29 Burst results for "Brookings Institute"

"brookings institute" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

03:00 min | 2 weeks ago

"brookings institute" Discussed on WTVN

"Missile Rose was 6 10 W. Tvnz Joel Riley after the discovery of an unknown number of incorrect absentee ballots. Were sent to voters across Franklin County this week. White House Chief of staff Mark Meadows says President Trump's still improving following his positive test for Corona virus last week. He's doing real well. We actually spent some time together yesterday, working very hard from the residents, and I can tell you that he's fully engaged and feeling great. That's Meadows on Fox News this morning, according to President Trump's physician, the president's doing extremely well in reported no symptoms. Presidents repeated he still looks to participate in next week. Second presidential debate in Miami, Florida The Brookings Institute says tonight's vice presidential debates the quote most important vice presidential debate in history. We have the two oldest presidential nominees in American history. So an open discussion of an incapacitated or dead president is demanded by the candidate's age in health history. In 2016 vice president Pence showed himself to be a good debater and we get back to 3.5. A 4% growth with Donald Trump's plan will do. We're gonna have the ability to bring down the national debt. Kamala Harris showed herself to be ineffective and powerful debater during the primaries. And that little girl was me. Penson Harris have the opportunity to be the presidential candidate America wants and needs right now, one of them maybe president sooner than planned. Mike Power, NBC news radio of the more than 7.5 Million Americans who are known to have contracted Corona virus doctors. We're finding more and more long haulers, patients who struggle with symptoms that Lance for weeks or even months. ABC chief medical correspondent, Dr Jennifer Ashton says a new study out this week's is nearly a third of hospitalized patients experienced some type of mental dysfunction. Somehow this virus is accessing the brain tissues. It's not clear whether it's due to Ah change in blood supply to the brain or an inflammatory response, but huge numbers for neurological and mental and psychological effects. She says. Among the symptoms now are mental fog or cognitive changes, and people can't concentrate, leading to an inability to function. Radio 6 10 W TVN sports trade with Montreal. The Columbus Blue Jackets acquired 25 year old center Max Domi and a third round pick for forward Josh Anderson Domi registered 81 goals at 170 assists in 375 career NHL games. The Jackets also drafted 19 year old Russian Yegor Chin, a cough in the 2020 NHL draft last night. Take off. The 21st pick overall, has recorded five goals and two assists in 12 games in the Russian Continental Hockey League. The Columbus crew host Orlando City tonight in Monterey Stadium. The crew remain unbeaten at home and are currently tied for the top spot in the Eastern Division with Toronto FC with 31 points from the central Ohio Honda Dealer Sports Task My Campaign a news radio 6 10 W TV END will be sunny today with a high of 77 clear Chile 47 tonight. Sonny and cooler. A high of 67 Tomorrow, Sunshine and 50. For now, I'm Scott Jennings stayed connected to Columbus and Central Ohio on the hour. 30 minutes past stand as news breaks Glenn Beck continues next. Goodbye..

President Trump president Kamala Harris vice president Dr Jennifer Ashton Mark Meadows Columbus Blue Jackets Joel Riley Tvnz Columbus Franklin County Glenn Beck Chief of staff NHL White House Brookings Institute Fox News ABC
Couples delaying pregnancy because of pandemic

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

00:33 sec | 2 months ago

Couples delaying pregnancy because of pandemic

"Vacations and work on hold next year. The U. S could experience a 13% decline in births, according to the Brookings Institute. That's because more than 1/3 of women say the ongoing Corona virus pandemic has upended their pregnancy plans, causing EMS either want fewer Children or put starting a family on hold. Many told CBS News that the looming uncertainty around how the novel virus impacts pregnant people influence their decision, as well as economic fallout caused by nationwide lockdowns that CBS is Kate Smith, who says a

Cbs News Brookings Institute CBS Kate Smith U. S
Census Bureau confirms plans to end data collection early

Joel Riley

01:11 min | 3 months ago

Census Bureau confirms plans to end data collection early

"Announcing last night. That it is ending Field Data collection a month earlier than had been plan. They were going to shut it down September or October 31st But now they say households have to complete the census by September 30. The date Census Bureau says that they're knocking on doors of households that haven't done the census that's coming to an end changes likely to raise new concerns about how the Census Bureau possibly undercounts. Population, and when you talk population in this country, babyboomers have kind of been the £800 gorilla generally regarded as the largest part of humanity in this country, But now not the case. New Brookings Institute analysis. They checked the US population with regularity, and they say it's the younger folks that are edging out the baby boomers, baby boomers right now 162 million. And when you look at millennials and points younger, it's 166 million. So the oldest millennials are now 39. Gen Xers be born between 65 80 Gen. Z after 96. So right now, younger populations are the lion's share of US population

Census Bureau United States
"brookings institute" Discussed on Talk Radio WPHT 1210

Talk Radio WPHT 1210

07:57 min | 3 months ago

"brookings institute" Discussed on Talk Radio WPHT 1210

"Simpson infusion GPS, and now it appears like it's the Brookings Institute. Was also heavily involved in this Then, obviously they go after Carter Page in October of 16. Well, nothing comes of it. And then lo and behold. The impossible happened. And what is that Donald Trump becomes president. Nobody thinks that's gonna happen. Then they have to go back to the well again and say, Well, we if you remember Shawn, there was there was, I would call it a Halloween story. October 31st of 16. There was a leak of massive leak that people didn't realize at the time so that they had been looking at the Trump campaign for ties to Russian And they didn't find anything so effectively. Somebody at the FBI leak that because they wanted to get the hell out of town. They knew that when they went after Carter page, it was wrong. I knew they didn't find anything right before the election, and I think they were trying to clear their books off so that no one would ever find this out. Discover this Well, then Trump wins. And then, as you know, that's when I think the Obama administration gets into full gear and they're like, Oh, no, no, no, no, no, We're going to have to go back and look at all this. We were led to believe that this dossier when we were first briefed on it, even though most of the mainstream media had it shine on. You and I were the only ones who didn't have it and Trump On then you fast forward. They get this. They brief us on this Gaussian January were led to believe from that time forward that this is somebody serious? Right there. There's somebody that must have some ties to Russian. Well, Sean now we know as you said, all this is about it's we now know that the number one left wing think Take in Washington, D C. Was heavily heavily involved in the development. The dissemination and the defense. Of this dossier. It's basically a full time operation from the from the Left wing think tank the last four years to discredit the House Republican investigation, too. Discredit media figures like yourself. They've been there knee deep in all of this, and you take what Lindsey Graham said. And now we know for sure. The FBI hid this from Congress obstructed our investigation. We should have known this from the very beginning that this was that this was you know, a dude that used to work at the Brookings. I'm Kelly's here here in the swamp. This is this is no Russian. So the whole thing was based on a lie. Now we got to get to the source of the lie. And who knew what? When And where? Um, what is frustrating to so many people that I know is okay. We're now at the end of July. We gotta can't. We've got an election in 99 days. I think the American people deserve to know the truth about the last election before this one, you know, Where's the Durham investigation? Yeah, I know. I totally agree. And it's just that you know that the challenge we have here is that we keep finding new evidence. I mean, you know we've made and I know every gets frustrated, so we've made 14 criminal referrals. That doesn't mean 14 people. There's a lot more than 14 people. We've made the criminal referrals on. We have 1/15 request for an investigation to occur. Um, you know, I have to believe that the challenge here is Shauna. This is such a wide ranging investigation involving so many layers of people. Ah, that they're probably trying to figure out. You know, how do they bring indictments here in the inn in August? Because you know the rules of the FBI say that you know you Britney if there's anything political That they would have to be brought in August. So you know, my hope is I'm crossing my fingers that we will get. You know some initial indictments. You know, I would, I think like you said, I think the American people expect For us to know what happened in the 2016 election before we vote again in the 2020 election. Based on what we know, we already know. That they should. They absolutely lied and protected. Hillary, we APS. We know that this is the dirty misinformation dossier. We know that they were worn before the 1st 5 application. That's premeditated fraud on the court. You know. Roger Stone and Paul Manafort had their predawn raids and stones case 29 guys in tactical gear, frogman and CNN cameras. For a process crime that we know Comey, McCabe and others had already been referred to themselves. Why does nothing ever happened to them and I? Well, you're exactly right. And I think you had and now we now know That the FBI knew that this dossier was just was just garbage. I mean, they know they had to have known it then. I mean, the the whole thing was a sick fantasy that was dreamt up by a bunch of Clinton operatives. And they got somebody, the dirty cops but the FBI to go along with it, and they perpetuated this hoax on the American people. I mean, itjust gets it. You know, I would have never thought I mean, you know, I knew this was bad four years ago. You know when, when I first broke this to the American people. But even I didn't believe that it went. This fought this far and wide this far deep, you know, I would have never thought that the think tank would be this heavily involved in engaging this Brookings Institute. I just It makes sense now, in retrospect, Ron because They were. So you know all these guys on Twitter that might have been going tic tac all part of a scheme. Do you think How many times did you see that? You know, and you know, and they're supposed to be fact checkers right Nonprofit were nonprofit, independent fact checkers. And it never made any sense. Why on earth like every single time that you know anything that that that I did they criticized and they go and they slandered they smeared. You and you and I both have been raked over the coals. I mean, you know, I had 45 pages of 30 two's on me and my text messages with Manafort released You've been through your own hell and this congenital liar, never no ramifications for his conduct ever. Well, look, That's why this election is so consequential, and that's what we can't We have Teo as Republicans and conservatives. We have to understand there is a disinformation operation that's never ended. It started with the Clinton campaign, creating this nonsense. Now it's continuing to this day with they continue to say and promote out there that Trump had something to do with Russia. Now they're attacking the attorney general. They're attacking Durham. So we just have to make sure that those that those conservatives out there and independence we have to spread the truth and it's It's not going to be easy because we have to fight through the mainstream media. That's against us. And, of course, all the social media companies that are against us. So we have our work to do in the next 99 days and and we have to cross our fingers that that somebody is indicted for this, but we also have to be ready for the worst. And that is that nothing happened. In which would be a travesty, but we we have to make sure our people get out and vote on Election Day. All right. Devin Nunes ranking member House Intelligence Committee has been phenomenal, and he's been honest and he's been truthful. And he's told the American people the truth the whole time. And, you know great personal prices that never ending attacks against this man. Thank you, sir. We will get to the bottom of it. Otherwise we don't have We don't have equal justice or application of loss. We don't have a constitutional republic. It just evaporates. If they get away with this, and I want to know what everybody in that January 5th meeting new and when did they know it? And why did they know it? And why didn't they do anything about it? Devin Nunes. Thank you. Hey, listen in this world we live in today. I used Norton 3 60 If you believe in privacy, I suggest you get it A cz. Well, they're the best at what they do. Norton, 3 60 keep spying and prying eyes out. You get real time protection against existing and emerging threats that put your personal information at risk That.

FBI Donald Trump Brookings Institute Carter Durham Devin Nunes Clinton Paul Manafort Lindsey Graham Simpson Shawn Brookings president Obama administration Twitter Shauna
"brookings institute" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

04:13 min | 6 months ago

"brookings institute" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"As public health indicators will tell us when to move forward at anytime they could also signal that we need to move backward I would say that you better just start feeling as if this is essentially I don't like this phrase but I repeat it this may be the new normal because phase five which is the good old days is a long way off the only way that we can cross interface five Illinois restored with all the sectors of the economy running with completely normal operations it is with a vaccine or a widely available and highly effective treatment more with the elimination of any new cases over a sustained period of time so in other words be careful if you want to go back to the way it was that's probably not gonna happen it's gonna happen no later rather than sooner now I want to deviate from the governor's comments here to bring this to your attention is from Harvard Business School today this is a staggering statistic before the pandemic less than four percent of American employees work from home full time that has now jumped to more than half that cuts across all income levels all demographics all regions of the country so less than four percent of American employees work from home full time before this which was one mid March is that when we all we're told to hunker down mmhm I mean I've lost track I I I don't know how many weeks I've been here now but you know but but there's less than four percent now more than half this is per the Brookings institute via Harvard I am among the top twenty percent of earners sent to white collar the shares close to seventy percent people have adapted and they've learned how to work from home lots of people are leaving urban hot spots that's going to be a trend you're going to see people say all right well I guess even if except perhaps for millennials older people say I guess I really don't have to travel to the NBC tower every day any longer so I'm selling the condo and I'm getting out of Dodge if the trend sticks this will reverse a century long move towards urbanization and I know that there's Evan flow with that but the trend has been recently people because I hate commuting and because of traffic primarily have moved back downtown whether Chicago or any place else that may reverse and also families are cooking more meals at home they're spending more time with kids and they're incorporating a lot of these crisis era practices in the normal life but if you expect that we're going to get back to the way it was anytime soon you may want to do a little rethink the offices they you may eventually return to will look a lot different than the one you left in March gone will be the conference rooms and co working spaces well at least temporarily give way to spread out office layouts and it has a greater share of Americans work remotely you can look this is a sector of the economy that will improve as a greater share of Americans work remotely meaning at home look for builders of new homes to give us a lot more thought to expanding home offices which are still at least for the time being tax deductible couple other very important clips from the governor what if people complain I just don't want to follow your faces I don't want to follow your regional distinctions and I won't open the door to overwhelming our hospital system and possibly tens of thousands of additional deaths by exposing everyone to the virus today just because a loud but tiny minority would like to indulge in that fantasy and one more and I think this is important for the governor's very wise to do this he is not giving getting heavy handed on enforcement essentially saying I I'm making these unix or talk to a constitutional attorney last hour who said that the governor's definitely overstepping his bounds and that this will be challenged in court and he probably will lose but Intel then the governor I think very prudently is not gonna be standing the state police and anytime soon anywhere he'll leave it up to local authorities do with.

How Do You Compare to the Average American?

Motley Fool Answers

09:15 min | 9 months ago

How Do You Compare to the Average American?

"The financial profile all of the average American or more accurately profiles of many average Americans since a proper apples to apples? Comparison takes into account several factors. So we're GONNA approach this this by looking at the financial life cycle of somebody which of course starts with birth. Fortunately you don't have to pay for your own birth. That's good because because the average cost of a birth in America these days ten thousand dollars and that's if there are no complications whatsoever So let's jump ahead to one of the first experiences people have have with actually earning money and that is an allowance. How many kids get an allowance? And how much do they get law. According to a recent survey from the American Institute of CPA's as two thirds of parents get allowance and the average is thirty dollars a week. It's pretty nice. Isn't ages they say what ages they start giving they broke it down a little bit. Okay but what was interesting to me was far too five. Parents expect the children to do work. Some people feel like you should just allowance because that's how you learn how to be responsible And they expect at least one hour week of chores but on average children are spending five point one hours a week doing chores for their allowance. So let me just say that my kids are below average with my kids are not doing five hours. Where the tour? I don't even do five hours worth of chores in our house and I do a lot of chores in our. What are these are? Are these kids living on a farm like that's a very good question. Chores chores could be clean your room for us. It is dishes this. This is the number one joy that kids do and we're not even very good of making them. Do it. Put your own shoes on in the morning to dress yourself. Live at Downton Abbey. Everyone everyone here anyway. So there you go. That's allowance so that's money from your parents but you'll eventually reach the point where you can start earning money from other people and here we are talking about being a teenager but the emphasis is can because most teenagers don't according to a study by the Hamilton project. And the Brookings Institute back in Nineteen nineteen seventy nine fifty eight percent of teenagers. Were doing some sort of work. But today it's only thirty five percent most teenagers don't have a job which not even like babysitting reasoning or I I guess not then the factors for why this has gone down as number one. They say that teenagers just have more things to do. Like like more kids are doing More kids are taking classes over the summer. Also there's less low wage work more competition from older folks and immigrants. That said I have three teenagers and I'm not sure I quite vile this Mike. Especially in the summer my kids have managed to find jobs but regardless the majority of teenagers not working. What was your first job while so I used to cut before I was of age to be doing? I cut lawns in the neighborhood and Dan. I watered flowers at a local flower shop. Then sure I've told you this story F.. I faked my birth certificate so I could work in McDonalds when I was age. Fifteen instead instead of sixteen so I did that ric have I to you. It was your first job horrible paper route once where you have to go door to door and collect the money which I always hated to do you so I never did it so I never really got paid for thing. What about you so my first job? I I went to high school where you are expected to work like four hours a day so you go to class in either the morning or the afternoon and then you would then so what kind of like work at the school. Yeah you'd work in the school or you'd lurk working in nearby bakery or you'd work farm too so you could work on the farm. Some people had farm jobs or work on maintenance and the school So I worked for the principal symbol. Of course I was responding. I did a lot of you. Know entering in people's grades and typing let transcribing letters and just the office work so as like fifteen. I think started. Did you like that because I've often thought especially as a former elementary school teacher junior high teacher. I thought a lot of this education is wasted in the dish. It's been half the day like working out in the basically interning at different types of jobs because they're not learning so much in school. Yeah no I mean it was is one of the better jobs to have on campus. That's for sure. So did you. And your friends. I'll get straight a's no but we I mean we could. We could have definitely changed. All of our grades were honest asked by it was a religious school so God would have smoked in us we. We were well aware of the consequences for changing our grades. So we didn't do it got got it. At least I didn't what's next in life. maxine life is well. We're going real job hitting their well even before. Then you finish high school and and then what college you go to college. I should first of all point out that it's nice if you want to write so point out. First of all. The graduation rate from public high schools is now eighty five percent near an all time high. So let's go so how many people then go onto college sixty nine point seven percent according to the Department of Labor not everyone gets four year degree as some people go to college and they don't get a degree. People get the associates so when you look at four year bachelor's degrees and graduate degrees. It's it's between thirty five and forty percent of people who actually end up with a degree but almost seventy percent do end up going to college which of course brings us to one of the first major financial decisions. A kid has to make depending on how much their family is willing and able to pay and that is the cost of college so according to the College Board. Let's go over the numbers here for the two thousand nineteen thousand twenty year a four year your public in State Education Room Board Fees Tuition Twenty one thousand nine hundred and fifty for your public out of state thirty eight thousand three hundred and thirty four year private school forty nine thousand four hundred ninety dollars ice now. The College Board is quick to point out at those are the published sticker prices and that most people don't pay those they say that about three quarters of students receive grants that reduce the actual price that people pay and just just about every college these days has something called net price calculator. You go onto their website. You put in some basic financial information. It gives you a general idea of how much you would pay. It's not binding or anything but if you're thinking of a college go to the net price calculator and you get an idea of how much aid you might receive. That said. We all know that grants. It's an aren't enough. which brings us to the topic of educational loan so approximately two thirds of kids graduate with debt with the average being between thirty thousand and forty thousand dollars depending on which source? You're looking at repayment. Can Take Ten to twenty years. And according to the Federal Reserve one fifth of ours were behind in their payments in two thousand in seventeen. So you have to wonder is a college degree worth the cost well for most people. The answer's probably yes. College grads on average earn seventy I five percent more than high school grads but that said the Fed did find that college is not a good investment for about twenty five percent of graduates and several studies of people who have loans at found that the majority of people regret the debt and they wish they would have found some other way to pay for college either going to community college allege not going to the private school something like that but regardless of how you pay for it you do graduate head out of college time for that first job. How much can you expect to make while starting salaries these days around fifty three thousand dollars? But who's paying you the most well engineering degrees computer. Peter Science and math those starting salaries are between sixty five thousand and seventy thousand math math. Now that's crazy math data that everyone is so hot with the data. One loves the data exactly so since we just brought up salaries. Let's expand this beyond starting income income in general in the United States. What is the average or the median household income and the United States and the answer is whereas the sixty three thousand one hundred seventy nine dollars? that's what you said family or average average average household household income but there are a lot of factors that would tournament starting with where you live. So the highest incomes are in the northeast. Meeting is around. Seventy thousand thousand filed by the West Midwest and the South South is lowest at fifty seven thousand. Being married helps. The median income for a household with a married couple earns. Ninety three thousand six hundred dollars Also age is a factor the households will make the most are in the forty five to fifty four age range with a median income of eighty. Four thousand four hundred dollars. We've talked about this before. Where income generally peaks at some point in your late forties or early fifties? Finally just just give me an idea of where your income puts you in relation to the rest of America. Here's how the income dispersion breaks down so if you make thirty seven thousand dollars you're in the bottom thirty thirty percent again. Median sixty three thousand. If you make one hundred thousand year in the top thirty percent hundred eighty four year in the top ten percent and to be in the top five five percent you make two hundred and forty eight thousand dollars. That's generally how income breaks down.

College Board America United States Federal Reserve American Institute Of Cpa Mcdonalds Brookings Institute School Teacher Downton Abbey Mike DAN Principal Department Of Labor West Midwest Peter Science South South
Job growth in the tech sector clustered in a few coastal U.S. cities

KCBS Radio Overnight News

01:14 min | 11 months ago

Job growth in the tech sector clustered in a few coastal U.S. cities

"Almost all tech job growth is happening in just five U. S. cities KCBS is Kerry who the sexes San Francisco and San Jose are among those five the study finds a handful of US cities have accounted for ninety percent of all high tech job growth leaving much of the nation behind in this digital economy those cities are San Francisco San Jose San Diego Boston and Seattle agree persons in portent trend that we're going to have to maybe push back against if we want different outcome mark Nero is co author of the study and a senior fellow with the metropolitan policy program at Brookings institute in Washington DC he says tech industries preferred to have the resources clustered so they can exchange new ideas face to face or replace that were looking laugh our headquarters for major platforms and all of the development ancillary grow pickles with that I think there's a very real case for a kind of walking on that may not be healthy for the nation it's cause massive affordable housing problems for cities like San Francisco he says one way to tackle the issue is to encourage the fed to support tech investment in areas outside these five

Kerry San Francisco San Jose Boston Senior Fellow Brookings Institute Tech Industries San Francisco San Jose San Die Seattle Mark Nero Washington Ninety Percent
Ambassador Susan Rice: If you're not able to make the people who you're leading feel valued and feel like their input matters then you're going to lose them.

Skimm'd from The Couch

11:46 min | 11 months ago

Ambassador Susan Rice: If you're not able to make the people who you're leading feel valued and feel like their input matters then you're going to lose them.

"You really have to recognize that the people around you have value to add and that you may be the person in charge you have the vision. You have the responsibility woody. But if you're not able to make the people who you're leading feel valued and feel like their input matters then you're gonNA lose them awesome. I'm Carly's Aken. I'm Danielle Weisberg. Welcome to skin from the couch. This podcast is where we go deep on career advice from women who have lifted from the good good stuff like hiring and growing a team to the rough stuff like negotiating your salary and giving or getting hard feedback. We started the skin from a couch. So what better at our place to talk it all out than where it began on a couch today. Hey we welcome ambassador. Susan Rice to skimmed from the couch ambassador. Rice was national security advisor to President Barack Obama before serving as national security the advisor. She was the United States Ambassador to the United Nations as well as a member of the cabinet. Prior to the Obama Administration at Basseterre Rice was a fellow fellow at the Brookings Institute and began her career in foreign policy under president. Bill Clinton so many questions also ambassador rice as has just published her book tough love the title references. Her parents approach to raising her which prepared her for career in world politics. And I'm guessing a lot more. The memoir has been called both highly personal and unflinchingly honest. It's landed her a spot on the New York Times Bestseller. Lists congratulations. We we are thrilled to get the opportunity to speak with her about her historic career ambassador rice. Welcome to the couch. Thanks so much. It's really great to be with you. Both very excited right okay. So let's jump into it first question we ask everybody. Skim your resume for us. Okay scholar written and published academic work on national security and foreign policy when I was at the Brookings Institution as a foreign policy scholar I've also been a management consultant diplomat. negotiator national security expert. That's the first time we've had those bullets on this show. What is not on your your wikipedia or login? Daniel dropped. Her microphone in a very important question was the literal mic. Drop in writing. Not On your official biography or Kapadia that we should know about you. Well I mean there's a lot but one of the most important things if not the most important things is that I'm a mom. I have two kids one in high school now in one in college and I'm a wife and I'm a proud daughter daughter of two parents who had phenomenal impact on me So family to me is hugely important. What is a typical day? Look like for you now now. It's well now when I'm not on book tour normally. Okay it's so much better comparatively like I can get up at seven you know as opposed to five thirty or six. I can work out and take my time doing it. Not being rushed I can put on my yoga pants I and my fleece and very leisurely eat my breakfast. which is usually like fruit and yogurt or something like that with a lot of coffee and then it depends on what my days as about? When I was writing the book? Sit Down and focus on that. I spend time at the School of International Service at American University. where I meant to our students I do some speaking. I do some travel. I'm on the board of Netflix. And I do some other private sector so depends on what the the the deal of the day is but for the most part the great thing is I'm in charge of my own schedule and I'll have to get dressed up except when I'm on book tour you said You can travel. I'm sure you have traveled so much watch but a lot of it has been in your professional life. Where's the last place? You traveled here for fun abroad or anywhere anywhere. The last foreign trip we took took was to Peru with the family in August which was really fun. 'cause it's been a while given that the kids have jobs in camp in whatever that we've actually been able to do to a cool foreign trip together. Is there a place you haven't gone. That's been on your bucket list. Oh Gosh lots. Let me do a short summer. Yeah I would think you've been everywhere. I've been a lot of places Che's but not everywhere and there's a lot of places I still WANNA go Thailand Morocco Sosa Czech Republic. Ah Norway I've been Ireland into the big places have been you know. China had been Russia into Japan. Indonesia I've been to many parts arts of Africa most of western Europe a good bit of South America but I still want to go to Chile. I WANNA go back to Argentina. Yeah I WANNA go back to Brazil. We should do do a little girls chalet you should. It's amazing you talk about family being really important to you. And that's obviously a huge inspiration from the book. The the title of the book is a nod to your parents parenting style. Tell us about your parents. Well I had to really wonderful parents both past unfortunately but my dad. I was born in segregated South Carolina around nineteen twenty. His grandfather. My grandfather had been a slave. He fought in the Union army in South Carolina during the civil war and then after the civil war my great grandfather rather miraculously got a primary education occasion became a teacher and then got his divinity degree Went to college and after college he An after his early professional career. He established a school in New Jersey. called the board in town school and from the late eighteen eighty s until nineteen fifty-five that school educated generations of African Americans both in vocational and technical skills and in college preparatory skills and Albert Einstein and Stein and Mary McLeod but Thune. Eleanor Roosevelt. All came to the school which was really quite extraordinary in that. Legacy of service of education was what my father was raised with but born in this oppression of segregation and Jim Crow. He really was struggling to figure out how he could fulfil his potential during World War. Two he served with the Tuskegee airman and in the segregated Army Air Force and he had the horrible experience of not being able elite in restaurants off of base but seeing German. POW is being served and so he knew that he wanted to become somebody. He was brilliant and after after college he decided in after the war lead the south. Go out to California. He got his PhD in economics at the University of California Berkeley and then he spent his professional fashion career. Working his way up he worked in the Treasury Department. He worked at the World Bank in a senior position. Ultimately he was a governor of the Federal Reserve. And I'll come back to him but I learned from my father just extraordinary perseverance and basically believing in yourself even when society and everybody around around you is telling you that you're not worthy or you can't. My mom came from a totally different background. She was the daughter of immigrants from Jamaica. That came came to Portland Maine of all places in nineteen twelve and my grandparents on her side. Had No education was agenda when was a maid and yet like so many immigrants immigrants. They came with the American dream in saved and worked very hard and sent all five of their kids to college. Two of my uncles became doctors. One a university president won an optometrist optometrist and then along came my mother the baby and she was Valedictorian of her high school class. She was debate champion. She she went on to Radcliffe College now. Part of Harvard and was president of the entire student body graduated magna cum laude and because she almost didn't get go to college because she was denied a scholarship because she was black but eventually because her principal enter debate coach went to bat on her behalf. She azazel receive another source of money. She made the fight to enable college to be affordable to low income Americans. Her life's passion and she. He was known as the mother of the Pell Grant Program because she was instrumental in establishing and sustaining this extraordinary program. That's allowed eighty million Americans to go to college. My mom was it was a bad ass in nineteen fifty when she graduated from high school as an African American woman. In a very white state of Maine She he went on through her career to be a pioneer. And so these two parents who were wonderful but had a horrible marriage which can come back to really taught me to fight and to be strong and to not be dismissed her diminished or discounted by others how his career talked about in your household growing up. I mean I. I had a working mom and a professional mother from the earliest days of my life and so on the one hand. It was an example in an expectation that you can work and have family at the same time. It was rare. Frankly at that time this has been the late sixties early seventies for the mothers of my classmates for for example to be working outside of the home in a professional capacity. So I had her example and I had my father's example of rising up in government and in private it's sector we were expected to excel. We were expected to work hard and do our best. We are also taught that you know we could be whatever we wanted to be. They weren't saying you gotta be this or you got to be that but the fundamental message was whatever you choose to be do your best at it and make it something. That's about somebody other than just yourself when I hear you talk about your parents and them as role models to you and your family I think about it two ways on one hand. I'm like that is incredible. crediple an amazing and they obviously created such a strong legacy in you. Second thing I think of is that's got to be a lot of pressure at times. Did you feel that growing up. Who is funny not really not in the sense of? I was scared that I wasn't going to meet their expectations and they were going to get mad at me. They had a really important saying that. Did they sort of banged into me. And my brother which was do your best and your best will be good enough and what they meant by that was you know. Don't be a slacker. Don't be fast but if you do your best and it's not you do badly that's okay. You are allowed to fail. You just not allowed not to try your best. And so they gave us a sort of confidence in safety net. They'll be behind us. We can take risks. We can do something thing that we may not be good at but just do your best. The message was you know. Don't be lame and that was kind of their version tough love. It doesn't mean that they expected us to always get as observe. Be The best person on the basketball team or whatever the the thing was but were they gave us a hard time was when we sort of cut corners fit in the Rom- of your imagination that you would have the jobs that you ended up having served in the way that you ended up serving the particular job that I had were not in the realm of imagination. Because I didn't know yeah. When I was young I was going to be interested in foreign policy and national security? I didn't know the field well enough to say. This is what I want to but I knew that I was likely to to do something and do it to the best of my abilities and that it would be an ambitious objective.

Susan Rice President Trump Brookings Institution Maine President Barack Obama United States Ambassador Advisor South Carolina Danielle Weisberg United Nations Carly Bill Clinton Radcliffe College Basseterre Rice Obama Administration New York Times Bestseller Netflix Basketball School Of International Servic
John Bolton out as national security adviser

KYW 24 Hour News

00:59 sec | 1 year ago

John Bolton out as national security adviser

"National security adviser John Bolton has left the trump administration following long simmering differences between the hawkish Bolton and president trump that recently came to a head CBS news senior national security analyst friend tells and John is a very principled guy and I think going in there he understood that there might come a point in time where he and the president just didn't agree on a policy approach I'm bill Rakoff with John Bolton's departure from the west wing president trump will now be in search of his fourth national security adviser it's highly inefficient to have this much staff turnover Catherine Dunn tempus of the Brookings institute says no president has burned through is many national security advisers so quickly Jimmy Carter had one first only turn he served George H. W. bush had won national security adviser all four years president Clinton had to any was there for eight years tempus says the staff turnover is causing chaos and disarray in the administration Bolton's resignation letter was just two

John Bolton John President Trump Bill Rakoff Donald Trump Brookings Institute Jimmy Carter George H. W. Bush Clinton Tempus CBS Analyst West Wing Catherine Dunn Eight Years Four Years
Trump says he canceled secret Camp David meeting with Taliban leaders

KYW 24 Hour News

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Trump says he canceled secret Camp David meeting with Taliban leaders

"The trump administration effort at some kind of peace agreement with the Islamist Taliban in Afghanistan now at a standstill this is the president announces there were supposed to be secret talks today at camp David but no there won't be after recent Taliban bombing attacks in Afghanistan Michael o'hanlon of the Brookings institute and not show any kind of control over their own forces and of these processes sort of meaningless anyway and so we're gonna have to hold on to some degree of control of their of their own minions and some cohesion and their own approach if the peace process is going to work so most menace is a fellow at the institute for Policy Studies at the US now going to escalate is it going to to stay the course of what it is now is it cancels negotiations will it stop the talk of withdrawing troops all of these are on certain questions that we just don't have answers to yeah Mr trump was back on Twitter tweeting about other things just before

Taliban Afghanistan President Trump Camp David Brookings Institute United States Mr Trump Twitter Michael O'hanlon Institute For Policy Studies
Trump says he called off secret meeting with Taliban

KYW 24 Hour News

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Trump says he called off secret meeting with Taliban

"The trump administration effort at some kind of peace agreement with the Islamist Taliban in Afghanistan now at a standstill this is the president announces there were supposed to be secret talks today at camp David but no there won't be after recent Taliban bombing attacks in Afghanistan Michael o'hanlon of the Brookings institute and not show any kind of control over their own forces and of these processes sort of meaningless anyway and so we're gonna have to hold them to some degree of control of their of their own minions and some cohesion and their own approach if the peace process is going to work so most menace is a fellow at the institute for Policy Studies at the U. S. now going to escalate is it going to to stay the course of what it is now is a cancel think she agents will it stop the talk of withdrawing troops all of these are on certain questions that we just don't have answers to yeah Mr trump was back on Twitter tweeting about other things just

Taliban Afghanistan President Trump Camp David Brookings Institute Mr Trump Twitter Michael O'hanlon Institute For Policy Studies
"brookings institute" Discussed on The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"brookings institute" Discussed on The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

"We've got Bernie AFC talking about not having access to banks ahead. It's funny because you would think that an densely populated community like the Bronx or like Jackson heights, that you'd be able to have a Bank on every corner, but we actually see is that in poor and lower income urban communities. There are way, fewer banks per capita. There was a study that showed incompetent, there was one thing for every twenty five thousand people back in two thousand six from Brookings. And so it shows that it's not swift as to cabriolet. Where do you Bank? Your phone. Yes. No. I know. Go and banks anymore. I'd never been sits I understand. But you go into a Bank. Well about about. The Brookings institute study from two thousand you would never go into going to pay for. I don't know she's ticket a toaster. See one of those pens chain on it. I don't know. I never go no Bank anymore. But, you know, I'm me, I don't know what other people do. But she me like a an ATM that TM's around. First off, I doubt every twenty five thousand people, I would question question. All studies now cited by all politicians, especially ones that are thirteen years old, number one, and before smartphones number one, but number two, I am sure there are less banks in bad neighborhoods than there are in good neighborhoods. I I'm sure they're less sauce world, ice cream places like I'm sure there's less everything those neighborhoods because I think there's a higher risk for banks and lower return, and so on. And so I get it. That's not the question the question is can you access a Bank not? Not if there's one across the street from where you live. I didn't have any banks in my neighborhood. I'd have to walk a while. But you could get to a Bank, I'd have to get a ride to a Bank, you had to go to the Bank to you had to go. Also people in rural communities where the banks twenty miles away like down a road dusty road. I mean. Okay. All right. Sorry, we'll continue curious about that. Study the Brookings study. It's not just access to capital, but just the ability to go somewhere and cash a check it can be very difficult. Whether you're in a very rural part of the country or even in certain urban neighborhoods. Okay. Yeah. Same point we just may. Well, if you live in rural part of society, you're gonna have you're not going to get the latest avengers movie playing at the dough plaques up the street either. Like it's kind of. The rural side of it is if that's the way you live. You wanna live your life, like an Amish person you're going to have you're not gonna have Bank next door. The question is. Do you have access to a Bank in neighborhoods that aren't great? And also, there's this lot like look I lived in bad. Neighborhoods I was poor, I worked hard and got out of those neighborhoods. That was the plan. The plan wasn't let let the mountain come to Mohammed. The plan is I'm going out of here. Go ahead and have some of those thoughts. Hey, there's no banks around. Good. Get outta here. Yes. Yeah. Or if there's a lot of gang violence think about perhaps. Resettling encina. All right, Tom, Tom, the Keita Jemma Jeff Jeff six six Jeff. What's going on? Much how you guys doing? Good. So a little bit of context before my question. Keep his his brief as possible, but I was talking to my, my parent's the other day, I was over their house, and these are two of the most pragmatic and sensible people that I've ever known my entire life. I'm thirty five years old. And my dad started trying to convince me that Donald Trump was not going to leave office..

Bank Brookings Bernie AFC Brookings institute Keita Jemma Jeff Jeff Jackson heights Donald Trump Resettling encina Mohammed Tom thirty five years thirteen years
Climate change top of voters' minds in NSW election

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:37 min | 1 year ago

Climate change top of voters' minds in NSW election

"It's called. Men and women who work and leaving Electric's of those officer. History. Leah's prime minister Scott Morrison wasn't yet prime minister when he made that infamous so-called cola, phobia speech in the nation's parliament in twenty seventeen but it certainly helps set the scene for what would become one of the most consequential battles of his political career. Fishawy Mr. spike out. The fleet stars officer. But it's that novelty break up the quitting the job in the towns and the industries and indeed in this country because of their pathological ideological opposition to call important part of Australia will face a federal election in the first half of this year and being the fifth straight win prime minister in a decade Morrison knows exactly help politically sensitive his government's energy policy could be in a country. That's just experienced a string of record breaking heat waves. It's perhaps not surprising to find climate change near to the top of otas. Concerns for Australians, extreme weather doesn't just mean Scholtz and Teixeira and more days down at the beach. Toria ablaze counting the cost of the worst bushfires in decades. I hate wave always brings with it. An increased risk of deadly bushfires. To understand the nation's emissions policy predicament. It's important to consider the economic impact too. By value. Australia is the world's largest coal exporter. Despite Scott, Morrison's cola phobia, stumped in parliament industry has recognized that a shift to other means of power will be an eventual reality. The question is how eventual a report by the Brookings institute found that it measures recommended in the Paris climate agreement in two thousand fifteen were fully implemented. Australia's economy would suffer. Of course, a full global commitment of that kind as highly unlikely, but it has helped spook enough of straightly as politicians to spark notable seat shuffling in Canberra after all conventional wisdom suggests that when the economy tumbles governments crumble, prime minister, Morrison's latest hope is that a couple of old ideas might when taken together carry the appearance of something near first. There's the old direct action. Policy. First pitch by former Prime Minister, Tony Abbott, which essentially pays businesses to cut carbon emissions. This game was initially funded by taxpayers to the tune of two point five billion Australian dollars from this fund way will purchase improvements in the environment. That will also reduce emissions. The kinds of things Morrison's predescessor tumble dismissed the plan as a recipe for fiscal recklessness on a grand scale. But now a couple of tumbles earn ideas obeying fide backup to the two. Pronged approach would see a considerable boost to the snowy mountains hydro electric game billed as a cost effective way of generating green energy. Meanwhile, a cable running from Australian mainland to the island state of Tasmania would boost the nation's overall 'electricity capacity pot of Tasmania's so-called battery of the. Program. Even if prime minister Morrison manages to get he's energy policies up and running without losing his job. He's on slippery ground. Australia's energy minister Angus Taylor seems to have made a habit of claiming that the nation's emissions are falling despite the government's own official figures showing the opposite emissions are up by the last five years down. What will actually the lightest grain house? Guests report that came out last week says that emissions at Dan by I've a one percent and they like trinity sector. We know. Up by one percent. Every night your own berry to be clear emissions, in fact up. There's plenty of evidence to suggest that climate change is an increasingly important issue to the average Australian vote home some observers have gone as far as dubbing this year's election the climate change

Prime Minister Australia Officer Leah Brookings Institute Mr. Spike Canberra Tony Abbott Tasmania Scott Scholtz Angus Taylor Trinity Paris
"brookings institute" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"brookings institute" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"It's Red Eye Radio. He is heard curly and I'm Gary McNamara. Eight six six ninety redeye coming up on the bottom. There are we will get to that audio cut that I wanna play it's actually from last week, and we just got through a bunch of different things and never got to this. And I just want to play it because it just shows where we're trying to show a media bias and highlighted whenever we can because media bias to us gets to the point of being as we've said fake news, somebody that the president has used all the time, and we'd like to point out examples of it. And as we said media bias is also what you would screwed. But also what you will not address. And this is just a perfect example of the media bias by trying to send you in a different direction when they are called upon it when they are called on it, should I say I called upon it but called on it. So we'll get to that here in just a little bit. Plus not really much to say about, you know, the red as much as I could on the the the the president and China and. And a potential trade agreement. But really nothing there in the president announced that will China will be reducing their tariffs on China only increase the tariffs as they did to forty percent because of the president's tariff. So what does that actually mean? I don't know. An and nothing is written in stone. It's sort of just a cooling off period for the next three months is what it seems to me. Right. I don't know. Whether it was we we said the president's rhetoric was extremely high last week on one side on the other side. It was being said that they were trying to really deal to soften things down, you know, with the with China is it a waiting period to see where the economy goes. We know China's heard a little bit. We the economic numbers for the United States in the fourth quarter in the first quarter are not yet. But indicators will be coming in especially indicators when you look at housing. And and car production. Not where we'd like them to be a jobless claims went up in the last on a unemployment report. So is the president waiting as reading. I think it was was it. The Wall Street was maybe from the Brookings institute quoted in the Wall Street Journal, I'm doing this for memory who said all of the economy's cooking the president might wanna use terrorist. But if it's not cooking, then he won't want to go down that path. And we said all the time is president needs a great economy by twenty twenty. And so there's got to be you've got to have at least Larry cudlow as part of his economic advisors saying, look, you cannot continue to go down this path. You've got us solve these trade things now. Well, it gets down to this without a great economy going into or at least an improving an ever approving improving economy going into twenty twenty I don't know what the president wins on. I mean, we still have in place. The you know, what the what the left and the media or attempting to do against him. That's not enough to carry him over like it did in two thousand sixteen because of the fact that coming in in two thousand sixteen it was about his business experience for many people. If you thought that if you felt that and you look at an economy that is going into twenty twenty that's not doing as well. Then that's not going to be. That's not going to be a big carryover for the people in the middle in those fly over states. It's just not going to be enough. That's the one thing he has to have a going into twenty twenty you can he can go because he likely will get funding for the wall before then. But I think he can survive. What he can't survive. I believe is a sluggish economy. This particular president when you run on that when you because as you mentioned, Gary the whole make America great again thing was about the economy, right? And if your slogan, if you're if you're central focus. Slogan named effort is not in play is not working. Those are that's an uphill battle. As just don't know how he wins that.

president China Larry cudlow Gary McNamara United States Wall Street Journal Brookings institute twenty twenty America forty percent three months
"brookings institute" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"brookings institute" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Radio. He calling and I'm Gary McNamara. Eight six six ninety redeye coming up on the bottom of the hour. We will get to that audio cut that wanna play. It's actually from last week, and we just got to a bunch of different things and never got to this. And I just want to play it because it just shows where we're trying to show a media bias and highlight whenever we can because media buys to us gets to the point of being as we've said fake news that the president has used all the time. And and we like to point out examples of it. And as we said media bias is also what you exclude. But also what you will not address. And this is just a perfect example of the media bias by trying to send you in a different direction when they are called upon it when they are called on it, should I say I called upon it but called on it. So we'll get to that here in just a little bit. Plus not really much to say about you know, the. Read as much as I could on the the the the president, and and China and a potential trade agreement really nothing there. I mean, the president announced that will China will be reducing their tariffs on China only increase the tariffs as they did to forty percent because of the president's tariff. So what does that actually mean? I don't know. An and nothing is written in stone. It's sort of just a cooling off period for the next three months is what it seems to me. Right. I don't know. Whether it was we we said the president's rhetoric was extremely high last week on one side on the other side. It was being said that they were trying to really deal to soften things down, you know, with with China. Is it a waiting period to see where the economy goes? We know China's heard a little bit. We the economic numbers for the United States the fourth quarter in the first quarter aren't out yet. But indicators will be coming in especially indicators when you look at housing. And and car production. Not where we like them to be a jobless claims went up in the last unemployment report. So is the president waiting. I think it was was it. The Wall Street was maybe from the Brookings institute quoted in the Wall Street Journal, I'm doing this. Remember who said, well, if the economy's cooking the president might wanna use terrorist. But if it's not cooking, then he won't want to go down that path. And we've said all the time this president needs a great economy by twenty twenty. And so there's got to be you've got to have at least Larry cudlow as part of his economic advisors saying, look, you cannot continue to go down this path. You've got to solve these trade things now. Well, it gets down to this without a great economy going into or at least an improving an ever approving improving economy going into twenty twenty I don't know what the president wins on. I mean, we still have in place. The you know, what the what the left and the media or attempting to do against him. That's not enough to carry him over like it did in two thousand sixteen because of the fact that coming in in two thousand sixteen it was about his business experience for many people. If you thought that if you felt that and you look at an economy that is going into twenty twenty that's not doing as well. Then that's not going to be. That's not going to be a big carryover for the people in the middle in those fly over states. It's just not going to be enough. That's the one thing he has to have a going into twenty twenty you can he can go because he likely won't get funding for the wall before then. But I think he survived that. What he can't survive. I believe is a sluggish economy. This particular president when you run on that when you because as you mentioned, Gary the whole make America great again thing was about the economy, right? And if your slogan, if you're if you're central focus. Slogan named effort is not in play is not working. Those are that's an uphill battle. I just don't know how he wins that.

president Larry cudlow China Gary McNamara United States Wall Street Journal Brookings institute twenty twenty America forty percent three months
"brookings institute" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"brookings institute" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"A L. Washington comes to talk. It's Red Eye Radio. Gary mcnamara. Eight six six ninety redeye coming up on the bottom of their we will get to that audio cut that I wanna play it's actually from last week, and we just got to a bunch of different things and never got to this. And I just want to play it because it just shows we're we're trying to show a media bias and highlight it whenever we can because media bias to us gets to the point of being as we've said fake news, something that the president has used all the time, and we like to point out examples of it. And as we've said media bias is also what you exclude. But also what you will not address. And this is just a perfect example of the media bias by trying to send you in a different direction when they are called upon it when they are called on it, should I say I called upon it but called on it. So we'll get to that here in just a little bit. Plus, not really much to say about the, you know, the red as much as I could on the the the the president and China and. And a potential trade agreement, but really nothing there. I mean, the president announced that we'll China will be reducing their tariffs on China only increase the tariffs as they did to forty percent because of the president's tariffs. So what does that actually mean? I don't know. An and nothing is written in stone. It's sort of just a cooling off period for the next three months is what it seems to me. Right. I don't know. Whether it was we we said the president's rhetoric was extremely high last week on one side on the other side. It was being said that they were trying to really deal to soften things down, you know, with with China. Is it a waiting period to see where the economy goes? We know China's heard a little bit. We the economic numbers for the United States in the fourth quarter in the first quarter aren't out yet. But indicators will be coming in especially indicators when you look at housing. And and car production. Not where we'd like them to be a jobless claims went up in the last on a unemployment report. So is the president waiting. I think it was was it. The Wall Street now somebody maybe from the Brookings institute quoted in the Wall Street Journal, I'm doing this from memory who said, well, if the economy's cooking the president might wanna use terrorist. But if it's not cooking, then he won't want to go down that path. And we've said all the time this president needs a great Konami by twenty twenty s so there's got to be you've got to have at least Larry cudlow as part of his economic advisors saying, look, you cannot continue to go down this path. You've got to solve these trade things now. Well, I it gets down to this without a great economy going into or at least an improving an ever approving improving economy going into twenty twenty I don't know what the president wins on. I mean, we still have in place. The you know, what the what the left and the media are attempting to do against him. That's not enough to carry him over like it did in two thousand sixteen because of the fact that coming in in two thousand sixteen it was about his business experience for many people. If you thought that if you felt that and you look at an economy that is going into twenty twenty that's not doing as well. Then that's not going to be. That's not going to be a big carryover for the people in the middle in those fly over states. It's just not going to be enough. That's the one thing he has to have in going into twenty twenty you can he can go because he likely will get funding for the wall before then. But I think he can survive that. What he can't survive. I believe is a sluggish economy. This particular president when you run on that when you because as you mentioned, Gary the whole make America great again thing was about the economy, right? And if your slogan, if you're if you're central focus. Slogan named effort is not in play is not working. Those are that's an uphill battle. I just don't know how he wins that.

president China Larry cudlow Gary mcnamara United States Wall Street Journal L. Washington Brookings institute Konami America twenty twenty forty percent three months
"brookings institute" Discussed on African Tech Roundup

African Tech Roundup

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"brookings institute" Discussed on African Tech Roundup

"What thirty something is. Welcome back because he has got reelected, right? Okay. As they call it. You wake up in the morning and tell your child keep going to school, I'll keep working in the foam paying for your school fees 'cause you can be anything you want to be you can even be the president of Cameroon. No expectation is already capped that affects financial response because used that learning to be really careful if you don't have what Marvin calls, my reckless enthusiasm for what is possible, you can only go for what you think you can do this affects how banks measure risk and how entrepreneurs develop their business ideas. They will take what's been done somewhere else. And do just a little bit of it. Maybe just a little bit more because there is no example of wild crazy blew up out of no acceptable. Some of the Unicom's. We're gonna talk about later, but I truly believe in your wife is right about financial literacy, it's not just that. There is an emotional impact to designing. Finance that can grow and emotional desire to do. Well. And I think we do that and many people think how can you Kwait finance an emotion? Sounds well. It's no. But it's real it is I'm planning to put some information together for the World Economic Forum on this. And I am luckily, I'm country into the Brookings institute on what this is like there is an emotional capacity associated with how finance arrives how it's used and the result because when you are poor your brain only works on subsistence, take a look at what happens when people win the lottery, poor, okay? How many millions? I give you. You will wreck that thing and come down.

Brookings institute Cameroon Unicom Marvin president
"brookings institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

16:45 min | 2 years ago

"brookings institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"One of the great innovations of the American constitution is it system of checks and balances each branch of government can apply a break on the others in particular, congress and the courts are supposed to check the power of the president. But the presidency is gathered more and more power over the last seventy years, and we now have a president who attacks congress, and the judiciary when it suits him and mounts almost daily assaults on other institutions that can hold them to account the media in the career professionals in federal agencies like the FBI and the Justice department later this hour, we'll hear about the erosion of the informal unwritten rules that can lubricate the machinery of government. They're often called norms. And we'll look to the lessons of Watergate, we're checking balances worked, but we begin with the formal set of checks and balances written into the constitution. EJ Dan is a well-known commentator and columnist for the Washington Post. He's also a senior fellow in governance. At the Brookings institute. A government professor at Georgetown and a visiting professor at Harvard. His most recent book is one nation under Trump, which he wrote with Thomas Mann and norm Ornstein, he joins us from Cambridge EJ. We're looking at the workings of democracy in this series and central to that are checks and balances in the US government. I think you described as the genius of the constitutional system. How are they supposed to be working? Well, when the founders put together the constitution, they did not assume the existence of political parties that's audit away because the constitution itself created what you might call the first party system, federalists and anti federalists. But they did not assume that the branches would be affected by party loyalty, I think what you're seeing in this period. Since Trump's election is a Republican party that has largely decided not to play its traditional role in congress that congress rather. Than being a check on the president is choosing to support him in the courts, particularly the lower courts. We're going to see if the supreme court proves to be checked. There were reasons to doubt that the biggest check we do have is not so much in the constitution. Although it's part of the constitution. It's in the larger acceptance of small the democratic values in the country show, the checks are outside the government both in political mobilization, which is happening in a big way in the country and also in a free media, which is doing a lot of the investigating the congress isn't doing. I think one of the things we forget when we sort of go back to the Watergate period is that in Watergate, you have all of the institutions working in tandem to hold the president accountable. The courts played a critical role in this congressional invest. Gatien's played a critical role in this. Remember that the congress was controlled by Democrats, and obviously the media played a critical role. Now, you are missing important pieces in that system of checks and balances, and I think we so far see the outcome. Let's look at how we got here. EJ when people look at the supreme court today, for example, they tend to look at President Trump's judicial appointments which have moved the court to the right? And yet this is really nothing new this process started all the way back in the Reagan administration when Reagan's attorney general Edwin Meese, very famously said the idea was to institutionalize the Reagan revolution. So it can't be set aside. No matter what happens in future presidential elections. The plan was simply to cement a conservative majority in the court. So it didn't matter what voters did. And there's been surprisingly little pushback on that over the years. Are we really seeing anything that's in any way new? Yes. It in some ways it goes back even before. And it means and Reagan to the nineteen sixties the real attack on the court began in the early sixty s with those impeach Earl Warren billboards that you had around the country supported by the John Birch society and others. You can argue it goes back to Brown v board and then a series of progressive decisions the court made around one man one vote at the end of prescribed prayer in public schools and a whole series of democratising Europe. Progressive decisions the court mates of the conservatives set out to take back control of the court, and this has been cyclical in our history that the court that Franklin D Roosevelt confronted in the nineteen thirties was a very conservative court the product largely of appointments by Warren, Harding and Herbert Hoover. Which is why we had the court packing fight in the nineteen thirties. Conservatives have been. Been determined in a very disciplined way to take over the court. And I think that the sort of most extreme expression of that. Which a lot of people have talked about is the decision not even to take up the nomination, America garland by President Obama, which held the seat open for more than a year because Mitch McConnell and others on the right felt that if we can only win the next election, we can grab this majority. And I think we're going to see over the coming years a crisis. That is not unlike the one that led to the court packing fight in the nineteen thirties. Just remind people Franklin Roosevelt try to expand the court from nine members to fifteen and failed despite large democratic majorities in congress, which suggested that at least in that case congress did work as a check against the president. Oh, no, that's that's very important in what you had in that period were a couple of things happening simultaneously one. It was. The nineteen thirties Americans were looking across the ocean in Europe they saw Hitler. They saw Mussolini. And so there was a healthy mistrust of presidential power. But you also saw in that period. The beginning of the conservative democrat Republican alliance in the congress where even though Democrats had nominal control. They didn't always have -ffective control. Those two forces came together to kill court packing on the other hand. What's fascinating is the court itself realized that if it made a series of decisions that seems so political knockout virtually all of the new deal its own long-term legitimacy would be at stake. So some justices started swinging the other way one Justice in particular swung in an important case in in our history. It became known as a switch in time saves nine meaning that the. Court kind of giving in a bit to the new deal prevented a big crisis. And then Roosevelt got some more appointments to the court and the controversy dissipated. I'd like to get back to the courts in advance. But you've just raised the question of congress. How did congress get to the point where it seems to be? We are right now that it is unwilling to provide an effective check on President Trump for the most part Republicans in congress have decided that a there is much to be gained from their point of view from a Trump presidency beginning, obviously with court appointments moving onto the tax the the big tax cut, and then also all of the deregulatory measures that Trump is undertaking that Republicans in congress have long supported so for policy reasons, they are reluctant to undermine or go after or hold accountable. President Trump on the other side there is the makeup of the Republican party that over. The last thirty or forty years. The Republican party has become a much more monolithically conservative party and since the rights of President Trump. They've also become a much more monolithically Trumpian party if you look at his ongoing approval rating among Republicans, this not only reflects his broad popularity among Republicans, but the people choosing to stay in the party or more pro-trump, and some of the people who might oppose him have are leaving the party. What this means is a lot of members of congress, look not to a general election where they might lose. But to a primary where they might lose to a pro-trump candidate. If they stand up to him, Mark, Sanford, the congressman from South Carolina, very very conservative lost a primary because he was seen as anti-trump a lot of Republicans have taken a lesson from that. And I think for example, another. South Carolinian newest very close to a Mark Sanford, Lindsey Graham who began as a sharp critic of Donald Trump has moved into being one of his strongest supporters, the a lot of people in South Carolina. Now, they've said Lindsey Graham understood where the balance of power lay in the party needs decided that he wanted to survive and survival right now in the Republican party means supporting President Trump, but the increasingly strong executive is nothing new. It's been going on since FDR hasn't it? We have the two parties becoming more ideologically coherent beginning in the nineteen sixties with the flight of many, southern conservative white Democrats to the Republican party, and the ideological purification. If you will I don't like that word. But that's that is what it is. Each party really was nearly completed in the nineteen ninety four midterm elections where many? Many moderate to conservative Democrats in the south were defeated and many of the more moderate, and in some cases, liberal Republicans in the north began to lose their seats afterward just to pick one example, Connie Morella was very progressive Republican from the suburbs of Washington DC, very well loved in her district, but the the democratic voters who had elected her to that point said, we don't want to support this Republican majority anymore, and she was defeated by Chris van, Holland the point being that each party is more ideologically coherent. There are a lot of ironies here. Back in the nineteen. Fifties political scientists said gee, R parties, really don't work. Well, because they are not ideologically coherent, and we need more ideologically coherent parties. Well, now, we have them and we're not fully happy with that outcome either. But that coherence is part of what drives the car polarization. I think there's. One other factor, which is that virtually every election is contested in every election. Each party. That's out has a chance of regaining of the majority. We went through a very long period from nineteen fifty four until nineteen Ninety-four. We are the Republicans really never had a good shot at taking over the house of representatives now with every election being competitive the entire period of congress becomes part of the campaign coming forward. That's not the fault of either party. It's that each party behaves in a way that it sees as functional for the next election, but that operates against bipartisanship, obviously what I'm trying to untangle. Here's whether we're in the moment that we're in because of the movement of the Republican party to the right, or whether there's something in our lack of checks and balances right now that we need to address that is a problem in either case. But the solutions are going to be very different. What I do, yo. And this may reflect my point of view, although I would argue it also reflects the data I wrote a book called why the right went wrong because I felt that the Republican party really had moved much farther to the right than the Democrats have moved left, and that this was creating a problem in the political system, and we could talk at great length about a symmetric polarization. I just think that's a reality in the system, which means that I would like to see a revival of more moderate brands of republicanism. And I see some small hope for that. By the way, in the movement of anti-trump conservatives it's going to be very interesting to see where today's anti-trump conservatives end up five or ten years from now, I see them in a funny way as comparable to the Neo conservatives in the nineteen sixties were disillusioned liberals who move right? I think you're seeing with the anti-trump conservative disillusioned conservatives or moving to the center, and in some cases over to the center left, the other part of it to the extent that it is a larger problem. I'm not sure it's in our governing institutions as such it may be in part in the media in a media system, where there is less of a common narrative that people broadly share, and then argue within it now, there are not only sort of narratives, but facts themselves that are contested across political lines. And there is some evidence that search algorithms push us into our own a little camps now that can be exaggerated. But I do think that the nature of our conversation now is different. And I don't want to romanticize the past. You can argue that online media. Have opened up the political system to all kinds of points of view, and that in the old system there might have been too much elite control. I can see that argument. But I think the lack of any kind of common agreement on a set of facts makes political argument much more difficult because if at least you agree on facts, you can argue about what to do about them if you don't agree on facts anymore. Then there's almost no way to carry on a coherent argument. And I worry that that's the direction we're going in EJ tips to me, your describing a system, we're certainly the Republican party and increasingly both parties are interested more in partisan advantage, and ideological purity as you describe it how do we get back to a system where there are at least in crises more interested in the national interest. You know, there's one interesting case, and it's a very controversial one where partisanship did disappear for a moment of crisis. And that was the Bank bailout back in two thousand eight and the irony there. Where is the Bank bailout was called for by President Bush or Republican the bulk of the votes for the bailout came from Democrats in congress they didn't much like it either. But there was a feeling that in the middle of this crisis. When the entire economy could collapse, if this didn't happen, no matter what injustices might be involved in the Bank, bailout the damage to everyone would have been worse. So we at least have some occasions when we come together, we also came together in a remarkable way. Obviously after nine eleven went President Bush's approval rating rose to the eighties or nineties some argued that that strong consensus actually became a problem because we inadequately debated the Iraq war afterward. I would note that in both of those cases, it was largely Democrats who went over to the other side and said all right, we're going to support Bush, even though we didn't like this and after nine eleven there was a decision. Made that we wanted to unite behind our president who many Democrats disagreed with. I'd like to think there would be circumstances. Like that when Republicans would do that for a democratic president. I just haven't seen that in recent years. I'd like to believe that it's true. The one clear example on the other side is when Syria cross President Obama's red line, the beginning of a second term in using chemical weapons. It is true that John Boehner the speaker and Eric cantor. The number two Republican supported President Obama. But there was so much opposition in the Republican party. And as well as the Democratic Party that there was no agreement reached. So we have at least seen some occasions when a national threat brought people together. I hope we will see a clear example of that on the Republican side someday and this period those and very hard to find..

Republican party congress president President Trump President Bush Franklin D Roosevelt President Obama Trump Democratic Party Brookings institute EJ Dan US Washington Post senior fellow Harvard Cambridge EJ professor
American Pastor Charged in Turkey Put Under House Arrest

John Hancock

09:23 min | 2 years ago

American Pastor Charged in Turkey Put Under House Arrest

"Associated Press ground game. Hosted by AP's Megan, crane a weekly conversation about the top political. Issues ahead of the upcoming midterm elections available on apple podcasts and podcast one dot com Radio, dot com station Yesterday we, were talking about Democrats they had kind of had a confab in Columbus Ohio, about what path to take. For reelection whether or not you're going to Run hardcore liberal or whether or not. You're going to be a little bit more interest in the battle within, the party and we talked about how that battle went on among with the Republicans and it was actually wasn't until this last, election cycle twenty sixteen that the Republicans finally, decided that they were going to Get the hell out of the middle and go For something completely unconventional Every time I hear myself, talk about the primaries I think of what was his name Daniel Called me early in the primary season instead Mark my words, Donald Trump is going to be the. Nominee And it was. This, the most ludicrous, statement at the time that he said it And so Mr. all-knowing talk show host Said you're, out of your, mind and he said Mark my words. And I told TJ save that tape not that I think. You'll ever need it, in the day after. The the day he won the nomination We got on the. Air and said hey Daniel where where are you buddy and. He called in and, we played the tape He was right we were wrong And and do this very second there's absolutely no reason why. It should have. Happened that way But, it, did, and then so the the. The battle between within the inside. Of the party said no we're we're tired of moderate. Republicans we're tired of the Bush family we're tired of this A passive Approach we want somebody that will go in there and And. We kind of. Talked about it in a, roundabout ways we, never mentioned, Donald Trump is being guy but we said you know you need somebody that will go in there and not care about what anybody says about him and shake things up and make decisions, and stand by them and. Not worry about re election four years from then And somebody that has the guts to just hack off the entire country but to do the things that need to be done and so you take a look at what's going on, right now with tariffs And meeting with world leaders that we don't normally associate with and deregulation tax breaks to the detriment of the, national debt and you know all of that kind of. Stuff and all of a sudden we got a guy in there right now You can't say, he doesn't care what people think because he's He does He's narcissistic But he doesn't care to the point that He does care about what people think but not to, the point that he's also a pit bull He's just gonna stand there with a steady stance and And stare you down so there's. A really, interesting article on FOX today from Melissa's peak that said. Why Chuck Schumer's about to have a very bad week It's the economy stupid And I can't speak for, everyone but Chuck Schumer having a. Bad week just makes my, day Nancy Pelosi having a bad week I'm all for that So Liz peak writes Chuck Schumer is about to. Have a bad week he's having a bad week and it's about to get, worse because on Friday we're expected to learn from the Federal Bureau of economic analysis that the United States economy has grown at a blistering pace in the second. Quarter of this year further affirming. The success of President Trump's tax. Cuts in deregulatory efforts economists expect the bureau of economic analysis report on Friday that will show that the nation's gross domestic product, grew between three point three percent and four point six percent in the second quarter showing, not only strong economy but. One, that is accelerating now if you'll recall at, one point or another and I don't remember what the actual quote. From the president was but the president said that with his tax cuts, and deregulation deregulatory measures the GDP would start to, grow at, getting out. Say three four percent he may be. Even higher than that And everybody and everybody pointed to history and pointed, to recent, history as. To being how absurd that comment was And so. Here it is percolating along three point three percent to four point six percent of the second quarter You don't have to like him to appreciate that number You don't even have to respect. Them appreciate that number but you've got to appreciate his Financial mind Whether you like his style or not Schumer this peak rights hopes each day to distract from the booming economy by champing bewildering array of issues which has been the whole deal, since Trump took office was you know death by a thousand paper cuts and so far there's been a whole lot of bleeding Despite withering criticism for Trump's press conference in Helsinki establishment outrage over his, trash talking of NATO alarm among even his supporters about the looming trade war lingering angst Which I thought was supposed to be singular to an eighty s a young person Kurt. Cobain deal in that Didn't he own angst angst it all this far Lingering angst over families? Separated at the border And cereal other offenses President Trump's the President, Trump's approval. Approval rating over the past week crept higher this has gotta just make Schumer, and Pelosi's head explode New Wall Street, Journal NBC poll shows forty five percent of respondents giving, a thumbs. Up to the president a record since he took office Second amount of, scraped support from his own party only to George W Bush, right after the nine eleven attack Schumer, desperately wants, Democrats to, take back the house, and the, Senate by, winning majorities in each chamber in the November sixth midterms and he they live story rights our lives peak rights He must, wonder what, will it take to, bring this, president down Decem extent even. Those of us, who at least support the better parts of him Kind of wondered the same thing So, William, Galveston Brookings institute governance studies program senior Writes in the Wall Street Journal today why Republicans can't get enough Trump. And we'll share that with, because it's, pretty cool Mike Doyle in, the WBZ news Saturday President Trump meeting today. With top European Union officials who tried to. Talk about of his trade war worried it will hurt both academies Trump claims the US isn't getting a fair deal yesterday the. Administration announced it would borrow twelve billion, dollars to pay, US farmers for the losses they've suffered in the trade dispute today Chevrolet makers including South Carolina Senator, Tim Scott said farmers not too excited about a government bailout program in the effort to do anything else. Other than permanent Marcus Welby efforts that will be viewed by farmers and businesses trying to do around. The globe as insufficient the European, leaders warned they're ready to put tariffs on twenty billion dollars of American exports at Trump what's the duties on. Car imports five, Carolina, pastor in, prison for nearly two years in Turkey. On terror and espionage charges is getting better accommodations Turkish news reports. Say Andrew Brinson will we put under house arrest answers trial continues case against the A fifty year old evangelical pastor from black mountain has strained ties between NATO allies, Turkey in the US Brunson strongly denies the charges against him Georgia state Representative Jason Spencer says he will. Resign after exposing himself on Sasha baron Cohen's cable TV show Spencer dropped his pants and then his. Underwear while shouting USA and America, after being told by a disguised calling that such behaviour incites fear and homophobic jihadists Spencer also repeatedly shouted the. N..

President Trump Chuck Schumer Donald Trump United States Daniel Mark George W Bush Nato Associated Press Nancy Pelosi Jason Spencer Megan Apple Federal Bureau Of Economic Sasha Baron Cohen Columbus Ohio Turkey Carolina TJ
"brookings institute" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"brookings institute" Discussed on Here & Now

"Brookings institute cites studies showing nearly forty percent forty percent of american kids experience a child services investigation by the age of eighteen and studies show that those in foster care sadly suffer compared to their peers you know in getting into college in getting in trouble with the law these also i would imagine are reasons to try to keep if you can to try to keep kids with their families birth right the goal is always to try to keep children safely at home and to reunify them in a timely and safe way with their family with their birth family if they do come into foster care the idea is to really help the family he'll and get back on their feet and so th these services and the funding here really provides a lot of help for those necessary services now mental health and substance use our longtime factors that create struggles for family and lead to children coming into foster care so even though we have the opioid epidemic state child welfare agencies are definitely they've been struggling with these issues for for a long time they're more severe right now because of the opioid crisis we'll so we'll keep an eye on the promise of the bill which is more money's going to preventive service to try to keep children with their families but meantime you know a couple of hundred thousand over a couple hundred thousand children every year go into foster care and liam stand there aren't enough families there's a national campaign champs children eat amazing parents the any casey foundation published a paper in two thousand sixteen with the whole plan for recruiting foster families what what's going on there right so i'm involved in the champs campaign and that is an effort to support state policy improvements to get more supports to foster parents there are actually surveys national surveys that show there are millions and millions of adults who are very interested in being foster parents although many parents who begin fostering quick.

Brookings institute casey foundation liam forty percent
Washington, Xi Jinping and President discussed on Bloomberg Best

Bloomberg Best

01:37 min | 2 years ago

Washington, Xi Jinping and President discussed on Bloomberg Best

"Journalists and analysts in more than one hundred twenty countries around the world i'm jim grasso on this edition of bloomberg best for monday may seventh brookings institute senior fellow john hudek discusses republican chances in the midterm elections a strong economy is typically good for the party in this case for the republican party plus former rbi governor rotherham russian weighs in on interest rates you've seen many years without nation that doesn't mean that there isn't a magic moment when all the labor markets across the world that are in competition dyke all this and more coming up in the next hour of bloomberg best and i'm doug krizner at bloomberg world headquarters in new york let's check this hour's top business stories and the markets we've got big news in the chip business qualcomm is said to be planning to give up its push to develop chips for data centers servers we are being told qualcomm may shut its fledgling data center processor unit in an attempt to cut costs the company is also considering the possible sale of the unit shares in twenty first century fox were up by more than four percent in late us trading reuters is reporting that comcast is planning to make a bid for the most of the assets of twenty first century fox this would counter a previously accepted offer from disney valued at fifty two billion dollars the top economic advisor to china's president xi jinping plans to visit washington next week for a follow up on trade talks her recently promoted to vice premier is chinese president xi jinping's top economic advisor last friday us officials left bay two days after those trade discussions with only an agreement to keep talking president trump has threatened to impose tariffs on as much as one hundred fifty billion dollars in chinese goods now these duties can be imposed after a public comment to period at ends may twenty second and starbucks just came into some serious cash thanks to nestle the swiss food giant is buying the right to sell starbucks coffee products at a price of seven point one five billion dollars now starbucks shareholders are expecting to.

Washington Xi Jinping President Trump New York Bloomberg World John Hudek Senior Fellow Brookings Institute Starbucks Donald Trump Jim Grasso China Advisor Disney Comcast Reuters Qualcomm Doug Krizner
Exclusive: EPA gives giant refiner a 'hardship' waiver from regulation

Mornings On the Mall with Brian Wilson

02:20 min | 2 years ago

Exclusive: EPA gives giant refiner a 'hardship' waiver from regulation

"The environmental protection agency has made a big change actually to an obama era rule that would have regulated how many miles per gallon your suv should get in twenty twenty five quite explicitly they've changed it to that no longer will require a fifty mile per gallon average fuel economy by twenty twentyfive so essentially all like cars and light trucks would have to have been fifty miles a gallon by that time that's according to the obama administration roles scott pruitt got rid of those he announced them yesterday and in a series of tweets he said the following the previous administration's determination was wrong obama's epa cut the midterm evaluation process short with politically charged expediency made assumptions about the standards that didn't comport with reality and set the standards too high cooperative federalism doesn't mean one st can dictate standards for the rest of the country and he's referring to california here epa will set a national standard for g h g emissions that allows auto manufacturers to make cars people want and can afford while still expanding environmental and safety benefits of newer cars this seems like a good move this idea of basically not mandating that every light truck for instance get to fifty miles a gallon by twenty twenty five and instead letting the market dictate that people want high powered vehicles but they also want high fuel efficiency to the sense that they can buy it the market will continue to push companies towards higher fuel efficiency because they act because customers actually want that compelling this at the governmental level at the agency level i don't think so not foreign scott pru is not for it and he'd he's just got rid of it well there's also a safety issue involved in this these are called cafe standards corporate average fuel economy there known as cafe standards and several studies have been done a study was done in two thousand by the is the president of science serving society in michigan anyway they've found that adding a passenger to one of two identical cars involved in a two car frontal crash will reduce the driver fatality risk by seven point five percent they say because cars now way less there was a study done by the brookings institute they found the.

Barack Obama Scott Pru President Trump Scott Pruitt EPA California Michigan Brookings Institute Five Percent
"brookings institute" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"brookings institute" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"What's your income right now about forty to fifty but i hoping to get a new job here soon that'll be sixty to seventy what do you do right now i'm a machinist i'll be working at a limestone plant how old are you okay cool cool good for you and how much is the truck how much is owed on the truck i think i still have seventeen thousand pounds yeah i'd sell the truck okay sure it's about half your income at this stage of the game all right you've got a baby on the way and you know so you need to get that that together i'm curious why are you guys not married we've only been together for about a little over a year and it's it's in my in my plan but i i just haven't approached it yet right the reason i ask is is a financial reason there's a a study i was reading the other day that says that people who are married before they have children which they're still time to do that and have graduated from high school before they get married and have children the percentage of them succeeding financially over the scope of their life goes way up right and it's it's just a really interesting study let's see i'm brookings institute did some of.

brookings institute seventeen thousand pounds
"brookings institute" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"brookings institute" Discussed on 710 WOR

"The scope of their life goes way up right and it's it's just a really interesting study let's see i'm brookings institute did some of it and i it said the do three things to avoid living in poverty graduate from high school mary before having a child and have that child after age twenty that's the three things only eight percent of the people who do so end up poor seventy nine percent of the people who fail to do all three will end up poor according to the study so they call that the big three in sociology when they're studying it and let me read it to you again 'cause i just thought it was interesting and it's something to consider you know like when i was your age as an example i read a study one time like this this is why i'm bringing up that a guy said if you if you are engaged for six months before married and you do detailed indepth premarriage counseling that your marriage the chances of your marriage succeeding a triple very few marriages fail that have a six month engagement and have detailed into free marriage counseling very few of them fail and so that's an example i'm when i read that you know what i said i said wolf i want my marriage to work i'm going to have six months engagement and i'm a detailed into premarriage counseling so and then i'd push that on all my kids as they got married so it's just it's very interesting to learn these things i mean seventy nine percent of the people who don't do this these three end up in poverty that's like everybody you know yep okay man thanks for calling thank you open phones at triple eight eight to five five two two five you jump in we'll talk about your life and your money it's just interesting to me because the the the did you know that more people live together now that aren't married than our that's an interesting statistic especially when you consider this this study you know.

brookings institute seventy nine percent six months eight percent six month
"brookings institute" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"brookings institute" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"Story service it is pretty good person or host at that same that's a month a two separate auriol's condemning the saudi bombing of yemen's or moral posturing uh a neither the niche in the us bombing which of course uh according to even you know the the the i would say pretty probe work uh brookings institute and the ad council of foreign relations above the both of whom acknowledged that without your support there would be no warning that it's not just a sort of incidental support that the us is actually a the fundamental part of a work self without it there would be no war so uh yeta did the media started any sort of begi eight because it has escalated under trump but us involvement is being inconsistently whitewashed in saudi arabia's for you guys you know this kind of rogue arab country does not doing so at the behest of the us right this gets to the issue of partisan utility that we were speaking about before your colleague at fair ben norton has a piece coming out soon about media coverage of yemen over the past year and he points out that on msnbc there was an uptick had coverage at the beginning of the year when trump came into office in ordered that raid on a yemeni village that killed many yemeni civilians but also led to the death of a us navy seal and it was that death that got a lot of attention because it can be used by democrats to go after president trump and that's when ben norton says that yemen got some coverage but after that in the months afterwards pretty much nothing yeah because it doesn't episode is a war that avaaz started in a bomb supported trump as a kinda like all these things right he he escalator but he he he was he was fundamental just carrying out of almost him before did you think that inside these new rooms they discuss yemen and they and they ask themselves if if it's worth covering i mean how do you think that the process works where it just decided that is not worth covering unless there's something major than as partisan use like the killing of a navy seal its factoredin debt debt debt bronchial are factored it they don't care uh the only time.

yemen us brookings institute saudi arabia ben norton trump media coverage
"brookings institute" Discussed on Super Station 101

Super Station 101

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"brookings institute" Discussed on Super Station 101

"Crazy because if you really look at the people that benefit like we said 95 percent of all people that pay income taxes or will get a benefit and a lot of the ones even the ones that live in those high income states that end up getting a little bit of a raised will probably see some benefit just depending on how we're gonna file taxes and also their stuff so i guess it has to do with how you define middle class because if you to find it as somebody making you know two hundred fifty three hundred five hundred thousand than yes some of those people will probably have some slight tax increase for the state and local uh issue that's going on but very and there's always exceptions there's no way you can have a thousand pages and have some people that fall through the cracks certainly some people will be left for whatever reason that always happens but the overwhelming majority and we're talking about nineteen out of twenty americans we'll see a benefit and that we can see directly and that that came a came from the broking i think one of those came from the brookings institute which is centerleft that's the kind of a house at heritage used to work with brookings on some bipartisan stuff but they're they're all sort of a you know they're democrats this more on the centreleft centreleft and so i just i don't understand why they say i think sometimes in politics people just repeat stuff mates colic in our own party like you taught you we've talked a lot about corporatist just repeating stuff that says all immigration is always perfect all the time there's never any cost and they just repeat it repeat it repeat it and it didn't matter whether you could show i'm like there's some there's some benefits to some of this option cost it didn't matter because the mantra was set and everyone's going to toe the party line and i guess is the same in the democrat party like it if taxes cuts are always bad then it doesn't matter regard of what the.

brookings institute centreleft centreleft democrat party 95 percent
"brookings institute" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"brookings institute" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"The day chile but bright on monday high of thirty nine i'm wbz tv meteorologist danielle niles wbz newsradio 1030 rono's forty one degrees and mostly and bush the middle of him 34 president trump bruised turning up the rhetoric on tax reform after the house passed the republican reform bill and a tweet early this morning he called the democrats obstructionists and said they could exert greater sway over the shape of the bill if they weren't focusing on defeating it wbz's were newscorp who says the massachusetts congressional delegation voted against the plan including congressman stephen lynn congressman lynch says he voted 'no on the plan because it heavily favored the rich corporations right out what lot better than all business all as or average taxpayers the brookings institute determined that you know the bottom 95 percent of uh wageearners and an income filers received about a point five percent income tax cut uh wild the top five percent received on average about nine and a half to ten percent reduction in taxes the plan also eliminates student loan deduction switch lynch believes is a disincentive for people to get a college degree bernie scorpio wbz newsradio 1030 bernice will check wall street aries is a good week this aim high goals that were just make sure the realistic inventories if you've been having a rough couple of weeks things should turn around in a few days gemena i as a good way to evaluate where you stand in preparing for the future cancer that.

chile danielle niles rono trump the house wbz massachusetts congressman stephen lynn congr brookings institute cancer bush president income tax five percent forty one degrees ten percent 95 percent
"brookings institute" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

03:22 min | 3 years ago

"brookings institute" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"Bob i was talking earlier about the brookings institute hello they had come out about the progress left left was taking it to four about impeachment or convoking the 25th them hi everyone welcome to conclude about that particular story was there absolutely correct it it you know i'm happy that someone is pointing out that all these clause for impeachment are invoking the 25th member or without any basis and either public policy your constitutional law i'm glad for that but are disappointed because from a purely political point of view the mayor the th the left screams for impeachment or invoking the 25th member trying to get the cabinet to remove the president the united states of america well that would just took slings for the 2018 midterm elections they of republicans could just coast to retain control both houses the some of the probably gain a 60seat majority or bedroom the us senate so from a purely partisan political point of view i wish bookings which shut up but look to lift continue to scream in whole or don't don't shut up nancy don't shut up maxime don't shut up john lewis relieve the others let them screen for impeachment all link won't the other point that they made which i think bears some further discussion is the idea that if they keep pushing for this very tyranny that they claim that trump is about to impose on the country would come of belt if they were to try impeach lift when there is when you think about the term high crimes misdemeanors i know but this is the one that's the most recent example it is still i think a valid example although i think politically it was stupid to do bill clinton was impeached not because he had sexual relations with monica lewinsky built us the merapi that's the media narrative missed what they're what you to believe the bill clinton was impeached for committing perjury that is literally a misdemeanor not a high crime in misdemeanor in the sense of the constitution necessarily but it is a criminal act much like what articles of impeachment would being drawn up for richard nixon folk illegal activity bill clinton was impeached for committing acts of perjury during a deposition how do we know he actually did that because his barlois moose was permanently revoked he was this board for perjury ego.

constitutional law president united states nancy maxime john lewis bill clinton monica lewinsky perjury Bob i brookings institute america senate richard nixon
"brookings institute" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"brookings institute" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"With patients but also the experts my colleagues who are represent uh i'll come to speak to you today about how the or bureau crisis is personal to the work i do as well as the consequences of failing to provide full mental health parody while not all the patients i work with have some sort of sort of opioid addiction those who do have serious underline mental health issues opioids by the very nature by their very nature are pain relievers and the people i work with our and pain there are anxious depressed and they've reported turning to opioids to deal with this pain i this does the dissolution comes at a cost um when people turn to opioids they miss out on family celebrations gatherings with friends church events and most importantly work uh this report is supported by national findings from a recent brookings institute report the found that between 1999 and two thousand fifteen roughly twenty percent of the reduction in the men's workforce participation was due to painkiller abuse one patient in particular comes to mind a patient that i started working with who when i started working with him had gone through treatment for chemical dependency already uh the permanente medical group has a specific department firm for chemical dependency i work with adults i cried trim output russian basis not to get your goes too much of the weeds on this thing but when this person came to me he was no longer on the opioids per se he was using them periodically but he had started.

brookings institute twenty percent