35 Burst results for "Brookings Institution"

U.S. Jobless Claims Fell to Pandemic Low of 348,000 Last Week

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

01:39 min | 2 months ago

U.S. Jobless Claims Fell to Pandemic Low of 348,000 Last Week

"'cause it's thursday it's first time jobless claims the trend to be clear over the past month or so has been really good last week. The number of people filing for unemployment benefits for the first time fell to three hundred and forty eight thousand the lowest since the middle of march a year ago and total claims in all government jobless programs is down to eleven point seven million but again from the desk of maximum peril. Mitchell tells us there is a potentially nasty shock lurking inside that number you can see. The latest jobless claims numbers as a glass half full mark hamrick at bank rate says unlike earlier in the pandemic when millions were getting laid off every week. Layoffs have not really been the overarching concern with respect to the economy but there is a big concern looming. Emergency federal pandemic benefits are about to expire says analysts go-getter at the brookings institution on labor. Day anyone who normally wouldn't qualify for their state unemployment which is quite a lot of people that were impacted by the pandemic lose their benefits. That's nearly five million people right now including anyone. Who's a gig worker. Contract worker self-employed navy worked part time and didn't earn enough to qualify another four million or so long term unemployed are getting federal benefits because they ran out of state benefits and everyone on unemployment right now gets an extra three hundred dollars a week from the feds all told that's more than six billion dollars in weekly federal benefits that vanish in two. And a half weeks.

Mark Hamrick Brookings Institution On Labor Bank Rate Mitchell Navy
Complex Forces Are Keeping Women From Coming Back to Work

NPR's Business Story of the Day

02:06 min | 5 months ago

Complex Forces Are Keeping Women From Coming Back to Work

"This time last year around twenty million people were out of work now as the economy recovers employers. Say they can't find anyone higher. Still millions of women have yet to return to work. Npr's andrea shoot talked with two of them for more than twenty years. Catherine gains worked as a legal assistant in washington. Dc she had a reputation for excelling at everything documents. Foul leans reefs scanning. Whatever they needed done. I was the go to person. She even wants planned and attorneys wedding early last year. Her law firm downsized and she was laid off. She quickly applied to some temp agencies and got an assignment but then cova kicked in. Nobody had anything for me to go to in a way. It was a blessing. She had recently moved in with her mom. Who has alzheimer's take care of her. Was a fulltime job. Finding an actual job in the pandemic was daunting. I knew i couldn't work in retail. Because i knew. I couldn't be exposed and bring it home to my mother so i just had to. Just be hopeful. Sit and wait. I always say. God didn't bring me this far to drop me off earlier. This year gains moved her mother into a nursing home and now she's applying for jobs again. She'd prefer to work from home but is okay with going into a covid safe workplace. Most importantly she wants to find something that would allow her to take her mom to doctors appointments and checking on her frequently. Gains herself is sixty two now. She's willing to hunt a little longer for the right job at least until unemployment benefits run out. I'm giving myself at least till august. That's when i really hit the grind caregiving responsibilities. Are one reason labor. Economists think women are not returning to the workforce in droves. But stephanie aaronson of the brookings institution says other things are at play to. I think it's just a complex mix of factors that are keeping women out of the labor force right now ongoing concerns about the virus some industries still struggling to recover and a change of heart about how people want to spend their

Andrea Shoot Catherine Gains NPR Cova Alzheimer Washington Stephanie Aaronson Brookings Institution
Why Black Entrepreneurship Surged During the Pandemic

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:04 min | 5 months ago

Why Black Entrepreneurship Surged During the Pandemic

"Is of course the one year anniversary of the murder of floyd in a year of protests and reckoning there have been signs of hope even during a pandemic that hit black americans particularly hard and closed many black owned businesses new data suggests that people in black communities started new businesses over the last year in cities like new york and atlanta the study from the national bureau of economic research says. Black americans were more likely than white americans to take steps toward entrepreneurship. during the pandemic marketplace's euler has more on. Why so the study found that. After a relief package is passed last year. There was a big surge in registered business formations in the following weeks. Catherine facia teaches business at boston university and helped write the study. She says that's despite the cares. Act not directly infusing. Any money into new businesses are passed not to pat is a lot of start up formation so it was very interesting for us to see that cares out had that ripple of fat another reason for the surgeon. Black entrepreneurship could be the americans. Now have a better understanding of historic inequality or he goes. Mom is an assistant professor of management at columbia university and a co author of the study. There's being clear intends in banks and government to make sure all the financial reports out this year. Which is wachner hurts. And andre perry says that speaks to a bigger lesson to be learned from this study about access to capital. He's a senior fellow at the brookings institution. If you really want to see the economy grow figure out two ways to invest in the under appreciated assets in our community in that happens to be black and brown communities it happens to be black and brown entrepreneurs he says black people represent about fourteen percent of the population in the us but only two percent of all businesses with more than one employee this investment and black businesses. He says shouldn't be a pandemic induced

Catherine Facia National Bureau Of Economic Re Floyd Boston University Wachner Andre Perry Atlanta New York Columbia University United States
"brookings institution" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:05 min | 5 months ago

"brookings institution" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"At the Brookings Institution. Shipley. Thank you so much for joining us my pleasure. I'm Sarah Gonzalez in for 10, Xena Vega and you're listening to the takeaway. President Biden has proposed the American families plan and as part of the plan, he is proposing $200 billion for free, Universal preschool. If past, experts say the package, which would also set aside $225 billion to make child care more affordable, would represent the largest ever American investment in child care and early education and to help us understand the long term effects of preschool. We can look to Boston back in the late nineties. Boston offered preschool to some of its Children through a lottery. And this week, researchers released a study looking at the long term effects of preschool education on those Children. Here to help us understand what they found is one of the authors of the study. I'm joined by Christopher Walters, associate professor of economics at UC Berkeley and affiliated with the Mighty School Effectiveness and Inequality Initiative. Christopher Thank you so much for being here. Hi, Sarah. Thanks so much for having me. So let's start first, with just what happened in Boston in the late 19 nineties with preschool who was involved in this what happened? Sure So, like a lot of states and localities in the U. S. Boston has a public preschool program for three and four year olds and its program. Actually, Coast goes back quite a long time. Like you said, back to the late 19 nineties. And as you alluded to a kind of interesting institutional feature of the way public preschool in Boston works is that assignment to the program actually happens partially by lottery. So parents who want their kids to attend preschool will submit their preferences over which programs they want to attend. They have some priorities based on like where they live, whether they have a sibling enrolled. And then within those groups because there aren't enough seats for all the kids that want to attend the district actually breaks ties by random lottery to decide who gets a slot. So we as researchers, we can use that to understand the impacts of the program by comparing the kids who randomly win and lose those lotteries to get seats. So researchers like yourself thought, well, this is a good opportunity to follow these Children and do a really long study. We'll get into some of the findings some of your findings in a bit, But first, can you just give us a sense? What? What did past studies on the benefits of preschool show US? Yes. So we actually have a lot of pretty encouraging evidence on the impacts of preschool from a couple of different kinds of studies. One set of studies are randomized studies kind of like what we're doing in Boston in the past, typically conducted on pretty small scales. A famous example of that is the Perry Preschool project. In the 19 sixties, which randomized a very small number of kids to an intensive, high quality preschool program, and researchers there found very large positive impacts on all kinds of outcomes. Over kids entire lives from attending preschool. And then we have studies of some bigger programs like head Start that typically come from non experimental research strategies. So comparisons of kids that attend head start to those who don't And those also tend to find positive effects. But with that, with that type of research design, your voice a bit worried, you know. Is there something else that's different between the head Start kids and the non head start kids, So our study is kind of bridging that gap. We have both a pretty big program. In Boston serving a lot of kids and also this randomized design kind of a natural experiment that comes from the assignment process that lets us get a clean estimate of what the program actually did.

Sarah Gonzalez Sarah Christopher Walters Christopher $225 billion $200 billion Xena Vega UC Berkeley three U. S. Boston Boston Brookings Institution four year Shipley 19 sixties US Perry Preschool this week both first
European Commission Unveils Plan to Tackle Foreign Subsidies

The Daily

02:08 min | 6 months ago

European Commission Unveils Plan to Tackle Foreign Subsidies

"It block deals with foreign companies if those companies get unfair subsidies from their governments. You don't have to read too terribly closely between the lines to see the EU was talking about China here as the global search for leverage over the world's second biggest economy. Seems to be waning event marketplaces to replenish or has that one European leaders are increasingly worried that China's state heavy economic system is threatening their own companies. James Lewis is with the Center for Strategic and International Studies. He says China and Europe have a history here about a decade ago. The Chinese through a combination of industrial has been nauseous and economies of scale from the local market and huge government subsidies, basically ate the solar panel market and drove the Europeans out of the business. Europe's new rules are trying to level the economic playing field. Concern over human rights is another factor. Other governments also concerned President Biden is reportedly circulating proposals targeting China. The G seven summit David Dollar is with the Brookings Institution. We and the Europeans we can control who invest in our economy Who's able to do mergers and acquisitions in our economy that there lots of other areas where we just do not have any leverage. Anything that China does within its territory from subsidies to human rights is probably out of reach, he says Jennifer Hillman with the Council on Foreign Relations. Says China's growing influence as an investor and infrastructure through its international belt and road initiative has made it harder for some countries to confront him. And Hillman says the U. S is partly to blame. It's very hard when we're going around the world telling everyone don't use wall weighs five G when we do not have a five G alternative to offer we're concerned about the degree to which China is building all of this high speed rail around the world, but we do not have a high speed rail alternative to offer. Governments have called for a level playing field with China. But for now it is a moving playing field in the U. S and its allies are just trying to find their footing in New York. I'm sorry, banish shorts for marketplace.

China President Biden James Lewis David Dollar Center For Strategic And Inter Europe Jennifer Hillman EU Brookings Institution Council On Foreign Relations Hillman U. New York
Who Wins Or Loses If There's An Increase In The Federal Minimum Wage?

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:12 min | 8 months ago

Who Wins Or Loses If There's An Increase In The Federal Minimum Wage?

"The covid relief bill moving through congress includes a higher minimum wage for someone like lisa harris. Who works grocery store outside richmond. Virginia that make a big difference able to afford the things that i need to get by day to day without having to ask one ability to feel that i am a contributing member to byatti. I mean they say thank you and that were essential. That were heroes. But we can't feed our families off of being heroes scaling up from seven. Twenty five an hour to fifteen dollars. An hour is still running into resistance though and testing democratic unity in congress. David wessel is following. The debate is of the hutchins center at the brookings institution. David good morning. Good morning steve. So there's always case made against raising the minimum wage. We're told that if you raise the minimum wage employers are just going to hire fewer people. What's the evidence here. Well textbook economic says if you raise the price of something there's going to be less demand for it. In this case less demand from employers for low wage essential workers now the question is how many winners and how many losers one influential estimate comes from the congressional budget office. They estimate that by twenty twenty five which is when the wages supposed to get to fifteen dollars. It would mean twenty. Seven million people would be getting a raise. Nine hundred thousand fewer people would be in poverty but one point four million fewer people would be working or not having got hired on the other hand economist. Aaron debate at the university of massachusetts at amherst has been looking at what happens when states raise minimum wages and he argues that the latest evidence suggests that. Cbo is overestimating the ill effects of raising the wage. A fifteen bucks okay. So a lot of people benefit. Some people may be hurt. But there's an argument over how many people are actually hurt. That's the point of view of the employees. What about the employer. business owners objected. Here well it would raise their payroll costs for sure now. Some employers would may discover that they have better workers or less turnover so it might not hurt them that much some would suck it up in the form of lower profits somewhat. Pass it onto their consumers in the form of higher prices and some would get by with fewer workers are cut the hours of their workers they would clearly be very painful for some businesses and particularly for some businesses like those in the fast food industry that already been hit hard by the covid pandemic but really interesting new academic paper that looked at ten thousand mcdonald's outlets many of them in states or cities that have raised. The minimum wage found that nearly all of them raise prices to cover the extra costs and interestingly it found that despite higher labor costs they didn't more of them didn't install high-tech touch screen ordering that potentially saves labor which suggests that consumers would pay but workers would benefit as well. David you've referred a couple of times here to the fact that some states have already raised the minimum wage. Well above what the federal minimum is. When you look at this debate does it. Matter what part of the country we're looking at it matters a lot. Twenty nine states and the district of columbia have set their minimum wages above the federal seven. Twenty five and hour minimum and so have several cities raising the minimum wage to fifteen dollars. An hour across the country would have a huge impact on some states in the south that are paying seven two thousand five hundred minimum wage or state like west virginia where the minimum wage is now. Eight dollars and seventy five cents an hour. That's of course politically important. Because democrat senator joe manchin has indicated. He's against a fifteen hour wage and his opposition could be fatal to the proposal but a fifteen dollars. Minimum wage would have much less impact in states. Like california where it's already set to go to fifteen dollars. It's thirteen dollars now. And in florida voters in november approved a referendum that takes their minimum wage to fifteen bucks over the next few years no matter what congress does anything special about going up to exactly fifteen an hour. Not really it's politically important. The fact is that the minimum wage has been stuck at seven twenty five since two thousand nine. It would be close to nine dollars. An hour fifty kept up with inflation since

Lisa Harris David Wessel Hutchins Center Congress Brookings Institution Congressional Budget Office Richmond University Of Massachusetts David CBO Virginia Amherst Steve Aaron Mcdonald Senator Joe Manchin
Panel agrees: Racial equity in Washington DC requires more work

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:47 sec | 8 months ago

Panel agrees: Racial equity in Washington DC requires more work

"Government and business leaders recently took part in a panel discussion about improving racial equity in the biz. Drinks during an event hosted by the deputy mayor for planning and economic developments. Panelists like Corey Griffin, with the Greater Washington Black Chamber of Commerce, laid out the continued objective, bringing the black business community together to help facilitate engagement with each other and with other opportunities in the private sector and in the government sector. Others like Dr Andre Perry, senior fellow the Brookings Institution brought up matters like better ways to invest specifically. And the utilities and tech industries targeted to businesses that will employ more people that will serve government and private industry. Griffin Notes. Eight out of 10 Black businesses fail within 18 months Ken Duffy

Corey Griffin Greater Washington Black Chamb Dr Andre Perry Brookings Institution Griffin Ken Duffy
Unpacking Biden's Executive Orders Advancing Racial Equity And Tribal Sovereignty

Morning Edition

02:49 min | 9 months ago

Unpacking Biden's Executive Orders Advancing Racial Equity And Tribal Sovereignty

"Faith and morality require. Among the executive orders He's signed since arriving in the Oval Office for are aimed at advancing racial equity and tribal sovereignty. Earlier this week, we spoke with the Brookings Institution's Andre Perry about one of those initiatives. Tackling discriminatory federal housing policies. I do think this is a start. You have to start somewhere you start with HUD and hopefully mo mentum from the public. Can encourage these other areas to make change. We called on three experts to address the other pillars of the Biden plan, reaffirming tribal sovereignty, ending the federal government's use of private prisons and condemning discrimination, bias and hate crimes against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. Ethel Branches. A former attorney general for the Navajo Nation. Paul Butler, is a former prosecutor and author and professor at Georgetown Law and from Citizen University and the Aspen Institute. Eric Liu. I started off by asking. Will these executive orders make a difference? Ethel Branch spoke first. Absolutely. It sends a strong message. Using the language of equity is very hopeful. It's a needed reaffirm INTs to Indian country that this administration's engagement with Indian nations will be very different from the last administration and also signals that some of the things that were under way under the Obama administration will be put back into place. But I think this is just a start. If President Biden really wants to reaffirm tribal sovereignty we need to start talking about Lifting the federal chains essentially that restrict tries from controlling their territory and governing with respect to their people. And Eric Liu, you have written about the experience of Chinese American families. I wonder what you make of this order fighting xenophobia against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. I think President Trump created a frame of permission. That it was okay to be casually racist toward Asian Americans and people of Asian descent. And, as with so much of President Trump's racism he could say, at least on the surface, plausibly. Oh, I didn't mean that that's not meant to be that you're being too sensitive. But I think anybody of actual Asian descent could feel the vibe of disrespect and menace and the form of disrespect comes in this way in particular. Which is You look Asian. I don't really care whether you're Asian, American or Asian from Asia. I'm going to see you as a threat. I'm going to see you as a problem. I'm going to see his escape goat President Biden Simply by changing the tone simply by refusing to speak in that way, makes a big difference. I want to turn to

Eric Liu Andre Perry Mo Mentum Ethel Branches Georgetown Law And From Citize Ethel Branch President Trump Brookings Institution Oval Office President Biden Obama Administration Paul Butler Aspen Institute HUD Biden Federal Government Asia
Biden Administration Hopes to Increase Vaccine Production

MSNBC Morning Joe

03:44 min | 9 months ago

Biden Administration Hopes to Increase Vaccine Production

"The biden administration is now projecting that as many as ninety thousand more americans will die from the coronavirus in the next four weeks. The virus has already taken over four hundred and thirty thousand. Us lives the administration's new health. Briefings are set for three times a week and are part of biden's attempt to restore trust and breakdown public resistance to the vaccine as for the vaccine white house corona virus coordinator jeff. Zen says the administration is looking into multiple waves so speeding up production. His comments come a day after president biden announced plans to provide states with enough doses for three hundred million americans by the end of the summer. He said states or getting better at at administering the shots and called on congress except for florida. Maybe maybe to pass biden's one point nine trillion dollar american rescue plan. The bill includes four hundred billion dollars for efforts to contain the virus including increasing the pace of vaccination and ensuring more testing nationwide joining us. Now physician and fellow out the brookings institution dr patel. She's also With us morning joe. Chief medical correspondent. Dr dave campbell. Good to have you both. I like to always begin with where the virus stands right now. dr dave. You're focused a lot of your time on florida. My instinct is florida's doing terribly. Just looking at how people are behaving at night out and about in cities florida like many states across the country are not doing well but we make a weekend see some little shining light in the numbers that have been coming out in the last week or two in terms of new cases and hospitalizations in florida and across the country. But the grave concern that. You'll be hearing about now all day for the next few weeks or these variants that could be increasing the rate again with yet another surge if the the unfortunate expectations come true. Dr patel your concerns and we're talking about ninety thousand more deaths before we can figure out how to roll out this vaccine in a way that it gets to everybody. Is there any way that can be curtailed. We're gonna hit half a million people absolutely make a good morning and happy to be here at publicly with a little bit of good news. We're starting to see a lot. More data on just the strength of some of the treatments it's not hydrochloric winter. Bleach no surprise there but emerging evidence about combination of antiviral treatment monoclonal. Antibodies as well as other trials before people get hospitals that can actually decrease death and the risk of becoming severely. Ill so this just emphasizes that you know. The biden administration as they spoke about yesterday has to do everything they've got to fix a vaccine distribution and supply problem. They've also got a fix. What never got fixed on testing issues mega. It's ridiculous that it still takes me. Forty eight hours to get a turnaround and that's a good day on test and then they also have to really fix this issue of masks fatigue to your point. That's partly why governor governor newsom basically had to call it quits on stay at home orders because frankly nobody's following them especially in southern california for the hospitals are still deluged but improving lightly

Biden Administration Florida President Biden Biden Dr Patel Dr Dave Campbell Dr Dave ZEN White House Jeff Congress JOE United States Governor Governor Newsom Southern California
Congress Didn’t Include State And Local Aid In Stimulus package

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

01:50 min | 10 months ago

Congress Didn’t Include State And Local Aid In Stimulus package

"That stripped down relief. Bill we thought was going to pass left out aid for state and local. Governments states are now fighting each other over. Which should be able to collect income taxes for the hundreds of thousands of remote workers who used to commute across state lines from the workplace culture desk. Marketplace's megan mccarthy carino has that one before the pandemic dave hausky commuted everyday between his new jersey home into work at an architecture. Firm in manhattan. I ride my folding bike to the ferry. And then i take a theory across. He also has to file taxes in both places. New york is one of seven states which tax workers based on their physical office is located new jersey normally refunds the more than one billion dollars paid by residents like miron hausky who have to pay taxes to new york but this year is different than it was march fifteenth when my office close to new jersey and about a dozen states are bringing the legal question to the supreme court to try to stop states from taxing workers who never step foot in the office. This becomes a serious problem. If remote work becomes a long term phenomenon as it probably will jared wall sack with tax foundation says while states have had agreements to avoid double taxing workers. That could change if your home state decides that you truly are both living and working in their state than they might still tax you especially as state struggle to make a drop in other tax revenues due to the pandemic says lewis shiner with the brookings institution. Clearly there's some hain things like parking tolls and gas taxes and drops in tourism and sales taxes. All that's pushed state revenues down an average of five percent so every last tax dollar counts. I megan mccurdy carino for marketplace.

Megan Mccarthy Carino Dave Hausky New Jersey Miron Hausky Jared Wall Manhattan Bill New York Supreme Court Lewis Shiner Brookings Institution Megan Mccurdy Carino
Fiona Hill Discusses Massive Cyberattack on Government Agencies

All Things Considered

06:44 min | 10 months ago

Fiona Hill Discusses Massive Cyberattack on Government Agencies

"Those were the words of Thomas Bossert, who advised both President George W. Bush and President Donald Trump on Homeland Security. Utah Republican Senator Mitt Romney compared it to Russian bombers flying undetected over our entire country. Both men, Of course, we're talking about the massive cyber attack believed to have been perpetuated by Russia on scores of US government and private networks. The attack went undetected for months on let's bring in Fiona Hill. She has spent her career studying Russia. She served until last year as President Trump's most senior Russia advisor on the National Security Council field. Hell hey there! Welcome back. Thanks so much Mercury's thanks. Start with something you just heard me say that this breach is believed to have been perpetuated by Russia. Is there any reason to believe this was anyone other than Russia? No, I don't think so. I mean, given the number off private sector entities of other government entities who have attributed it to Russia. There's also you know, longstanding hallmarks of a Russian operation that many of them very familiar with me. People have bean on the lookout for these kinds of attacks, and obviously, you know they have discovered one and this is I've been able to do all the forensics, so I don't think there's any reason to question it. When you say there are hallmarks that seem familiar to the way Russian hackers do their work that's like that. Yes, suddenly having worked with Many of the people who've been looking at this a cybersecurity experts, you know they're very familiar with the telltale signs that Russians and other actors leave behind. You'll have seen President Trump's tweet raising the possibility that this was China. Is it possible this was China? Well, China's certainly done actions on this kind of scale. A few years ago, we had Chinese hack which, of course, export trade and all kinds of data out of U. S. Government systems, including the personal data of many of the people had filled out security clearances and full time. Part time employees of the government. But you're saying the signature on this one appears to be consistent with Russia. Exactly. So, I mean the fact that he's saying Well, China, you know, could have done this well. China could have done an operation on this scale, but I don't think there's any question that this is Russia. Someone who has advised President Trump. Why, In your view, is he so resistant to blaming Russia or confronting Russia? I'm afraid to say that there's a very personal element to this. President. Trump has been fixated on President Putin for some considerable period of time. It's President Putin style of governance, it says. Seemingly unchecked power. It's the word that he presents himself personally. Azad leader. I think that there's a lot that Trump admires in Putin style, and I think he finds it extraordinary hard because he was convinced that they had personal chemistry to think that Putin would do something like this on his watch. I mean, I think we've seen that President Trump is the same person private in public. Who takes everything very personally, who believes my mention his own personal question. His own personal role on he's become personally invested in Vladimir Putin as a result of thinking that they have a relationship and he's lost sight. Unfortunately, then of the national security perspective of all of us, I think that's one of the reasons why he's both in denial to himself has said very little about this. How did this happen? Understanding you're out of government now. But do you think the U. S was asleep at the wheel, distracted by the pandemic, the election? Other things? Look, I think all of these things and issues I think part of is also problem. When your team is getting undermined. Then we were also in the midst of an election. Of course. In which we were extraordinary worried about a repeat performance of 2016 a hack of the election, But I think as a result of that we put a lot of resource is onto this. I mean, I can't say for sure, because I mean, I know that we have a new awful lot of very technically capable, hard working people across the entire system. But it was certainly the case that we were being pushed to look in one particular area. On any other pointed as well that the president is actually undermined The intelligence community at every turn has bean you know, pitted against them, since you know very much the beginning of his presidency. On a date has bean you know, putting political loyalists in place essentially to investigate the intelligence community. He's also sacked s O money. Cabinet members and senior people in The key purses that one would want to see pulling together as a piece of team to tackle. This kind of issue on has been a odds with the branches of government. Congress haven't Bean pulling together without the executive branch of the Department of Agencies, either this it takes the whole of government effort on the whole of society effort. May I say I've interviewed you now. A number of times, Fiona Hill. I have never heard you speak so openly in such an openly critical way of the administration. You served has something changed. I think that really what we've heard is more of an accumulation of facts to basically point out to people. I know what I've been trying to do all along, including last year when I was testifying is trying not to politicize everything we talked about in the impeachment inquiry. This is actually part of our problem. When we politicize Russia on we get into parties and fights. This is exactly when we lay ourselves vulnerable on the whole message that I've been trying to get across is we need to pull together, you know, thinking a part of the problem for many of the people have been trying to speak out like myself in earlier times. Is gonna get painted His disgruntled employees as somebody with an agenda while speaking out is a political act doesn't have to be partisan. You have to speak out on behalf of the country on I think that this kind of stirred it should be inescapable to everyone about. You know our failure to tackle Cove in our failure to get ahead at this kind of hack. All failure, frankly, should be able to hand off the president. Seeing a smooth fashion President Trump is already talking about massive demonstrations on the streets of Washington, D. C on January 6th. I'm talking in the language of in another country. In another setting that people would say, Hey, he's trying to basically instigate a coup. So I mean, I think at this point if the larger population has not quite got the message that I feel like I've got to speak out a bit more strongly. It was Fiona Hill of the Brookings Institution. She served his director for European and Russian affairs on the National Security Council in the Trump Administration. Great to speak with you as always. Thank you. Thank you very much. Thank you.

President Trump Russia China Vladimir Putin Thomas Bossert President Donald Trump Senator Mitt Romney Fiona Hill Putin Donald Trump National Security Council President George W. Bush Utah Mercury Azad Department Of Agencies U. United States Cabinet
C.D.C. Pleads With Americans to Stay Home on Thanksgiving

MSNBC Morning Joe

06:29 min | 1 year ago

C.D.C. Pleads With Americans to Stay Home on Thanksgiving

"Right now. Laboratories are warning shortages of supplies likely will create more delays in getting test results. Out especially as case numbers surged joining us. Now physician and fellow at the brookings institution dr patel. She's a former obama white house. Health policy director in an msnbc medical contributor dr patel. It's good to see this morning. We also heard yesterday from the cdc that said please avoid travel now for thanksgiving a week out and we got our first news briefing in four months from the task force. The white house task force. Dr burks and dr fauci. What did you take away from what they said yesterday. And what's your view of these incredibly stark numbers. We just saw good morning to everyone. I think that take away from yesterday was actually both an incredible dire warning about thanksgiving about the numbers that we can expect and then also a ray of sunshine. If we can actually do what we need to do. Dr fauci spoke about the extraordinary. And casey mentioned it. The extraordinary progress we've made with vaccines from operation warp speed as well as global cooperation. But a vaccine does not mean that you can actually just kind of read the sigh of relief and go about your merry ways. It really does mean is. Dr burke said yesterday that we have to do things today and change behaviors today in order to be able to have a light at the end of the tunnel and benefit from the vaccines and willie looking at those pictures. I can't help but shudder and fear that some of those people in line are actually doing testing so that they can go and celebrate thanksgiving. I i know that a lot of what my patients are saying. And and that is frankly a big concern your task force and the cdc again was clear yesterday. Small groups within your own household and do not even travel at this point for thanksgiving. That's about as serious as that warning could be so dr patel as you rightly. Say great news on the vaccine front but for most people in this country. That's at least what six months away to get that so we have six months. Let's say from here to there where anything can happen. If we don't have further mitigation efforts from your point of view based on these numbers that we're seeing the trajectory you say were on and that we are on should we go further nationally or at least state by state in terms of stay at home. Orders for example mask mandates. What would you like to see. Yes this is absolutely the conversation that i hope every governor again because we have no national strategy what we did not hear yesterday was kind of an announcement or a bold proclamation about what we can count on at the national level. So you're right willie. We do need to have mask. Mandate that the state levels nationally. We just need all except that wearing a mask and make a difference. Especially if you're going to go and celebrate thanksgiving with people who are not normally in your household. Here's something that i think is incredibly controversial. That happening were closing schools. Before we're making mold steps close or reduce indoor capacity of a restaurant than places where we know people are getting together. I would do the reverse. I would not penalize younger children where we have seen that. We have not been having as much of an outbreak as we have in other settings that people are moving towards indoors shops and restaurants and then i really hope that on a policy level that we can resurrect some stimulus funding because these businesses especially during a holiday season are dying on the vine and again. It's all unnecessary. We've had zero ability to offer small business owners an away to have reliable testing to even keep their employees safe. And that's what we've decided to do in this country. So that's what i want to ask you about in terms of testing dr patel's a former white house health and policy director. I know the biden team says on day one. The president plans to invoke the defense production act on things like testing these lines. That we're seeing Football fields of cars people waiting for hours and hours sometimes days to get a false result on testing is a massive almost the number one impediment to mitigation because as they're waiting in line. They're missing work if they have work. They're exposing themselves to people as they're waiting for these tests and these test results that sometimes take days to come and for those who are lucky enough. Maybe they can buy a test. But it's not like that for the rest of america. Who is in this situation right here. Which is so unacceptable. Had president trump invoked the deep on testing. Would we be in this situation right now. No your outrage. I can't tell you how much that outrageous felt by so many healthcare workers around the country. Here here's something to wrap our brains around. We were able to develop to at least two highly efficacious vaccines and cheaper than it is to get a pcr nasal swab which your head around that that is unacceptable that somehow we have decided that the ability to actually offer employers to open safely away to actually keep schools open in a way for americans to feel. Testing does not replace masks and prevention whatsoever but it certainly could be a critical piece in finding those asymptomatic carriers the majority of people we know who are either infected or are able to transmit the coronavirus right now if we had reliable cheap and easy testing. It doesn't even have to be perfect makeup. We could do something every three days. We know that that's probably the time period where we could catch the majority of cases and this is just a system failure on all levels that the fda is cdc initially relying on flawed testing in the beginning and then again no national vocation of the defense production. Act at no pressure to try to identify how we can get testing especially to the hardest hit communities black and brown communities where we still have really pathetic testing eighth and turnaround times stability and the and the needless loss of life here is mind. Boggling dr kavita patel. Thank you very much for being on the show this

Dr Patel Dr Burks Dr Fauci Dr Burke CDC White House Willie Brookings Institution Msnbc Casey Barack Obama Biden Football America FDA
"brookings institution" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"brookings institution" Discussed on WTOP

"Posted it. At least three times this year. President Trump's team and his supporters have shared misleading or fake videos, arguing that Biden is not mentally fit for office. This information around voting within minority communities can have an effect on voter turnout, according to researchers at Howard University. They, along with the Brookings Institution, have taken a look at how information around the election Khun spread within black communities. But it's you know, we're talking about robots. These are programmed mechanisms that look at the different information that's tweeted out the language that you use kind of scouring through your post and then replicates it doctor behind Mohammed of Howard University, says a recent report on the 2016 election. Found 19% of all election tweets that year were spread by Bob's Go through your list. The father was and you will identify, you know, at least 20 to 30 bahts that are following and are posting things. Andrea Camryn w T o P News. Despite the recent rise in Corona virus cases, some senior citizens are taking a risk and volunteering at voting sites. Gloria Gati is one of those senior supporting voters at the Buoy Gymnasium in Bowie, Maryland. Volunteer people are people who have love in their hearts, and they're doing a job because they wanted to it. She's with the Democratic Committee Club of Annapolis for first time. I'm 74 years old. I feel like I have a voice and my voice is being heard. She says. No matter what, your political party affiliation she wants your voice Heard to Stephanie gains Bryant w. T o p News Up next in money News. Another restaurant chain is facing bankruptcy. It's 8 54. Montgomery County Board of Elections remind you Tomorrow.

Gloria Gati Howard University President Trump Brookings Institution Andrea Camryn Biden Buoy Gymnasium Democratic Committee Club of A Montgomery County Mohammed Bowie Bob Board of Elections Maryland Stephanie
U.S. And India Sign Military Agreement During Pompeo, Esper Trip

Morning Edition

01:48 min | 1 year ago

U.S. And India Sign Military Agreement During Pompeo, Esper Trip

"The 20 Indian troops killed in a fight with Chinese soldiers this summer on the two countries Himalayan border. And he used his visit to rail against the Chinese Communist Party, or CCP. The CCP is no friend to democracy, the rule of law. Tom Hair, Esper signed a pact with India to share sensitive satellites often used to steer muscles and drones. Big things are happening. As our democracy is aligned to better protect the citizens of our two countries and indeed of the free world. The US has long seen India as a bulwark against China, and the Trump Administration has pushed India to buy more US weapons. But there was an awkward moment when India's defense secretary was asked whether he's willing to stop buying Russian weapons. That depends on negotiations. Demure Tanvi Madan at the Brookings Institution, says it's significant that India hosted Pompeo an Esper Well, tensions are so high with China after that border crisis this summer. At another time, India might have declined to do AH, high profile visit like this with American officials, George a time of crisis in case China was provoked further at a press conference. Indian officials did not mention China by name. Pompeo head's next to Sri Lanka, the Maldives and Indonesia, where the main topic once again will be China. Lauren Frayer NPR news This

India China Chinese Communist Party Esper Pompeo United States Lauren Frayer Brookings Institution Tanvi Madan Sri Lanka Tom Hair Trump Administration Maldives Indonesia George
"brookings institution" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

09:14 min | 1 year ago

"brookings institution" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"For three. Leave that to Dotcom Studio Lario here, according to the host and pundits on CNN, MSNBC heart which I watched So you don't have to Donald Trump. Literally is dripping with the blood of 220,000 Americans because of the corona virus related deaths. However, there is a well known China expert named Gordon Chang. I've always started him. It's reasonable. Headline and WorldNetDaily an article we put upon Larry elder dot com experts stunning conclusion. China's killing Americans. Deliberately. Chang right to China has been pushing for fentanyl. Into the country for years and extremely potent opiate opioid. Last year, Fatal drug overdoses hit a record 70,980, according to the CDC. Of that total. More than 36,000 were from synthetic opioids such a fentanyl. One fellow with the Brookings Institution, called it the quote. Deadliest close quote Drug epidemic in American history Cocaine and methamphetamine fatalities. Are also up largely because they're mixed with fentanyl. A researcher at the Brookings Institution, noted that since 2013 China has been quote the principal source of the fentanyl flooding the US illicit drug market. Or of the precursor agents from which fit in all its produced often in Mexico. End of quote. This tracks with what the D A found Gordon Chang noted. Quote in China gangs work on fentanyl compounds in labs to make the drug more addictive, a former American national security official told me a few years ago. Moreover, Chinese technicians constantly change formulas to avoid detection at the American border. In short, China's regime is killing Americans with fentanyl. It is doing so deliberately end of quote. Chang points out that the Communist Party controls virtually every business in China. Even gangs are not likely to survive without government approval. Gordon Chang said. And I'm quoting, And if the Communist Party does not know of a particular gang, it is because it had decided not to. End of quote. All exports are inspected before leaving China. Which allows the shipment of fitting all through its national postal service. Chang estimates 13% of packages from China contained fentanyl or another contraband product. But Chinese officials believe running drugs is quote a small price to pay. For achieving national greatness in the quote One researcher with the Washington D. C based Foundation for Defense of Democracy, says the Chinese are quote obsessed with comprehensive national power. They meticulously measure it Thoroughly study it and constantly compare rankings of China to other countries, especially to the United States. In the quote Gordon Chang, the China expert says China is quote with malice trying to reduce America's comprehensive national power. Was sitting all there could be no other explanation for Beijing. Leading criminal organizations operate on impeded End ofthe quote. So it's Donald Trump's fault that the Chinese Have been lying to the world about covert 19 lying to the world. But when they discovered it, lying to the world of the house trading transmitted and according to the Chinese urologists, who somewhere in the United States because she's afraid of her safety The Chinese have been doing this deliberately. Gordon Chang says that the Chinese have been making evermore potent fentanyl in order to weaken America. Chinese can't make the Americans take it. Recall the reaction when the CIA in the 19 nineties were accused of Putting drugs in the inner city. To the point where the CIA director John Deutch came to L. A. Had a town hall took every single question to refute the allegation. Didn't matter. They still blame the CIA. But for some reason No fly zone over planing China. Stunning, isn't it? Now. Comma Harris was on 60 minutes was reminded that according to Eight non Republican group. She has the most far left record of any voting member of the Senate, including Bernie Sanders, and she wasn't prepared with a response very different. In the policies that you've supported in the past. You're considered the most liberal United States senator is somebody said that in the actual was Mike Pence on the debate stage, but well, actually not. Somebody said that Really, That's the best you could do very different in the policies that you've supported In the past. You're considered the most liberal United States senator I Somebody said that in the actual with Mike Pence on the debate stage, but well, actually, the nonpartisan Gove track has raided you as the most liberal senator. You supported the green new deal. You supported Medicare for all you've supported legalizing marijuana. Joe Biden doesn't support those things. So are you goingto bring the policies? Those progressive policies that you supported his senator into abide administration what I will do, And I promise you this and this is what Joe wants me to do. This was part of our deal. I will always share with him my lived experience as it relates to any issue. That we confront and I promised Jo that I will give him that perspective and always be honest with him Notice. We're no longer talking about the fact that she has the most left wing voting record more left wing Bernie Sanders. And is that a socialist or progressive perspective? Now watch how she brings out the race card honestly. Is that a socialist Democrat social perspective. Watch this that a socialist or progressive perspective. No. It is the perspective of of a woman who grew up a black child in America who was also a prosecutor who also has a mother who arrived here at the age of 19 from India. What does this have to do with your left wing voting record? You're the only person who's got an immigrant parent, a woman who grew up a black child in America who was also a Prosecutor. Well, that explains why you have the most left wing record. You grew up with a black child in America who also has a mother who arrived here at the age of 19 from India. Who also so that explains why you're more left wing than Bernie Sanders right now likes hip hop. Like, What do you want to know what I want to give you? I want to get through the opportunity to address this because At the Republican National Convention that cackle annoying or what mention President Trump made the case that Joe Biden is going to be nothing more than a Trojan Horse for socialist policies getting pushed pretty hard for 60 minutes, right? The left wing. This is Nora O'Donnell Democratic party, CBS. Are you going to push those policies when your vice president, I am not going to be confined to Donald Trump's definition of who I or anybody else's? Andi. I think America has learned that that would be a mistake. So just just America has learned that what would be a mistake. Ah, little confused here. Can you help me out over here? Are you going to push those policies? When you're vice president is not going to be confined to Donald Trump's definition of who I or anybody else's. Andi, I think you're not going to be confined to Donald Trump definition of who I or anybody else is. Erica has learned that that would be a mistake. So just just to button it up because you have fought for Medicare for all also commission to study reparations. It's not something that Joe Biden supports. If you become vice president, would you say to a president by you know what Let's we should really be pushing for Medicare for all, not a public option. That's just not going to do it. That's not my value. I would not have joined the ticket if I didn't support what Joe was proposing. Okay, So you want a Medicare for all Joe doesn't but you wouldn't have joined administration if you weren't happy with Joe Biden is proposing. So you're no longer the most.

China Gordon Chang fentanyl President Trump Joe Biden United States America Bernie Sanders CIA vice president Communist Party Medicare Donald Trump senator Mike Pence national power researcher Brookings Institution India Larry
"brookings institution" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"brookings institution" Discussed on KCRW

"The Brookings Institution. 20 sexual time. I really appreciate it. Thanks for having me. The longer this pandemic lasts, the more likely it seems that those of us who can are going to be working from home forever. Anu S and P Global survey shows nearly two thirds of organizations. It's a significant increase in remote working is going to be permanent. Granted. There are many who love working remotely. No commute more flexibility, pajamas, but his marketplaces Mariel Cigar heard from a lot of people. They have found a real real challenging Richard find began Our conversation with a warning about the hammering sound I was about to hear his downstairs neighbor has recently undertaken some construction. That's just, you know, the joys of working from home. Fine, who talked to me from the bedroom of his Manhattan apartment because his wife and son were working and learning remotely in the other rooms, is an executive at Doc Doc, the doctor appointment booking site. We have committed Tio full company that we will not mandate people to come back until Labor Day of 2021 find doesn't love working from home think it's ah, pretty inferior form ofwork. Remote working is leaving Nyla con kind, afraid to. She's the head of talent at the health care company eating health and a single mom living in a small apartment in Queens with her six year old daughter, who's doing school online. I feel like I'm a meaner mom to her because my patients is immediately low now compared to before, and my stress is incredibly high, and she claps back pretty hard like Mommy, You just yelled at me. That was not nice. She is grateful that she gets to spend more time with her daughter. At the same time she misses interacting with her colleagues in person. So does Kate Adams in Milton, Massachusetts. She's a marketing exec at a tech company called Drift. She has friends at the office. You know, Fridays at four o'clock sent up the bat signal, and we'd go like Joined each other in the kitchen and grab a glass of wine and hang out. And just like decompress like I missed that desperately last, she heard the office probably won't reopen until June. So for now, she and her co worker have come up with this game. We have a contest. Sometimes we're on zooms like if we can make each other laugh, they even keep score. It's not the same, but it's the best they've got right now. Mariel Segarra for marketplace here,.

Kate Adams Mariel Segarra Mariel Cigar Brookings Institution. Doc Doc Anu S Tio Richard Manhattan P Global Queens Massachusetts Milton executive Fine
What Happens If The President Is Incapacitated? The 25th Amendment Charts A Course

Morning Edition

06:53 min | 1 year ago

What Happens If The President Is Incapacitated? The 25th Amendment Charts A Course

"Greene. The story we are covering this morning was first revealed in a tweet from President Trump in the middle of the night. He and first lady Melania Trump have tested positive for the Corona virus. Many people we should say never developed serious symptoms and even if they do they recover, But Trump is 70 for an age group that is more likely to develop serious complications and to be hospitalized. The White House physician says the president is doing well as of now, but will remain in the White House residents. A White House official told NPR's Tamara Keith that the president plans to stay engaged, but that Vice President Mike Pence is ready to step in. As needed. Now, if and when a president falls ill. There are significant questions about how the nation is governed. And John 48 has studied and written about scenarios just like this. He's executive director. Of the continuity of government Commission, which was set up in the wake of the 9 11 attacks. He also runs the government studies program at the bipartisan Policy Center, and he joins us on Skype. Thanks for being here. Mary. Thanks for having me. So I mean, someone who looks at these questions so closely. How did you react when you heard that the president got a positive test? Well, given all that's happened, it was probably the one thing that might stir up some or turmoil in this, this very tumultuous election system season we've had. Look, there are some real questions. Both about a president as president having on illness, especially if it were to get worse but also in terms of a presidential candidate. Those are those are different issues about being on the balance and what happens afterwards. So I do think there are some significant concerns if If things were to worsen. Well, let's separate those things out. Let let's talk about the here and now. I mean, what sort of things are being discussed right now inside the White House and were the president's health to deteriorate. I mean, you've written that there could be confusion there. Khun B. Chaos. I mean, take us inside that building. Well, first, a zoo president, the question would be is the president at some point does he feel that he doesn't isn't able to carry out the duties of the presidency for a time? And there's a pretty clear provisioning the 25th amendment, where he can sign over the power of the presidency to the vice president. And then when recovered, take it back, and that's happened a few times in recent years, basically, for elective surgeries, That would be pretty clear. I think you know what would be a little harder is if the president got sick enough that he wasn't able to make the determination there's still a A vision in the Constitution where you can have the vice president. A majority of the Cabinet say it's time for the vice president to take over and then in the most contentious situation. We have heard about another context that if the president disagreed with that, that Diagnosis. Congress might have to decide whether to keep the president on orto keep the vice president so it could go further down the line. But that would be the more extreme version. Look, we also have The election. And how would President Be on the ballot or not be on the ballot. If it really came to the the point where the president had to withdraw. There is a very difficult procedure and trying to replace him at this time. You know what? Who makes that decision? I mean, how well determine happened earlier. I think it's pretty clear that party could have just stepped in on the party. The party still has a role of selecting a new person. Ah, And that would be the party committee could elevate Mike Pence to the presidency and pick someone else as vice president, But that's a relatively simple vote. We've actually done that once in the in the seventies with vice presidential candidate Bigger place, Tom Eagleton. But the question now that the ballots are out is much more difficult. Could the president's name be removed from the ballot? I think it would be very difficult, but one further complication is in our election of president. We're really not voting for president. But we're voting for these electors in the Electoral college. They're still there in the ballot, even if you don't see them in your states about there, behind those names, and in theory, those people could be elected and then make a choice of another person come December with some complications that have come up recently, the Supreme Court but basically that there is a possibility that that even if Donald Trump's name is still on the ballot, and he were to have withdrawn Um, that those electors could still end up voting for the Republican ticket. Whatever that is, in December, they could actually decide. I mean, you would have electors around the country making a decision that Shouldn't theory be made by health experts, but they would be actually deciding who would who would be president. Assuming if Donald Trump won the election, even though he had withdrawn then there's there's this question in November of well, who's Who of these electors gonna vote for? They're gonna vote for the Republican ticket. Whatever it is. Then again, there are some complications. But the Supreme Court has allowed some states to really bind those electors. But Basically those those electors, many of them at least have the freedom to choose another person. We assume that would be coordinated by the party. And of course, that would be great questions about the legitimacy for the American public. Usually it's possible. I mean this this obviously so so speculative ahs. You said. I mean, these are extreme circumstances we're talking about, but I wonder. I mean, this is your line of work like I wonder if you get people sometimes saying, like, Oh, why do you dedicate so much time to scenarios That might never happen? But I guess there's an argument that these air really important questions that you want answered. You have to plan for for the worst and most chaotic sin areas. You do, And off with some better plans in place for for a lot of these continuity scenarios. I mean, obviously, questions of national security might matter if if we're not absolutely sure if the president is is Well, we had cases well before the 25th amendment, Woodrow Wilson, who was essentially incapacitated for his last almost a year and a half in the White House, and you know the real is a real question as to who was really running the government, the vice president ahead and stepped in and so you know, there are these questions. We don't want uncertainty in times of trouble. And you're saying that that you're not satisfied with the plans that are that are in place that the government could do a better job planning for scenarios like this. Well in some, I do think there's a very clear transfer power to the vice president. That's the 25th amendment has made that very clear if we get into much more public ated scenarios like they're both sick or the question of how you get somebody on the ballot and how the electors were picked because it happens this close to the election. Look, I think we could have more clarity. John 48 is executive director of the Continuity of Government Commission, a nonpartisan think tanks set up by the conservative leading American Enterprise Institute and the liberal leaning Brookings Institution. Thank you so much for helping us work through some of these Something big questions that you know, we hope don't have to come up. We hope the president remains healthy, but things we have to think about. We really appreciate it. Thank you.

President Trump Vice President Melania Trump White House Mike Pence Government Commission John Executive Director Supreme Court Bipartisan Policy Center Tamara Keith Tom Eagleton Greene. Khun B. Chaos NPR Congress Official Brookings Institution
"brookings institution" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:29 min | 1 year ago

"brookings institution" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Thank you. I'm pleased to introduce Dr Blane, Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin, Madison and Dr Blank has served as chancellor since 2013 previously, she said, as deputy secretary and acting secretary of Commerce under President Obama. She was also a member of the Council of Economic Advisers. Under President Clinton. She has served as Dean and professor of public policy and economics at the University of Michigan. She was a faculty member at Northwestern and Princeton University's and a fellow at the Brookings Institution. That was the University of Wisconsin is a number of big child one of the power five conferences with 23 bars. He's forint at approximately 800 participating students each year. Chancellor Blank was recently appointed to the dollar division One border directors I look forward to hearing her insights today as part of today's Important discussion about college athletics and compensation. Welcome Chance Circling and on Wisconsin. Thank you are our second witnesses. Karen Dennis. She served as director of track and field and cross country at the Ohio State University for the past six years. She's been named Big 10, coach of the Year four times and was inducted with Coaches Hall of Fame of the US Track and Field and Cross Country Coaches Association in 20. 18 sharing both a bachelor's degree in public affairs and a master's degree in physical education from Michigan State University. Senator Romney will introduce our next witness bag, Mr Chairman, I have the honor to introduce John Hartwell, who is vice president and absolute a director at Utah State University. As a former student athlete himself, he played basketball for the Citadel. For more than five years, He has been the direct Teacher of athletics in Utah state, and he has ensured that his students have successful both in the classroom and on the Plains field. Under his leadership, the Utah state he's achieved a 54 15 record and men's basketball Overall, Utah State University has claimed five mountain last regular season championships and four postseason titles.

President Obama Utah State University University of Wisconsin Ohio State University Michigan State University Chancellor Blank Chancellor Utah Dr Blank University of Michigan President Clinton Princeton University deputy secretary Dr Blane Karen Dennis basketball Wisconsin Council of Economic Advisers Cross Country Coaches Associat
Women's earnings drop after having a child—but men's do not

Motley Fool Answers

01:33 min | 1 year ago

Women's earnings drop after having a child—but men's do not

"Retiree planning isn't easy for anyone, but it's particularly challenging for women. They generally earn less more likely to spend time out of the workforce caring for family members and live longer, which is a good thing in general, but it means a tyrant savings have to last longer. A recent report from the Brookings Institution qualified some of these challenges first off, they cite study, which found that women with one child earns twenty percent less on average over her career that a woman without a child in contrast becoming a father typically does not reduce man's earnings. A women are also likely to then men to care for their aging parents responsibility that predominantly falls a women over the age of fifty. So. People who leave the labor force early to care for a parent or other elderly relatives. Lose on average one, hundred, forty, two, thousand dollars in wages. So obviously people who earn less can't save as much. So that's one reason why they might be behind in retirement savings, but the report also quantified the impact until security benefits, which is the number one source of income for most retirees. Here's what the report concluded. Women Receive Social Security benefits that are on average. Eighty percent of those that men receive and having a first child reduces a woman social security benefits through durst earnings than average of sixteen percent and each additional kid increases gap a two percent and then women who leave work to care for an elderly family member not only lose wages but they also lose an average one, hundred, thirty, one thousand in lifetime social security benefits.

Brookings Institution
"brookings institution" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"brookings institution" Discussed on WTOP

"Washington at 7 11 The Brookings Institution has released its findings on the impacts of Corona virus on black households and the researchers air raising some alarms. More than 33,000 black Americans have died due to the Corona virus. Travon Logan, professor of economics and co author of the report, says Corona virus is already the third leading cause of death for black Americans. Logan says one of the major contributing factors is poor healthcare. The states that have not expanded Medicaid, for example, have a disproportionate share of the African American population, so that a basic health level we see and how care level and particularly the social safety net for health. We see a disproportionate effect on African Americans. Logan says. The range of devastation has largely gone unnoticed, in part because most states have been under a quasi quarantine. Since March. Andrea Camryn w T O P NEWS Virginia Tech is renaming two buildings following student calls for the change. A yearbook link former longtime faculty member Claudius lead of the pay KK and for former president Paul Barringer. He openly supported pro slavery positions in the early 19 hundreds. Now, the executive committee of the VT. Board of Visitors has voted to remove the men's names from residence halls. School's current president, Tim San, says the names were inconsistent with rich heritage and increasingly diverse community at the school. Buildings will instead be named after William and Janey Hoga black couple who has the first African American students who are not allowed to live on school grounds, and also after James Leslie Whitehurst junior who was the first black student toe live on campus. Like Murillo. W T O P NEWS it's 7 13 Milwaukee the home of Harley Davidson and the setting for the old Happy Days, TV show has been rated by several think tanks over the years as the most racist city in America. On this week's episode of W. T O. P's new podcast Colors a dialogue on race in America with J. J. Green and Chris Corps. John Norquist, the former mayor of Milwaukee, said the methodology used to come up with the rankings is fundamentally flawed. 2010 It was rated according to Brookings Institute is the number one most racist Aah City in the country. But then so were Memphis. They were all the top 10. Memphis Detroit. Kansas City and all the ones that have black populations. It's disgusting, Norquist said. The ranking system is based on racist ideas and attitudes. From the 19 fifties. You can download new episodes of colors. Starting Friday evenings on apple podcasts, podcast one Spotify or wherever you get your podcasts. You might have heard. There's a great need for organ donors with in minority communities, and a related issue involves people deciding not to get lifesaving transplants when you want. Dallas is You are consumed with it. Dennis Harris of Silver Spring wants people who are reluctant to get a transplant to reconsider. He knows how surviving with failing kidneys drives every decision. From what you eat what you drink. To the way that you lay to the way that you asleep. The everything that you do is controlled by Harris has had two transplants. He received a kidney from wife Darlene and diagnosed with.

Travon Logan Dennis Harris Milwaukee John Norquist The Brookings Institution president Paul Barringer America Memphis Andrea Camryn professor of economics Washington Medicaid Virginia Tech Claudius James Leslie Whitehurst Murillo executive committee Kansas City
Sorry, boomers: millennials and younger are new US majority

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Sorry, boomers: millennials and younger are new US majority

"Move over baby boomers you're not in the majority anymore millennials and their younger siblings and kids now make up a majority of the U. S. population a new analysis by the Brookings Institution shows that fifty point seven percent of US residents were under the age of forty that as of July of last year the analysis of population estimates released this summer by the U. S. census bureau shows that the combined millennial Gen Z. and younger generations numbered one hundred and sixty six million but combine Gen X. baby boomer and older cohorts represented one hundred and sixty two million US residents I Shelley handler

Brookings Institution U. S. Census Bureau United States Shelley
Income Share Agreements - Good For Students or Investors?

Money For the Rest of Us

05:58 min | 1 year ago

Income Share Agreements - Good For Students or Investors?

"Welcome money for the rest of us. This is a personal finance show on money how it works, how to invest it and how to live without worrying about it. We host David Stein today's episode three seven. It's titled Income Share Agreements. Good for students. Or. Investors. Over five years ago and upset forty-five of money for the rest of us. I introduced income share agreement as a way to partially fund college. An income share agreement is a contract where individuals agree to pay a certain percentage of their income for a set period of time in exchange for an upfront payment that is usually used to pay for education cost but can be used for other things. For example, a line income share funding says that you can get an essay for home repairs, debt consolidation, paying a medical bill or even planning your wedding. Not sure I would do it income share agreement for most of those things. They are traditionally us to invest in what is known as human capital, our ability to earn money by getting more. Education. Another name for income share agreements is human capital contracts. Income share agreements were first proposed by the economist Milton Freeman in a nineteen, fifty, five essay titled The Role of Government in education. He wrote vocational or professional education is a form of investment in human capital precisely analogous to investment in machinery buildings are forms, of non human capital. Its function is to raise economic productivity of the human being. If it does. So the individual is rewarded in a free enterprise society by receiving a higher return for his services than he would. Be Able to command. We discussed this concept summit upset to forty five is college worth it. And determined, there is a positive financial return in investing in human capital. By attending college, you can earn more, you build your social capital, your network you gain knowledge. Having a college degree allows you to pass filters that many companies put in place with their hiring practice in that, they only hire individuals with college degrees. Freeman continued. If a fixed money loan is made to finance investment in physical capital, the lender can get some security for his loan in the form of a mortgage or a residual claim to the physical asset itself, and he can count on realizing at least part of its investment in case of necessity by selling the physical asset. In other words, the lender has some collateral that could be sold in the case of default. But Freeman a problem if the loan is made to invest in human capital. He writes the lender clearly cannot get any comparable security in a non slave state the individual embodying the investment cannot be bought and sold. Freeman then pointed out that because there isn't collateral that the interest rate charged on student loan would have to be sufficiently high to compensate for the capital loss because there wouldn't be collateral and that the interest rate would have to be so high making the loans unattractive to borrowers. Now. A solution was found. Federal guaranteed student loans. The total US Student Loan Dad. Private and federal is one point six, four, trillion dollars. Only a hundred and twenty, four, billion of that one point six trillion is private. The average federal student loan debt balance is thirty, five, thousand dollars and the default rate is high. Eleven point one percent. It's particularly challenging for individuals that have taken on a lot of student loan debt to pay off. A Brookings Institution study from two thousand eighteen found that the median borrower who had less than fifty thousand dollars in student loan debt in the early two thousands paid off the debt within ten years. While the median borrower, they had more than fifty thousand dollars in student loan debt ten years later still owed about seventy, five percent and most of the students falling behind on their student loan debt are those that have a balanced greater than fifty thousand dollars. Friedman's proposed solution income share agreements. They weren't necessarily called that, but he said that. A contract could be structure where an investor would buy a share in an individual's earnings prospects. To advance him, the funds needed to finance his training on condition that he agreed to pay the lender a specified fraction of his future earnings. In this way Friedman wrote, a lender would get back more than his initial investment from relatively successful individuals which would compensate for the failure to recoup his original investment from the unsuccessful. There seems no legal obstacle to private contracts of this kind even though they are economically equivalent to the purchase of a share in an individual's earning capacity and thus to partial slavery. These. Agreements have been criticized perhaps not slavery, but certainly indentured servitude. Although Miguel Palacios yet us in his book investing in Human Capital felt that the analogy to slavery or indentured servitude was incorrect because the students retain the full freedom of action they're not forced to stay in a given job or even a work in the field in which they trained in. So they have the ability to to work anywhere they want.

Human Capital Milton Freeman Friedman David Stein United States Brookings Institution Miguel Palacios
"brookings institution" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"brookings institution" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"The Brookings Institution, which is a liberal think tank, of course. They put out an explainer explaining that de funding the police just meant redirecting funds away from the police. Now, Joe Biden says, No, I don't want to defund the police. I just want to redirect funds to other things. That means do you find the police? And if you ask the LAPD here where I stand at the moment What it means to have $150 million cut from your budget. It's no consolation to know that those dollars are going towards social programs that will theoretically reduce crime. That's de funding the police, that means fewer officers, less equipment and so forth. So Joe Biden is definitely on board. With that. He doesn't utter the phrase defund the police. And he's trying to play that balancing act on a number of policies. So he says, Green new deal, For example, he goes along with Alexandria Kaze O Cortez, and he wants to cancel the Keystone Pipeline. And all of that. But then he needs to throw the moderates a bit of a bone. So he talks about nuclear power, which is not in the original green new deal. And so he's going to have to play this balancing act. It's very Interesting, but it's still the most left wing pitch we've ever seen from a major party in American political history. Geopolitics book is read November Will the country vote Red for Trump or red for socialism and is clearly a good analysis of the decision that we have in front of us this November? I guess the bigger question Joel is Do you believe that those American voters in the important states let's face it, But the way California goes or the way New York goes or, for that matter, the way Alabama goes, is irrelevant. But when you look at states like Ohio and Michigan and Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, will those voters really be voting on policy or they're going to be voting on the person? It's very interesting. I think that there are.

Joe Biden Brookings Institution LAPD Keystone Pipeline New York Trump Joel Alabama Pennsylvania Ohio California Wisconsin Michigan
Banks Under Fire for Alleged Unequal Lending Practices

Business Wars Daily

03:17 min | 1 year ago

Banks Under Fire for Alleged Unequal Lending Practices

"The practice of red lining were denying financial and other services to people based on race, was outlawed in nineteen, sixty eight, but last week several Chicago Chase Bank branches closed temporarily as protesters call for racial equity and lending from the nation's largest bank and expose published in early June by nonprofit newsroom city bureau and WBZ radio found that off the seven and a half billion dollars in Chicago home. Purchase loans approved since two thousand, twelve, less than two percent was loaned in black majority neighborhoods. The bank is also the subject of a Federal Class Action Lawsuit. That suit alleges that chase shutout. Business. Borrowers from the paycheck protection, program or PCP. Stacey Hawkins Armstrong's the founder of shop. poppin gourmet. Popcorn in Westchester. She told news station ABC seven Chicago the. She tried to file her PP loan application with chase. On the first day. They were accepted, but she got nothing but error messages desperate to keep her doors open and her four employees on payroll. She ultimately secured a smaller loan through a different bank. She believes that chase prioritized. It's favored customers and left small businesses like hers in. In the cold, She's not alone the US. House of Representatives is launching probes into how several banks including J. P.. Morgan Chase Bank of America and Citigroup made P P P loans according to the Orange County Register. Critics allege that big banks service business customers and Shutout underserved borrowers from the funding pool. redlining continues in subtle ways today, including in how P P P loans. Loans were distributed according to Everett. Sand CEO of small business lender lend Distri in a report in fortune as business wars daily reported earlier this month. The Small Business Administration gave no guidance to lenders to prioritize underserved communities about ninety percent of black owned businesses have no employees ease sands, says P, P P rules. Regarding sole proprietors came out last that let these entrepreneurs unclear about. About which loans were available to them? The SBA hasn't released the demographics of WHO received PPP loans, but a survey report by color of change and UNIDOs US is revealing more than half of black and Latin next small business owners who sought assistance requested less than twenty thousand dollars in funding only about one in ten received the funding. They ask for according to the report. One united the nation's largest blackout bank has been working to help black owned businesses get better access to loans in the second round of stimulus funding, federal government allowed thirty billion dollars to smaller and minority owned banks such as community development, financial institutions were CDFI's one united secured some of that funding with that on April. Twenty nine, the bank launched its own P. Program. The bank committed to lending to black owned businesses and self-employed people. It's I. P P Loan, went to an uber driver. Time will tell who was more effective in getting money to black owned businesses, but the stakes couldn't be higher. A recent report by the Brookings Institution Warns Covid. Nineteen could wipe out a decade of economic gains by black owned businesses as Congress debates whether create another stimulus round. The future of many black owned businesses hangs in the balance.

Stacey Hawkins Armstrong Chicago Chase Bank Small Business Administration Morgan Chase Bank Of America Chicago Brookings Institution J. P House Of Representatives Cdfi Orange County Westchester ABC Everett Congress CEO Founder Citigroup Distri
Understanding the border dispute between India and China

Between The Lines

05:48 min | 1 year ago

Understanding the border dispute between India and China

"Together China in India account for more than one third of the entire population of the world, and if you believe the predictions of Keisha Mahbubani, remember him. He's been a skit on this program. He's the distinguished Singaporean intellectual. He says the future is Asian, and it's China's and India's to shame. But as my next guest points out. There, a deep historical tensions between these two budding global superpowers, which might make that impossible. China and India share land border in the Himalayas which has been in dispute since nineteen, sixty two, and it's been a pretty quiet style for decades, however, since May tensions have been rising nuclear powers facing off in a remote corner of the Himalayas, the disputed Kashmir region. This is the first the classroom this border in forty five years Indian government confirmed twenty of its soldiers were killed in the clash. China seems to now be making new claims to territory now. Will this be the event that pushes India away from Chana. Chana for good, and what does it mean for the rest of the World Tom V. Madan is a senior fellow in the foreign policy program at the Brookings Institution. In Washington. She's the author of a new book called Fateful Triangle. How China shut US India relations during the cold. War She's got an article in this month's foreign. Affairs magazine on how China is losing India Tovey. Welcome to between the lines. Thank you for having me Tom now. The border dispute between China and India has probably been the most tasteful. Conflict in the world. No one died and forty five years. What sit this conflict of? It was set off because of some early moves in early May that. had. Brought forward troops and equipped military equipment at different points on the China. India boundary the line of actual control. In the western sector particularly of their border, which is eastern Hlavac and at multiple points, what we saw was attempts to change the status quo whether it was to establish a permanent presence in built in areas, but both sides claim. Or attempts to stop a Indian patrols from moving in those areas which they have traditionally done. That's set the context. It's been going on since at least early May. What we actually saw what was happening to June, sixth meeting between senior military commanders was that they had agreed to a process of de-escalation and disengagement but something went very wrong in the course of this de-escalation. And this is where the incident took place. Now this particular incident has just been a larger in scale and an this whole stat of larger scale, but also regrets aggressiveness and the ones we've seen before, and there are reports that both countries are deploying some serious weapons to the bases close to the border. Is this just posturing, or is there a serious risk of Esscalation I? Think these kind of situation. There's always a risk of escalation. We've seen at least three. faceoffs three major face before this one between the Chinese and Indian military's in two, thousand, thirteen, two, thousand, fourteen in two thousand seventeen This one is could have larger in scale. We've seen as we did. On June fifteenth that even though they have traditionally had a whole series of agreements, standard operating procedures protocols in place between the two countries to avoid the kind of Esscalation we saw injured fifteenth. They clearly are not sufficient anymore, so let's put this in a broader historical context. China and India and went to war in nineteen, sixty two over the border. Now this of course was at the heart of the Cold War. Taibbi take us back to the geopolitical context of the time what was going on? By the time, the nineteen sixty sixty-two war broke out between China and India. You've seen a few years from about nineteen fifty seven about five years already of rising China Idiot tensions you've seen. The Indians relies that The Chinese did not consider. The boundary settled that they were building. A roads through territory India sought was India's. You saw scuffles skirmishes at between. The. Two sides patrols at various points on the boundary. You also saw the escape of the Lama. At a number of Tibetan. Refugees remain to stay in India in one, thousand, nine, hundred, nine, which the Chinese soil with deep suspicion and suspected that the US and you had worked together to engineer about escape. And, so you seem kind of rising tensions between China and India and at the same time you see you saw. The US India actually because in a national park because of their shared concerns about China actually starting to move closer towards each other for the for the the US This saw a in democratic India as both Jew potential, a political counterbalance, but also democratic contrast to soviet-backed Communist China accident, very interested in supporting it. N India welcomed that support, and so that was the. what was? Preceded that sixty to war, but which occurred when the Chinese decided. To move what they call the self defense a counterattack. And in nineteen, sixty two. Move across across the boundary took and defeated India quite badly, which laughed a number of different. It's a it's left a lot of historical baggage. The only major war the Union army has lost

India China N India United States Himalayas Tom V. Madan Esscalation Chana Indian Government Keisha Mahbubani Union Army Brookings Institution Tovey Washington Hlavac Senior Fellow Taibbi
"brookings institution" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"brookings institution" Discussed on WTVN

"Show more than twenty million people have lost their jobs and the impacts of those job losses widespread Brookings Institution study found that seventeen percent of Americans with kids under twelve years old said those children are going hungry re opening begins today in California some retail stores a lot open for curbside pickup and a military member worked as a White House valet tested positive for covert nineteen he's regularly around the president the White House said the president tested negative Brian Clark ABC news thanks Brian seven nineteen if you're still looking for Clorox wipes chairman of cincy Clorox Breno door telling Yahoo finance this morning supply of wife's gonna be touch and go until summer they have increased production of the sun after pandemic product by forty percent but stores are really having a hard time keeping the wipes in stock so the doors as we go to the store we're shipping to our stores every single day but we're shipping is pretty much scooped up right away so I mean literally stores open in the bam those things are gone it's going to take us probably until middle of summer to get caught back up when you think Hawaii thoughts of being on the beach come up right during the pandemic those iconic beaches have been shut down interesting the aloha state's governor David I started implementing plans to open up places shut down during the coronavirus crisis malls are on the list they're gonna open up the malls but they're not gonna open up the beaches he just says open beaches will promote gatherings and big groups bad bad bad together said malls will be responsible for setting capacity so will distancing rules employees and shoppers will all be wearing masks moving forward C. N. B. C. spoke with medical and travel experts on their show the next normal to gauge when travel return to pre pandemic levels they're thinking this morning it's somewhere between eighteen and twenty four months even though spike in air travel is expected once countries ease up restrictions they're still gonna be a lot of people delaying trips because of fears of being stuck on a plane was stranger for hours layoffs and furloughs to there are people that just can't afford it anymore so if you're in the travel industry that's the projection prediction eighteen to twenty four months until you're back online well at least like pre pandemic levels all right we're at seven twenty updates on traffic and weather now will kick it off with Johnny hill I. seventy westbound ramp to seventy one south reported reopen downtown leader semi disabled just short of green lawn and that's the reason they closed the seventy west ramp to seventy one south seventy eastbound right was never affected but we're looking better coming through downtown the inbound flow is still running it just wanted to speed it looks like seventy west is still about eleven to twelve minutes off to fifty six I'd be out about ten minutes from main street to.

Brookings Institution
"brookings institution" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

03:19 min | 1 year ago

"brookings institution" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"By the Brookings Institution this runs about an hour good morning everyone listening in Washington around the country and around the world I'm Michael handling with the foreign policy program at the Brookings Institution today we are honored to host the secretary of defense mark esper who after being introduced by my boss the president Brookings retired general John Allen a little over some remarks on how quickly nineteen is affecting the American armed forces and anything else that you'd like to begin the conversation with him some questions and I will hear from you with your questions that if you haven't already submitted you're welcome to do so through the events at Brookings dot EDU email address with the policies that we may not get all of them but again events at Brookings dot EDU and without further ado let me add on to John Allen to introduce secretary asked for good morning ladies and gentlemen is John Allen who will present the Brookings Institution great to welcome you all here today for that future yes the US secretary of defense Dr more yes the end is nigh on twenty seventh secretary of defense on twenty three July twenty nineteen service acting secretary in June and July of that year but also serve as the secretary of the army on twenty November twenty seventeen to the summer of twenty nineteen secretary of spring is no stranger constructs in nineteen eighty six west point graduate and actuation was commissioned in the infantry Mr secretary that makes at least remain on this call okay well on completion of ranger in pathfinder training he served in the hundred and first airborne division it was all in protest updated in the nineteen nineteen ninety one Gulf War with the cherished screening angles he later committed a rifle company in the three three two five airborne battalion combat team inventions like Italy retired from the U. S. army in two thousand seven after spending ten years on active duty in eleven years with the star to reserve the decades that followed secretary esper continued his service in and around the government moblie secretary Chuck Hagel a former Senate Majority Leader bill Frist and as the Deputy Assistant Secretary of defense for negotiations policy under president George W. bush I would then go on to a distinguished career in our defense industry most recently serving as the vice president of government relations for Raytheon Mr secretary on behalf of all of us at the Brookings Institution we are still under construction data this show online conversation especially given the ongoing commitment nineteen crisis important roles in our government today and we thank you for all that you're doing to keep us safe let me also commend you Sir for making artificial intelligence and tech modernization key priorities for our department of defense this is an issue of utmost significance include working as we struggle to ensure that we maintain our presidents and.

Chuck Hagel department of defense Deputy Assistant Secretary of Senate Majority US vice president George W. bush bill Frist Brookings Institution U. S. army Italy John Allen president mark esper secretary Michael Washington
"brookings institution" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

09:08 min | 1 year ago

"brookings institution" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"One of the main drivers of productivity is communication right so it enables people to share information work together more effectively a twenty fourteen study by the Brookings Institution found that workers with limited English proficiency earn twenty five to forty percent less than their English proficient counterparts it also found the high skilled immigrants who are not proficient in English are twice as likely to work in unskilled jobs for example those requiring low levels of education or training and those who were as opposed to those who are proficient in English now this is a big thing because in a twenty seventeen analysis by the national academies of sciences engineering and medicine they found that male immigrants who entered the U. S. between eighty five and eighty nine and then again from ninety five to ninety nine made significantly less progress learning to speak English than those who answered between nineteen seventy five in nineteen seventy nine which is my my my generation my parents generation so I find that interesting that this lack of being able to communicate is directly correlated to making money and of course it makes sense on his face no question what this some study goes into a lot of different fax twenty fifteen paper in the journal of human capital says that the media's spreading the opposite believe by appealing to a source at the stores other sources for example the Washington post in twenty fifteen reported that the National Academy of sciences engineering and medicine claim that today's immigrants are actually learning English faster than their predecessors in turn this report cites a two thousand six book that doesn't show and that you know it's funny I'm gonna stop right there because something similar happened to me today I'm scrolling through Twitter has occasionally do and I have a rule for Twitter it's don't feed the trolls because they'll come back but I break the rule every now and again so I tweeted something I think I thank the president are responded to something the president said and somebody trolls me and says you know nice try but the economy is not really doing good the middle class the middle class is shrinking so I I think to myself let me take a look at this article from the Brookings institution's are left leaning but you know typically relatively smart people there so I said okay great let me take a look I take a look and it's an analysis of study that is longitudinal between nineteen seventy nine and two thousand sixteen now you don't have to be a PhD to understand that trump one at the end of sixteen and took office in twenty seventeen so anything looking at economic growth shrinking between seventy nine and twenty seventeen doesn't have anything to do with trump so I write back to the guy to tell him look this is more ironic you you sit here and try to site that the economy is shrinking using data that's eight old M. B. doesn't even support the faces that you're making he comes back with all sorts of craziness but that's exactly what they're saying here that the wapo article was saying that immigrants are assimilating faster but the data that they used to cite their sources proves the absolute antithesis of what they're saying this is what's happening with journalism today all too often and this is what mark Fuhrman talks about in on freedom of the press and if you don't have it you should go on Amazon dot com and get a copy of on freedom of the press by mark within he talks about and really systematically breaks it down from the history to practical application of how and why people in the media are using social activism to promote an agenda as opposed to actually reporting the news and how these things came about you know from our very beginnings so it's it's a really good read but the reality here is and the question I want to ask our many callers and our many listeners is do Hispanics benefit by assimilating into American culture is learning English good for you this article from just facts that comes as yes it does that we need to not reject the melting pot so let me know I want to go to the phones eight seven seven three eight one three eight one one eight seven seven three eight one three eight one one and I'd like to speak with Moses in Long Island you're on wood ridge Valdez Hey what's going on race my god what's going on brother residents have been we won't talk like wise what's on your mind as well let me let me tell you first of all you get callin Amanda your intro was amazing thanks right on the money I have a great store if you would have the I. and they won't let me let me touch on one topic that close to home the bold and it's the audio quality ball spanning community okay a good kind of going to be a legal weapon on the Democrats either they don't get it or I don't know what it is now but that went when they when they allow well one day how do you say when they push this agenda of open borders I don't think they realize that there that maybe they don't but they are affecting Hispanic communities the molds and not in a positive way you're insane on in our communities that these drawn from into more than any other communities our community that get affected by these gang members that back home throw I'm not accusing all of them being that of course not but I will community get hit the hardest on the negative aspect with with the only I would job get cake and you get what I'm saying like they and their and they I think there's we've been on the Hispanic vote because eight and the way this started out you know another thing that should be really really should be pointed out that before you bring up the next point I I think you're right I think that there has been an again I can't prove it with the any study from anywhere because we're looking in twenty nineteen and there probably isn't any data to support it but I do believe I mean I talk to people he when I was in the Christie administration I met Sandra Benitez she was moving and shaking it within New Jersey GOP she's down in Washington she was doing her thing with the RNC now she's the executive director of Latinos for trump and they are moving and shaking they are turning things upside down so yes I do believe you when you say that Hispanics may be part of the secret weapon as as well as African Americans but god what's your second point Moses I know you're right on the money that brings me to my second point the second point is exactly what you were touching on we have to get out there for the Hispanic bother that he is out there that are from supporters you got to get out there and do more than gold okay let me just give you many of my family as an example because when you when you talk about we don't have a mobile we're also talking about big time big news on that again I'm back hello and and if you're not if they're only getting information from one side but I'm my family they started out this trump administration you know on the same aspect is more of a a lot of the liberals with leaving the fake news until I came out and I opened and I and I sold on the on the side and I thank them easy Corey Hispanic communities were not about where we're very pro life you're in sales a great point not just pro life but the reason so many Hispanic families are pro life his because Hispanics by and large a surround their lifestyle in faith so many of us are Catholic many of us are Protestant so faith is a big part hard working entrepreneurship is another part and and these things I think jibes so well with the conservative message the conservative movement absolutely man so I just wanted to say that everybody it trust me that if you put the word out that I believe that your easy it's really easy to open that that you're you're spending family members I to the reality and just sold on the point the point with them because my family started out very anti trump due to the news they were watching and now I literally everybody except the one on a billable it's time around and it's because they never had the information the only had or he rambles on their feeding them a you know gold store of the gender type stuff and and and well said brother I think you're spot on and we're gonna get into a little bit of George Soros later and you're right I do believe that as more people learn about what what what it is that really is going on and put labels aside they realize you know what these are things I believe this president seems to be leading the way on the things that I believe and that's truly what I think makes a difference in an election and in life in general so I appreciate the call Moses again our phone number eight seven seven three eight one three eight one one you're listening to the mark living show I am rich Valdez average job does on Twitter then are.

Brookings Institution
"brookings institution" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"brookings institution" Discussed on KCRW

"Center at the Brookings Institution about healthcare spending since the affordable Care Act was signed into law ten years ago those stories coming up on morning edition enroll now for winter and spring classes at Santa Monica college California's number one transfer college offers courses in high paying career fields like design technology and cloud services take advantage of counseling services financial aid in large class offerings learn more at SNC dot EDU now this from KCRW knows California is all important C. R. snow pack is sitting above its average for this time of the year that's according to measurements taking this week by the state department of water resources but does this mean it will be a good year overall not necessarily as KCRW's Benjamin Gottlieb explains it's true the first day of winter isn't officially until tomorrow but already this year is our holding about fifteen percent more water than usual that's the most in several years that's welcome news for state water regulators after all about a third of all the fresh water that's used in California well it comes from the Sierra snowpack run off feeling these terrible readings a series of strong storms that coated this year is in snow over the past couple weeks or even sell state regulators are only cautiously optimistic it's still too early they say to predict just how twenty twenty is going to shake out in terms of overall snow fall KCRW's Benjamin godly this is a test of the emergency alert system is a test of the emergency alert system in an actual emergency the traditional two tone EBS alert signal would have been heard followed by official safety instructions this concludes our weekly test of the emergency alert system I am eighty nine point nine KCRW from nume whose yellow green and red approach to categorizing food is designed to help people make improved meal choices with the goal of losing weight and keeping it off for good learn more at noon N. O..

Brookings Institution KCRW California Benjamin Gottlieb Benjamin Santa Monica college Californi twenty twenty official
"brookings institution" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"brookings institution" Discussed on KTOK

"At the Brookings Institution last week calling for controls on how the government can use facial recognition technology securing America Republican Mike Lee says the technology is useful in many ways but also poses threats to privacy and national security this as it makes government more efficient that can be a good thing at the same time as that happens as government becomes more efficient at potential for abuse escalate Democrat senator Chris Coons is urging US lawmakers to protect Americans here at home now an overweening over reaching overly powerful government that can collect data on us all the time everywhere anywhere and it doesn't have guard rails in terms of how it's using that tool can initially began trying to interject and prevent crime in Washington Julian Turner fox news president trouble we back on the campaign trail this week president trump is returning to Pennsylvania tomorrow night for a keep America great rally at the giant center in Hershey Pennsylvania is twenty electoral votes help the president win the White House in twenty sixteen making the president the first Republican to win the keystone state since nineteen eighty eight in twenty sixteen the president was able to offset huge margins voting for Hillary Clinton in Philadelphia and Pittsburgh by winning large majorities in rural areas the president is hoping to repeat that performance and keep Pennsylvania in his column in twenty twenty at the White House John decker fox news team mobiles purchase of sprint goes on trial today in New York it's been approved by the justice department and Federal Communications Commission but fourteen state attorneys general are suing to stop the deal saying would would do to reduce competition and raise Americans phone bills that trial is expected to last several weeks stock markets overseas trading mostly higher.

New York John decker White House Pittsburgh Julian Turner Washington America Federal Communications Commiss justice department Brookings Institution Philadelphia Hillary Clinton Hershey Pennsylvania trump president US
"brookings institution" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"brookings institution" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"And who was that that was the Brookings Institution president strobe Talbott who had been sent a copy of this any share it with you that was the day before it was published in those fees you mention in your deposition also that you thought that it was a script exact quote but the dossier I was a rabbit hole so still your testimony that's correct let me explain to strobe Talbott is somehow but when I first heard of him he worked at time magazine and he was cited by Walter F. Mondale in nineteen eighty four he was cited by Monday as some expert in something or other during a debate with Reagan nineteen eighty four says a strobe Talbott what a name Strom topic that's got a being that's got to be ivy league that's dead just gotta be pinstripe white shows it's got to be the whole ball what strolled with top so I said okay who is this then I found out that strobe Talbott one is a good friend and best body of Bill Clinton that they had gone to watch the road scholars together and then I found out Clinton gets elected nineteen ninety two the strobe Talbott in the inner circle of advisers now the guy well not know all that's fine there's nothing wrong with any of this it's just that he's in the Clinton network fox and he's got the dossier he is a Clinton apparatchiks he goes way back you know Clint was a Rhodes scholar when they when the okay that's Oxfords that would be I don't know sometime late seventies my could be way wrong on that that year doesn't matter but they were thick as thieves and if you don't hear my god you know booking she did not want to mention math because she knows I mean he's just just all the partisan links in the world so then known as said do you know who paid Christopher steel to generate the still does the a is there were there were several of them you know and as I've told you the least Smith book actually the documents the fusion GPS wrote the dossier folks and there were several little miniature dossiers that got compiled by steel to become the final product known as a steel Dustin fusion G. P. S. actually assembled Saul Nunez knows this and so he's asking Fiona hill do you know who paid Christopher still generate still dossiers there were several of the mob you know at the time I did not know I understand from the media that it was through GPS fusion I thought so correct you know who was on there was a law firm involved you know who the source of the money for us I didn't have the time noted now the lead in the polls and thanks to your colleagues as well that it was the the GMC is I'm not to believe and the Clinton campaign I don't know that for sure I know everything there is to know that I I I don't know any of this I know everything I don't I know more than but I never heard of anything as you say the DMCA well I don't know man I read a report I read in media reports on cars and your colleagues your colleagues yeah Alex lime your conspiracy Brad's I've heard I've heard I've heard it Senate did you said you believe it was the DNC as I read the police and and the Clinton campaign but I know everything else once again how hard is it to believe these people really don't know all they know everything there experts are you never heard of G. P. S. fusion until Devin newness told him about it I never heard a glands sim sin he asked him you know restored you no no way or you know Peter struck struck smart you know he's a bit I don't I'm not too familiar no some to believe so do you know I'm going down the third secretary undersecretary pork bellies are all yes yes almost a very lyrical social you never heard of personal now I can't say as I Rush.

strobe Talbott Brookings Institution president
"brookings institution" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

09:20 min | 2 years ago

"brookings institution" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"At the Brookings Institution. Hollander is the author of step forward. America a case for a national service program. A book laying out the case for mandatory service and Lucy. Stagger. Walled is the author of stuff. Justin mandatory national service as a six for America's problem and a journalist a contributing editor to antiwar dot com. We thank you all for joining us today before we begin. Let me explain how we will conduct. Today's hearing the Commissioner's have all received your written testimony, and it will be entered into the official record. We ask that. You summarize the highlights of your testimony in the allotted five minutes before you will see our timing system. When the light turns yellow, you have approximately one minute remaining. And when it turns red your time has expired. After all testimony is completed we will move into questions from the commissioners each Commissioner will be given five minutes to ask a question and to receive a response, and I asked that the commissioners maintain the five minute limit depending on time we will proceed with one and possibly two rounds of questions upon completion Commissioner questions we will provide an opportunity for members of the public warrant attendance attendance to offer comments either on the specific topic addressed today or more generally on the Commission's overarching mandate. These comments will be limited to two minutes. The light will turn yellow when there are thirty seconds remaining and read one time has expired. We are now ready to begin our panelists testimony, and I'd like to begin with Mr. Bando senior fellow of the Cato Institute out your recognized recognized for five minutes while I appreciate the opportunity to present my views on the subject services in Americans DNA was commented upon by Alexis de Tocqueville on his famous trip to the United States where he saw civic society that did not exist. Monarchical europe. Mandatory national service, really is a very different concept. I think though, it's not a new one much of the literature on national service reaches back to Edward Bellamy's famous book looking backward, and especially the William James essay, the moral equivalent of war. I think it's something. In fact, it is worth reading in part to show that the, you know, the arguments made at that time radically different from the ones today, he read William James conception. What national services sounds very alien to what we be think of today. There've been a number of advocates for mandatory programs over the years ranging from Margaret need to Robert McNamara. Moscow's Ted Kennedy, John McCain others, like Harris, wafford Stanley mcchrystal of talk to of some of these ideas proposed suggested an offer different ideas, the outcome over the years have always been small programs voluntary programs, AmeriCorps teach America and such things. I would argue that the mandatory universal programs. In fact, a very bad idea. One that I think one of the dangers reports to the panacea where everyone who supports sees it as solving different issues and different problems. It becomes kind of universal solution for variety of bills. They see in American society. I I think we want to be very careful about presuming that American youth in America are so far down that this is the only kind of approach to rescue them so bad so selfish, so greedy, the Potomac institute report back in nineteen seventy eight Harris wafford was involved talked about Saturday Night, Fever, essentially, if America at that point forty years ago that movie, but of course. The dangers of exaggerating America's virtues. We also have dangerous. I think if exaggerating America's failings, and we don't want to go overboard, and we're discussing those kinds of issues the second. I think this extraordinary danger and seeing a program like this is being an element of so molding. I think the notion that the government is going to be good at turning people into good to transforming them from selfish. So y'all kind of two compassionate to a number of other things is rather scant skeptical of your values formation is very important. We have issues with family community churches, where we've traditionally have values formation. I don't see a massive government program that would have four to eight million people presumably roughly four million turn eighteen every year. I think the spectacle of the comfortable in privileged judging the young and vulnerable and explaining how they are so selfish and need to be taught compassion is one. That's more likely to breed cynicism. Idealism while there are in fact tasks that I think are unique and special that can be done are there. Four million other eight million. What do we actually think of? A program like this would do. And ultimately, do we believe that compulsory compassionate is something that really works? I tend to think the compassionate is something that does not come through compulsion. Almost all of these issues discussed the whole question of unmet social needs the vision of four eight million people doing wonderful things across the country. The question, of course, is what does that mean? Basically all of these lists come out. And I've seen a number of lists over the years. I remember one that towed it up five point three million unmet social needs two hundred thousand in libraries went down the list. And if you ask people if they like to have free labor, they can come up with a very large list. The problem is if there's no conception of cost either direct costs of paying people that cetera or the opportunity cost of what they would. Otherwise, be doing a list of this nature tells us nothing, you know, the question is what is valued. What is useful? How will these Yogi used how will organizations use them? We know nothing. So you have to have both costs and benefits to take into account. I think one has to be very careful about using this kind of language the question of kind of putting all of this in the public realm. You know, there are lots of forms of service. And it's not clear to me that we want the government defining what appropriate service is someone in private medical practice can be very self sacrificing. Somebody can go on mission strip someone can serve. I mean, we have the US Senator enough. It goes down to Haiti and does operations on his off time services a multiple out there people in private sector can do extraordinarily important service. I think there's a danger of baptizing only one sense of service that ultimately is it better to shelve books in a library or to shelve books in a private bookstore. It's not clear to me working in a library itself is uniquely self-sacrificing compared to other uses the again, the question of free labor. How this is used. How agencies would use this NGOs with us this? I worry that there's an element of which we are continuing a process of a giving primacy to state programs where the welfare state tends to push out the independent sector within the independent sector and others government funding. So NGOs are really not non governmental benefactor government. And then it's not only funding, but it's going to be volunteers. We're going to be provided by government. We're losing something in the expectation of duty to give money to be involved in organizations to assess needs that people average folks who may not be able to take out full-time. We're going to have trouble doing. So I think that we should be very skeptical of the concept of mandatory universal national service. Thank you, Mr. Banda. Dr gallstone, you're recognized for five minutes. Live coverage from American University in Washington DC, a meeting of the national commission on military national public service. Chairman heck vice-chair water members of the commission. Thank you for this opportunity to offer. My thoughts on the appropriate scope of national service. The modern national service movement is more than three decades old, and it has scored many remarkable successes. Those of us who were present at the creation of AmeriCorps, for example, must acknowledge that it is falling short of our aspirations. We hope that as it grew. It would come to transform the prevailing understanding and practice American citizenship. We hope that active citizenship would become the norm. And that all Americans would see citizenship consists, not only in rights to be claimed. But also in responsibilities to be met, we hoped above all that national service could help close the widening gap among Americans of different backgrounds. Partisan affiliations and ideological orientations little of this last has come to pass. We now face a choice between scaling back our hopes to fit the reality of national service as it now exists and expanding service to fit the scale of our hopes. I inclined toward the ladder because I refuse to accept the civic status quo, which I regard as dangerously inadequate. I doubt that I'm alone and that byu so what should we do? The first step which is not trivial is to come as close as we can to what the commission calls universal access service for all who desire to participate in my judgment. The best course would be to quadruple the opportunities AmeriCorps offers each year a program that engaged three hundred thousand people each year which corrected for population growth was the original conception would be much more visible than today's program. Today's version most Americans would know, or at least know of someone who's performing service the odds that the program could reshape civic norms would rise significantly. If we had achieved the original vision quickly. I'm not alone in this room, and believing that the texture Americans should I silica political life today might be very different. There's a caveat. The venue matters. I believe that services most likely to achieve its civic mission. When it's performed in diverse groups that is team. Teams learning through concrete experience, the people whose backgrounds and beliefs are very different can work together to accomplish your goals is the heart of the lesson that today's service must.

America Commissioner United States Brookings Institution Lucy Harris wafford Hollander Edward Bellamy William James Justin europe contributing editor official Alexis de Tocqueville Haiti Cato Institute completion Commissioner American University Mr. Bando
"brookings institution" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"brookings institution" Discussed on WTVN

"Works. Why isn't it more widely used? Single word. Luddites? Luddites are that's the word that people use to refer to those who resist technological advancement. The phrase comes from a group of people back in the eighteen hundreds in England who destroyed looms that were used to replace weavers weavers felt their jobs were threatened. They destroyed the looms to protect their jobs, and they came to be known as Luddites. And so that's just a catch all phrase for people who resist technological advancement. This is not a bitcoin conversation. That's not a crypto conversation. It's an exponential technologies conversation a couple of weeks ago in Phoenix. Tires were slashed. Why the tires were of a car that was a self driving vehicle operated by Waymo? There have been two dozen attacks on driverless vehicles over the past two years. These self driving vehicles have been pelted with rocks drivers have repeatedly tried to run them off the road recently. A man pulled up alongside the vehicle and threatened the employees inside the car. You know, the guy was a passenger the car drives itself. He's just in the car. There are fears that people have that these self driving vehicles will eliminate jobs, and they're fearful of it. And it's very similar to the weavers who destroyed the looms back in old England and Luddites will slow down technological innovation. But you can't stop it. At the Brookings Institution. They say that one quarter of American jobs are at high risk of automation. Low-wage earners will be among the first to see their jobs disappear because their tasks are routine based and the more repetitive. Your job more redundant. It is the easier. It is for a robot or a computer to do it for you. They their report was quite clear if your job is boring and repetitive. You're a great risk of automation. So ask yourself about that in your job. Are you pushing paper are you filling out forms because the more that you do you got to admit it a computer can do it faster more accurately? And more cheaply than you. The World Economic Forum says one point four million workers will be displaced within ten years and only one in four of them will be rehired in new jobs because they don't have the skills necessary. You're familiar with the World Economic Forum. It's Hilton Davis in Switzerland every year executives there at the recent conference are racing to automate workforce's to stay ahead of the competition with apparently little regard on the impact on workers, the president of Infosys tech and consulting firm. They say that businesses think they can fire ninety nine percent of their people Deloitte did a survey and found that fifty three percent of companies are already using machines to perform tasks previously done by humans had IBM their artificial intelligence unit generated six billion dollars of revenue in the last three months. UBS says the. I industry will be worth nearly two hundred billion dollars by the end of next year. And one tech executive says they is going to eliminate forty percent of the world's jobs within fifteen years at Foxconn. They plan to replace eighty percent of their workers within the next decade, you need to be aware of what's coming the CEO of IBM Jimmy Rometty. She says that hiring needs to be based on skills. Not college degrees and the companies have to focus on hiring people with skill sets. Because that's what really matters. You need to be aware of the future. That's coming because it's going to be very different from the future that you might have been expecting. And when we come back on the program, I'm going to tell you the best jobs for the future..

England IBM Brookings Institution Phoenix UBS Waymo Foxconn Infosys Hilton Davis Switzerland Jimmy Rometty CEO executive president two hundred billion dollars fifty three percent ninety nine percent six billion dollars eighty percent
"brookings institution" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"brookings institution" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Don't know if they'll ever be debt free. Twenty-five percent blankly say they expect to die in debt, by the way, who expects to be out of debt. The soonest is people who have less than fifty thousand in income or people with more than fifty thousand in income. This might surprise you the people who have less than fifty granted income or the ones who expect to be out of deficit honest, which just demonstrates don't think you're gonna earn more money to solve your problem. People are as broke two hundred grand as they were a twenty grand. Oh, they're living nicer lives. They got bigger houses and fancier cars. But they're still broke. And bankratEcom says fifty five percent of Americans don't think their personal situation will improve this year. We got to fix all this triple eight plan RIC, and we'll help you do it. All right. Let's change the subject I'm gonna bring onto the program. Bill arnon. He is the chief executive officer of the National Academy of social insurance. The academy is comprised of about a thousand of the nation's leaders and experts in social security Medicare worker's comp and related programs Bill, thanks so much for joining us on the show today with you at a recent event at the Brookings Institution. SEC Commissioner CARA Stein, talked about the retirement crisis. And she called it a su- NAMI that is rapidly approaching. Do you agree with that phraseology? I don't like gritter that stat heightened. But is there a challenge facing the retirement system our country, the answer is yes? Had we known of it's coming the answer's yes. And like most you Nabis that come without warning. Manageable. Yes. But there's no question that we can't just sit Pat so to speak for the best. Well, let's let's elaborate and make sure folks understand the nature of this crisis. And what it is that we see coming talk about social security's current status and its term outlook. Status is strong. It's been paying benefits on time. History. So people currently getting social security can be sure they're going to be getting it into into their futures and their lives. The issue is that with the boomer generation of being so large. Demographic challenges be such that the program is nothing is done. Under reasonable assumption will not have enough to pay full benefits and the twenty thirties. It'll have enough to pay about seventy two to seventy five percent, which you might say, let's not bad. But it is a big cut. If we do nothing. So something has to has to be done to correct long-term imbalance program. I it really is a bigger number than I think most people realize the average social security. Check is retirement benefit is about thirteen hundred bucks. Yes. And average is misleading the media is even lower. So, but yes, it's about thirteen hundred today. And so a twenty five percent cut would take it under a thousand dollars. And if most retirees are getting most of their income from social security, this cut could have a significant impact on their lifestyles and most are never intended to be the primary source of income for people in old age. So to speak. But it's evolved that blood because of what else has happened to retirement system with pensions and four K plans underperforming, or some cases disappearing so it's been asked to play a bigger role is it position to play that role going forward. Oh. I said something has to give the kademi were nonpartisan. We don't take positions, but we can say one thing. And that's the longer you. Wait the harder. It's sort of like driving down a highway, and you see a brick wall in front of you, the sooner you begin to apply the break the easier..

Commissioner CARA Stein chief executive officer kademi National Academy of social SEC Brookings Institution bankratEcom Pat Medicare seventy five percent Twenty-five percent twenty five percent fifty five percent thousand dollars four K
"brookings institution" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

05:21 min | 3 years ago

"brookings institution" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

"I'm Bill fry with the metropolitan policy program here at the Brookings Institution. While Twenty-eight teen was a year of economic revival. Historically, low unemployment and rising wage growth demographic indicators stand in contrast seemingly ushering in an era of population growth stagnation, this was emphasized in the recently released census bureau population change estimates for the year, ending July. Twenty teen these data show that the national rate of population growth is at its lowest since nineteen thirty seven a result of declines in the number of births and gains and the number of death and the nation's under eighteen population as declined since the twenty ten census, this is on the heels of new data showing that geographic mobility within the United States is also at a historic low and while some states particularly in. The mountain west are growing rapidly. Nearly a fifth of all states displayed absolute population losses over the past two years while some of these downward demographic trends reflect the delayed impact of the great recession. The aging of the American population is the broader cause a factor that the nation will have to cope with for years and decades to come the US population growth rate of zero point six two percent for twenty seventeen to twenty eight teen is the lowest registered in eighty years while the nation's growth rate, varied through wars, economic upheavals baby booms and baby busts the current rate reflects further dip in a trend toward a lower level of growth registered since the great recession of two thousand seven to two thousand nine these downward growth trends in. Initially reflected declines immigration as well. As lower natural increase, the excess of births over deaths because the economy was down during the recession but over the past few years immigration gained some momentous reduce natural increase became more responsible for the overall declines in population growth as it dropped from one point six million in two thousand two thousand one to just above one million last year. There were fewer births than in recent decades and more deaths than in earlier years. The decline in births may have been eccentric needed by young adult millennials who still bearing the brunt of the recession may still be postponing birth. However, the long term trajectory should yield fewer rather than more berths as the population ages with proportionately fewer women in child bearing ages the rise in deaths is more directly related to the nation's aging. Population census bureau projection show that their rise to be the major cause of reductions in the nation's natural increase over time the sleeves immigration as an ever more important contributor to national population growth because of the recent decline natural increase immigration now contributes nearly as much to population growth and is projected to be the primary contributor to national population growth after twenty thirty as natural increase continues to Klein, thus immigration its size and its attributes will be an important contributor to the nation's future population that is growing slowly and ageing quickly the national population growth slowdown did not occur in all parts of the country to states, Nevada. An Idaho grew by more than two percent last year. Continuing a recent boom in the mountain west which like other regions to growth hits. Earlier in the decade among the fourteen states, which grew by more than one percent. Most are located in the south and west yet all is not upbeat even for these high flyers among the fourteen states that grew so rapidly ten grew more slowly than in the previous year, the bigger story in the last two years is the number of states which lost population. Ten states twenty sixteen to twenty seventeen and nine states last year compared with only one or two states earlier in the decade. These are states were current natural increase along with immigration could not counteract migration to other parts of the country. Among these are the two large urban states, New York and Olin, OI. The latter losing population for the fifth straight year as natural increased windows states will rely more heavily on in my Gration from the rest of the US and abroad to fuel. Growth or stave off to Klein, the new census estimates put an exclamation point. And what we should be preparing for the country ages and grows less rapidly from natural increase the latest national growth rate of zero point six two percent is noticeably below what we'd have experienced in prior decades while it is still higher than.

United States Klein Brookings Institution Bill fry Idaho New York Nevada Olin six two percent two years eighty years one percent two percent