. So the individual is rewarded in a free enterprise society by receiving a higher return for his services than he would. Be Able to command. We discussed this concept summit upset to forty five is college worth it. And determined, there is a positive financial return in investing in human capital. By attending college, you can earn more, you build your social capital, your network you gain knowledge. Having a college degree allows you to pass filters that many companies put in place with their hiring practice in that, they only hire individuals with college degrees. Freeman continued. If a fixed money loan is made to finance investment in physical capital, the lender can get some security for his loan in the form of a mortgage or a residual claim to the physical asset itself, and he can count on realizing at least part of its investment in case of necessity by selling the physical asset. In other words, the lender has some collateral that could be sold in the case of default. But Freeman a problem if the loan is made to invest in human capital. He writes the lender clearly cannot get any comparable security in a non slave state the individual embodying the investment cannot be bought and sold. Freeman then pointed out that because there isn't collateral that the interest rate charged on student loan would have to be sufficiently high to compensate for the capital loss because there wouldn't be collateral and that the interest rate would have to be so high making the loans unattractive to borrowers. Now. A solution was found. Federal guaranteed student loans. The total US Student Loan Dad. Private and federal is one point six, four, trillion dollars. Only a hundred and twenty, four, billion of that one point six trillion is private. The average federal student loan debt balance is thirty, five, thousand dollars and the default rate is high. Eleven point one percent. It's particularly challenging for individuals that have taken on a lot of student loan debt to pay off. A Brookings Institution study from two thousand eighteen found that the median borrower who had less than fifty thousand dollars in student loan debt in the early two thousands paid off the debt within ten years. While the median borrower, they had more than fifty thousand dollars in student loan debt ten years later still owed about seventy, five percent and most of the students falling behind on their student loan debt are those that have a balanced greater than fifty thousand dollars. Friedman's proposed solution income share agreements. They weren't necessarily called that, but he said that. A contract could be structure where an investor would buy a share in an individual's earnings prospects. To advance him, the funds needed to finance his training on condition that he agreed to pay the lender a specified fraction of his future earnings. In this way Friedman wrote, a lender would get back more than his initial investment from relatively successful individuals which would compensate for the failure to recoup his original investment from the unsuccessful. There seems no legal obstacle to private contracts of this kind even though they are economically equivalent to the purchase of a share in an individual's earning capacity and thus to partial slavery. These. Agreements have been criticized perhaps not slavery, but certainly indentured servitude. Although Miguel Palacios yet us in his book investing in Human Capital felt that the analogy to slavery or indentured servitude was incorrect because the students retain the full freedom of action they're not forced to stay in a given job or even a work in the field in which they trained in. So they have the ability to to work anywhere they want.

Human Capital Milton Freeman Friedman David Stein United States Brookings Institution Miguel Palacios
Banks Under Fire for Alleged Unequal Lending Practices

Business Wars Daily

03:17 min | 5 months ago

Banks Under Fire for Alleged Unequal Lending Practices

"The practice of red lining were denying financial and other services to people based on race, was outlawed in nineteen, sixty eight, but last week several Chicago Chase Bank branches closed temporarily as protesters call for racial equity and lending from the nation's largest bank and expose published in early June by nonprofit newsroom city bureau and WBZ radio found that off the seven and a half billion dollars in Chicago home. Purchase loans approved since two thousand, twelve, less than two percent was loaned in black majority neighborhoods. The bank is also the subject of a Federal Class Action Lawsuit. That suit alleges that chase shutout. Business. Borrowers from the paycheck protection, program or PCP. Stacey Hawkins Armstrong's the founder of shop. poppin gourmet. Popcorn in Westchester. She told news station ABC seven Chicago the. She tried to file her PP loan application with chase. On the first day. They were accepted, but she got nothing but error messages desperate to keep her doors open and her four employees on payroll. She ultimately secured a smaller loan through a different bank. She believes that chase prioritized. It's favored customers and left small businesses like hers in. In the cold, She's not alone the US. House of Representatives is launching probes into how several banks including J. P.. Morgan Chase Bank of America and Citigroup made P P P loans according to the Orange County Register. Critics allege that big banks service business customers and Shutout underserved borrowers from the funding pool. redlining continues in subtle ways today, including in how P P P loans. Loans were distributed according to Everett. Sand CEO of small business lender lend Distri in a report in fortune as business wars daily reported earlier this month. The Small Business Administration gave no guidance to lenders to prioritize underserved communities about ninety percent of black owned businesses have no employees ease sands, says P, P P rules. Regarding sole proprietors came out last that let these entrepreneurs unclear about. About which loans were available to them? The SBA hasn't released the demographics of WHO received PPP loans, but a survey report by color of change and UNIDOs US is revealing more than half of black and Latin next small business owners who sought assistance requested less than twenty thousand dollars in funding only about one in ten received the funding. They ask for according to the report. One united the nation's largest blackout bank has been working to help black owned businesses get better access to loans in the second round of stimulus funding, federal government allowed thirty billion dollars to smaller and minority owned banks such as community development, financial institutions were CDFI's one united secured some of that funding with that on April. Twenty nine, the bank launched its own P. Program. The bank committed to lending to black owned businesses and self-employed people. It's I. P P Loan, went to an uber driver. Time will tell who was more effective in getting money to black owned businesses, but the stakes couldn't be higher. A recent report by the Brookings Institution Warns Covid. Nineteen could wipe out a decade of economic gains by black owned businesses as Congress debates whether create another stimulus round. The future of many black owned businesses hangs in the balance.

Stacey Hawkins Armstrong Chicago Chase Bank Small Business Administration Morgan Chase Bank Of America Chicago Brookings Institution J. P House Of Representatives Cdfi Orange County Westchester ABC Everett Congress CEO Founder Citigroup Distri
House passes legislation to make Washington, DC the nation’s 51st state

KCBS Radio Weekend News

02:58 min | 5 months ago

House passes legislation to make Washington, DC the nation’s 51st state

"The house voted yesterday to establish the district of Columbia a city of seven hundred thousand as the nation's fifty first state with all but one Democrat voting in favor to hear more about this we're joined on the KCBS ring central news line by John who attack a senior fellow in governance studies at the Brookings Institution in Washington DC thanks so much for joining us John thanks for having me Sir John what would statehood mean for DC and how would it differ from how it's governed to now so there's really two parts to statehood that would be meaningful change for DC the first would be voting representation in Congress the C. would get one excuse me one house member in two senators which right now we don't have any any representation representation in in the the Senate Senate and and the the delegates delegates who who DC DC Alexa Alexa Congress Congress doesn't doesn't have have voting voting rights rights within within the the chamber chamber the the second second is is the the second second change change that that would be meaningful is the DC would really have full self government right now we have a mayor who functions essentially as our governor and a city councilor district council that functions more like our legislature but Congress has veto power over any ballot initiative or any laws the B. C. government passes and that creates some real friction between what are the National Congress is interested in and what the more than seven hundred thousand people in the district John this is something that's been in the works for a while all right yet there has been for decades real serious movement within DC organizationally to lobby Congress to take this step there have been you know grass roots efforts that has tried this and failed for quite some time in fact the only time that it came to to a vote in the house about DC statehood with the nineteen ninety three and that measure failed pretty badly and only got about a hundred and fifty five votes but it never came up again until this year when as you said at the opening of the house passed the legislation I yesterday how is this expected to benefit the city's black population well right now this is a a Washington DC is a majority minority city it is a more than fifty percent of black and Latino and I'm white now those voices are not being heard in Congress this is a city without representation even though DC pays a significant sums of federal income tax and obviously contributes to the broader economy but those voices aren't being heard there is no representation in Congress for those hundreds of thousands of individuals and so this is a city that is facing a lot of challenges it is a city that needs help from Congress and really it's a city that needs that voice in Congress to make sure that its population of her

Columbia
Understanding the border dispute between India and China

Between The Lines

05:48 min | 5 months ago

Understanding the border dispute between India and China

"Together China in India account for more than one third of the entire population of the world, and if you believe the predictions of Keisha Mahbubani, remember him. He's been a skit on this program. He's the distinguished Singaporean intellectual. He says the future is Asian, and it's China's and India's to shame. But as my next guest points out. There, a deep historical tensions between these two budding global superpowers, which might make that impossible. China and India share land border in the Himalayas which has been in dispute since nineteen, sixty two, and it's been a pretty quiet style for decades, however, since May tensions have been rising nuclear powers facing off in a remote corner of the Himalayas, the disputed Kashmir region. This is the first the classroom this border in forty five years Indian government confirmed twenty of its soldiers were killed in the clash. China seems to now be making new claims to territory now. Will this be the event that pushes India away from Chana. Chana for good, and what does it mean for the rest of the World Tom V. Madan is a senior fellow in the foreign policy program at the Brookings Institution. In Washington. She's the author of a new book called Fateful Triangle. How China shut US India relations during the cold. War She's got an article in this month's foreign. Affairs magazine on how China is losing India Tovey. Welcome to between the lines. Thank you for having me Tom now. The border dispute between China and India has probably been the most tasteful. Conflict in the world. No one died and forty five years. What sit this conflict of? It was set off because of some early moves in early May that. had. Brought forward troops and equipped military equipment at different points on the China. India boundary the line of actual control. In the western sector particularly of their border, which is eastern Hlavac and at multiple points, what we saw was attempts to change the status quo whether it was to establish a permanent presence in built in areas, but both sides claim. Or attempts to stop a Indian patrols from moving in those areas which they have traditionally done. That's set the context. It's been going on since at least early May. What we actually saw what was happening to June, sixth meeting between senior military commanders was that they had agreed to a process of de-escalation and disengagement but something went very wrong in the course of this de-escalation. And this is where the incident took place. Now this particular incident has just been a larger in scale and an this whole stat of larger scale, but also regrets aggressiveness and the ones we've seen before, and there are reports that both countries are deploying some serious weapons to the bases close to the border. Is this just posturing, or is there a serious risk of Esscalation I? Think these kind of situation. There's always a risk of escalation. We've seen at least three. faceoffs three major face before this one between the Chinese and Indian military's in two, thousand, thirteen, two, thousand, fourteen in two thousand seventeen This one is could have larger in scale. We've seen as we did. On June fifteenth that even though they have traditionally had a whole series of agreements, standard operating procedures protocols in place between the two countries to avoid the kind of Esscalation we saw injured fifteenth. They clearly are not sufficient anymore, so let's put this in a broader historical context. China and India and went to war in nineteen, sixty two over the border. Now this of course was at the heart of the Cold War. Taibbi take us back to the geopolitical context of the time what was going on? By the time, the nineteen sixty sixty-two war broke out between China and India. You've seen a few years from about nineteen fifty seven about five years already of rising China Idiot tensions you've seen. The Indians relies that The Chinese did not consider. The boundary settled that they were building. A roads through territory India sought was India's. You saw scuffles skirmishes at between. The. Two sides patrols at various points on the boundary. You also saw the escape of the Lama. At a number of Tibetan. Refugees remain to stay in India in one, thousand, nine, hundred, nine, which the Chinese soil with deep suspicion and suspected that the US and you had worked together to engineer about escape. And, so you seem kind of rising tensions between China and India and at the same time you see you saw. The US India actually because in a national park because of their shared concerns about China actually starting to move closer towards each other for the for the the US This saw a in democratic India as both Jew potential, a political counterbalance, but also democratic contrast to soviet-backed Communist China accident, very interested in supporting it. N India welcomed that support, and so that was the. what was? Preceded that sixty to war, but which occurred when the Chinese decided. To move what they call the self defense a counterattack. And in nineteen, sixty two. Move across across the boundary took and defeated India quite badly, which laughed a number of different. It's a it's left a lot of historical baggage. The only major war the Union army has lost

India China N India United States Himalayas Tom V. Madan Esscalation Chana Indian Government Keisha Mahbubani Union Army Brookings Institution Tovey Washington Hlavac Senior Fellow Taibbi
It's official: U.S. recession began in February

Morning Edition

03:29 min | 6 months ago

It's official: U.S. recession began in February

"It is official the recession began in February that's according to the national bureau of economic research which studies such things but for federal reserve officials gathering this week the question is when will this recession end and what will the economic recovery look like David Wessel is director of the Hutchins center at the Brookings Institution and he joins us with some answers hi David good morning so the recession is now four months old which is nice to know I guess we've been in this for awhile and hopefully what that means we'll get out but when when will that happen when is it gonna end David it's a good question you know this is a really unique recession that was triggered by the government ordering a shut down of the economy it was very abrupt it was very deep the April may June quarter will be one of the worst on record technically the recessional be over when the economy stops contracting it starts growing again the best gas of forecasters that'll occur sometime this summer doesn't mean the economy is going to be healthy or that unemployment will go back below four percent only the things will start getting better rather than worse sometime this summer so getting better is better thing worse but when the forecasters at the fed and in the private sector look into their crystal balls that aren't so crystal what kind of recovery do they say well we're gonna learn from the fed on tomorrow on Wednesday what they see for the economy when they give us their new forecast but it's even harder than usual because this is such a situation we've never seen before analysts have developed a kind of shorthand alphabet shorthand to describe the passive possible scenarios the economy was chugging along nicely tell the pandemic cat then it took this abrupt downturn the optimistic scenario is that the economy will be shaped like a V. sharp down sharp up as people go back to work and shopping and stuff last Friday's jobs report that we added jobs in may has encouraged the optimists that includes the people in the White House and at least yesterday the stock market which is recovered as of yesterday all the games all the losses that occur it took us since the beginning of the year all right so so that's the the sunny scenario what are the others well one of them resembles the Nike swoosh we get a burst of euphoria as businesses open up and we go back to work but it's a slow us a long slow climb out of the ditch restaurants are only serving half as many people people are reluctant to get on airplanes I'm so that by that scenario it takes maybe years before we get back to the path we were on and there's an even less pleasant scenario the dreaded W. that's where things get better but we have surgeon covert cases and another round or shut downs later in the fall okay so we could have a V. that would be good if we could have a swish and not so great the W. please tell me that's the worst case scenario or does it possibly get worse I'm I'm afraid it's not the worst the worst case looks like an al the economy does grow but we never get back to the path we are on before the pandemic some laid off workers never find jobs lots of business go bankrupt malls and restaurants remain empty for a long time you know there's lots of vacancies business is to S. R. and D. so we have fewer innovations that sounds really bleak but that's what the economy look like for several years after the last recession two thousand and eight and two

Official National Bureau Of Economic Re
'We Can't Take Your Call': Uber Drivers, Other Gig Workers Struggle For Unemployment

All Things Considered

02:11 min | 6 months ago

'We Can't Take Your Call': Uber Drivers, Other Gig Workers Struggle For Unemployment

"The uber drivers to Airbnb hosts that dog walkers they are the millions of people who make a living from gig work thanks to a massive federal relief package they are temporarily eligible for unemployment benefits but the unemployment system was not built for gig work and so many states are struggling to help this new class of workers NPR tech correspondent Shannon bond reports many of them are still waiting for their money Michael o'dell as a jazz musician in Columbus Ohio but music doesn't pay the bills so he drives for lift in Newburgh in since the pandemic hit he only goes out when he needs cash right away I definitely don't put the time into it like I normally do because I'm not going to get good rights unemployment benefits should be a lifeline for gig workers like him but dell hasn't seen a check yet I've been applying every week and every single week I get the night like regular unemployment denied because lift and uber don't consider themselves his employer they say there are millions of drivers are independent contractors who choose when and how much to work that's how many apps operate and that means they don't do what a normal employer does Jay Shambaugh a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution explains normally if you're eligible for unemployment insurance it's because your employer has been paying into the insurance system and it's part of paying in their reporting earnings gig workers have to show proof of their earnings so the state knows how much to give them an unemployment benefits and Gemma says most states have to set up systems to process those claims that's been the big hold up figuring out how they track who is supposed to get this money it's been more than seven weeks since Congress made gig workers eligible for unemployment and according to Brookings thirty nine states are now processing those claims but even those who got their claims in really early are still waiting like lift driver Jerome gauge in Los Angeles he applied for unemployment in early March make sure that all on your reported earnings looking over your reward is zero dollars because you don't think that your employee earning their knowledge days appealed he's still

Shannon Bond Columbus Ohio Newburgh Dell Jay Shambaugh Senior Fellow Brookings Institution Gemma Congress Los Angeles Airbnb NPR Michael O'dell
J.Crew Files For Bankruptcy. More Retailers Are Expected To Follow

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:38 min | 7 months ago

J.Crew Files For Bankruptcy. More Retailers Are Expected To Follow

"When J crew filed for bankruptcy yesterday it got a lot of attention in part. Because it's the first major retailer to fall prey to this pandemic. The company was forced to close five hundred stores and furlough all but two thousand of its thirteen thousand employees but this might not be the end. Other companies are very likely to go under in these times. And let's turn to David Wessel director of the Hutchins Center at Brookings Institution. David Hope you're well good morning so talk to me about J. crew going to bankruptcy court and what what exactly the company is going to be experiencing here well when a company files for protection of the Bankruptcy Court under chapter eleven of the law. It's allowed to not pay its debts. So it can continue to operate in business in the case of J. Crew which also owns a company called made. Well it worked out a deal with its creditors before it went to court. People who'd lent the company nearly two billion dollars essentially get control the company squeezing out to shareholders. Then it borrows more money about four hundred million dollars so we can keep going It's online businesses functioning. And it's planning to open. At least some of its stores. When the Corona virus receives the whole point of chapter eleven is to allow a debt laden company to reorganize and and stay in business. So is this an option that other retailers other companies are going to follow. We're GONNA see more. Companies seeking protection absolutely. American businesses borrowed a lot of money fifteen trillion dollars by one recent estimate when times were good. Many of them are going to have trouble keeping up the payment. It's hard to stay current on your debt when your revenues drive up. Gold's gym filed for bankruptcy this week already the Wall Street Journal says that both Neiman Marcus and JC. Penney have missed some interest payments. And they're talking to lenders about a bankruptcy filing hurts. The car rental company has hired advisors and in the oil and gas industry. Low Oil prices are pushing a lot of the little companies towards the bankruptcy court as well. David you've talked on a program about the hundreds of billions of dollars that Congress approve to try and help small businesses. Wasn't that supposed to try and avoid this. It was and all that aid is GONNA keep some companies out of bankruptcy. But it's not enough for all of them particularly that were already kind of over-borrowed before the corona virus hit and the problem here is this is going to overwhelm the bankruptcy courts. And that's going to have unfortunate side effects. Some companies are going to have trouble finding the money you need to borrow temporarily to keep going while you're in bankruptcy and history suggests when they're lots of business bankruptcies as I expect there will be. The courts tend to put their attention on reorganizing. The big ones and that means little people a little companies had filed for bankruptcy just end up liquidated they sell off their assets with the court supervision and essentially go out of business. What other options out there David to to try and save a company in these times? Well the best option. Of course we'll get the economy going when the virus receipt so they can start selling again. Joe Stiglitz Nobel laureate suggests a super chapter eleven kind of one size fits all plan. David scale a law professor at Paneth suggested that Congress legislate a moratorium on debt payments giving companies and even some families the immediate benefits of bankruptcy without having go through the court and Peter or Zag was the White House budget director in the Obama administration says that because bankruptcy can have such a big effect on suppliers. He suggests government lending to what he calls firms that are two connected to fail doing. Essentially what the government did for GM and Chrysler during the great recession? But none of this is painless. That that is that is true. As we know. David Wessel from the Hutchins Center Brookings. Thanks so much you're

Bankruptcy Court David David Wessel David Hope Brookings Institution J. Crew Congress Hutchins Center Hutchins Center Brookings Peter Neiman Marcus Wall Street Journal Director Joe Stiglitz Nobel Chrysler Penney Low Oil GM Gold
"brookings institution" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

02:27 min | 7 months ago

"brookings institution" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Past week a number that is especially painful in the heart of Texas CDS is Janet Shamli and is there how are you getting by right now right now we're living off our savings for live in real lane right now really planning out our grocery budgets and just sticking to the necessities in previous downturns oil workers like crystal he could usually find other jobs during corona virus no one is higher has been named the city most likely impacted by recession by the Brookings Institution because forty two percent of its people work in oil and gas and other industries considered high risk and unconventional shut down are also affecting our politics big time the democratic convention pushed back a month into August and in Texas the party brass moving to scrap plans for a state convention in June for a virtual one one thing that a conventional so is beside the chance to connect party businesses it serves as you know sort of pep rally to fire up people before the November election and that is something that will be probably a little harder to create technology virtual setting but they say look this is the best that we can do it we still think that we can provide the energy and get people excited CBS campaign reporter Adam Brewster mainly work in the midst of a worldwide pandemic North Korea once again the focus of world wide speculation about Kim June complain house says that it is aware of those reports and the intelligence community is looking very closely at them earlier this week and the president was asked about Kim Jong on he said he hopes that he is okay and hopes that he's not in any medical trouble but he wouldn't say when they last had contact CBS is Nicole Killian this is CBS news you can listen to CBS news radio twenty four hours a day seven days a week on radio dot com or the radio dot com app download it today it is shocking that your home could be stolen this usually let me share two story Debra learned that brutal lesson when thieves found the title to her hold on line then they forged the documents to appear she sold her home but she hadn't been they borrowed thousands using her home's equity devry didn't know she was a victim until for closure notices arrived interdiction notice followed she spent a fortune trying to get a hold back the crime is home title fraud and the F. B. I. calls it one of the fastest growing crimes the best advice for avoiding a title fried nightmare is to protect your home with home title lock and no either your homeowner's insurance nor.

Janet Shamli Brookings Institution Texas North Korea president Kim Jong CBS Nicole Killian Debra fraud reporter Adam Brewster Kim June
Federal Reserve Unveils Emergency Lending Program

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

03:07 min | 8 months ago

Federal Reserve Unveils Emergency Lending Program

"We learned another six point. Six million people in this economy have lost their more on that in just a minute for Mitchell Hartman but at that very same stroke of eight thirty the Federal Reserve reached in and grabbed the macro economic headlines with news. That it's making another two point. Three trillion dollars available to businesses and state and local governments. The details honestly our weedy so we will concentrate instead on the tone and tenor of what Powell said in a Webinar. This morning hosted by the Brookings Institution many many parts of the capital markets and lending more. Broadly stopped functioning and That is exactly the situation that our emergency powers are meant to address so we have moved in as I mentioned our priority or those areas of the markets that are most fundamental to supporting the real economy. I know what you want to know right. What does the guy running the real American economy right now? Think about the prospects for the real American economy right now when the virus does run its course and it's safe to go back to work and save business to open Then we would expect there to be a fairly quick rebound as people do go back to work and start resuming normal levels of economic activity. I think most people expect that to happen in the second half of this year after the second quarter which of course ends on June thirty to be clear there was some nuts and bolts. Economics disgust in response to questions from David Wessel. Also Brookings and another public radio program. You might listen to as well questions. Like G chair PAL BETWEEN ALL THE MONEY. Your adding to the economy and all the money congress is authorizing. You're worried about inflation at all. There are certainly I would say these are programs. That were developing at a high rate of speed. We don't have the luxury of taking our time the way we usually do. We're trying to get help quickly to the economy as it's needed and I I worry that you know in hindsight you will see that we could have done things differently but But I one thing I don't worry about is inflation right now. Speaking of Congress or as Paul and his fed colleagues like to say fiscal policy makers yeah. They got some work to do. We're not responsible for fiscal policy. We don't give public advice to Congress on Fiscal Policy. I will say that As I mentioned in my remarks in many cases what people really need is direct. Fiscal Support Rather than Alone and what we can do loan. So there's A. There's a big need for fiscal policy. Finally one last thing just because I think it's really important here. Actually it's the why of what the Fed is doing. People are undertaking. These sacrifices for the common good we need to make them halted extent we have the ability to make them whole. We should be doing that as a society. They didn't cause this their businesses closed because of anything they did wrong. They didn't lose their job because of anything did wrong. This is what the great fiscal power of the United States is. Four is to protect these people as best. We can from The hardships they're facing a good phrase right. The great fiscal power of the United States. I kinda like that.

Congress Brookings Institution Federal Reserve United States Mitchell Hartman David Wessel Powell Paul
Coronavirus Confronts US Economy With Tough Recovery

This Morning with Gordon Deal

04:42 min | 9 months ago

Coronavirus Confronts US Economy With Tough Recovery

"Coronavirus is already the most serious threat to the U. S. economy since the financial crisis and D. honorable when markets editor at Axios says the dominoes are aligned for a severe recession that could erase much of the eleven your recovery Dionne explained as the court of viruses kind of exploded or really started to ratchet up here in the U. S. and also in place parts of Europe and around the globe a lot of folks have been asking the question is this going to cause a recession and I want to take a step back and point out a lot of the economic issues that particular facing United States right now but it's kind of gotten less attention have been swept under the rug a little bit that we put them all together sort of form this series of dominoes that really could set us up for a pretty tough recession right so some of these bullet points you get to get that you put together really raise some eyebrows like with one first off growth has declined over the last couple years yeah so explain that explain them or otherwise that could been getting glossed over well the growth rate in the U. S. has been declining even though you had this two trillion dollar tax cut the tax cut and jobs act was passed in twenty seventeen that was supposed to kind of kick start the economy is going at three four percent growth and it has been and not only have we not hit that three or four percent number we kind of we got close to it the year after the tax cut was passed and you've been declining ever sent so you've got not only the increase that two trillion dollars to that to the national debt but you had declining growth and economists were expecting a decline even further this year even absent this corona virus scares so we're kind of moving back toward slower growth books you know depending on who you talk to depending on how they did their metrics were expecting about two percent while under maybe a little over but the difference between two percent and recession is a lot less than the difference between three or four percent and recessions are so would you reference the the the tax cut and jobs act speaking of jobs up some was able was a labor markets done well why is this a concern but you see a lot of these are coming out the high paying jobs that we necessarily like to see a lot of these are these kind of service industry hourly positions while these folks don't have if they do have health insurance they don't have particularly good health insurance they are what would be classified as under insured that's one issue also they can't really take time off so I live in talking to a number of economists are they talk about a lot of folks will get sick and they won't miss work to keep going and potentially spread the disease to other people and then people who do stay out and miss work they're looking at you know getting either fired or having their wages docked and they can't afford that the the Brookings Institution study that came out in January found out that forty four percent of all U. S. workers earn barely enough to live on the averages about eighteen thousand dollars a year or about ten dollars a little more than ten dollars an hour when you make that a lot of times and some of the less expensive cities around the country you can afford to live to kinda get by him to your day to day routine but you're not able to put savings away for a rainy day for a time when you get sick so you just try to barrel through and if you can't build through you end up missing work and then maybe you don't make certain payments and certainly you're not going out to eat you're not going to the game hanging out with your friends things like that that really keep the economy moving speaking with Dion rebel in markets editor at axial C. although also writes the axial markets newsletter this piece is called the next dominoes in the corona virus economy you reference to obviously the president trump mentioned he'd like to see something along the lines of a payroll tax cut or some of the relief is that's a a political possibility it it's a political possibility not a good one because right now with the president has talked about is he wants targeted tax relief force in these industries maybe a cut in the payroll tax and the Democrats have come come back and said Hey you know we're not even interested in talking about more tax cuts what they want to do is they want to do it on the spending side and it's just kind of this ideological Democrat versus Republican ideals and I spoke with economist Claudia Sahm forward this piece and what she said was the the real issue is that they don't seem to understand no one on Capitol Hill understands that what we need is just a big package that says Hey the government's got this we're behind you we're gonna authorize a lot of spending to make sure the economy stayed on course and the people get the money they need to keep

Coronavirus Markets Editor Axios
What happens if Uncle Sam goes home?

Between The Lines

11:54 min | 9 months ago

What happens if Uncle Sam goes home?

"Support for Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders indicates more and more. Americans are questioning the nation's role as global leader. But what happens if Washington Jettison? Us alliances and ended the Ford Presence of U. S. forces according to Thomas wrought in the Lightest Foreign Affairs magazine. That's a distinguished New York based journal a strategy of Retrenchment. He argues would among other things. Destabilize the regional security orders about Europe and Asia increase the risks of nuclear proliferation and aggravate the threat of major power conflict. The foreign affairs article is cold. The folly retrenchment. Why America can't withdraw from the world? The author Thomas Rod is director of the Center for the United States and Europe at the Brookings Institution and is affiliated as Nonresident Fellow with the Lowy Institute in Sydney. He's based in Washington. Hi there Tom Hi Tom. It's great to be Richard and join us in cine studio. Is Doug Bandow? He's a senior fellow at the Cato Institute also in Washington a former special assistant to President Ronald Reagan and this she's scholar in residence at the Center for Independent Studies. That's a Sydney based think tank that I had welcome back. I glad to be on Tom. Tom Why do you still support a foreign policy? Strategy that Yusei quote has served the US. Whoa for decades. Well I think that the you know the. Us has had a critical role to play in Europe and in Asia since the end of our two and then after the Cold War And I think it really has worked. You know it's it's created sort of stable open and prosperous regional orders. I think if the US was to withdraw from those regions those orders will be at jeopardize some. We'd see all sorts of negative effects and I think as we look at American farm policy. Be Up to distinguish between some of the conflicts in Afghanistan and elsewhere that might make sense to to to pull back from or to to to end and the more broad sort of American commitment to international security. And I'm sort of worry that we might throw the baby out with about water in this when we talk about you know how engaged the US should be in the world but your critics would say that the US has over extended itself Particularly in nations. That don't directly affect the American national interests. I think of Afghanistan Iraq Libya many people would say strategic disaster after strategic disaster. Doesn't that undermine the case for? Us Global leadership role. Well I think that we can. We can debate the merits of of each of those and certainly in Afghanistan. Icee in the piece that it's time to end the the Board Air. I think Iraq is a sort of a tricky case because there needs to be some sort of a small presence to prevent the resurgence of Isis. And but the main point of the piece actually is that the US has not overextended in Europe and Asia. So all those cases you mentioned are sort of the Greater Middle East right there nod And Not in Europe not in Asia and I think the strategy in those two regions is basically working has worked quite well and so I don't really see the evidence of an over extension in either of those two places over extension dot band. I think we're clearly overextended. The problem is it's going to get worse. You look financially at the United States. It has a trillion dollar annual deficit for the foreseeable future without a financial crisis. Those numbers will get worse of the entitlements. Is the elderly retire? The question is how one maintains globe spanning military capable of trying to contain nations along their borders essentially everywhere and also fund other commitments. I think is going to put enormous pressure on the US budget. And I think what we see today is basically an overhang of a policy. It's inertia for policy that worked well in terms of containing the Soviet Union but doesn't make much sense when it comes to Russia and a policy that in East Asia's very complicated China's strikes me as being the major problem that we face but it makes no sense to extend ourselves everywhere for primarily concerned about China. I kept isn't a US. Pullback from Asia and Europe want that be more likely to embolden regional powers like China and Russia. I don't view Russia's being particularly strong power the stage Russia doesn't dominate Europe the way the Soviet Union threatened do so Russia doesn't have anywhere close to the relative strength towards Europe that China does Europe strikes me as being a very good example of where history suggests we should change policy changing circumstances. Meena change the policy now argue frankly. Us policy's been destabilizing. American policy towards Russia in terms of NATO expansion involvement in Ukraine and Georgia has actually provoked the Russians and has created greater problems there and argue greater threats than an alternative policy. Would Have Tom Rock. Well I guess I would sort of ask Doug if you pull of NATO or reduce the US commitment to troops in the to to the countries in the Baltics Eastern Central Europe. I mean I see the presence there as having a deterrent effect. In that if we didn't have NATO Basically have Russian incursions into those countries in greater instability. I also think NATO helps to sort of try to slow the rise of authoritarian intimate some of those countries. We have big problems in Hungary and elsewhere. I think if NATO was to disband pullback those problems get worse than that. We need to be more focused. On Democracy. In those countries that are currently in the NATO Blah if as the retentions argue the US should basically withdraw from NATO or weedy ended started military. An present there that will have significant negative consequences in another part of Tom. Wright's thesis in his Foreign Affairs as I dug Bandau is that. Us retrenchment leads to nuclear proliferation that is US allies. No longer protected by uncle. Sam would be tempted to acquire nuclear weapons of their own. Why Co that danger Doug Bandow? Everything's relative here. Sometimes you live in a world with bad choices so if the question is to the United States forever defend lots of allies being willing to sacrifice American cities to defend them or should they have nuclear capabilities. Themselves it's not so clear to me. That proliferation is such a bad thing. It's not a good thing but the question is does. The United wanted to risk Los Angeles to protect Taipei and Sydney and Seoul and Tokyo should the US be prepared to risk. You know. The United States still cities and dealing with Russia when in fact already Britain and France have nuclear weapons. Perhaps the European Union are some European defense for should also have nuclear capabilities. I don't think that it's a good alternative. On the other hand the assumption undebated you know kind of unconsidered. I think that. Us should of course maintain this Really starts falling apart especially in Northeast Asia if North Korea possesses missiles capable of hitting the United States and targeting American cities doesn't make any sense for the United States to be prepared to go to war on the Korean Peninsula. What risks are at stake? What interests are at stake? I look at that and say this really is at point to argue that. Maybe we need to reconsider. Who has want Tom Rod on that note? How would you respond to Doug? Bangles question does the. Us wants to risk of Los Angeles to protect Taiwan. Yeah I just. I just think it's really. You know in the exaggerated concern. I mean this is a very real concern. At the height of the Cold War there was a problem. Extended deterrence you know. Obviously there was a number of Said's and brinksmanship but since the Cold War the US has been able to deter Russia in Europe and Saudi. Different way you know actors in Asia what I going to the brink of a global crisis and You know that would precipitate nuclear war. Hasn't we haven't seen that pattern of crises in the last three decades so The evidence would suggest that deterrence in Europe is fairly stable. I came guests. Doug band out from Kite. When Thomas Rod from Brookings? Both prominent washington-based think tanks. And we're dividing. Tom's lightest site in Foreign Affairs magazine. The folly of retrenchment. Why America can't withdraw from the world before we turn to Australia's neighborhood in is Doug. I just want to put it back to you on this question of pulling America out of certain regions. Say the Middle East if the US pulls out of Iraq and Syria a want you just invite those suny jihadist or even the Shia militias to fill the void while they're already there. I mean the reason. Shia militias are active in Iraq is because we blew it up. I mean the notion that America promotes stability in the Middle East. I think is a fantasy the? Us helped blow up Libya now. We created the precedent that if you're dumb enough to give up your nuclear weapons and missiles we take you out who what dictator wants to follow more Merck Offi. I think the the Iraq circumstance you cannot complain about Iranian involvement there when we took out the anti Iranian dictator. So I don't see us as being able to promote relative stability in Iraq in twenty eleven when Obama Administration withdrew. Us troops that created a vacuum for those Sunni. Jihadists non-islamic stunned. I mean th this. As soon as you hottest were active. The reason we have al-Qaeda's it was created al Qaeda in Iraq which transmuted into Isis Obama pulled out following the George W Bush plan Bush could not get a status of forces agreement through when he had all the troops. So the blame Obama for this. I think is silly. And if American troops had been there there's no reason to think they would have maintained stability they would have been a target not only of Shia militias it would have been targeted Sunnis. Both sides would viewed the United States as being a problem. I told me dot band now. He he's a former Reagan. Adviser Menu reflects with I express themselves in different ways Obama trump and sands would essentially agree with Doug Bandow. How would you respond? But I think Obama. The Obama Administration came to the conclusion that it had sort of made a mistake in pulling out of Iraq in the manner in which it did because it went back in. You know to fight. Isis applied played an isis merged So I think you know. I think there's a tendency when we look at these issues you know to say the US withdraw from all of these conflicts to say. It's a Bama toward the beginning. Iraq was the wrong war. Could start it on false. Premises and Afghanistan was the good war Because it was legitimate when it began and broader than looking at the strategic consequences of both which are sort of independent of the causes right. And you know if you have a country `significant you know as Iraq in the heart of the Middle East. What goes on there has consequences and consequences for the region at a time when there is still continuing terrorism threat. I think is happening now. Let's bring it to Asia a dog. You obviously five a retrenchment of US power from not just Europe in the Middle East. I completely get that but you also support a retrenchment from East Asia question. Why China just feel the strategic vacuum left by Uncle Sam and therefore threaten the integrity of many sovereign states in the region. Doug Bandow well. China's the great challenge and the question of how to deal with China. There's no easy answer. I think the question of what America's role should be. It's clearly much more of a backup role it's not America's job to protect scarborough reef for the Filipinos me last year. Rodriguez territory announced after the Chinese Sankar ship. The US should send the navy in and start bombing. And I'm here with them. I mean it shows the danger of essentially transferring these decisions to local powers. And there's no doubt I think providing security guarantees

United States Doug Bandow Europe Asia Iraq Russia Middle East TOM Afghanistan Nato America East Asia China Sydney Thomas Rod Washington President Ronald Reagan
As the coronavirus epidemic grows, China prepares to cut tariffs

Marketplace

02:08 min | 10 months ago

As the coronavirus epidemic grows, China prepares to cut tariffs

"We will begin with an update and the trade war with China which has perhaps begun the official cooling off period China's government announced that it will reduce tariffs on more than seventeen hundred US products these cuts will kick in a week from tomorrow and that's the same day American tariffs on some Chinese products are said to be reduced as well now there was a time when this would be just an incremental step in the phase one deal we might even noted in passing and get on to other things but context is key here as market place's Kimberly Adams reports this move comes as China is grappling with the continuing fallout from the corona virus the human cost of the outbreak is growing hundreds dead and tens of thousand sick when down John teaches economics at Iowa State University he says at the risk of that China's economy might not grow as fast this year has markets questioning whether the virus will specifically impact China's ability to implement the US China face one deal he said that's part of the reason China is reducing tariffs this dab brings some the certainty and shows China's willingness to continue on Kerry outs the promises in the face one deal the White House has expressed concern China might need to delay some parts of the deal like promised purchases of US agricultural products Joshua Meltzer is a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution he says those purchases had people scratching their heads even before the virus outbreak effective later the deal requires Chanda double purchases and it's not clear how this is going to be done not just because there may not be enough market demand in China but also because U. S. farmers need to ramp up production Matt slaughter is dean of the tuck school of business at Dartmouth that depends on not just the investments they make in their seed and fertilizer all those things but the vagaries of the weather slaughter says whether China can stay on track with the phase one deal objectives will depend on just how bad the human and economic costs of the coronavirus turn out to be in Washington I'm Kimberly Adams for

Joshua Meltzer U. S. Chanda Official Washington Tuck School Matt Slaughter Brookings Institution Senior Fellow China White House Kerry Iowa State University John Kimberly Adams United States
China Will Cut Tariffs In Half On $75 Billion Of U.S. Products

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:08 min | 10 months ago

China Will Cut Tariffs In Half On $75 Billion Of U.S. Products

"We will begin with an update in the trade war war with China which has perhaps begun the official cooling off period China's government announced that it will reduce tariffs on more than seventeen hundred US products these cuts cuts will kick in a week from tomorrow. And that's the same day. American tariffs on some Chinese products are set to be reduced as well now. There was a time when this would be just just an incremental step in the phase one deal we might even noted in passing and get onto other things but context is key. Here as marketplace's Kimberly Adams reports this move comes. As China is grappling with the continuing fallout from the corona virus. The human cost of the outbreak is growing hundreds dead and tens of thousands sick when Don John Teaches economics at Iowa State University. He says the risk that China's economy might not grow as fast. This year has has markets questioning whether the virus will specifically impact China's ability to implement the US China face. One deal he said. That's part of the reason. China is reducing tariffs the stat. Bring some to certainty and shows China's willingness to continue to carry out the promises in in the face when deal the White House has expressed concern. China need to delay some parts of the deal like promised purchases of US agricultural products Joshua Meltzer services senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. He says those purchases had people scratching their heads even before the virus outbreak effectively. The deal required under under double purchases. And it's not clear how this is going to be done not just because there may not be enough market demand in China but also because us US farmers need to ramp up production. Matt slaughter is Dean of the Tuck School of business at Dartmouth that depends on just the investments they make in their seed and fertilizer closings. But the vagaries of the weather slaughter says whether China can stay on track with the phase one deal objectives will depend on just how bad the human and economic economic costs of the corona virus. TURN OUT TO BE IN WASHINGTON. I'm Kimberly Adams for marketplace.

China Kimberly Adams United States Don John Washington Iowa State University Matt Slaughter Brookings Institution Tuck School Of Business Official Joshua Meltzer Senior Fellow White House
A Few Cities Have Cornered Innovation Jobs

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:24 sec | 1 year ago

A Few Cities Have Cornered Innovation Jobs

"Well hi tech jobs are growing but according to a new survey they're growing in just a few select cities a report released this morning from Brookings Institution finds that since two thousand five ninety percent of new innovation jobs have been created in just five metro areas they are Boston San Francisco San Jose Seattle and San Diego meanwhile three hundred forty three metro areas loss to share these jobs in that same

Brookings Institution Seattle San Diego Boston San Francisco San Jose Two Thousand Five Ninety Perce
"brookings institution" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"brookings institution" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"More often atop rant KNX ten. Seventy NewsRadio the cold day, sunshine out at least today. We're looking at highs only in the fifties. Mostly clear tonight thirties and forties for your Lowe's. Another chilly night sunny tomorrow, cold again and windy as well. Highs. Upper fifty some areas might get into the lower sixties. Look further ahead how the weekend's going to shape up your exclusive five-day weather forecast. Stick around for that. It's coming up at eleven fifteen some temperatures right now, fifty degrees in San Clemente. We've got fifty two in lake forest now up to fifty five degrees downtown, Los Angeles. Eddie eleven o seven the accurate Jesse smell at back in Chicago today working again on his popular TV series empire. This is police there continue to look into. His report of being attacked by two men because he's black and gay TMZ is reporting small lead who is also an R and B singer flew back to the windy city right after performing at a concert here in West Hollywood over the weekend also says the police want to speak with him again soon as part of their investigation, so far they have not been able to find any security video that actually shows smollet being attacked. This winter has been unusually wet for southern California. Downtown LA has already received nearly thirteen inches of rain since October. First that's about one hundred and seventy percent above average for this time of year. Climatologist Bill Patrick tells KNX the polar vortex lift a big big chilly. Northern parts of the country is the reason these storms from the north Pacific one right after another not too powerful. But right and cool. He says that's been good because the storms produce lots of snow in the mountains. And it's kept frozen downtown LA had less than two inches of rain up to this point last year climate. Experts say high pressure system block storms in the north from coming down here. Some weather experts say the warming the climate is increasing a trend toward billion dollar disaster damage estimates for weather related disasters nationwide. Over the past two years total close to four hundred billion dollars. It's been really warm and really wet contributing to fires hurricanes tornadoes and flooding Mark with the Brookings Institution calls it.

Los Angeles Eddie Brookings Institution San Clemente Lowe lake forest California Bill Patrick KNX Chicago Jesse Hollywood four hundred billion dollars fifty five degrees seventy percent thirteen inches billion dollar fifty degrees two inches
"brookings institution" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

WCBS Newsradio 880

03:19 min | 1 year ago

"brookings institution" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

"Listen every day. You're never more than fifteen minutes from the big stories on WCBS. Good morning. I'm Vicky Allen. Three things to know twelve forty five one a crash on route eighty and New Jersey leaves one person dead and twenty others hospitalized doing printable condition after a New York City bound Adirondack trailways bus traveling east and the express lanes at Parsippany struck a median two cars, just before eight pm twenty eight people were treated for minor injuries to a couple of proposals for ending the now 35-day-old partial government shutdown one from each party failed in the Senate, but Senate leaders are trying to craft a plan to reopen the government with some eight hundred thousand federal workers about to miss their second paycheck today at three robots will not replace every worker, but and you report from the Brookings institution's says a quarter of US jobs could be severely disrupted as artificial intelligence accelerates, the automation of existing jobs, senior, fellow and policy director. The Brookings Institution. Mark borough spoke with John Metaxas on the afternoon roundup Mark thanks for joining us. I understand. Thank you, L, bar pleasure. And stand you've identified jobs that hold a high exposure to automation. Can you tell us what they are? And what that means for those workers. Well. It's actually quite a few jobs. Let's say thirty-seven million nationally. That's only a quarter of the overall job base. But a lot of jobs that we're talking about especially low end service jobs that may have survived the first round of automation that hit the factory floor and middle skill jobs. Molasses twenty five years well now now automation is coming for those new forms of automation, especially high. So the ability to to replace servers. Wait, people people who work in hotels, Tom. Ears. All kinds of those jobs, and then folks like the human resource department at work. People who are providing basic kind of worked process kinds of functions may be exposed. So it's a it there there. There's more coming. What can those people who have those jobs do to prepare for the future? The first thing is. We are research shows substantially lower exposure for those who have a bachelor's degree education seems to allow for greater creativity. Greater nimble less ability to change. Meanwhile, everybody's going to have to get better at re-skilling themselves, and and kind of dancing the dance. I'm gonna have to be able to change jobs. Move onto the next thing. Skill reskill continually. That's Mark borough of the Brookings Institution talking about artificial intelligence and its impact on US jobs.

Brookings institution Mark borough US Senate Vicky Allen New Jersey Parsippany New York City John Metaxas director Tom twenty five years fifteen minutes 35-day
"brookings institution" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"brookings institution" Discussed on KCRW

"Even as the Senate is expected to get back to work tomorrow. So far the holidays have obscured much of the impact of the shutdown. Marketplace's Justin how reports it's called a partial shutdown. But if you work at one of the nine federal departments that is still closed. There's nothing partial about not getting paid even if there will be backpack. There are west is at the Brookings Institution about eight hundred thousand workers in those departments who are affected. Those of us who aren't government workers who are trying to get into certain national parks, for instance, probably aren't feeling the effects of the shutdown. But west says there will be economic pain. If an agreement isn't reached soon three opened the government on the workers in general. But also just in terms of how people think about government and the economy itself. This is the third partial shutdown. We've had this year Douglas Holtz Aken, president of the American action forum. Says this is no way to run the government takes productivity people. Don't love the government to begin with. I think it's inefficient. Just makes it worse. And it doesn't help calm Wall Street, either Washington's problems only add to all the uncertainty around the economy. I'm Justin how for marketplace. Gold hit a six month high today bond prices also up these are both places investors go to hide and there's a lot to hide from markets. Haven't liked the Fed's rate hikes or the trade war or rumors? The president wants to fire the fed chair or the shutdown just to name a few triggers. Markets are certainly still down far down from a couple of months ago. The Dow is down five thousand points from October. But as we say the market is not the economy and the economy is not the market. Marketplace's were not to say go is here with us. We're not has the market volatility had an impact on the actual economy. It hasn't the economy is doing fine. Consumer spending is up in fact, data from MasterCard show holiday sales. This season grew five point one percent to eight hundred fifty billion dollars. That's the biggest growth we've seen in six years when consumer spending is up that's a good sign for GDP, which is another indicator of a strong economy. Susan Schmidt is head of US. Equities with Aviva investors. She says the problem here is that when people hear the stock market is not doing too. Well, they take it as a sign. The overall economy is tanking attack. Yourself into not wanting to spend as much going back to being savers and slowing the economy down. I also spoke spoke with Mark Lucina. He's chief investment strategist with Janney Montgomery, Scott. He says that the stock market continues to slide. It's still unlikely to hurt the overall economy we really haven't seen much in the way of deterioration on that. Softer data to lead us to believe that the US economy is going to be victimized. The economy is an enormous structure that depends on so many factors more complicated than just the market. All right. Thank you so much, and let's take a look at the numbers..

Susan Schmidt Fed Justin west president US Mark Lucina Senate Douglas Holtz Aken Brookings Institution Washington MasterCard Aviva Scott Janney Montgomery eight hundred fifty billion do one percent six month
"brookings institution" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"brookings institution" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Even as the Senate is expected to get back to work tomorrow. So far the holidays have obscured much of the impact of the shutdown. Marketplace's Justin how reports it's called a partial shutdown. But if you work at one of the nine federal departments that is still closed. There's nothing partial about not getting paid even if there will be back pay there, a west is at the Brookings Institution about eight hundred thousand workers in those departments who are affected those of us who aren't government workers or who aren't trying to get into certain national parks. For instance, probably aren't feeling the effects of the shutdown. The west says there will be economic pain. If an agreement isn't reached soon reopen the government book on the workers in general. But also just in terms of how people think about government and the economy itself. This is the third partial shutdown. We've had this year Douglas Holtz Aitken, president of the American action forum says. This is no way to run the government takes twelve productivity. People. Don't love the government begin with. I think it's inefficient. Just makes it worse. And it doesn't help calm Wall Street, either Washington's problems only add to all the uncertainty around the economy. I'm Justin how for marketplace. Gold hit a six month high today bond prices are also up these are places both of them where investors go to hide. There's a lot to hide from markets. Haven't liked the Fed's rate hikes or the trade war just to name a few of many triggers. But as we say the market is not the economy and the economy is not the market. Marketplace's of Renata sago is here. We're not a has the market volatility had any impact on the actual economy. It hasn't the economy's doing fine. Consumer spending is up in fact, data from MasterCard show holiday sales. This season grew five point one percent to eight hundred fifty million dollars. That's the biggest growth we've seen in six years on consumer spending is up. That's a good sign for GDP, another indicator of a strong economy. Susan Schmidt is head of US equities with Aviva investors. She says the problem is that when people hear the stock market isn't doing too. Well, they take it as a sign. The overall economy is tanking. We think about our savings. We think. About our investments you get into a negative cycle. Where you talk yourself into not wanting to spend as much going back to being favors and slowing. The economy down the economy is an enormous structure that depends on many factors companies workers cash more complicated than just the market. Right. But is there any chance for a significant turnaround in the market this week? Do you think now now Schmidt says many investors are waiting for the new year new data to be able to make decisions on what's best? All right. Thank you very much. And let's do the numbers. The.

Susan Schmidt Justin Brookings Institution Douglas Holtz Aitken Senate Renata sago MasterCard Fed Washington president Aviva US eight hundred fifty million do one percent six month six years
"brookings institution" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"brookings institution" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In this month's all tech considered. We're looking at toxic content online what it is. And what's to be done about it? It's become part of the routine after a horrific events like a mass shooting. The suspect social media post are often examined and often found to be filled with hate speech. The supreme court has ruled that hate speech generally is protected under the constitution. The question is when does online hate speech become a real threat NPR's jasmin Garcia reports for Rochelle Ritchie political commentator who is frequently on television. It was obvious. The man who tweeted at her quote kiss your loved ones when you leave home following TV appearance was threatening her. But when she reported him to Twitter Twitter, sent her a reply saying it concluded that this was not an abusive. Tweet Ritchie was frustrated. What is offensive behavior? Do. I have to be walking out of my condo building. And in being physically hurt or harmed in order for it to be taken seriously just a few weeks later the man who threatened Richie is accused of sending over a dozen explosive. Devices nationwide. Turns out he threatened other people on Twitter too. But online behavior isn't always this easy to define take the recent shooting spree at a synagogue in Pittsburgh, the alleged shooter had a history of antisemitic ranting on the social media site gap. It was hateful. But I I don't know you see a direct threat in there. I don't that's Andrew Torah the CEO and founder of gab. He spoke to NPR the day after the shooting answer ship and pushing these people into the shadow who's never going to be the answer guns. Do not kill people social media platforms. Do not kill people people kill people tore. But isn't the only one who thinks this Jonathan Rouch a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution says my view is that minorities are better off in a society that protects hate speech than in a society that protects minorities from hate speech row who is Jewish and has been active in the gay rights movement. For decades believes confronting hate speech has been key to the advancement of civil rights in America trying to deal with Haight by repressing hate speech is like trying to deal with global warming by breaking the thermometers. The problem, isn't the speech. The problem is the hate and the way you deal with that problem is by understanding confronting Heidi. Byron is the director. Of the southern poverty law center's intelligence project. Their position is heat speech. Can and often does lead to violence. We know people are radicalized by interacting with others to learn how to hate black people or Jews or so on by Rick points to one egregious case Myanmar a country where the military recently published post on Facebook spreading hateful misinformation about the Roe Hindu, Muslim minority. The United Nations has said those posts contributed to the mass murder rape and forced exodus of the Rohingya and Facebook acknowledges it was too slow in removing anti Muslim hate speech in Myanmar. But it's been cautious about censoring hate speech in America. Just a few months ago. It got into hot water for allowing holocaust deniers Law Center has called on these tech companies to rid their platforms of this material. We're just going to get more violence as a Steph proliferates, but the southern poverty. Law Center itself has come into controversy over who it labels a hate group. And then there's the question of pushing hate groups further underground where they might be hard to monitor. Even if the extremists leave these big platforms and end up somewhere else. The reach of their propaganda has now been reduced. I would rather have extremists preaching to the choir. Then preaching to the masses in converting more people to their ideas. Facebook is at least taking an additional step in that direction. It recently announced that it's creating a new independent board to monitor content complaints, free speech. Experts say here's the thing the first amendment prevents government, censorship, private social media companies like Facebook and Twitter, they can do whatever they want. The question remains are we better off if they do jasmine guards NPR news, New.

Twitter Facebook NPR Rochelle Ritchie deniers Law Center Richie America Myanmar supreme court Brookings Institution Steph proliferates Jonathan Rouch Pittsburgh jasmin Garcia Heidi United Nations Byron
"brookings institution" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"brookings institution" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

"You can now listen to Brookings podcasts on Spotify. If you have any questions for me or for the scholars who appear on the show senior emails to be c. p. at Brookings dot EDU and now all of the show. Here's EJ Dion. Thank you, Fred. It's great to be here with my Brookings Institution colleague, Bob Kagan the occasion for our talk is his new book. The jungle grows back America in our impera world. I have to say it's a real joy to be here with Bob. He someone I haven't always agreed with nor his. He always agreed with me, but he is a delightful person and a clear thinker, and we do agree on the importance of democracy. And even those out there who may have disagreed with Bob in the past should know he's a heck of a guy to have dinner with and kick things around with. And so what we're going to try to do today is have a kind of dinner table conversation about foreign policy and where things stand now for the US and what is the future of US power in the world. It's really good to be with you bump. Well, it's a treat for me. It's always a pleasure to read you to talk with you and also have dinner with you. That now before we lose all our audience, how get the substance, the book is called the jungle gross back and for a split. Second, when I saw the title, I thought my God has Bob Kagan become an environmentalist when she doing writing about jungle. So why don't you just start by giving listeners a sense of the argument of your book, which is pretty clear and straightforward. And by the way, the book is written a very clear and straightforward way. Well, thanks a lot. Yeah. I mean, the metaphor is for any of folks out there. I'm not a good gardener and I haven't done much gardening, but I understand general principle. How thumb. Anyone who's ever garden knows the first of all garden is an artificial construct that human beings build. It's not a natural phenomenon. And once you've planted a garden, your job is not finished. You have to weed it. You have to cut back the vines. You have to prevent the jungle from going back over it because the forces of nature are always seeking to undermine and over grow a garden. And for me, that's the metaphor for what we call for lack of a better phrase the liberal world order that was created largely by the United States in American policies after World War Two, we can think of all the horrible things that have happened over the past seventy seventy five years and many horrible things have happened. But if you compare this period to the rest of human history, it's been a remarkable period. We've seen the most global prosperity that we've seen in any other time in history. Most people throughout history of been in abject poverty. And what we've seen since World War Two is something. Like an average of four percent annual GDP growth globally and not just obviously in the west, but in China and India and Latin America and elsewhere. In addition, of course, we've seen incredible explosion of democracy. Democracy is the rarest form of government. It's almost an accident in the rest of history. And yet we've seen this has been a remarkably democratic world and under girding all this has been a long period, perhaps the longest that anyone can think of great power peace. Now, there have been wars wars at the United States has been involved with obviously, but the kind of cataclysmic world wars that we saw twice in the first half of the twentieth century have not been present. So this in my view is like it's almost a miracle. It's a unique situation. It's an aberration in the same way that a garden is and what we have to understand is this order. This generally positive international system doesn't just stay there. It requires constant efforts to beat back in Herod forces in human nature. That seek to destroy it. So the insurance system is normally chaotic and conflictual, and human nature does not simply support democracy as I think you would agree..

Bob Kagan United States Brookings Institution Spotify EJ Dion Fred Bob America China Latin America India seventy seventy five years four percent
"brookings institution" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"brookings institution" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The brookings institution in washington well from brussels president trump made the short flight to london just north of london where he landed about twenty minutes ago he's just going into a helicopter on his way from essex just north of the capital into the center of the city he's on what's being called a working visit to the uk meeting the prime minister theresa may and queen elizabeth but it isn't a full blown state visit with all the pomp and pageantry that that entails prompted questions about whether the special relationship a phrase may popular by winston churchill after the second world war is looking rather shaky right now and perhaps it's long been passed its historical sell by date i'll diplomatic correspondent james robbins considers the on off love affair between london and washington the past is a foreign country well you only have to go back to january last year to confirm that game changing votes in both britain and the united states had put resume and donald trump into power and she was the first leader into the new president's white house paps the personal relationship seemed a little awkward from the very start but mrs may laid particular emphasis on the special relationship between two nations as she delivered britain's most sought after invitation in record time i have today being able to convey a majesty the queen's hope the president trump and the first lady would pay a state visit to the united kingdom later this year and i'm delighted that the president is accepted that invitation a year and a half later things look very different state visit indefinitely postponed but professor kathleen burke of university college london stresses this scaled down working visit is the minimum necessary.

united states university college london professor donald trump prime minister london kathleen burke united kingdom president brookings institution britain james robbins winston churchill elizabeth theresa essex brussels washington
"brookings institution" Discussed on The Lead with Jake Tapper

The Lead with Jake Tapper

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"brookings institution" Discussed on The Lead with Jake Tapper

"He has the power to do so with trump's anger at a boiling point news of the president's hastily cancelled trip to south america and the departure of homeland security advisor tom bossert source telling tnn there is a deep sense of anxiety and uncertainty in the west wing as aids wonder what's next cnn has learned bossert was pushed out by newlyinstalled national security adviser john bolton just days after an appearance on television on behalf of the administration i think the prisoner got a point that's been very clear and i'm going to reiterate that point with his departure nearly half of top level snap inside trump's white house has turned over according to brookings institution study and the president who shortened his trip to south america has been grumbling that he didn't want to go at all is actually staying back in part to figure out the next steps at his department of justice according to sources familiar with the matter the white house as you know has said jake that he staying behind to monitor the situation in syria but as you know last year the president made the decision to launch those strikes for maralago so it's unclear a why he wouldn't be able to make any decision abroad jake pamela just to underline this you're saying that you're hearing from the source that one of the reasons he staying back and not going on this trip is so he can figure out what to do with his justice department he's clearly fixated on the raid on his personal attorney and he's angry all of this is factory nan and he's trying to figure out what the next steps are unclear if anything will happen but all of this is factoring into this decision on a trip that the president didn't even want to go on in the first place but again the white house is saying officially that this all.

trump president cnn john bolton syria attorney south america advisor tom bossert brookings institution jake pamela
"brookings institution" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"brookings institution" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Good morning everyone thank you so much for coming what a wonderful mix of old friends and and fresh faces my name's jonathan raushan i'm a senior fellow here at the brookings institution and a contributing editor of the atlantic magazine it's my duty and my privilege enjoyed it be the moderator here today on this extraordinary panel before introducing i guess i wanted to do something to slightly unusual and take the temperature of the room just to understand where we stand relative probably the most fundamental question that all of our panelist will be discussing the oath of office of the president of the united states is remarkably concise and effective like everything else in the text of the constitution i will read the entirety it says i do solemnly swear that i will faithfully execute the office of the president of the united states and will to the best of my ability preserve protect and defend the constitution of the united states that's it it doesn't say that i will do a good job of preserving protecting and defending the constitution or that i will do it in the way that republicans would like it to be done or democrats would like it to be done it just says i will to the best of my ability preserve protect and defend the constitution other words i will really really try so here's the question here's the question that i want to ask the room i'm going to ask you to raise your hand if you think that president trump is really trying to fulfill the oath of office.

jonathan raushan senior fellow brookings institution contributing editor atlantic magazine president united states trump
"brookings institution" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"brookings institution" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Tax reform that it's heart because and tax reform you often take away tax deductions and one person's tax loophole tax break is another person's tax benefit the least example is this there were reports the republicans might be considering lowering the cap on taxdeductible contributions that workers make to 401 k retirement accounts you'd be able to put less money in taxfree and then yesterday came a tweet from the president saying the opposite quote there will be no change to your four a one k for more on this returned as we often do david wessel it wrecks the hutchins center at the brookings institution and as a contributing correspondent for the wall street journal david good morning good morning which your mind issa how 401 k works and how that would change if this idea ever became law sure the tax law currently says that workers can take it tax deduction if they make a contribution to one of these retirement plans now that the eighteen thousand dollars a year or twenty four thousand dollars a year if you're over 50 the money is taxed only when it comes out in retirement o v what's so that way you can like you can grow the money taxfree at its taxed at the end okay exactly now the republicans were considering lowering eighteen thousand dollar cap to twenty four hundred dollars by there was a twist any additional contributions would go into what's called a roth style retirement account name for a former senator that means no upfront tax deduction but you don't have to pay taxes when you take the money out in retirement it turns out that's really unpopular with people who take advantage of this deduction and really unpopular with the money management industry that manages this money now the president as you said seems to have killed this off he tweeted quote this has always been a great impact killer middle class tax break that works and it stays exclamation point well why were republicans thinking about this at all well look republicans are struggling.

taxfree president david wessel hutchins center brookings institution wall street journal tax law senator 401 k twenty four thousand dollars twenty four hundred dollars eighteen thousand dollars eighteen thousand dollar one k
"brookings institution" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"brookings institution" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

"And he was peter dunne cinema senior was in university my question concerns democratic norms in the trump presidency whether it is donald trump's firing of fbi director james comey democrats going nuclear over the nomination neil gorsuch or the swift and secretive reconciliation process that ultimately led to the demise of the republican repeal and replace blow in the senate democratic norms unwritten rule seemed to be on a fullblown assault my question is what is the role of democratic norms in the trump presidency and in the greater frontex of deep political polarization and what options to policymakers have to preserve some semblance of these norms in order to maintain stable governance thanks peter good question thanks for asking and i wish more people were asking that question including more young people i'm bill gostyn a senior fellow in governance studies at the brookings institution the question of democratic norms is something that goes all the way back to the beginning of our republic if you look at the father of our constitution james madison on the one hand he was a strong believer in institutions relying on institutions rather than on individual motivation to prevent bad things from happening and to create as many incentives as possible for good legislative outcomes that would serve the public interest.

neil gorsuch senate assault senior fellow brookings institution peter dunne donald trump fbi director james comey bill gostyn james madison one hand
"brookings institution" Discussed on WJNT 1180 AM

WJNT 1180 AM

02:47 min | 3 years ago

"brookings institution" Discussed on WJNT 1180 AM

"Six ninety red eye welcome and good morning uh he is eric harley i'm gary mcnamara while this uh this uh poll on young people and free speech just a little bit frightening out there i don't know if you see gene that the number of people nineteen percent of a young people believe that the violence is acceptable stop free speech that violence is okay that some let's destroyed things to shut people down are that fearful of opinion route yeah well we'll have these specifics of that uh coming up here in just a little here okay got a hurts behind another story that's why uh uh results were followed this is a from uh the brookings institution did this 44 percent of all students that hate speech is not protected by the first amendment no wonder what's the cuomo chris first from and wonder chris kromah said that one teacher 44 percent of all students had hate speech is not protected by the first amendment sixteen percent answered don't know which means the majority of young people these are college students are wrong uh yeah the majority of death eight beta right they don't even understand that they don't matter if the united states one's gotta fifty one percent of all students had shouting down speakers to silence them in a public form is acceptable over sixty percent of democrats agreed compared to roughly forty percent of republican college students in nineteen percent of students supported violence as a of shutting down speech deemed unacceptable that's which wept an interesting word 'unacceptable 20 per set of democrats twenty two percent of college republicans students uh it's also our belief though that the republican party is getting more liberal it's important and sixteen percent of independent supported violence two cents repondents those results are notable as was pointed out first of uh the fraction of students who view of the use of violence as acceptable is extremely high while percentages in the high teens and twenty are low relative to what they could be it's important to remember that this question is asking about the acceptability of committing violence in order to silence speech any number as significantly above zero is concerning in a free society of course it is just amazing i'd love to isolate that group that believes the violence is acceptable and just then get into that and what level of violence are.

eric harley gary mcnamara brookings institution first amendment democrats republican party chris kromah united states nineteen percent sixteen percent 44 percent twenty two percent fifty one percent forty percent sixty percent
"brookings institution" Discussed on WCTC

WCTC

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"brookings institution" Discussed on WCTC

"Brookings brookings institution also professor at georgetown and a cochairs it's huge forum for the brookings institution angela in terms of the trump putin meeting let's go back to that for a second and more big picture what's the best way for these two powerhouses to really improve the relationship between the united states and russia well petrol it perry difficult i don't think we should better my how difficult it is because we in the russian have our pretty different view of the world a different understanding of how things go i mean what the russians want what putin want it for russia to be treated as an equal by the united states he would like us to treat russia that at the soviet union got pretty pretty challenging but at least 81 feet at the table on all important decision i mean he got that meeting with president trump mp at the g twenty and so to some extent we we have to understand that that the russian you pointed out to me we have to acceptable you have to move forward based on that i think the fact that this administration has said that it's not interested in democracy promotion is probably something that has also indira administration to president putin now from the russian point of view ave prepared to accept you know are confirmed about what happened during the election and to make any meaningful take any meaningful steps toward discussing the issue with we'll wait and pre abbott backpay perfect dot out from a realistic understanding of what russia is and then not be too and bishop and not have too high expectations every us administration since the collapse of the soviet union has come into office hoping that it could really improve relations with russia they've all had their own research bill clinton did george bush did president obama did and all of those endeavours have ended in disappointment that we have to try it and can be more realistic about what it is possible to achieve with russia and then and then it might be a from what mood a passage angela thank you so much for a few minutes a really appreciate the time and we'll talk soon back you there you have it angeles dent the deal actor of the center for eurasian russian and east european studies at georgetown also a nonresident senior fellow at the brookings institution.

professor georgetown united states russia putin soviet union bill clinton obama georgetown nonresident senior fellow brookings institution brookings president george bush the deal 81 feet
"brookings institution" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"brookings institution" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"Gary burtless economist at the brookings institution thank you so much thank you bye beck bennett we love your feedback on the show and we asked her followers on facebook to tell us how they feel about minimum wage dini good in overland park kansas said inflation of the price of everything is all it ever clauses kevin greene said as a business owner minimum wage dust to things number one at least for now at payroll tax basically doubles the cost to employers and number two at the cost of labor rises the incentive to automate task increases and tom hendrickson dallas asked us not forget about theodore workers who he says are paid the lowest wages and benefits allowed by law we encourage your comments and you can email us anytime weekend at marketplaceorg and while you're writing to us what else up for the newsletter do that by also gonna marketplace dot org as you may know we hear it marketplace love to do the numbers simple little context behind them and that is why we bring you this week's news by the numbers with producers sara mendez antoni wagner headed sarah thanks lizzy ri number is sixty six thousand that's number of posts facebook deletes per week for hate speech investigation by pro publika found some interesting ways facebook's content reviewers those are real people are being trained to identify hate speech for example the phrase white men is okay because both the words white and men are protected categories.

Gary burtless brookings institution facebook kansas kevin greene marketplaceorg business owner tom hendrickson theodore