36 Burst results for "Brookings"

Fresh update on "brookings" discussed on Financial Quarterback Josh Jalinski

Financial Quarterback Josh Jalinski

04:06 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "brookings" discussed on Financial Quarterback Josh Jalinski

"If you haven't been in this for a while. Well, you know, it's a cautious reentry plan if you're going in, you know. Going with a percentage. I always say you should have a volatilities buffer. Because that's all the things we talked about in my book, Retirement reality check. Put in the market only what you're comfortable to lose. What I mean by the looks of it. The dowels. I mean, going to? I mean, I've I've kind of From a technical standpoint. Looks like we're gonna have stimulus. All the indicators are up. The Big Five indicators. You know, there might be a stall and you might have, you know a little correction here there, but I think long term I mean, like the next six months. Look like it could be. Like, you know, we could get through this, You know, a week or two ago when the markets were Plunging a little bit after you know yet in November 9th vaccine hi. Things were looking great and all the sudden wave to was upon us. People started selling off. And then, uh, Operation Christmas Miracle was launched. That's my nickname for it. We're over 20,000 people will get vaccinated. The most vulnerable and health care workers, probably Although there is a good case to be made for the super spreaders. Um How many Healthcare workers are there. In America, You know, that's an interesting Um 18 million, so basically Um They're not going to go to the vulnerable first. We're going to go to the front line health care workers, Probably So The World Health Organization. Now this is interesting, too. Um There's a lot of health care workers, you know, but No, the world health care organs that you know what these people sell. We'll vaccinate the world well. Your first accident. The people here we spent a lot of money and you know What's crazy is now China is moving in line. To help vaccinate the world which is pretty crazy. So We got a bunch of health care workers. They're probably going to be the first one. So, according to the Brookings Institute. 50% of the estimated 18 million Healthcare workers are deemed front lines and maybe you do nine million of them and 11 million Of the other. So it's a lot of people. And are they all going to take it? Well, I guess I guess that's the thing you could force them to. It's gonna be tough to force. Vaccinate people. But if you're in health care, they're gonna say Well, you have to go in. Then you have the super spreading community. Then you have people don't even want to take the vaccine. They don't trust vaccines. Kind of big government encroachment. And Kind of an irony of history, right? So Give it a call 803 21. 07 10. If you have a financial question for us Now we were We've been talking all weekend about Roth. Interesting article by Think advisor dot com. Talks about life insurance. And this is from Ed's slot, where he calls life insurance, the single biggest benefit of the tax code. And the questioner says Why Because the money comes in tax free and It's really after tax and all the return his income tax for..

World Health Organization Brookings Institute. China Roth Advisor America
C.D.C. Pleads With Americans to Stay Home on Thanksgiving

MSNBC Morning Joe

06:29 min | Last week

C.D.C. Pleads With Americans to Stay Home on Thanksgiving

"Right now. Laboratories are warning shortages of supplies likely will create more delays in getting test results. Out especially as case numbers surged joining us. Now physician and fellow at the brookings institution dr patel. She's a former obama white house. Health policy director in an msnbc medical contributor dr patel. It's good to see this morning. We also heard yesterday from the cdc that said please avoid travel now for thanksgiving a week out and we got our first news briefing in four months from the task force. The white house task force. Dr burks and dr fauci. What did you take away from what they said yesterday. And what's your view of these incredibly stark numbers. We just saw good morning to everyone. I think that take away from yesterday was actually both an incredible dire warning about thanksgiving about the numbers that we can expect and then also a ray of sunshine. If we can actually do what we need to do. Dr fauci spoke about the extraordinary. And casey mentioned it. The extraordinary progress we've made with vaccines from operation warp speed as well as global cooperation. But a vaccine does not mean that you can actually just kind of read the sigh of relief and go about your merry ways. It really does mean is. Dr burke said yesterday that we have to do things today and change behaviors today in order to be able to have a light at the end of the tunnel and benefit from the vaccines and willie looking at those pictures. I can't help but shudder and fear that some of those people in line are actually doing testing so that they can go and celebrate thanksgiving. I i know that a lot of what my patients are saying. And and that is frankly a big concern your task force and the cdc again was clear yesterday. Small groups within your own household and do not even travel at this point for thanksgiving. That's about as serious as that warning could be so dr patel as you rightly. Say great news on the vaccine front but for most people in this country. That's at least what six months away to get that so we have six months. Let's say from here to there where anything can happen. If we don't have further mitigation efforts from your point of view based on these numbers that we're seeing the trajectory you say were on and that we are on should we go further nationally or at least state by state in terms of stay at home. Orders for example mask mandates. What would you like to see. Yes this is absolutely the conversation that i hope every governor again because we have no national strategy what we did not hear yesterday was kind of an announcement or a bold proclamation about what we can count on at the national level. So you're right willie. We do need to have mask. Mandate that the state levels nationally. We just need all except that wearing a mask and make a difference. Especially if you're going to go and celebrate thanksgiving with people who are not normally in your household. Here's something that i think is incredibly controversial. That happening were closing schools. Before we're making mold steps close or reduce indoor capacity of a restaurant than places where we know people are getting together. I would do the reverse. I would not penalize younger children where we have seen that. We have not been having as much of an outbreak as we have in other settings that people are moving towards indoors shops and restaurants and then i really hope that on a policy level that we can resurrect some stimulus funding because these businesses especially during a holiday season are dying on the vine and again. It's all unnecessary. We've had zero ability to offer small business owners an away to have reliable testing to even keep their employees safe. And that's what we've decided to do in this country. So that's what i want to ask you about in terms of testing dr patel's a former white house health and policy director. I know the biden team says on day one. The president plans to invoke the defense production act on things like testing these lines. That we're seeing Football fields of cars people waiting for hours and hours sometimes days to get a false result on testing is a massive almost the number one impediment to mitigation because as they're waiting in line. They're missing work if they have work. They're exposing themselves to people as they're waiting for these tests and these test results that sometimes take days to come and for those who are lucky enough. Maybe they can buy a test. But it's not like that for the rest of america. Who is in this situation right here. Which is so unacceptable. Had president trump invoked the deep on testing. Would we be in this situation right now. No your outrage. I can't tell you how much that outrageous felt by so many healthcare workers around the country. Here here's something to wrap our brains around. We were able to develop to at least two highly efficacious vaccines and cheaper than it is to get a pcr nasal swab which your head around that that is unacceptable that somehow we have decided that the ability to actually offer employers to open safely away to actually keep schools open in a way for americans to feel. Testing does not replace masks and prevention whatsoever but it certainly could be a critical piece in finding those asymptomatic carriers the majority of people we know who are either infected or are able to transmit the coronavirus right now if we had reliable cheap and easy testing. It doesn't even have to be perfect makeup. We could do something every three days. We know that that's probably the time period where we could catch the majority of cases and this is just a system failure on all levels that the fda is cdc initially relying on flawed testing in the beginning and then again no national vocation of the defense production. Act at no pressure to try to identify how we can get testing especially to the hardest hit communities black and brown communities where we still have really pathetic testing eighth and turnaround times stability and the and the needless loss of life here is mind. Boggling dr kavita patel. Thank you very much for being on the show this

Dr Patel Dr Burks Dr Fauci Dr Burke CDC White House Willie Brookings Institution Msnbc Casey Barack Obama Biden Football America FDA
U.S. And India Sign Military Agreement During Pompeo, Esper Trip

Morning Edition

01:48 min | Last month

U.S. And India Sign Military Agreement During Pompeo, Esper Trip

"The 20 Indian troops killed in a fight with Chinese soldiers this summer on the two countries Himalayan border. And he used his visit to rail against the Chinese Communist Party, or CCP. The CCP is no friend to democracy, the rule of law. Tom Hair, Esper signed a pact with India to share sensitive satellites often used to steer muscles and drones. Big things are happening. As our democracy is aligned to better protect the citizens of our two countries and indeed of the free world. The US has long seen India as a bulwark against China, and the Trump Administration has pushed India to buy more US weapons. But there was an awkward moment when India's defense secretary was asked whether he's willing to stop buying Russian weapons. That depends on negotiations. Demure Tanvi Madan at the Brookings Institution, says it's significant that India hosted Pompeo an Esper Well, tensions are so high with China after that border crisis this summer. At another time, India might have declined to do AH, high profile visit like this with American officials, George a time of crisis in case China was provoked further at a press conference. Indian officials did not mention China by name. Pompeo head's next to Sri Lanka, the Maldives and Indonesia, where the main topic once again will be China. Lauren Frayer NPR news This

India China Chinese Communist Party Esper Pompeo United States Lauren Frayer Brookings Institution Tanvi Madan Sri Lanka Tom Hair Trump Administration Maldives Indonesia George
Persecution Complex

Thank God I'm Atheist

06:02 min | Last month

Persecution Complex

"Hi everybody. Hi guys well from somewhere in Oregon and Salt Lake City Utah. It's thank God I'm atheist the podcast I'm mark and I'm Dan and. Mark Hello pay there now. You're not frank, I'm I'm not anymore. I have emerged like a butterfly from Christmas. From the Frank Shelf Christmas and the Frank. No thanks. That's right Thank you so much for coming on and and help out you you who have helped out here before but are also my co host over on the how do heretic. As much as well as other things I, guess you sure you've in the in the world not that I pay any attention. To the most important stuff Yeah. Unfortunately, I was going out of town and frank was going to have to find a replacement for me. And then, and then frank came down with some horrible apparently non-co vid disease. And and I had to fill in last as far as we know, frank does not have the Rona. Dead. Yeah it seems. It seems as though he is negative though false negatives have occurred in the world. So but anyways, prayers in that seed money coming in. Yes exactly basically, the only way to save him is to is to send us a all of your money. On the television screen, we'll tell you how to do that a later in the program also later in the show you and I are going to have a discussion about persecution privilege. And There's a difference between those two things and points and purpose purpose qwerty. So the four pence perspicacity yeah, which is also Yeah. I anyway, we'll get to all of that later on but in but first, why don't you tell me one of your stories I understand that you've come prepared with with stories to tell the kids you know me I'm already I've got a pocketful of magic for everybody so. This, this will probably relate a little bit to our discussion later in the show. Daniel Okay and this is an older article, but it's been making the rounds again because of reasons. Okay. Yeah. It's an article in the Atlantic by Emma Green and it's about. You know the most most persecuted people in America and those would be. Christians. Of course, they will let me. Let me read a couple of excerpts from the article here in. Many. Many Christians. Believe they are subject to religious discrimination in the United States new report from the Public Religion Research Institute and Brookings. Offers evidence. Almost half of Americans say discrimination against Christians is as big of a problem as discrimination against. Including blacks and minorities. Three quarters of Republicans and trump supporters said this. This article is like a year and a half old. So imagine it's much higher now. And so did nearly eight out of ten White Evangelical Protestants of the latter group six and ten believed that although America wants was a Christian nation, it is no longer a huge jump from twenty twelve. Forty, six percent of those surveyed said immigration from Mexico and Central America has been too high in recent years. Yeah. When asked the same question about immigrants from predominantly Christian countries though only ten percent of people said immigration has been too high. The irony in this is essentially the same question phrase student as Latin American countries are overwhelmingly Christian. Right. All those all those non-catholic Mexicans that are coming over our border. Yeah exactly. Well, who didn't Alex Jones we talk about Alex Jones saying that Mexico was run by a bunch of white shoes at one point but. You know. So Then to kind of conclude. While the US, is still a nation of faith with roughly seventy one percent of adults identifying some kind of Christian. Religious organizations of all kinds are struggling with lower levels of attendance declining participation in ritual practices. More and more people say they're not part of any religion and this is especially true of young people in their twenties and early thirties with you. Guys if religious believable believe their institutions are declining, which demographically speaking they are they may feel more threatened by what they perceive as the growing numbers of people in the country who have a different kind of faith. There's evidence of this in the strongest style. Many people seem to feel for the past and allusive time when Americans felt more of a consensus about their values and beliefs strong majorities. Evangelical Protestants in White Catholics believe America has changed for the worse since the nineteen. Fifties. So off the one, thousand, nine, hundred, Eighty s Jim crow women knowing their place raging cold war nuclear arms race the good old days as Back Yeah back when we could win when everybody's lives were so much better. So this is a lie that just will not die. Like this Christian persecution complex Oh. My God it is amazing and we're GONNA get to more of it. We're going to expound on later in the show like you alluded to but my God it is. It's astounding at what's really funny is. The Christians believe that it is a due to outside influence that everything's getting so bad. Not at not at all acknowledging that, no dude, the calls coming from inside. Right. He's leaving. You are doing this. Yeah. First of all. It's not true that you're being persecuted but part about right believing. You're doing that. Yeah exactly because you're persecuting. They're not leaving because the world outside of Christianity looks. So enticing your leaving because the world inside of Christianity is a an abusive health gape. Maybe work on that you

Frank Mark Hello Daniel Okay Emma Green Public Religion Research Insti United States Salt Lake City Alex Jones Utah Oregon DAN Brookings Mexico Central America Evangelical Protestants
What Happens If The President Is Incapacitated? The 25th Amendment Charts A Course

Morning Edition

06:53 min | 2 months ago

What Happens If The President Is Incapacitated? The 25th Amendment Charts A Course

"Greene. The story we are covering this morning was first revealed in a tweet from President Trump in the middle of the night. He and first lady Melania Trump have tested positive for the Corona virus. Many people we should say never developed serious symptoms and even if they do they recover, But Trump is 70 for an age group that is more likely to develop serious complications and to be hospitalized. The White House physician says the president is doing well as of now, but will remain in the White House residents. A White House official told NPR's Tamara Keith that the president plans to stay engaged, but that Vice President Mike Pence is ready to step in. As needed. Now, if and when a president falls ill. There are significant questions about how the nation is governed. And John 48 has studied and written about scenarios just like this. He's executive director. Of the continuity of government Commission, which was set up in the wake of the 9 11 attacks. He also runs the government studies program at the bipartisan Policy Center, and he joins us on Skype. Thanks for being here. Mary. Thanks for having me. So I mean, someone who looks at these questions so closely. How did you react when you heard that the president got a positive test? Well, given all that's happened, it was probably the one thing that might stir up some or turmoil in this, this very tumultuous election system season we've had. Look, there are some real questions. Both about a president as president having on illness, especially if it were to get worse but also in terms of a presidential candidate. Those are those are different issues about being on the balance and what happens afterwards. So I do think there are some significant concerns if If things were to worsen. Well, let's separate those things out. Let let's talk about the here and now. I mean, what sort of things are being discussed right now inside the White House and were the president's health to deteriorate. I mean, you've written that there could be confusion there. Khun B. Chaos. I mean, take us inside that building. Well, first, a zoo president, the question would be is the president at some point does he feel that he doesn't isn't able to carry out the duties of the presidency for a time? And there's a pretty clear provisioning the 25th amendment, where he can sign over the power of the presidency to the vice president. And then when recovered, take it back, and that's happened a few times in recent years, basically, for elective surgeries, That would be pretty clear. I think you know what would be a little harder is if the president got sick enough that he wasn't able to make the determination there's still a A vision in the Constitution where you can have the vice president. A majority of the Cabinet say it's time for the vice president to take over and then in the most contentious situation. We have heard about another context that if the president disagreed with that, that Diagnosis. Congress might have to decide whether to keep the president on orto keep the vice president so it could go further down the line. But that would be the more extreme version. Look, we also have The election. And how would President Be on the ballot or not be on the ballot. If it really came to the the point where the president had to withdraw. There is a very difficult procedure and trying to replace him at this time. You know what? Who makes that decision? I mean, how well determine happened earlier. I think it's pretty clear that party could have just stepped in on the party. The party still has a role of selecting a new person. Ah, And that would be the party committee could elevate Mike Pence to the presidency and pick someone else as vice president, But that's a relatively simple vote. We've actually done that once in the in the seventies with vice presidential candidate Bigger place, Tom Eagleton. But the question now that the ballots are out is much more difficult. Could the president's name be removed from the ballot? I think it would be very difficult, but one further complication is in our election of president. We're really not voting for president. But we're voting for these electors in the Electoral college. They're still there in the ballot, even if you don't see them in your states about there, behind those names, and in theory, those people could be elected and then make a choice of another person come December with some complications that have come up recently, the Supreme Court but basically that there is a possibility that that even if Donald Trump's name is still on the ballot, and he were to have withdrawn Um, that those electors could still end up voting for the Republican ticket. Whatever that is, in December, they could actually decide. I mean, you would have electors around the country making a decision that Shouldn't theory be made by health experts, but they would be actually deciding who would who would be president. Assuming if Donald Trump won the election, even though he had withdrawn then there's there's this question in November of well, who's Who of these electors gonna vote for? They're gonna vote for the Republican ticket. Whatever it is. Then again, there are some complications. But the Supreme Court has allowed some states to really bind those electors. But Basically those those electors, many of them at least have the freedom to choose another person. We assume that would be coordinated by the party. And of course, that would be great questions about the legitimacy for the American public. Usually it's possible. I mean this this obviously so so speculative ahs. You said. I mean, these are extreme circumstances we're talking about, but I wonder. I mean, this is your line of work like I wonder if you get people sometimes saying, like, Oh, why do you dedicate so much time to scenarios That might never happen? But I guess there's an argument that these air really important questions that you want answered. You have to plan for for the worst and most chaotic sin areas. You do, And off with some better plans in place for for a lot of these continuity scenarios. I mean, obviously, questions of national security might matter if if we're not absolutely sure if the president is is Well, we had cases well before the 25th amendment, Woodrow Wilson, who was essentially incapacitated for his last almost a year and a half in the White House, and you know the real is a real question as to who was really running the government, the vice president ahead and stepped in and so you know, there are these questions. We don't want uncertainty in times of trouble. And you're saying that that you're not satisfied with the plans that are that are in place that the government could do a better job planning for scenarios like this. Well in some, I do think there's a very clear transfer power to the vice president. That's the 25th amendment has made that very clear if we get into much more public ated scenarios like they're both sick or the question of how you get somebody on the ballot and how the electors were picked because it happens this close to the election. Look, I think we could have more clarity. John 48 is executive director of the Continuity of Government Commission, a nonpartisan think tanks set up by the conservative leading American Enterprise Institute and the liberal leaning Brookings Institution. Thank you so much for helping us work through some of these Something big questions that you know, we hope don't have to come up. We hope the president remains healthy, but things we have to think about. We really appreciate it. Thank you.

President Trump Vice President Melania Trump White House Mike Pence Government Commission John Executive Director Supreme Court Bipartisan Policy Center Tamara Keith Tom Eagleton Greene. Khun B. Chaos NPR Congress Official Brookings Institution
Women's earnings drop after having a child—but men's do not

Motley Fool Answers

01:33 min | 3 months ago

Women's earnings drop after having a child—but men's do not

"Retiree planning isn't easy for anyone, but it's particularly challenging for women. They generally earn less more likely to spend time out of the workforce caring for family members and live longer, which is a good thing in general, but it means a tyrant savings have to last longer. A recent report from the Brookings Institution qualified some of these challenges first off, they cite study, which found that women with one child earns twenty percent less on average over her career that a woman without a child in contrast becoming a father typically does not reduce man's earnings. A women are also likely to then men to care for their aging parents responsibility that predominantly falls a women over the age of fifty. So. People who leave the labor force early to care for a parent or other elderly relatives. Lose on average one, hundred, forty, two, thousand dollars in wages. So obviously people who earn less can't save as much. So that's one reason why they might be behind in retirement savings, but the report also quantified the impact until security benefits, which is the number one source of income for most retirees. Here's what the report concluded. Women Receive Social Security benefits that are on average. Eighty percent of those that men receive and having a first child reduces a woman social security benefits through durst earnings than average of sixteen percent and each additional kid increases gap a two percent and then women who leave work to care for an elderly family member not only lose wages but they also lose an average one, hundred, thirty, one thousand in lifetime social security benefits.

Brookings Institution
Couples delaying pregnancy because of pandemic

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

00:33 sec | 3 months ago

Couples delaying pregnancy because of pandemic

"Vacations and work on hold next year. The U. S could experience a 13% decline in births, according to the Brookings Institute. That's because more than 1/3 of women say the ongoing Corona virus pandemic has upended their pregnancy plans, causing EMS either want fewer Children or put starting a family on hold. Many told CBS News that the looming uncertainty around how the novel virus impacts pregnant people influence their decision, as well as economic fallout caused by nationwide lockdowns that CBS is Kate Smith, who says a

Cbs News Brookings Institute CBS Kate Smith U. S
Census Bureau confirms plans to end data collection early

Joel Riley

01:11 min | 4 months ago

Census Bureau confirms plans to end data collection early

"Announcing last night. That it is ending Field Data collection a month earlier than had been plan. They were going to shut it down September or October 31st But now they say households have to complete the census by September 30. The date Census Bureau says that they're knocking on doors of households that haven't done the census that's coming to an end changes likely to raise new concerns about how the Census Bureau possibly undercounts. Population, and when you talk population in this country, babyboomers have kind of been the £800 gorilla generally regarded as the largest part of humanity in this country, But now not the case. New Brookings Institute analysis. They checked the US population with regularity, and they say it's the younger folks that are edging out the baby boomers, baby boomers right now 162 million. And when you look at millennials and points younger, it's 166 million. So the oldest millennials are now 39. Gen Xers be born between 65 80 Gen. Z after 96. So right now, younger populations are the lion's share of US population

Census Bureau United States
Sorry, boomers: millennials and younger are new US majority

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 4 months ago

Sorry, boomers: millennials and younger are new US majority

"Move over baby boomers you're not in the majority anymore millennials and their younger siblings and kids now make up a majority of the U. S. population a new analysis by the Brookings Institution shows that fifty point seven percent of US residents were under the age of forty that as of July of last year the analysis of population estimates released this summer by the U. S. census bureau shows that the combined millennial Gen Z. and younger generations numbered one hundred and sixty six million but combine Gen X. baby boomer and older cohorts represented one hundred and sixty two million US residents I Shelley handler

Brookings Institution U. S. Census Bureau United States Shelley
Income Share Agreements - Good For Students or Investors?

Money For the Rest of Us

05:58 min | 4 months ago

Income Share Agreements - Good For Students or Investors?

"Welcome money for the rest of us. This is a personal finance show on money how it works, how to invest it and how to live without worrying about it. We host David Stein today's episode three seven. It's titled Income Share Agreements. Good for students. Or. Investors. Over five years ago and upset forty-five of money for the rest of us. I introduced income share agreement as a way to partially fund college. An income share agreement is a contract where individuals agree to pay a certain percentage of their income for a set period of time in exchange for an upfront payment that is usually used to pay for education cost but can be used for other things. For example, a line income share funding says that you can get an essay for home repairs, debt consolidation, paying a medical bill or even planning your wedding. Not sure I would do it income share agreement for most of those things. They are traditionally us to invest in what is known as human capital, our ability to earn money by getting more. Education. Another name for income share agreements is human capital contracts. Income share agreements were first proposed by the economist Milton Freeman in a nineteen, fifty, five essay titled The Role of Government in education. He wrote vocational or professional education is a form of investment in human capital precisely analogous to investment in machinery buildings are forms, of non human capital. Its function is to raise economic productivity of the human being. If it does. So the individual is rewarded in a free enterprise society by receiving a higher return for his services than he would. Be Able to command. We discussed this concept summit upset to forty five is college worth it. And determined, there is a positive financial return in investing in human capital. By attending college, you can earn more, you build your social capital, your network you gain knowledge. Having a college degree allows you to pass filters that many companies put in place with their hiring practice in that, they only hire individuals with college degrees. Freeman continued. If a fixed money loan is made to finance investment in physical capital, the lender can get some security for his loan in the form of a mortgage or a residual claim to the physical asset itself, and he can count on realizing at least part of its investment in case of necessity by selling the physical asset. In other words, the lender has some collateral that could be sold in the case of default. But Freeman a problem if the loan is made to invest in human capital. He writes the lender clearly cannot get any comparable security in a non slave state the individual embodying the investment cannot be bought and sold. Freeman then pointed out that because there isn't collateral that the interest rate charged on student loan would have to be sufficiently high to compensate for the capital loss because there wouldn't be collateral and that the interest rate would have to be so high making the loans unattractive to borrowers. Now. A solution was found. Federal guaranteed student loans. The total US Student Loan Dad. Private and federal is one point six, four, trillion dollars. Only a hundred and twenty, four, billion of that one point six trillion is private. The average federal student loan debt balance is thirty, five, thousand dollars and the default rate is high. Eleven point one percent. It's particularly challenging for individuals that have taken on a lot of student loan debt to pay off. A Brookings Institution study from two thousand eighteen found that the median borrower who had less than fifty thousand dollars in student loan debt in the early two thousands paid off the debt within ten years. While the median borrower, they had more than fifty thousand dollars in student loan debt ten years later still owed about seventy, five percent and most of the students falling behind on their student loan debt are those that have a balanced greater than fifty thousand dollars. Friedman's proposed solution income share agreements. They weren't necessarily called that, but he said that. A contract could be structure where an investor would buy a share in an individual's earnings prospects. To advance him, the funds needed to finance his training on condition that he agreed to pay the lender a specified fraction of his future earnings. In this way Friedman wrote, a lender would get back more than his initial investment from relatively successful individuals which would compensate for the failure to recoup his original investment from the unsuccessful. There seems no legal obstacle to private contracts of this kind even though they are economically equivalent to the purchase of a share in an individual's earning capacity and thus to partial slavery. These. Agreements have been criticized perhaps not slavery, but certainly indentured servitude. Although Miguel Palacios yet us in his book investing in Human Capital felt that the analogy to slavery or indentured servitude was incorrect because the students retain the full freedom of action they're not forced to stay in a given job or even a work in the field in which they trained in. So they have the ability to to work anywhere they want.

Human Capital Milton Freeman Friedman David Stein United States Brookings Institution Miguel Palacios
Banks Under Fire for Alleged Unequal Lending Practices

Business Wars Daily

03:17 min | 5 months ago

Banks Under Fire for Alleged Unequal Lending Practices

"The practice of red lining were denying financial and other services to people based on race, was outlawed in nineteen, sixty eight, but last week several Chicago Chase Bank branches closed temporarily as protesters call for racial equity and lending from the nation's largest bank and expose published in early June by nonprofit newsroom city bureau and WBZ radio found that off the seven and a half billion dollars in Chicago home. Purchase loans approved since two thousand, twelve, less than two percent was loaned in black majority neighborhoods. The bank is also the subject of a Federal Class Action Lawsuit. That suit alleges that chase shutout. Business. Borrowers from the paycheck protection, program or PCP. Stacey Hawkins Armstrong's the founder of shop. poppin gourmet. Popcorn in Westchester. She told news station ABC seven Chicago the. She tried to file her PP loan application with chase. On the first day. They were accepted, but she got nothing but error messages desperate to keep her doors open and her four employees on payroll. She ultimately secured a smaller loan through a different bank. She believes that chase prioritized. It's favored customers and left small businesses like hers in. In the cold, She's not alone the US. House of Representatives is launching probes into how several banks including J. P.. Morgan Chase Bank of America and Citigroup made P P P loans according to the Orange County Register. Critics allege that big banks service business customers and Shutout underserved borrowers from the funding pool. redlining continues in subtle ways today, including in how P P P loans. Loans were distributed according to Everett. Sand CEO of small business lender lend Distri in a report in fortune as business wars daily reported earlier this month. The Small Business Administration gave no guidance to lenders to prioritize underserved communities about ninety percent of black owned businesses have no employees ease sands, says P, P P rules. Regarding sole proprietors came out last that let these entrepreneurs unclear about. About which loans were available to them? The SBA hasn't released the demographics of WHO received PPP loans, but a survey report by color of change and UNIDOs US is revealing more than half of black and Latin next small business owners who sought assistance requested less than twenty thousand dollars in funding only about one in ten received the funding. They ask for according to the report. One united the nation's largest blackout bank has been working to help black owned businesses get better access to loans in the second round of stimulus funding, federal government allowed thirty billion dollars to smaller and minority owned banks such as community development, financial institutions were CDFI's one united secured some of that funding with that on April. Twenty nine, the bank launched its own P. Program. The bank committed to lending to black owned businesses and self-employed people. It's I. P P Loan, went to an uber driver. Time will tell who was more effective in getting money to black owned businesses, but the stakes couldn't be higher. A recent report by the Brookings Institution Warns Covid. Nineteen could wipe out a decade of economic gains by black owned businesses as Congress debates whether create another stimulus round. The future of many black owned businesses hangs in the balance.

Stacey Hawkins Armstrong Chicago Chase Bank Small Business Administration Morgan Chase Bank Of America Chicago Brookings Institution J. P House Of Representatives Cdfi Orange County Westchester ABC Everett Congress CEO Founder Citigroup Distri
House passes legislation to make Washington, DC the nation’s 51st state

KCBS Radio Weekend News

02:58 min | 5 months ago

House passes legislation to make Washington, DC the nation’s 51st state

"The house voted yesterday to establish the district of Columbia a city of seven hundred thousand as the nation's fifty first state with all but one Democrat voting in favor to hear more about this we're joined on the KCBS ring central news line by John who attack a senior fellow in governance studies at the Brookings Institution in Washington DC thanks so much for joining us John thanks for having me Sir John what would statehood mean for DC and how would it differ from how it's governed to now so there's really two parts to statehood that would be meaningful change for DC the first would be voting representation in Congress the C. would get one excuse me one house member in two senators which right now we don't have any any representation representation in in the the Senate Senate and and the the delegates delegates who who DC DC Alexa Alexa Congress Congress doesn't doesn't have have voting voting rights rights within within the the chamber chamber the the second second is is the the second second change change that that would be meaningful is the DC would really have full self government right now we have a mayor who functions essentially as our governor and a city councilor district council that functions more like our legislature but Congress has veto power over any ballot initiative or any laws the B. C. government passes and that creates some real friction between what are the National Congress is interested in and what the more than seven hundred thousand people in the district John this is something that's been in the works for a while all right yet there has been for decades real serious movement within DC organizationally to lobby Congress to take this step there have been you know grass roots efforts that has tried this and failed for quite some time in fact the only time that it came to to a vote in the house about DC statehood with the nineteen ninety three and that measure failed pretty badly and only got about a hundred and fifty five votes but it never came up again until this year when as you said at the opening of the house passed the legislation I yesterday how is this expected to benefit the city's black population well right now this is a a Washington DC is a majority minority city it is a more than fifty percent of black and Latino and I'm white now those voices are not being heard in Congress this is a city without representation even though DC pays a significant sums of federal income tax and obviously contributes to the broader economy but those voices aren't being heard there is no representation in Congress for those hundreds of thousands of individuals and so this is a city that is facing a lot of challenges it is a city that needs help from Congress and really it's a city that needs that voice in Congress to make sure that its population of her

Columbia
Understanding the border dispute between India and China

Between The Lines

05:48 min | 5 months ago

Understanding the border dispute between India and China

"Together China in India account for more than one third of the entire population of the world, and if you believe the predictions of Keisha Mahbubani, remember him. He's been a skit on this program. He's the distinguished Singaporean intellectual. He says the future is Asian, and it's China's and India's to shame. But as my next guest points out. There, a deep historical tensions between these two budding global superpowers, which might make that impossible. China and India share land border in the Himalayas which has been in dispute since nineteen, sixty two, and it's been a pretty quiet style for decades, however, since May tensions have been rising nuclear powers facing off in a remote corner of the Himalayas, the disputed Kashmir region. This is the first the classroom this border in forty five years Indian government confirmed twenty of its soldiers were killed in the clash. China seems to now be making new claims to territory now. Will this be the event that pushes India away from Chana. Chana for good, and what does it mean for the rest of the World Tom V. Madan is a senior fellow in the foreign policy program at the Brookings Institution. In Washington. She's the author of a new book called Fateful Triangle. How China shut US India relations during the cold. War She's got an article in this month's foreign. Affairs magazine on how China is losing India Tovey. Welcome to between the lines. Thank you for having me Tom now. The border dispute between China and India has probably been the most tasteful. Conflict in the world. No one died and forty five years. What sit this conflict of? It was set off because of some early moves in early May that. had. Brought forward troops and equipped military equipment at different points on the China. India boundary the line of actual control. In the western sector particularly of their border, which is eastern Hlavac and at multiple points, what we saw was attempts to change the status quo whether it was to establish a permanent presence in built in areas, but both sides claim. Or attempts to stop a Indian patrols from moving in those areas which they have traditionally done. That's set the context. It's been going on since at least early May. What we actually saw what was happening to June, sixth meeting between senior military commanders was that they had agreed to a process of de-escalation and disengagement but something went very wrong in the course of this de-escalation. And this is where the incident took place. Now this particular incident has just been a larger in scale and an this whole stat of larger scale, but also regrets aggressiveness and the ones we've seen before, and there are reports that both countries are deploying some serious weapons to the bases close to the border. Is this just posturing, or is there a serious risk of Esscalation I? Think these kind of situation. There's always a risk of escalation. We've seen at least three. faceoffs three major face before this one between the Chinese and Indian military's in two, thousand, thirteen, two, thousand, fourteen in two thousand seventeen This one is could have larger in scale. We've seen as we did. On June fifteenth that even though they have traditionally had a whole series of agreements, standard operating procedures protocols in place between the two countries to avoid the kind of Esscalation we saw injured fifteenth. They clearly are not sufficient anymore, so let's put this in a broader historical context. China and India and went to war in nineteen, sixty two over the border. Now this of course was at the heart of the Cold War. Taibbi take us back to the geopolitical context of the time what was going on? By the time, the nineteen sixty sixty-two war broke out between China and India. You've seen a few years from about nineteen fifty seven about five years already of rising China Idiot tensions you've seen. The Indians relies that The Chinese did not consider. The boundary settled that they were building. A roads through territory India sought was India's. You saw scuffles skirmishes at between. The. Two sides patrols at various points on the boundary. You also saw the escape of the Lama. At a number of Tibetan. Refugees remain to stay in India in one, thousand, nine, hundred, nine, which the Chinese soil with deep suspicion and suspected that the US and you had worked together to engineer about escape. And, so you seem kind of rising tensions between China and India and at the same time you see you saw. The US India actually because in a national park because of their shared concerns about China actually starting to move closer towards each other for the for the the US This saw a in democratic India as both Jew potential, a political counterbalance, but also democratic contrast to soviet-backed Communist China accident, very interested in supporting it. N India welcomed that support, and so that was the. what was? Preceded that sixty to war, but which occurred when the Chinese decided. To move what they call the self defense a counterattack. And in nineteen, sixty two. Move across across the boundary took and defeated India quite badly, which laughed a number of different. It's a it's left a lot of historical baggage. The only major war the Union army has lost

India China N India United States Himalayas Tom V. Madan Esscalation Chana Indian Government Keisha Mahbubani Union Army Brookings Institution Tovey Washington Hlavac Senior Fellow Taibbi
It's official: U.S. recession began in February

Morning Edition

03:29 min | 6 months ago

It's official: U.S. recession began in February

"It is official the recession began in February that's according to the national bureau of economic research which studies such things but for federal reserve officials gathering this week the question is when will this recession end and what will the economic recovery look like David Wessel is director of the Hutchins center at the Brookings Institution and he joins us with some answers hi David good morning so the recession is now four months old which is nice to know I guess we've been in this for awhile and hopefully what that means we'll get out but when when will that happen when is it gonna end David it's a good question you know this is a really unique recession that was triggered by the government ordering a shut down of the economy it was very abrupt it was very deep the April may June quarter will be one of the worst on record technically the recessional be over when the economy stops contracting it starts growing again the best gas of forecasters that'll occur sometime this summer doesn't mean the economy is going to be healthy or that unemployment will go back below four percent only the things will start getting better rather than worse sometime this summer so getting better is better thing worse but when the forecasters at the fed and in the private sector look into their crystal balls that aren't so crystal what kind of recovery do they say well we're gonna learn from the fed on tomorrow on Wednesday what they see for the economy when they give us their new forecast but it's even harder than usual because this is such a situation we've never seen before analysts have developed a kind of shorthand alphabet shorthand to describe the passive possible scenarios the economy was chugging along nicely tell the pandemic cat then it took this abrupt downturn the optimistic scenario is that the economy will be shaped like a V. sharp down sharp up as people go back to work and shopping and stuff last Friday's jobs report that we added jobs in may has encouraged the optimists that includes the people in the White House and at least yesterday the stock market which is recovered as of yesterday all the games all the losses that occur it took us since the beginning of the year all right so so that's the the sunny scenario what are the others well one of them resembles the Nike swoosh we get a burst of euphoria as businesses open up and we go back to work but it's a slow us a long slow climb out of the ditch restaurants are only serving half as many people people are reluctant to get on airplanes I'm so that by that scenario it takes maybe years before we get back to the path we were on and there's an even less pleasant scenario the dreaded W. that's where things get better but we have surgeon covert cases and another round or shut downs later in the fall okay so we could have a V. that would be good if we could have a swish and not so great the W. please tell me that's the worst case scenario or does it possibly get worse I'm I'm afraid it's not the worst the worst case looks like an al the economy does grow but we never get back to the path we are on before the pandemic some laid off workers never find jobs lots of business go bankrupt malls and restaurants remain empty for a long time you know there's lots of vacancies business is to S. R. and D. so we have fewer innovations that sounds really bleak but that's what the economy look like for several years after the last recession two thousand and eight and two

Official National Bureau Of Economic Re
'We Can't Take Your Call': Uber Drivers, Other Gig Workers Struggle For Unemployment

All Things Considered

02:11 min | 6 months ago

'We Can't Take Your Call': Uber Drivers, Other Gig Workers Struggle For Unemployment

"The uber drivers to Airbnb hosts that dog walkers they are the millions of people who make a living from gig work thanks to a massive federal relief package they are temporarily eligible for unemployment benefits but the unemployment system was not built for gig work and so many states are struggling to help this new class of workers NPR tech correspondent Shannon bond reports many of them are still waiting for their money Michael o'dell as a jazz musician in Columbus Ohio but music doesn't pay the bills so he drives for lift in Newburgh in since the pandemic hit he only goes out when he needs cash right away I definitely don't put the time into it like I normally do because I'm not going to get good rights unemployment benefits should be a lifeline for gig workers like him but dell hasn't seen a check yet I've been applying every week and every single week I get the night like regular unemployment denied because lift and uber don't consider themselves his employer they say there are millions of drivers are independent contractors who choose when and how much to work that's how many apps operate and that means they don't do what a normal employer does Jay Shambaugh a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution explains normally if you're eligible for unemployment insurance it's because your employer has been paying into the insurance system and it's part of paying in their reporting earnings gig workers have to show proof of their earnings so the state knows how much to give them an unemployment benefits and Gemma says most states have to set up systems to process those claims that's been the big hold up figuring out how they track who is supposed to get this money it's been more than seven weeks since Congress made gig workers eligible for unemployment and according to Brookings thirty nine states are now processing those claims but even those who got their claims in really early are still waiting like lift driver Jerome gauge in Los Angeles he applied for unemployment in early March make sure that all on your reported earnings looking over your reward is zero dollars because you don't think that your employee earning their knowledge days appealed he's still

Shannon Bond Columbus Ohio Newburgh Dell Jay Shambaugh Senior Fellow Brookings Institution Gemma Congress Los Angeles Airbnb NPR Michael O'dell
Stimulus checks being sent to dead people, leaving loved ones confused

Morning Edition

04:03 min | 7 months ago

Stimulus checks being sent to dead people, leaving loved ones confused

"In under a month the IRS delivered more than a hundred and thirty million corona virus relief payments to Americans that's two hundred and seven billion dollars that was part of the relief package passed by Congress during the public health crisis but the speed has come with some significant mistakes NPR's Tim mak has been talking to the families of dead Americans who got coronavirus relief checks Bob lemon dues father passed away in December so Bob who lives in Houston notified the V. A. and the Social Security Administration that his father had passed in order to stop payments from them and those were halted but on April fifteenth Bob who is a co signer on his dad's account noticed a payment in the amount of twelve hundred dollars he was a corona virus relief payment from the IRS I feel bad that this money is sitting in my dad's account I don't know what to do with it and there are people out there that need it badly and that bothers me quite a bit I wish I knew what to do with it but I don't treasury secretary Steve Mnuchin said one week ago that any payments to the deceased would be a mistake and should be returned but this is raised more questions than answers this mass confusion that's Jenna holds what of the urban Brookings tax policy center there's been no official guidance as to how in this instance people should return the money that was received for their loved ones the Irish does not typically track information on the deceased in America but other parts of the government such as the social security administration do it appears that there was no cross referencing before checks went out the scope of the problem could be in the millions the CDC estimates that two point eight million Americans died in twenty eighteen for example and there are signs that people who have died more than two years ago are receiving payments Karen McClure of fort Collins Colorado experienced this first hand her mother passed away in January of twenty eighteen but in April of this year she received a payment of twelve hundred dollars the government is being very reactive instead of proactive to this situation which I I find frustrating mark Iverson is the former IRS commissioner serving from two thousand and three to two thousand and seven he told NPR that the IRS has generally been doing a good job but there's a real trade offs of speed versus accuracy in the processing he says the people in this situation should rely on official guidance people need to rely on the information they get from IRS dot gov but that's not so easy when it comes to this topic three so will not the seventy one year old in Rockford Illinois has been trying to do just that she lost her partner of thirty nine years Frank dica just two months ago last month he received the payment I'm coping with Frank stuff pretty well at this point I'm not over it I probably will never be over it but it didn't that part didn't bother me I'm I'm probably angrier at the government for sending out a payment to somebody who's deceased three says been trying without success to find guidance online from the IRS to send the money back so I went online to the address on the letter and looked for a long time trying to find some way that I could first send the payment back and I couldn't find that so look for a way to contact somebody at the IRS or treasury or whatever to return the payment and I couldn't find that NPR did not fare much better than Theresa after multiple requests the IRS directed questions to the treasury department the treasury department pledged to have an answer by Tuesday morning as of the sharing the treasury department has not answered questions about what steps the IRS is taking to address this problem or what to do if a deceased loved one

IRS
The IRS Sent Coronavirus Relief Payments To Dead People

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:03 min | 7 months ago

The IRS Sent Coronavirus Relief Payments To Dead People

"In under a month the IRS delivered more than one hundred and thirty million corona virus relief payments to Americans. That's two hundred and seven billion dollars. That was part of the relief. Package passed by Congress during the public health crisis. But this speed has come with some significant mistakes. Npr's Tim Mack has been talking to the families of dead. Americans who got corona virus. Relief Checks Bob. Meduse father passed away in December. So Bob who lives in Houston notified the V. A. and the Social Security Administration that his father had passed in order to stop payments from them and those were halted but on April fifteenth. Bob Who is a cosigner on? His Dad's account noticed a payment in the amount of twelve hundred dollars it was e- Corona Virus Relief Payment from the IRS. I feel bad that this money is sitting in my dad's account. I don't know what to do with it. And there are people out there that need it badly and That bothers me quite a bit. I I wish I knew what to do with it but I don't Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin said one week ago that any payments to the deceased would be a mistake and should be returned but this is reasonable questions than answers this mass confusion. That's Janet Holds Plan of the Urban Brookings Tax Policy Center. There's been no official guidance. As to how in this instance people should return the money that was received for their loved ones. The IRS does not typically track information on the deceased in America but other parts of the government such as the Social Security Administration. Do it appears that there was no cross-referencing before checks went out the scope of the problem could be in the millions the CDC estimates that two point eight million Americans died in two thousand eighteen for example and there are signs that people who have died more than two years ago are receiving payments Karen McClure of Collins Colorado experienced this firsthand. Mother passed away in twenty eighteen. But in April of this year she received a payment of twelve hundred dollars. The government is being very reactive instead of proactive to this situation which I find frustrating Mark Iverson is he former. Irs Commissioner serving from two thousand and three to two thousand and seven he told NPR that the irs has generally been doing a good job. But there's a real trade off of speed versus accuracy in the processing. He says the people in this situation should rely on official guidance people need to rely on information from. Irs Dot Gov. But that's not so easy when it comes to this topic Theresa Wilmot a seventy one year old in Rockford Illinois has been trying to do just that. She lost her partner of thirty nine years. Frank diker just two months ago. Last month he received the payment. I'm copying with frank stuff pretty well at this point. I'm not over it. I probably will never be over it but it didn't. That part didn't bother me. I'm I'm probably angrier. The government for sending out a payment to somebody who's deceased Theresa has been trying without success to find guidance online from the IRS. To Send the money back so I went online to the address on the letter and looked for a long time trying to find some way that I could. I send the payment back and I couldn't find that sort look for a way to contact somebody at the IRS or treasury or whatever to return the payment and I couldn't find that NPR did not fair much better than Teresa after multiple requests the IRS directed questions to the Treasury Department. The Treasury Department pledged to have an answer by Tuesday. Morning as of this airing the Treasury Department has not answered questions about what steps the IRS is taking to address this problem or what to do if a deceased loved one received a payment

IRS America Theresa Wilmot NPR Treasury Department Frank Diker Social Security Administration Mark Iverson Bob Who Official Treasury BOB Congress Urban Brookings Tax Policy Cen CDC Tim Mack Janet
J.Crew Files For Bankruptcy. More Retailers Are Expected To Follow

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:38 min | 7 months ago

J.Crew Files For Bankruptcy. More Retailers Are Expected To Follow

"When J crew filed for bankruptcy yesterday it got a lot of attention in part. Because it's the first major retailer to fall prey to this pandemic. The company was forced to close five hundred stores and furlough all but two thousand of its thirteen thousand employees but this might not be the end. Other companies are very likely to go under in these times. And let's turn to David Wessel director of the Hutchins Center at Brookings Institution. David Hope you're well good morning so talk to me about J. crew going to bankruptcy court and what what exactly the company is going to be experiencing here well when a company files for protection of the Bankruptcy Court under chapter eleven of the law. It's allowed to not pay its debts. So it can continue to operate in business in the case of J. Crew which also owns a company called made. Well it worked out a deal with its creditors before it went to court. People who'd lent the company nearly two billion dollars essentially get control the company squeezing out to shareholders. Then it borrows more money about four hundred million dollars so we can keep going It's online businesses functioning. And it's planning to open. At least some of its stores. When the Corona virus receives the whole point of chapter eleven is to allow a debt laden company to reorganize and and stay in business. So is this an option that other retailers other companies are going to follow. We're GONNA see more. Companies seeking protection absolutely. American businesses borrowed a lot of money fifteen trillion dollars by one recent estimate when times were good. Many of them are going to have trouble keeping up the payment. It's hard to stay current on your debt when your revenues drive up. Gold's gym filed for bankruptcy this week already the Wall Street Journal says that both Neiman Marcus and JC. Penney have missed some interest payments. And they're talking to lenders about a bankruptcy filing hurts. The car rental company has hired advisors and in the oil and gas industry. Low Oil prices are pushing a lot of the little companies towards the bankruptcy court as well. David you've talked on a program about the hundreds of billions of dollars that Congress approve to try and help small businesses. Wasn't that supposed to try and avoid this. It was and all that aid is GONNA keep some companies out of bankruptcy. But it's not enough for all of them particularly that were already kind of over-borrowed before the corona virus hit and the problem here is this is going to overwhelm the bankruptcy courts. And that's going to have unfortunate side effects. Some companies are going to have trouble finding the money you need to borrow temporarily to keep going while you're in bankruptcy and history suggests when they're lots of business bankruptcies as I expect there will be. The courts tend to put their attention on reorganizing. The big ones and that means little people a little companies had filed for bankruptcy just end up liquidated they sell off their assets with the court supervision and essentially go out of business. What other options out there David to to try and save a company in these times? Well the best option. Of course we'll get the economy going when the virus receipt so they can start selling again. Joe Stiglitz Nobel laureate suggests a super chapter eleven kind of one size fits all plan. David scale a law professor at Paneth suggested that Congress legislate a moratorium on debt payments giving companies and even some families the immediate benefits of bankruptcy without having go through the court and Peter or Zag was the White House budget director in the Obama administration says that because bankruptcy can have such a big effect on suppliers. He suggests government lending to what he calls firms that are two connected to fail doing. Essentially what the government did for GM and Chrysler during the great recession? But none of this is painless. That that is that is true. As we know. David Wessel from the Hutchins Center Brookings. Thanks so much you're

Bankruptcy Court David David Wessel David Hope Brookings Institution J. Crew Congress Hutchins Center Hutchins Center Brookings Peter Neiman Marcus Wall Street Journal Director Joe Stiglitz Nobel Chrysler Penney Low Oil GM Gold
Federal Reserve Unveils Emergency Lending Program

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

03:07 min | 8 months ago

Federal Reserve Unveils Emergency Lending Program

"We learned another six point. Six million people in this economy have lost their more on that in just a minute for Mitchell Hartman but at that very same stroke of eight thirty the Federal Reserve reached in and grabbed the macro economic headlines with news. That it's making another two point. Three trillion dollars available to businesses and state and local governments. The details honestly our weedy so we will concentrate instead on the tone and tenor of what Powell said in a Webinar. This morning hosted by the Brookings Institution many many parts of the capital markets and lending more. Broadly stopped functioning and That is exactly the situation that our emergency powers are meant to address so we have moved in as I mentioned our priority or those areas of the markets that are most fundamental to supporting the real economy. I know what you want to know right. What does the guy running the real American economy right now? Think about the prospects for the real American economy right now when the virus does run its course and it's safe to go back to work and save business to open Then we would expect there to be a fairly quick rebound as people do go back to work and start resuming normal levels of economic activity. I think most people expect that to happen in the second half of this year after the second quarter which of course ends on June thirty to be clear there was some nuts and bolts. Economics disgust in response to questions from David Wessel. Also Brookings and another public radio program. You might listen to as well questions. Like G chair PAL BETWEEN ALL THE MONEY. Your adding to the economy and all the money congress is authorizing. You're worried about inflation at all. There are certainly I would say these are programs. That were developing at a high rate of speed. We don't have the luxury of taking our time the way we usually do. We're trying to get help quickly to the economy as it's needed and I I worry that you know in hindsight you will see that we could have done things differently but But I one thing I don't worry about is inflation right now. Speaking of Congress or as Paul and his fed colleagues like to say fiscal policy makers yeah. They got some work to do. We're not responsible for fiscal policy. We don't give public advice to Congress on Fiscal Policy. I will say that As I mentioned in my remarks in many cases what people really need is direct. Fiscal Support Rather than Alone and what we can do loan. So there's A. There's a big need for fiscal policy. Finally one last thing just because I think it's really important here. Actually it's the why of what the Fed is doing. People are undertaking. These sacrifices for the common good we need to make them halted extent we have the ability to make them whole. We should be doing that as a society. They didn't cause this their businesses closed because of anything they did wrong. They didn't lose their job because of anything did wrong. This is what the great fiscal power of the United States is. Four is to protect these people as best. We can from The hardships they're facing a good phrase right. The great fiscal power of the United States. I kinda like that.

Congress Brookings Institution Federal Reserve United States Mitchell Hartman David Wessel Powell Paul
"brookings" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"brookings" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

"For homeowners. How much for auto companies how much for banks some of this reflects the anger that. So few people were held responsible for this economic calamity. A lot of us really do want Old Testament Justice. And some of the skepticism stems from the klutzy communications from the principals never managed to explain clearly what they were doing whatever. The cause the crisis left a legacy of public distrust, not only Wall Street, but also of Washington, and that has lasted a whole lot longer than the great recession and five a lot has been done to make the financial system more resilient to reduce the risk of a financial crisis as bad as the one we suffered ten years ago. The banks are better capitalized regulation has been tightened. But the job is not finished. And the pressure now is to weaken not to complete post crisis shoring up a financial regulation as the managing director of the International Monetary Fund. Christine Lagarde put it the other day. The system is safer, but not safe enough. In another interview led by Brookings Institution. Press director Bill fining, nonresident, senior fellow Marvin call before acted on the life and legacy of legendary journalist Edward r. Murrow and the relevance of his brand of journalism today. Do things to bear in mind about Moreau is where he comes from Monroe is from a small town log cabin in North Carolina raised in the state of Washington came back to North Carolina through his life into the idea of education. And then journalism all of this started in the mid nineteen thirties in Europe Moreau sore the rise of Adolf Hitler. It had a profound impact upon him. He always worried about the rise from the right of a force of a personality who had come to dominate the political scene and would do terrible things to freedom. Terrible things to our sense of who we were. And when he saw the rise of McCarthy starting nineteen fifty it immediately arose in him fears that he was watching once again, what was happening in Europe in Germany in the mid nineteen thirties, and he was determined to stop it. If he could how does a journalist stop it. The only thing journalists can do is to cover the news accurately, and when Moro decided to do using his radio program, and then his weekly television program was to focus a lot of attention of what McCarthy was saying how he said it the. The impact of what he said upon the American people. And then finally when he thought the time was right on March nineteen fifty four he came in with this extraordinary broadcast on Moreau. And that was the beginning of the end of Senator McCarthy and one of the things to bear in mind before that broadcast was aired forty six of forty eight percent of the American people believed that McCarthy was the second most powerful man in America. Be and President Eisenhower after the Murrow broadcast that number fell down to thirty two. And that is where it stayed throughout the army McCarthy hearings, the next three months that gave the Republicans up on the hill who were terrified of that time to move. They feared McCarthy. Suddenly, they realized that he was a journalist who could affect the opinion of the Americans about this man, and they felt a little bit of courage to stand up and Murrow did that that was a phenomenal moment in the history of American journalism their street American politics. It says so much about what good journalism can do in trouble political environment..

Senator McCarthy Murrow Moreau Adolf Hitler Washington Christine Lagarde Brookings Institution North Carolina International Monetary Fund managing director Bill fining President Eisenhower director Germany Europe Moro senior fellow
"brookings" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"brookings" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

"The way we Brookings do. So they need simple messages, and they weren't getting simple messages from the Democratic Party. They were getting simple messages from Donald Trump. He was saying I'm going to fix the problems facing. I'm going to build a wall on the border. I'm going to restrict trade, and I'm going to bring back manufacturing. And I'm going to do all of these things to bring back your jobs, and they got that. And they thought that was true in my book. I actually say there were a lot of misleading and flawed proposals in Trump agenda. But that's another question. It did resonate with. The public. But I think the other lesson that comes out of this is that you have to be simple, and you have to articulate values and principles not just laundry lists of policies and one of the ways I am beginning to talk about it is to say we need to marry red state values about education family, and especially work with blue state policies that will help people to achieve their aspirations in each of those areas, but especially in the area of work. And if people understand what the value is what the principle is. And then that you have an agenda to help them achieve it. They don't care as much about the details as they do about what your values are. And so I go back to what I said at the beginning, which is the value. Of work. The work ethic is very unifying value in American society. You can find links to Bell's essay and her new book in the show notes the episode on forgotten Americans and the twenty eighteen midterm elections. David Wessel and one of his regular Wessels economic update segments commented on the tenth anniversary of the financial crash, including the collapse of Lehman Brothers. And the response of key members of the US government to it. Some of whom are working at Brookings today. Can years is not enough time for the final verdict of history heck communists in historian spent more than half a century arguing about the great depression. But ten years does provide us with some perspective. Here's mine. One. What happened in two thousand seven through two thousand nine the housing bust. The financial panic was economically catastrophic and much of it was preventable. Sure. Banking crises and panics occur throughout history. But this episode was a failure of almost every check on excesses, irresponsibility and fraud regulators legislators boards of directors chief executives accountants rating agencies lawyers, the.

Donald Trump Brookings Bell Democratic Party Lehman Brothers US fraud David Wessel Wessels ten years
"brookings" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"brookings" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

"All that much easier. If you are a medical patient in Las Vegas, and you decide to take a vacation to Los Angeles. Even though those are two states with medical and recreational marijuana programs. You cannot bring product with you from Las Vegas to Los Angeles. You'd be crossing a state border. That's a silly premise. You should be able to bring medicine with you. If you are a registered legal medical marijuana patient. And so there are ways to what people like Mark Kleiman and others have argued are guardrails that is you set up. These regulatory boundaries that exist where the federal government steps in and says, here's what we are comfortable with from a regulatory perspective, and you essentially have an opt in system states are not required to do these things. They are not required. To legalize marijuana for medical recreational purposes. But if they choose to do that, then get access to certain federal benefits. And. John is author of the Brookings press title marijuana short history. It was also a co producer the Brookings short film the life. She deserves medical marijuana in the United States. In april. Donnie, Bihar David m Rubenstein fell in the global economy and development program. Visit the Colombian city of Kuta on the border within their he observed firsthand the unfolding refugee crisis astounds of Finnish walence crossed the border to seek food shelter medicine and new lives away from the difficult situation in their country. He said, it was terrifying and not normal border. But I asked him to reflect on what if anything he saw that gave him hope for the future. Fred eyeso- as I totally before very sad things. I so people looking for food people don't own where they're going to sleep people trying to do whatever is possible to find medicines for their family or for the children and at the same time, I saw hope in attitudes. And I saw a lot of people who are tripping worse who are doing their best to keep up with their microbusinesses. I so people who wear selling fruits I so people who had their. Only it'll be phone accessories. And they told me, you know, every day, I take a little my earnings with him back in the business in my business growing. I so people who were as you said like creating art like wallets and selling them the streets. I so people who already have three restaurants in Kuta giving jobs to navy's unto refugees. So I saw a lot of hoping that because I think that these people I mean, if there's something good that it's gonna come out of all these tragedy is that it's actually this migrants refugees will play a huge role in reconstructing Venezuela. Because as I've shown in my economic research migrants are the most important or the most effective way of transferring technologies and knowledge across countries, and these people will spend some years abroad in their jobs in new industries, and they will take that learning back to Venezuela, which will hopefully we'll help and it's become diversified economy. Having a strong business sector and having a prosper. Qualify for everybody. So I think that they are actually the key to future you can find a slide show of Downing's Boorda trip in a blog post. He wrote on Brookings dot EDU. Research from Brookings and elsewhere demonstrates that the combination of childhood poverty. Segregation and race is particularly hard on African American native American boys who has men are killed disproportionately by police senior fellow community set director of the race prosperity inclusion initiative at Brookings wrote that it is clear that the level of exclusion faced by these men is staggering. No other demographic group has fared as badly so persistently and for so long. In my interview with her. She explained why this is a national crisis. So the national crisis is the fact that African American boys poor African American boys and poor native American, boys. Simply do not have a chance to participate in this economy, and that has been a long standing crisis..

marijuana Brookings Kuta Las Vegas Los Angeles John Venezuela Mark Kleiman Donnie United States Fred eyeso producer director Downing David m Rubenstein
"brookings" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"brookings" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

"In january. Our annual look ahead to the top economic issues of the year. Ted gayer, then the vice president and director of economic studies addressed a range of issues, including how to read the unemployment figures labor force participation new research on deaths of despair and economic growth. If you could implement any one policy idea for the economy for this year in looking ahead. What would that be? I think I just referred to some that might be on the list, I'm gonna guess it last year, I told you we should have a carbon tax where we use a revenue neutral carbon tax, and that's always been something that I think would be smart policy. I think among the economic community you have broad agreement there, you might have disagreement, but how you use that revenue whether or not to offset corporate taxes, which is probably what I argued last year or whether or not to use it for spending or through other tax reductions that are more progressive one after that last year in two we just went through a huge debate about federal taxes, and you didn't hear nary a word about carbon taxes. So that tells you how popular over Nigeria that is. I don't know if this is one policy we'll go back to what I said before. Which is where I think we are under exploring some problems, and that is on the local regulatory level. I think if you look at what I see is productivity weakness. It is linked to the fact that people aren't as mobile as they used to be you don't get as much people moving across states as you used to. And so in a very simplistic world you're in. Local economy that takes them sort of shock that leads to depression, local oppression or local weakness in the Konomi. You look for productive employment somewhere else you relocate that becomes a lot harder. When the relocation decision is really on economic for you that the rents and the news city are just way too high. I think largely driving those high rents is what I was talking about the neighborhood near me and people don't want mixed use housing. People don't wanna increase the supply of homes. There are all sorts of local regulations that inhibited ability to increase the supply of home. So those prices artificially high. So I think more attention to that if I had to kind of bring up my dream policy that would certainly fall under that umbrella, the caveat there is he's local policy. This is not the federal government and having coordination across states on things like ocupation licensing zoning or you name it this challenging, but I think it would go a long way Ted is now the executive vice president of Brookings. I want to thank him for kicking off each of the last three years of Brookings cafeteria with a look ahead to the important economic issues of the year. You can also. Download an interview I did with tat June about the role Brookings place. Today's policy debates for the top economic issues of twenty nineteen. I look forward to talking with economic studies senior fellow David Wessel and sharing that with you in early January. In one of the eight interviews with authors of books published by our own Brookings Institution press..

Ted gayer Brookings Institution vice president and director executive vice president Nigeria federal government senior fellow Konomi David Wessel three years
"brookings" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"brookings" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

"He'd use lash podcasts for more analysis from Brookings experts. On the upcoming elections, could've Brookings that you to use lash twenty eighteen midterms and now with the interview. John welcome back to the riggings cafeteria. Thanks for having me this great to see you and it's great to kick off this special election series with you. So let's talk about miss and the twenty thousand elections. I heard one of our colleagues talk about the primaries project that you and Elaine KMart and others have been doing, and she said that reality doesn't reflect prevailing narratives based on the data that you and others discovered. So what does a big misconception or myth that people have now about the midterm elections? Well, I think the biggest myth right now is that historical trends that is that the president's party loses seats in a congressional midterm is necessarily predict. Give of the future. It is true that on average, the president's party loses about twenty seven seats in the house in a mid term. But that's not necessarily what happens every year. Sometimes that number smaller, sometimes that number is larger into fairly recent midterms in nineteen ninety eight and in two thousand to the president's party picked up seats in the house in the midterms. And so I think that for some people, they either right off election as a loss. If you're a Republican or they take for granted an upcoming win, if they are Democrats. And the reality is that on a race by race basis, in even nationally, the sands can shift very quickly. And if a party or a candidate or even voter is not prepared for that, they can be quite surprised come election night when emphasize to listeners that we're not here to talk about specific races. We're not talking about the horse races or particular candidates talking about data and trends in what they say based on what you saw. In the primaries. This could be another meth, our democratic candidates more to the left than they ever have been. We've seen a lot of very pronounced progressive candidates win their racist, but is that really what the Democratic Party is offering in two thousand eighteen? Well, there's two types of candidates in any mid-term. There are newcomers challenges and there are incumbents in this year..

president Democratic Party Elaine KMart riggings cafeteria Brookings John
"brookings" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

04:56 min | 2 years ago

"brookings" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

"I'm markus casey i'm rudenstine fellow in the economic studies program here brookings would i was a young child i lived in chicago on the south side and south overs actually moved around quite a bit around the sell side so i lived in various neighborhoods and then later when i got a little bit older my parents worked out in arrangement where i would live with my father in texas fort worth texas to be specific on the east side during the school year and then i'll spend my summers vacations back home in chicago with my mother so i lived in both chicago in texas to be honest i'm not really sure i can pinpoint any particular thing that inspired me to become a scholar when i was a child i was always kinda intellectually curious i used to read encyclopedias and books always had an interest in historical fiction things of that nature when i read fiction and when i got older and went off to college i tended to be a lawyer as most undergraduates who don't have a clear path seem to think that they'll become but later i did a summer program the american economic association summer program where i kinda was introduced into using kind of social science tools specifically quantitative tools to kind of look at a lot of societal issues and problems and never really intrigue me so i decided on a whim in the last year of college essentially to go on and become an economist if i was going to say one important issue be inequality i think any quality is one of our biggest issues because it feeds into a lot of things right politically socially and other aspects of society that some people have considered problematic and i think in part because equality helps feed into sort of a sense of pessimism for many people if you look at a lot of our major cities in this country the relatively fluent ineffectively wall themselves off from the less of fluent by virtue of nothing necessarily nefarious in that is just by the nature of we use you know prices to determine who gets what in the society and as a consequence i think the more unequal our society is getting the more that people who are on the other side of that divide the less flew inside feel like they have very few opera tunities to get to the afl inside which is typically seen as the american dream and as a consequence i think it contributes to political dysfunction tribalism a lot of the ills that people have talked about in the news so i have my feet in number of buckets so to speak so my primary area of research is looking at neighborhood amenities and how people value them and how changes in those amenities affects individual decisions and so some of the work that i've been looking at his looking at the consequences of intensity violent crime on various aspects of neighborhoods so for example my colleague and former graduate student i have written some work on looking at how violent activity can affect school accountability measures and looking at teacher sorting that's a current project we're working on in some other work i'm looking directly at any quality both from current day and looking at like the t c in other transfer policies to what degree they can sort of mitigate any quality we have and cities urban areas and also looking at some of the historical determinative kind of inequality in social mobility and in some other work i'm also looking at school choice charter schools some work that i've recently done is looking at the structure of charter school markets whether it fosters quality improvements among charter schools and so some of the extensions to that work include looking at long term effects of charter school attendance as well as whether charter school entry actually has the effects on local public schools if i was going to recommend one book it would be the twilight of the letes by chris hayes the msnbc host i think what he does in that book in the reason why recommended his dad he talks about how you know in describes in a very cogent fashion what is driving sort of the lack of faith in the standard institutions of the united states and how that feeds back into this this hopelessness lack of faith in institutions and how that translates into what some people seeing kind of political chaos it came out several years ago but it's one of the best now that help explain some of the things that we see in the news.

markus casey
"brookings" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"brookings" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

"And now here's mal reynolds with another addition of what's happening in congress my name is molly reynolds and i'm a fellow in the governance studies program at the brookings institution with immigration again making national headlines thanks to president trump's implementation of a so called zero tolerance policy and the associated separation of families at the southern border congress also finds itself embroiled in an immigration fight the capitol hill version of the story like most things in congress has several moving parts on one hand we've a legislative fight in the house of representatives that's been brewing for months back in january a group of house conservatives threatened to vote against a temporary spending bill over whether house republican leaders would schedule a vote on immigration bill sponsored by house judiciary committee chair bob goodlatte in may the same faction threatened to vote against the reauthorization of agricultural nutrition programs the farm bill unless house leaders i held a vote on go glutz bill and then followed through on their threat with the farm bill failing on the floor a different faction republican lawmakers led by representatives from places like florida and california used a procedural tactic notice the discharge petition to try and force the house to hold a series of votes on a set of immigration proposals the discharge petition allows two hundred eighteen members of the house to signify their support for particular perch here holding a series of votes on different immigration bills in order to force action even when the speaker of the house who controls what comes up on the house floor disagrees the proponents of the discharge petition came within two signatures of the.

mal reynolds brookings institution trump congress bob goodlatte florida california molly reynolds president house judiciary committee one hand
"brookings" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"brookings" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

"We're not an advocacy organization irs code five one c three nonprofit organization but there are other organizations that are utilizing or advocacy there's even some tanks that have a part of them which is a what we would call one c four they do advocate for legislation one of the goals or missions of brookings is to have impact in the policy debate how does brookings have impact in the policy debate without expressly lobbying for policy outcomes lobbying for legislation yeah i think there's so much to that question i see how we can break it down one of the things that i've considered when i think about my role and the role of brookings is many ways what i like to do is i try to i come from academia and there's some values that are held dear academia that i think are really important that i think we should emulate but there's other aspects of academia that distinguish us from them and so the idea of having a community were a scholar can be independent and pursue topics as he or she pleases based on their expertise i think is incredibly valuable that is different than a lobby organization which is going to be much more top down we are in favor of this please help us make that case it's an important thing to be doing i'm not saying we shouldn't have that but we are an organization that tries to attract people who have deep expertise have the freedom to actually pursue where that expertise takes them in their recommendations for what policies should look like so that is something i hold dear we are different from academia we don't just right the study and this is maybe uncharitable to some economics they're not all like this there's a lot more to it there's how do we communicate that how do we reach different audiences how do we speak to these issues in a way that can be convincing to use modern communication technologies and i can turn the question to you how do that as well beings over sitting in the communications department your brookings and i think this is a tough negotiation or space for us to negotiate and i think we're not alone in this we've seen an enormous explosion the means of communications and with that comes a lot of opportunities to expand your reach in your dissemination but also comes risks because ultimately the quality of our work is our brand and our credibility is the most important thing that we have and so we don't want the means of communication anyway distort what we're doing give you a little personal story if i.

brookings irs
"brookings" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"brookings" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

"Public policy program that's right yes so big shot out to them graduate of that program to from there from a long time ago great program so after almost nine years as leader of the economic studies program co leader of the program you now become the executive vice president at brookings essentially the number two leader brookings after our new president jon allen so i expect in the transition your day to day activities are changing quite a lot actually doing less research maybe more on the managing of the organization what in those buckets are you most looking forward to well so with the caveat that this transition is still taking place i'm new to the job and as i said before i'm trying to find my replacement for my job so i can be fully on board as executive vice president i think that the thing that intrigues me the most is what i was saying really what brought me here in the first place for me the intellectual fascination the interest in actually helping organization succeed coupled with the fact that i believe in the mission of the organization you can help all sorts organizations succeed and she ends that you don't believe in and that would not be gratifying and in my time here in economic studies i found it enormously gratifying to me to see the success of what other talented people within that group from researchers communication experts to everybody on the support team what they can do to actually really contribute to policy debates so could be the brookings papers on economic activity where we've done really formed of work in a raya of economic topics from issues a monetary policy and if you look at what the federal reserve has done over the years a lot of it has been informed by what we've published through bp they degrade work as we talked about i think that the last time i was here on a podcast on in case in angus deaton work on opioids to the work of the hutchins center where they've done great work and productivity and debtmanagement i mean there's all sorts of antacid were going on throughout economic studies on social policy richard reid had a fantastic book recommend tall your listeners called three mortars and i get enormous amount of gratification to seeing that i can actually in my what little way place on part in having them achieve that kind of success and so what excites me about my new role is trying to do that building wide this is a large place it's filled with just a large amount of really fascinating interesting experts on an array of subjects i am in the learning phase now to try and understand all that we do here and me being positioned in order to help everybody that are working on these key issues do better job be more effective i think is very satisfying to me i have this tradition in my current role of the studies whenever we have a new employee from an intern to new distinguish senior fellow iowa's take some time to sit down and talk about what they hope to get out of the experience of being here and so it's actually a fun meeting to have into here from people what they hope to get out of it and i envisioned my new job something similar is trying to understand what the actual talents are that we have here what are the interests of the people who work here across the research programmes across all the support business units and trying to figure out how as a team we can work towards success you reference a minute ago mission.

nine years
"brookings" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

02:37 min | 2 years ago

"brookings" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

"Welcome to the brookings cafeteria the podcast about ideas and the experts who have them i'm fred dues i guess today is ted gayer who wears many hats the brookings institution since april he's executive vice president of brookings and remains price president director economic studies and he's the joseph a senior fellow we'll talk today about his career about his new role at brookings about some of the important issues that brookings spaces as an organization and that its scholars or paying attention to also today show you'll hear about what's happening in congress from mali reynolds who unpack immigration and the competing factions in the house republican conference and also meet a new scholar economic studies marcus casey you can follow the brookings podcast network on twitter at policy podcasts to get the latest information about all of our shows and now all the interview ted welcome back to the brookings cafeteria and i'm delighted to welcome you to the two hundred episode of the showed wow i didn't realize we were an anniversary it's delighted to be here it's always fun to talk to you about economic issues so let's start with that fact during a communist by training earlier in your career you worked at georgetown university choice axum georgetown grad myself with stents in the government at the council of economic advisers and also the department of the treasury looking back what brought you to think tank like brookings acidic remaining in academia well i've been thinking about this a lot at you mentioned in the intro i now where two hats and i am desperately eager to only be wearing one hand so i have recently become executive vice president brookings which means i am trying to find someone to fill my shoes as the economic studies and in talking to them about the position it got me reflecting on what brought me here which was in two thousand nine at the time co director and then five years ago as director and vice president so with the apologies that it's been a long time and so my memory sometimes fuzzy i would say that the motivation at the time was both the place and the job and so i can explain both of those i had been in academic georgetown with various stints in policy positions at the council of economic advisers and at treasury as you had said those were exciting stints those were applications of economic research to real live current problems very exhilarating it was a good formative time in my life to be able to see how my understanding of economics could actually inform policy decisions i actually you know there's this common stories i sometimes sports radio and they asked not to compare myself too much here they'll ask an nba player one was the first you thought you could actually you know play professional basketball they talk about that kind of realization and for me that was the realization that the tools that i was bringing as an economist could actually be presented to really inform very important issues so when brookings came calling the place appeal to me it is a place dedicated to that it is a place dedicated to using informed research in my case economic research to try to inform the public and actually come up with innovative policy solutions to the pressing needs of the day so that was very appealing to me and then on personal level actual job appealed to me in a way that probably isn't typical of a lot of academics i loved being an academic at a great career georgetown i was there for many years i love the idea of academic research and dedication to independent expertise in to inform your research but for me is a personal matter at the time i was presented with an offer to become the co director which had a heavy management responsibility in perhaps a lot of my colleagues in academia that appeal to me i have had and continue to have intellectual curiosity for how you management how you take complex organizations you and i both working to conflicts organization how you can take the talent that exists in such an organization and help the people there chief the mission the mission of informing bringing experts to inform public policy research so that was intriguing to me to actually try and move a little bit away from the economic world which is almost strictly dedicated to research and teaching towards more of organizational operational managerial position of how to help organization and how to help other people in that organization succeed so that's what brought me here when you were at georgetown were you in the.

five years one hand
"brookings" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"brookings" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

"Welcome to the brookings cafeteria the podcast about ideas and experts who have him i'm fred dudes pakistan a richly textured nation of two hundred million people has come to be defined almost exclusively in terms of its struggle with tear but an ordinary pakistanis extremists and one explains how pakistanis think in pakistan under siege extremism society and the state a new book from the brookings institution press author medina asau explores the full picture of pakistan's relationship with extremism and suggests how this important nation can change course i saw is a non resident fellow and global economy development of brookings an is an adjunct professor at johns hopkins sice also on this episode we have a new installment of irregular metro lens feature in which internationally regarded demographer bill fry talks about the size and diversity of the millennial generation you can follow the brookings podcast at work on twitter policy podcasts get the latest information about all of our shows and sinn any questions you might have for me were our scholars to bcp at brookings dot eu and now here's my colleague bill fining director of the brookings institution press and his interview with media astle thanks reddin medina hello good to see you get to see you you right in your new book that pakistan has too often seen the wrong way by the outside his specially the western world what is that perception that is incorrect that's wrong about pakistan and general that's a great question so pakistan is really seen serve as a villainous kind of feeling state by the west and you know the perception that really sticks in people's minds is what they see on tv screens and what they see in the newspaper which is either of mobs who are virulently antiamerican so they're burning american flags and chanting death to america or they see mobs rallying behind islamist fundamentalists and those aren't incorrect images that's not fake news but that doesn't present the entire picture of pakistan i think the other side that we see here in the west is terrorist attacks and saw.

pakistan adjunct professor director america brookings institution medina asau johns hopkins sice bill fry twitter sinn dot eu
"brookings" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"brookings" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

"Welcome to the brookings cafeteria the podcast about ideas and the experts who have i'm fred dudes cities are powerful more powerful the most people understand in the new localism how cities can thrive in the age of populism published by the brookings institution press offers bruce cats and jeremy no walk show where the real power to create change resides and how it can be used to address our most serious social economic and environmental challenges in this episode of the brookings cafeteria my colleague bill fining director of the brookings institution press sits down with the authors to discuss the important power shift from national governments to states and cities also in this episode expert molly reynolds lets us know what's happening in congress in the wake of president trump's first state of the union address how will congress react to the president's statements on immigration infrastructure and other policy matters molly reynolds breaks it down you can follow the brookings podcast art work on twitter policy podcasts to get the latest information about all of our shows if you have a question for a brookings expert recorded and senate to me at bcp at brookings that eu all right first up today molly reynolds followed by the interview manning of mali reynolds and a fellow nick governance studies program at the brookings institution president trump delivered his first state of the union address to congress this week which always serves as important marker on the legislative calendar at the dictates much of the pace and rhythm of congress has burke each year meteorite arc aside and the effects of the speech on the president's approval ratings switch for this press an remain mile are likely to be small and fade quick.

jeremy director congress trump president senate mali reynolds brookings institution bruce molly reynolds twitter
"brookings" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"brookings" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

"Welcome to the brookings cafeteria the podcast about ideas and aspartame after i'm fred deep in july 2015 outreach spread when an american big game punter killed cease or the lions in auckland last fall the us fish and wildlife service announced that it would allow hunters to bring home trophies at elephants hunted in some african countries other president trump delayed that decision these and similar incidents have raised new concerns about species loss cost to some degree by the spread of trophy hunting and also poaching and wildlife trafficking affecting many more species suggests elephants rhinos in great cats to help us understand the scope of the threat of potential solutions i'm joined in the studio today by senior fellow bond fell by brown she's an expert on nontraditional security threats including insurgency and illicit economies she's the author of the recently published book the extinction market wildlife trafficking in how to counter it from hurst he's also coauthor of a new brookings institution press book militants criminals and warlords the challenge of local governance in an age of disorder by colleague bill finding recently interviewed her in one of the coauthors on the brookings cafeteria also on the show today nonresident senior fellow john austin from the metropolitan policy programme delivers another installment of our metro lens segment in which he discusses a tale of two rust belt s a vast region known best for its industrial output but that now also produces innovation but are all of its communities keeping pace you can follow the brookings podcast arok on twitter policy podcasts get the latest information about all of our shows fodder welcome back to the brookings cafeteria thank you very much for that it's great to be bank so we're here to talk about your book the extinction market let's start with the visit you describe in the book to a market in indonesia what did you see there.

auckland hurst john austin lions president senior fellow nonresident senior fellow twitter indonesia
"brookings" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"brookings" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

"As much as possible on the demand and supply and the price mechanism that such so when you have a politicized system or business decisions are being made you know whether or not it's to please the president directly whether or not it through a twitter war adding those things are dangerous and dangerous indications and you know i think in this gets back to the start of the regulatory center at talked about and why i think the timing is particularly good i think as the administrative state has grown as the economy has become more complex as congress has become more dysfunctional i think we've moved away from clear rules and more towards administrative discretion a little bit more towards the ambiguously about what exactly the rules are which i think interferes with the business practices and in the cases that you mention you know as kind of blatant politicizing of the process itself in of the business decision so you know on my more optimistic days when that happened i broke it as good politics and i don't like it and it's not gonna be very consequential and will be kind of a few one offs but you on my more trouble days i think this is the sign of a of a larger trend that will only increase and i think it have trouble consequences as i mentioned in the introduction we had about a dozen book interviews conducted by my colleague bill fining director of the brookings institution press and this clip he spoke with senior fellow john hudek who is the author of the brookings press titled the short history of marijuana bill had asked john about the racial history a marijuana policy in the us.

president congress director john hudek us twitter brookings institution senior fellow marijuana
"brookings" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"brookings" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

"I mentioned in the introduction that you're the author of the book why presidents fail and how they can succeed again now that we're thinking about the very beginning of the trump administration what are some things that president trump can do to succeed well the first thing he has to do in this i talk about a lot in the book any was a problem that affected both democrats and republicans is he has to understand the government he runs because the government he runs is both the source of his greatest advantage and his biggest disadvantages when the government you run crashes and burns you get blamed you're the president the people in the country think that you're in charge of the government even though it's a massive operation and you know a lot of presidents are so the put off by at that they don't spend any time learning welcome to the brookings cafeteria the podcast about ideas in the experts who happen i'm fred jews that was senior fellow elaine kmart in my interview with her on what ex presidents do once they leave office it was january 2017 president barack obama was leaving the white house we had a fascinating conversation about former presidents and their legacies about the work they do in what they are expected to do we talked about carter reagan the bushes clinton and even george washington but i wanted to look ahead so i asked her to share her ideas on how president trump could succeed in office as he embarked upon his presidency she continued the second thing is so sometimes discover minis scaling sometimes this government is going to give the president a big black guy and we saw that with the veterans administration scandals under obama he looked really bad when they failed in he didn't even seemed to know that that was going on the flip side of the hat is.

trump president elaine kmart barack obama white house senior fellow carter reagan clinton george washington
"brookings" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"brookings" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

"Welcome to the brookings cafeteria the podcast but ideas in the experts who captained i'm fred dis russian federation president vladimir putin recently announced that he will run for another sixyear term 2013 he has been either president or prime minister at this country since two thousand and is expected to easily win during putin's reign russia has reasserted itself on the world stage sending forces to georgia syria in eastern ukraine and even annexing crimea and in 2016 russian cyber interference in the us presidential election is considered by some to have been a deciding factor in donald trump's victory to discuss the challenge of ladimir putin in russia i'm joined today by elina polyakova she is a david m rubinstein fellow in the center on the united states in europe it brookings for specialties include european politics farright populism and nationalism and russian foreign policy you can also listen to her in a new series about russian politics and society on the law fair podcast she recently interviewed are katie ostroskey the russia and eastern europe editor at the economist stay tune in this episode for another addition of wessels economic update with senior fellow david wessel he talks about big changes coming to the federal reserve as fed chair janet yellen leaves in fed governor jay powell takes the helm after the interview opposite my discussion with no noha abba welder hub the visiting fellow at the brookings doha center about her paper on transitional justice in authoritarian context with a focus on egypt you can follow the brookings podcast that work on twitter policy podcasts to get the latest information about all of our shows and now on with the interview elina welcome to the brookings cafeteria thanks for having me it's always great and interesting for me to talk about let him you're putin in russia because that's what it started in college it seems like a long time ago but it always kind of resurfaces a lot of that old school love studies for me so this is always very interesting the talked to people who were like really experts on this kind of stuff so thank you could you first tell listeners how you came to be a scholar in the field of european.

wessels twitter senior fellow katie ostroskey foreign policy georgia president egypt brookings doha center visiting fellow jay powell janet yellen david wessel vladimir putin editor europe elina polyakova donald trump presidential election us crimea ukraine syria russia prime minister sixyear
"brookings" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"brookings" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

"Welcome to the brookings cafeteria the podcast about ideas and the experts who happen i'm fred dudes hezbollah and isis in the middle east pirate clan in africa criminal gangs in south america and the taliban in afghanistan are all nonstate actors that control territory and deliver public services that the nation state cannot or will not provide when national governance breaks down the vacuum is filled by gangs militias and warlords that in many cases have substantial popularity in a new book from the brookings institution press titled militants criminals and warlords the challenge of local governance in an age of disorder the authors explain why the rest of the world has a deep interest in these situations an offer answers to the question how should the international community respond on today's show coauthors fonda fell by brown and shoddy hammeed both senior fellows and our foreign policy program discussed their book with brookings press director bill fining also in today's show expert molly reynolds offers her update on what's happening in congress including a looming government shutdown and issues with the appropriations process you can follow the brookings podcast now work on twitter policy podcasts to get the latest information about all of our shows and now on with the interview here's bill fining thank you fred and welcome bonda shotty reading your book i remembered an essay by robert kaplan that came out at the end of communism you might remember to the coming anarchy was in the atlantic it became a book is sketched out a world population by militants on warlords and it was at this toby of tribalism and anarchy your book offers a different vision of what state break down can mean when militants warlords and criminal groups occupied the spaces where the state retreated or been removed and is not anarchy but a sense of order.

isis twitter molly reynolds director foreign policy brown brookings institution afghanistan africa south america fred world population robert kaplan congress fonda public services taliban