17 Burst results for "Brookhaven National Lab"

"brookhaven national lab" Discussed on Open Loops: Conversations That Bend

Open Loops: Conversations That Bend

02:55 min | 5 d ago

"brookhaven national lab" Discussed on Open Loops: Conversations That Bend

"Time they ever had a hologram right on the cover. National geographic. I worked at the guy's house who made that. Who was the hologram expert at the time. And he had this really cool hologram machine set up in his frigging workshop. Stuff like that out. See really cool stuff regularly. These corporations Yeah you know there's stuff going on both corporately and in the people's homes there was They had it was set up. I was there when they were building. It and i was there when they were done with it. I was still there plummer I'll just say that this family owned one of the big lock companies in the us. You know because okay. That's what you can do you own something that in perpetuity just gives you money you know so they had a really cool house the invested in cool things and i remember they set it up when you walked in the front door The way that the house was set up there was like the main atrium. But you can you can break to the left or break to the right and then there was like art on the wall and stuff like that but they had it set up they cut all this stuff into the wall and made it look like a picture but it was it was a hologram so it was like a haunted house disney type thing so when you walked by the picture kept turning his head and looking at you when you went by and it looks totally real. So it's really freaking creepy. That is very awesome. Time machine like i'm hoping you encountered but it still makes me wonder if these people have these devices in their homes and there's connection and long island to all this advanced technology potentially i mean what what's going on in some of the basements. There's gotta be some weird stuff right. I'm hoping there is a lot of science projects. A lot of folks are really Into things at a customer in roslyn that was very much into tesla coils things and got a wonderful education from that customer fund. There's a lot of folks. I mean so. I've been digging for quite some time. This is another oddity right so brookhaven national labs and all the signs that they're doing You'll you'll see in the. I just put up a video or youtube with them. An article about the new science at brookhaven. And you'll see in the articles that they refer to a piece of equipment at brookhaven has the light source. So they say that they're manifesting matter and antimatter out of thin air By utilizing light beams in a vacuum will guess what they have a light source. Well guess what the light sources nuclear reactor and i had costumers on long island again. I don't have control over who rings my phone and says my faucets leaking. I'd just go right..

plummer brookhaven national labs disney roslyn brookhaven tesla us youtube
"brookhaven national lab" Discussed on Bytemarks Cafe

Bytemarks Cafe

07:04 min | 2 months ago

"brookhaven national lab" Discussed on Bytemarks Cafe

"Into type certain type of sensor that the end user once these microchips essentially need to connect to censor and then put it in a little box and and create a user manual for it creates software for so. We're doing all of that integration At no scientific as we grow a team and have grown to be able to do that. Also wow so you did mention a word. I wanted to get you to maybe elaborate on you. Did you say fab or fabulous fabulous Semiconductor company essentially by fab lists. Second what do you mean by fabulous so every microchip. Open your cell. Phone all these microchips peter or tv biggest fabricated at a foundry. And it's a it's a giant facility multibillion dollar facility that essentially prints these to give them a design and they spent these and comes out two inflator and do the qualification packaging and everything else so we. We are in the design. Stay cycle of these My purchase essentially so we designed these. We identify a fat house that can do make our design suspect that we want and be emailed them the design and they will fabricated and send us the ship back and then then we take it from there gonna be do all value. Add things that goes on top of it because we know that the exact right right right okay. So you're you're you know a lot of ways similar to like apple computer. i mean they. They design the chips. But the don't fabricate it at at apple. I mean so that's that's somewhat different scale right. Yeah and so you know in terms of Getting back to the work that you folks are developing. I mean i know when we first talked to your very heavy into the whole chip design and specifically for you know these kind of sensors and as you mentioned you know getting the getting the timing timing for the sensors down to this trillions of a second. So it's very very precise kind of work But but now you're also seeing as your customers get you know. Get into integrating the circuits into the system Nonscientific is is actually right there with the customer helping to integrate the system. So you guys getting more into the integration work. Yes that's where it gets really exciting now. our team used to be You know a handful of. I see designers now on top of that. I have the experts that understand High frequency and and and complicated printed circuit boards they understand packaging. Denver verstand software and firmware design. Which is another beast under. The hood of any chronic circuit affirmed over. And so we do all that in house now and so we created these kind of quick collaborative work together within the company and in also. We're taking it one step forward and that is to be with the customer that wants us microchip and walk with them to show them how this microchip and make their life easier for them and emburey experts. That can actually make that happen. So we we. We have to expand and extend time and and be able to show that demonstrate to the customers. And now they're coming back for more package solution so tell us who are your well. Maybe you don't have to get into specifics who your customers. But what is the actual end product. That leverages your chip design right so Our customers are actually national labs mostly in university There are national. Labs are are essentially government. Funded research facilities. And they're doing a lot of great work in terms of scientific discovery and the united states and they're funded by for example in this case the department of energy The department of energy's thirty billion dollar agency and they have seven billion dollars a year off of science that that also funds you know ten national labs each of them running about you know five hundred billion dollars funding and they do a lot of research in from from physical science natural science allergy and they have really state of the art facilities and so imagine an oscilloscope. Right that is something that you as an electronic engineer and something that measures that way for our current or voltage that as a scientist are trying to make something you wanna. You wanna have a diagnostic tool you go to the store or ebay or wherever you buy that. It's a ten thousand dollar box sits on your desk and now now you have expensive expanded visibility into what you're designing essentially so We are making a custom version of that. That will sit on their desks. And help you know as sector of the scientists What their measurements essentially are you. Are you still involved with any of the work in like particle accelerators and all that. Yes so in fact Here's gets exciting The the way that we started was actually working on on the collider experiment. So imagine the large hadron collider and so it's on japan that been heavily involved with at at k. k. and And we we learned just being. There learned a lot of the problems that they have. And so that's how we kind of thought about starting out scientific and now moving forward There's excitement in the united states that they will be a new collider experiment. It's called electron ion collider And at brookhaven national lab in new york. And and that's gonna be happening in the next ten years. It's a giant construction project when With the need for lots of microchips in electronics and so we are positioning ourselves to able to cater to their needs. Essentially and so We're bringing a lot of lessons. Learned from from other experiments that have been happening. And we're trying to perfect recipe to put ourselves with the right microchip at the right time and the right. Kind of boxes fails microchips essentially that. Hopefully we can get into actually. Yeah no this is great. This is a really exciting work. And do i do want to talk to you a little bit about how your company scientific has has sort grown and evolved over the you know the even the last fifteen months that you know per last poverty last talked to you so what we'll do is we'll hold that thought we'll be right back after this short break to continue our conversation with isar must've find his odd founder and ceo of knowledge scientific and we're talking about custom chip design here in hawaii. This is bite marks. Cafe support for bite. Marks cafe comes from the hp our local talk show fund which helps hawaii public radio sustain and grow its locally produced..

apple department of energy Denver brookhaven national lab united states allergy ebay japan new york isar hawaii hp
"brookhaven national lab" Discussed on Not So Standard Deviations

Not So Standard Deviations

09:56 min | 5 months ago

"brookhaven national lab" Discussed on Not So Standard Deviations

"And so. He took that out of the paper. He's like i requested that they take out this appendix and then like added a statement. That was like a faux apology about it. Like it was like worse like he kinda like well. He didn't make it worse. I think that a lot of people be like. Oh look he apologized. The apology was like not good. You okay did you see it. Do not see it actually. It didn't make it into my feet. So which is. I think a good sign actually or sign that you happy muted. Which is i do not have you muted. I probably aright so the says well. The appendix was an earnest effort to explored more in depth weather technical competence issues or confirmation bias. These could explain why to overviews had strong unit directional bias the differentiated them from the four overviews from other four overviews. Whatever i don't. I don't know overview These like i had this discussion it was ernest. I'm grateful to the commentators who suggested that this effort might be misinterpreted here. Just passionate discussion of these technical bias issues may be pursued in other fora okay. The notion that other people's feelings may be hurt causes me more regret than the vilification. I have suffered because my priority is a physician. Epidemiologist has always been to care for other people even more so in a time of major crisis. Okay to be said as oppose commission shifts discretion away from the scientific essence of the main paper effectively silencing scientific debate i really applaud. Students have offered me their wisdom and critique almost in this occasion as sydor myself the least knowledgeable student of all Well i have. I have no. I don't have anything more to say about this. There's really nothing else to say. Yeah i You know it sounds like the issue is totally resolved will never happen again. I'm sure someone pointed out that that last sentence might actually be like a a reference Tease sounds like something like that. Yeah yeah so it's like. He's comparing himself socrates. Well the thing. That i thought was like funniest about the everett mayor's ally you know. Feel free to message me on twitter tweet at me if you don't if you're like why was that bad because i'm having to go into it more but the fact that he's like you can discuss this in other fora but then his whole thing was like mad. That people were talking about it on twitter. He went full circle. There you know yeah in the course of like you said it's like wait. You were mad thousand air discussing this. Another thing is if it's so important than like why isn't it in the paper like you. Yeah now it's truly like it's bad. I don't even or yeah poor guy. I honestly feel bad for him at this point really well. That's somebody's got some issues. You know what i mean. Yeah i see the broader says maybe but not. Yeah yeah like it's. It's very hard for this. I wanna be wrong clearly in a way that's like so self sabotage like he's basically trashing his career because he can't be wrong. I would go that far. No go that far. I think his his career is secure his career fine. But i mean he's done some damage probably not you don't think so. I think this whole episode has done damage. Well i don't think it's done damage in the senate like he's never gonna be able to publish a paper again or like he's never gonna be able to get a grant again or he's never gonna be able to teach a class again like i think he will be engage in his life like he always has well except for the part of his life was like going on the news. Talk about cova. Ed cove eventually goes away. They'll have to find something to do anyway right so i'm just saying if someone who likes this guy i think he'll be fine. I'm i'm confident they'll figure out another way to scratch that edge off your calm confident. Exactly that he'll figure out a way to kind of fox news will always be there always. There's always a channel right in this day and age is the number of channels out. There is always something interesting we shall see. I thought that was important. Follow the the personal taxes down the apologies. See you haven't the next proof of the paper. I'm glad you brought that up. Because i honestly did not see it. Yeah i was like. Oh my god what's going on here anyway. Speaking of standards of evidence. Yes i guess we were speaking of it. Did you see this story about the physics experiment. Now no it sounds somewhat familiar. So maybe it's so the some physicists. At fermilab this experiment on mules. I honestly i have no idea what i heard of this meal nuance. Yeah my understanding. Is that they're kind of like electrons but not but they're heavier than electrons. Okay never among the experiment involved particles and such at apparently the results implied that there may be some unknown or unseen or undiscovered forces or articles. Universe that we that we haven't liked discovered different than dark matter. Yes totally different from. Yeah well maybe there's a connection but there were dark matter did not come up so interesting. Wow that it would. Yeah right so now. The interesting things in the press. Release all the headlines like new discovery. All the coats decide to relate well. We're not sure you is strong. And and there's apparently there's a there is like a cutoff that physicists arabi particle physicists. Have for like what makes a discovery and it. It is equivalent to its bullets. Five sigma right so which would be a p value of point six zeros and then to eight. That's funny that it's five. They're like comedians. Six sigma now dan. This finding was only four point. Two sigma which is a value lint of only four zeros and one three point o o one three. This feels arbitrary. Well let me so first of all. I just think it's funny that like they operate on values that are that small and it's inherently funny right when you do data collection for physics. It's like oh my god. it's so consistent. They compared to like biology and for the history of this experiment is that so poorly in two thousand and one there was a similar experiment at brookhaven national lab where they had something like finding like this. And they're like whoa. This is weird. We did do it again right. Yeah so twenty years later my god they did it again. This is the kind of temporal timescale that we're talking about here right so they started right. It's taking twenty years to do it again. I'm not sure if they were working on it. Continuously for twenty years. But it's taken twenty years to publish it again. That's for sure. So yes that's how long it takes to a replication in particle physics this magnitude and it's still the same so we have to results that are close to significant essentially. Exactly right. oh so they got to do another one. i guess. Well that's okay. Let's teams arbitrary to me is just how sample size being determined. I don't even know what the meaning of sample sizes in this like race. Yeah it seems like i mean. I'm sure if. I actually under my cousins like smarty. Pants is getting a phd in astro physics from my from caltech. So give him a call. My guess is that the The kind of like limitations of the equipment have more to do than just like what we think of as sample size. I think there's like when you get to like physics stuff like this is just like you can only measure down to a certain level of uncertainty and then it's like you cannot buy the laws of physics dictate that you cannot get any more certain than this right and so i think just the nature of the equipment is probably such that. This is the level of precision that you have and that's it probably but so. Here's here's what i want. Here's the broader question that i wanted to talk about. Which is that got people like. You know saying that scientists broken right now like me because you have all these like false. You'll have all these discoveries that don't not to be true. Right and the implication is that like while you know we have this. We say ps five. But it's not actually point. Oh five it's it's bigger than that and and so we should. One solution is too low is to do what the physicists do a lower standard or not lower but well it depends on your perspective but the lower the p value threshold right so we could make ten to the minus sixth right right instead of your currently have which is like ten to minus two but then there would be like no discoveries like this like this wasn't even a discovery it made headlines right right. Yeah exactly it's like you have to..

twenty years Ed cove twitter two thousand cova twenty years later five one One solution Six sigma minus two four point brookhaven national lab Two sigma minus sixth ten caltech four zeros Five sigma eight
"brookhaven national lab" Discussed on Further Together the ORAU Podcast

Further Together the ORAU Podcast

07:33 min | 5 months ago

"brookhaven national lab" Discussed on Further Together the ORAU Podcast

"Hundred plus people work from home is there. Is there john able to do that. So we had some heavy lifting to do but man matt team rose to the occasion. I have a very great strong project. Manager are human cleveland and she reminds me of that that duck that she just looks calm on the surface. That her little. Peter paneling away quickly. I was able to really manage that two hundred us folks and say what are you doing. What are you working on. Let's make sure that you can work from home. And we worked with There are employees local managers at the facilities. They replaced up to make sure they could to you. And we all did this really prior to anybody talking about sending people home because we knew it was coming so we didn't know how long if you would've asked me back in march if you'd still be working for mom right now. I would have laughed in your face but you back in june But the the thing is is we may have. We probably seemed Overeager like we know to our clients have like. Let's let's talk about this now that you know. Afterwards we got feedback from our clients. Saying thank you. Thank you for for pushing this and taking it in this direction so that we can continue to have the support. I think that was probably the best example of how we really maintain focus on the client and to make sure that they had an easy transition not had to worry about one more thing on their plate when they had so much other stuff to worry about on their own for with. Cova d'you sure amidst the benefit of a good contractor meaning is. Is you know for you all to be able to look ahead and say this is coming and we need to be ready for it and yeah it was yeah. It was a smooth smooth transition in tomlin. Nothing was smooth right. So that was. That was a nice in. Everyone was asking questions. And how are we gonna do. This in our people are going to be productive and you know all all of questions. Everyone was asking back in march. So then you know the other audience that we focused on. Is the candidate and you know. I mentioned that we were crude. And hire the best of the best and that hasn't changed either and the need to find those people haven't changed at all so you know you don't have to go to the bureau of labor statistics and know that the world is changing and that the way employers Think about their workforce has changed and the way employees. Think about how they want to work is changing You know all employers right now are are if they never had remote work or telework before. They're like wow. This saves a lot of money right. We don't have facilities and there's there could be there. They're the same thing is happening with employees. They're thinking how do i ever want to go back to a nine to five forty hours a week. Two hours of commuting hot of life and that's something that we're we're keeping focus on and the way that we do that is again something we've always done is we are data nerds at heart. We look at what candidates are searching for so you see Obviously right now. A lot of he words around remote or tele work But we're watching that trend so as the economy starts to reopen as things kind of of ah won't say go back to normal because i don't think that there anymore right that's something. We'll continue to watch so from a candidate perspective. What we wanted to do is really meet them where they are So we always love to see where job seekers are searching and we do our best to cultivate a database of really strong candidates. There are always in contact with us so have am to really strong recruiters on my team. That and actually more than two. We have just a great team of recruiters that chew that allen. Talk about is britney hartselle indiana copeland They have their fingers on the pulse of of candidates. They know where they are hanging out online. They know how to reach them through professional networks or through university partnerships And that's something that we haven't changed either right. It's something that we've always done. But with cova ed we put it under a microscope and said okay. We've got a watch where they go and follow them so way. Continue to to do that through. Virtual events like i mentioned image in the technology piece you in virtual career fairs for clients like brookhaven national lab and the national society of black physicists. Where we're helping clients who may have not had the tools prior to cova to do this quickly. Transition from an im- person conference to an online digital conference And allow us to recruit on the best of the best during that process to you and you managed the whole conference. I mean it wasn't just like you've done you've done virtual career fairs but when we were talking about in preparation for this talked about in a you managed put together entire conferences for organisations of. We've we've always done Career fairs like you said but with covered we saw the need you know for for a water organizations to try to find a resource to said that they could continue to do really important work and have ways to connect with people that doesn't people people put people risk are You know have had an impact there so we use several different tools to really build out a virtual environment that looks just like a conference hall that you can have interactive booths and you can chat a need can video You can download documents and really have that true conference feel. I was really successful at it. This year And and that's been great one of the cool things about it is a lot of the People that have come to us. Come to us by word of mouth and that's the the the best compliment right that even people that you're doing work for saying hey you know you should.

bureau of labor statistics tomlin cleveland britney hartselle matt Peter cova ed john brookhaven national lab national society of black phys allen indiana
"brookhaven national lab" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

07:55 min | 5 months ago

"brookhaven national lab" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Child will that stop my legs from freezing at random? We have to determine Yes. Oh, great quote. Great point. We have to determine why your leg is freezing. Is it because of something that's not flowing correctly from your brain? You know the New York transmitters? And is that part of the brain affecting your leg or Is he low back affecting your leg? Because a lot of people when you have lower back issues, and you don't have to have horrible, low back pain. You may have a nerve flow loss so that your muscles are not being told what to do correctly. You know you do you have a strong signal on the muscles work beautifully or that signal electrical signals like a very weak light is supposed to a nice bright light. So we have to look and see what's happening with your back. And then there are vascular concerns that could affect because of the Parkinson. Well back problems can be from Parkinson's or come be without having Parkinson's affected. It may be damaged. Two discs just herniation degeneration. Ridiculous apathy, nerve root impingement so that maybe decreasing the inter float. Down here back. What? Okay, So what do you suggest They will take a look at the videos on the Web site? That'll give you a great view, You know, look at our approach, and certainly we love to be able to see you bringing copies of prior testing that you've had anything neurological testing cardiac blood work. And then we put together a specific blood test and recommendations on had helped to improve your picture. Thank you very much. Great. Look forward to helping you out. The website is Dr Cal dot net. Phone number's 516794. 0404 Great. Thank you. So much for your call. Let's go to Ed in Babylon. Hi. How are you? Hey, aren't you Carol player Once the patient have referred people to you, Thank you. And, uh oh, You're welcome. I think you're here. You're great. And you're type of medicine should always be protected and respected. That's for sure. Thank you very much. Appreciate them. The cutting edge of you know, being able to practice your your true True what I want to ask you, with all due respect, Um, I don't think it's within what you do your opinion on peptide bio regulators, which is Seymour in Europe. Maybe it's what popular popular for a while there. Well, peptides are important molecules that can help your body function. And the reason now the FDA is going to get in on this and create a problem for Manufacture. The big peptides is that Um, A lot of individuals that have gravitated towards using peptides are using them in the bodybuilding realm, And it's kind of interesting that lots of things that Either Get to the market, you know, come through the demand from the public in a specific room, So you know the bodybuilding realm and hormone replacement for men. Has now created all sorts of different types of testosterone. Of course, is you understand testosterone shot Sublingual gel, and now there's a nasal testosterone because it's easier to take you put little jealous, you know, so In the same realm in the athletic grown because they've always wanted to have better performance. There are peptides that affect your receptors for your hormones. That can actually Allow your receptors and you tissue to do better, even with less hormone. Some of these air selective androgen receptor modifiers, and they're just protein sequences, which are natural, but they're not gonna be around for long, because I think We're going to be classified as drugs. So there are peptides that are really good for your body that have no side effect. They just allow you to work better. So the shit from Britain and, uh, you know, and I was interested for friends in the term of cartilage. Rebuilding, Um College peptides, and I also was wondering in a scientific looked at it. Do they really make it through your of the acid in your stomach? Well, most of them don't because proteins were easily broken down by their jet, digestive enzymes and hydrochloric acid. That's why we talk about the Holly Ron eight, and in some of those other Combination is, uh, you know. They don't really do much, because first of all, they're broken down. Second of all to give your blood. How did they get to your ligament? They don't You don't have big blood vessels, pumping your ligaments to carry something. So look at the physics of that Take a little capsule. If we could, and it would be brilliant, But you can't you know mark of that or put a tracer on it. And if there's 100, you know particles in that capsule, for example, or 1000. If you could radioactively, watch them get into your system They get diluted disappeared all of your body. So the chances for some of those things to work on your joints. I don't see that that exists. No, But you brighten. How does it get to your college? I've never seen good custom. Incan Dryden on Emery before then, using them and Emory afterwards grow ligament tendon college, etcetera. So But this is why I called you. I'm going to get the medicine technology that stony brook and you know you could act like you say it based on technetium 99 A m. It's never been done. Maybe it Brookhaven National Labs. They think about it. You know if they're doing research on it, But you Just a perfect point. So I rely on you and that your gentleman that do the wonderful test that we love to do. Um all right. I rely on the M a ride to tell me if there's something that's there initially. And of course, we typically would have to do you know, maybe Prp if it's about problem, certainly stem cells. But you're not going to see studies done on peptides or vitamins because the expense of nature of setting up a study and doing that is only dubbed by the drug companies to try to show you That there's some sort of, you know, Symptom benefit, and there's no drug lost his leg of intending cartilage, so It's a whole realm of Theoretical benefit, and I think the people that take some of the Glucose, amino, the peptides or some of the combinations and there have been many combinations you know that vitamin manufacturers will make over the years. I just don't see those growing tissue And that's because we do the memorize, you know, repeat tests. What? Right s o. It's more secular. It's more of a psychological benefit. I think it could be. Or, you know, is something working like a pain relievers working You know something working like an aspirin. We don't know the entire mechanism. Yes. Fischel decreases Iraq Adana castles. So if people take something that might decrease your academic castle, would they feel less discomfort? Maybe. But you're not growing tissue, anything gross tissue step No. You have to do with him. The confluence of the site experiments and then you you know you have. We would need warp speed that ties This is this is a perfect discussion. I'm glad you brought this up because I want proof. You want proof? Someone comes in and I see this all day long. They have a bad joint shoulder, Hip, knee ankle. Whatever. And actually had a friend. Good friend of mine. Who's a my karate class Big, strong guy played football in college, and he ends up with pain in his heel in his foot foot. So Dr Diagnosis a planter fasciitis podiatrist. He said. Your toes you're being pulled backward and upward too much, and that's putting strain. On your foot. Before I could comment, and I asked him to get the Emery. The doctor went in and did a little surgical procedure on the top of his foot. He said. Whoa! What do you mean on the top of them? He's trying to let those toes come down flat on the ground, and he wasn't As if his toes were curled up, you know, and weren't moving. I said Wait. Where's the M r? I So the podiatrist into the, um right, but he did surgery. So you want me to get the number because it didn't help. And his pain is still at the back part of his heels, so I want the test to be done. You know what.

Brookhaven National Labs Carol 516794. 0404 Europe New York 100 Seymour Ed Britain Babylon FDA Fischel 1000 Two discs Emery Iraq Adana castles Parkinson karate Incan Dryden brook
"brookhaven national lab" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

05:44 min | 7 months ago

"brookhaven national lab" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"You know where one seat away from Paige taking control off the county Legislature, and just last year if I could just go through this and maybe brag a little bit about human You know, in three competitive races for state Senate, we flipped a Democrat with Alexis White in the third District. We knocked off a Democrat and we had two major retirements. In the state Senate can live out in the first district, and Jon Flanagan, the former majority leader in the second district. There, we successfully elected newcomers fresh faces with proven records, Anthony Palumbo in the first and marry Mattera in the second District. Along the way, You know, we lost in American icon. We lost our to retirement. Peter King and everyone across the country down the pundits in D. C. Everyone said we were gonna lose that race where we'll lose the second Congressional district. Instead what we did we wanted by north of 15,000 votes with annual Garbarino. And of course, you know the class. The standard bearer of our of our county. Here on on on state and federal elections is Congressman Lee Zeldin, and he overwhelmingly won by a north of 30,000 votes. I'm very proud that off the top 30 counties in the country that's in all 50 states. It was Suffolk County that came out for Donald Trump in this election. So you know we're using a Republican policies locally and we're growing and and exerting our influence. I do a ballot box. On the state and federal level. Well done. Jesse Garcia, chairman of the Suffolk County Republican Party. Listen, his Twitter. Their Twitter handle is at Brookhaven GOP at Brookhaven GOP. And you're right to Suffolk County went for Trump in 2020. I believe You guys went for Trump in 2016 if I'm not mistaken, correct, Jesse. Yes, we did. Okay, you were. I think we're one of the few counties of any in the country that went from twice in two years. Right through cycles. Excuse me, Great job out of you and the Republicans out there. Now. Here's the thing. Andrew Cuomo, Governor Cuomo, the smug thug. He fraught with corruption, blood on his hands now sexual harassment allegations. The time is right for the Republican Party T to make some gains to replace this guy again. Ah, previous guest pointed out after three terms of marry. Oh, Cuomo. We got George Pataki. Now We have had three terms of Andrew Cuomo. And it's time to get rid of this guy if they don't impeach him, at least in the election and speaking of Congressman Zeldin. His name is being talked about as a potential candidate to run against Governor Cuomo off so get give us your thoughts on all of that. Well, certainly, you know, there is no boogeyman for Andrew Cuomo to point um, point to anymore. Donald Trump is not the White House. No apology yesterday about coming out today. You pointing fingers that travels so funny, but go ahead. I'm sorry. It is hysterical, because that's what a typical all beneath progressive politician does. They do not take responsibility for anything and they point fingers because they don't want anyone to look at their record. This is an unbelievable situation we have here where this individual when we have hashtag them corrupt Cuomo because it started years ago with the Buffalo billions project, and now his malpractice, and his corruption has cost Thousands of lives. There is no doubt that he was the one that it was his administration's directive to to send covert patients back into the nursing homes without checks without support, and what he did is basically just let people die. He lied and people died, and that's a travesty. You can see that we're voting with our feet here in Suffolk County and throughout New York. They are leaving the state. We're losing two congressional state's congressional seats because our populations fallen. If Cuomo see something that moves or doesn't move, he's going to tax it, and that's what's making a situation even worse here economically. You know, I'm you brought up Congressman Lee Zeldin. You know what the country is seeing now is what we've seen here for years. He's a leader. Yeah, he's effective. He's bipartisan. All who want to do is get the job done. And there's always been talk about Lee's Elgin Congressman Lee Zeldin seeking higher office. You know, when I was the Brookhaven chairman, or now the suffocation Arman chairman from across the state and business leaders from across the state, we reach out to me. And shave. What about Lee? What's his aspirations and always, they said, It's about his family first and yourself. He goes to sleep at night and wakes up in the morning thinking about his family and his constituents. And that's what he does. But now that Trump it's getting louder because people are seeing and the media is finally reporting the corruption amount practice the ineffectiveness of the demand of the Democrats. One party domination up in Albany, led by Andrew Cuomo, and I gotta tell you, you know, everyone says talks one thing about Congressman and members of Congress here and there, but least Alvin's a very effective individual. I mean, he's someone that when the pandemic struck here in Suffolk County in Long Island, He delivered immediately when when we were not getting any assistance from the state, he delivered almost two million pieces of P pes support he delivered through the cares act $283 million in support for additional expenses as a result of covert Just stuff a county. Now Southern counties mismanaging that was Steve alone, but that's another story that we're taking care of this year. Plus, he's a combat veteran, even when he's not. Yeah, yes, encoded. He's delivered $2 billion To Brookhaven National Lab That's going to create tens of billions of dollars and increase our economy tenfold. Now. He's quite we lovely Selden. That's funny, just pointed out. He's a.

Donald Trump Anthony Palumbo Alexis White Andrew Cuomo 2016 George Pataki Zeldin Jon Flanagan 2020 $2 billion Jesse Garcia Peter King Republican Party Albany $283 million Lee Zeldin today Alvin New York last year
"brookhaven national lab" Discussed on Proof

Proof

08:58 min | 1 year ago

"brookhaven national lab" Discussed on Proof

"In nineteen thirty eight. A team of German and Austrian scientists discovered nuclear fission and then less than a year later. Germany invaded Poland leading to the outbreak of World War. Two Britain is tonight making it clear to Adolf Hitler that if he does send his armies into Poland Great Britain. We'll go to war. Today's men Evan's Gemini has invaded Poland and has bummed. Many general mobilization has been ordered in Britain and fronts armed with the understanding of vision. It took the US government less than six years to develop the atomic bomb largely through a top secret military program known as the Manhattan Project and one of the Manhattan project's bomb building sites was located about twenty five miles west of Knoxville and Oak Ridge. Tennessee also known as the secret city. There were actually seventy five thousand people living year in August of nineteen forty five. It was the fierce largest city in the state of Tennessee and it wasn't known any map. This is Ray Smith Historian based in Oak Ridge. I found ray through the Oakridge newspaper in his column called historically speaking which she's been writing since two thousand six for that. He worked as a maintenance manager at the y twelve national security complex known as the birthplace of the atomic bomb. Now he's the official historian for the whole city. I reached out to Ray because I knew there was a resurgence of interest in mutation breeding. Not long after World War. Two and I was curious how this transition from atomic bombs back to Thomas. Agriculture actually happened and it turns out that Oak Ridge played a pretty big role though not entirely on purpose. It came down to a herd of HEREFORD CATTLE ON JULY. The sixteenth of nineteen forty five atomic age was ushered in. When the first gadget it was called was exploded in Alamogordo New Mexico. This was known as the Trinity Test. The first ever detonation of a nuclear device. It was of isolated area very remote far from many ranches or any population and they thought that would be a good place. Now you might think given that the. Us was less than a month out from bombing Hiroshima and Nagasaki that there would have been some interest in understanding. The biological impact of this weapon. Stadler had shown that radiation could cause mutations so what would nuclear fallout mean for plants and animals and people but the army was primarily focused on just making sure that it worked at all so the first actual victims of nuclear fallout were entirely accidental farm animals including those hair for cattle who were down wind from the test site when the bomb went off. It kicked up a cloud of radioactive dust which was carried by the wind. Overtop these animals. Those particles were falling out of the Ska. And we're actually hitting on the backs of this herd of cattle raining down on them like snow. The fallout was primarily. Beta radiation a less penetrative form than gamma or x rays still where it landed on the animals backs it caused open sores and lesions and after the war when things were a little less hush-hush one local rancher actually filed a damage claim against the army so in December of nineteen forty five. The government bought the seventy five. Most impacted cattle. They were probably interested in observing the cattle for science. Yes but they were interested in keeping things quiet and they said look. We need to watch the cattle and make sure that we understand what happens to them because they've been closest to the actual blast so in order to monitor them. They ship them to Oak Ridge and they put them in this location at South of the city of Oak Ridge down on the clinch river in three bands area. Three bends in the river making some low flat grassland within a couple of years that grassland became the agricultural research lab a joint project of the University of Tennessee and the newly formed Atomic Energy Commission or ADC. Basically the peacetime arbiter of all things atomic. Now obviously this is a story about cattle not crops so it's a bit of a departure from what we've been talking about with mutation breeding. But it's kind of the origin for postwar atomic agriculture. This accident triggered all these new questions. About what might happen to living organisms and to food production systems in the event of a nuclear attack. Something that was a very real fear for a lot of people right and not just because of the blast itself but also because of this possibility of unforeseen dialogical consequences but the ABC was concerned that if people got too scared public opinion might turn against nuclear research altogether and they definitely did not want that to happen so one of their main goals was to try to manage this fear. The real appeal of mutation breeding and agriculture. Is that mutations are. They might be positive things right. It might be a mutation that makes a cold resistant orange. It might be a mutation that makes a disease resistant wheat and so one of the reasons why mutation plant breeding has such an appeal in. This context is that it's a a counter narrative to the story of mutation. That is is really quite scary. Which is the story of mutations? In in humans essentially the goal was to give the atomic age an image upgrade and to provide some distance from that scarier side something. That was a little difficult to do when the place you're in is the birthplace of the atom bomb so in nineteen forty seven the established a new nuclear research facility a full eight hundred miles from Ridge and its irradiated cattle and just seventy miles east of Manhattan Brookhaven National Lab. Brookhaven was dedicated entirely to the research of peacetime applications atomic technology without any of the destructive baggage which made it the perfect place for mutation breeding to make its comeback Brookhaven was. Certainly I would say the center of the resurgence of mutation breeding in the United States and it was in part through the actions of particular biologists. Whose name was Ralph. Singleton Dr Ralph. Singleton was a Harvard trained plant geneticist and sweetcorn breeder who already had some experience in the world of mutation breeding ten years prior during a sabbatical at the University of Missouri. He first experimented with radiation breeding while working with none other than Dr Lewis Stadler so when he was appointed Brookhaven Senior. Geneticist in one thousand. Nine forty eight. One of his first projects was taking stadler's ideas and expanding on them by making use of a resource that stadler never had radioactive isotopes or radio-isotopes access to radio. Isotopes meant that scientists could now produce gamma radiation a higher frequency. More penetrative form than Stadler's x-rays in one thousand nine forty nine singleton began building a new mutation breeding tool using cobalt. Sixty gamma emitting radioisotope. As his source he planted circular rows of crops around his source and called it the gamma field. This was set up an installation in which there was a central tower through which piece of radioactive. Cobalt could be raised to the top of the tower to really in some ways. You might think of it. As kind of showering radiation on a field of crops growing in concentric circles around the tower depending on their distance from that central source plants would receive different doses of radiation compared to earlier experiments with radiation induced mutation. The gamma field was something radically new. Instead of a quick blast of x-rays plants in the field were subject to near constant radiation. Sometimes the entire growing season and will initially a mutation breeding skeptic. Singleton quickly became convinced that Stanley had been wrong. That radiation could produce new beneficial crop varieties after all. He expanded the size of the field from three.

Dr Lewis Stadler Oak Ridge US Singleton Britain Ray Smith Poland Tennessee Cobalt Manhattan Brookhaven National Manhattan Adolf Hitler Dr Ralph Atomic Energy Commission Evan Knoxville Alamogordo
"brookhaven national lab" Discussed on Linear Digressions

Linear Digressions

16:03 min | 1 year ago

"brookhaven national lab" Discussed on Linear Digressions

"Okay cool cool so I have two examples. One of them is where there was nothing going on and where there was something going on and how they use a distribution of figuring out. Which when you want I I would like to hear about the something. Okay the something. So my favorite example of when they use a distribution figure out that something was going on was in nineteen eighty seven and nineteen thousand nine hundred eighty seven there was a supernova. They happened very far away. So Supernova is an exploding star that astronomers and astrophysicists and all. These sorts of people are really interested in and the thing about this Supernova is that in Supernova is in general. Is that what they kind of look like is a flash of light as the star is exploding but because of the nuclear reactions that are happening inside of the star when that happens it doesn't just give off particles of light also gives off these particles called neutrinos and so there's a bunch of neutrinos that are traveling it basically the speed of light and then because of certain detail? I think sometimes the neutrinos will actually get there a little bit earlier than the light does so the point is that when there's a Supernova sometimes the thing that you see I is a bunch of neutrinos rather than and then later the light shows up. Yeah I actually know why that is. Oh do tell. Yeah how about this? I've got something Physics wise to to contribute It's because neutrinos neutrinos pass through matter most of the time. Which makes them in in this situation. That neutrinos from the from the center of the Star while actually pass through the star without hitting any of the neutrons or any other particles because the nutrients themselves are so small and so they will escape the The surface of the star before the shock wave of all of the stars matter Gets to the the outside and it actually explodes and so you get this burst of neutrinos that travel through Through space just a little bit ahead of the light that we would want to observe and that also makes them really difficult to detect right because Since they pass through most matter without interacting with it you need a lot of matter to get just a couple of interactions and so what is it. Maybe maybe you know this off the top of your head but I think neutrino detectors are Are comprised of like humongous pools of like chlorine or something like that and then a neutrino hits. Is that right to you know. Yeah they have Well I mean they have different kinds of stuff inside of them. But it's chlorine it's water that kind of stuff yeah big volumes neutrino interacts with one of those particles than they can detect it cracked cracked. And so that actually you set me up really nicely for finishing the story here because like you said. Neutrinos are quite rare. And so we do Particle physicists do see them in their neutrino detectors but they don't happen very often The expected rate of arrival of neutrinos. It's a pastathon distributed process. Oh I think I see where you're going. And this has been you know they had had a neutrino detector or a bunch of Neutrino detectors that had taken a bunch of data layer. They just kind of sitting there idle and they're Looking up and every once in a while they see a Neutrino and they get us a pretty good measurement of over very long timescales. What's the rate of a rival of Neutrinos? And they say on average we see maybe about point eight. Neutrinos every ten seconds So we'll see if five neutrinos a minute or something like that and you know it's pretty rare for you to see much anything this much Burster THAN THAT. So they they understood that distribution you know quite well for the for the smaller number of neutrinos but then sounds the sounds like just to connect this it. Sounds like soccer scoring Yeah kind of is Except that they had a very. Yeah no I mean. It's all some statistics. That's the whole point here right so in one thousand nine hundred seven February twenty third one of these neutrino detectors. Well maybe not just one of them. I don't know But one of them goes just kind of nuts in a ten second period where they would normally expect to see about point. Seven five point eight. Neutrinos they see nine events nine. Neutrinos that's not a lot of neutrinos. It's not a lot of neutrinos but it's a lot more than point. Seven seven. Neutrinos I see so if I was looking at the at the counters. I might say Whoa. That was kind of weird. But you know we're going to see that every once in a while but comparing it connecting it to a distribution. That would be highly highly unlikely if you do that. Calculation bright so you had put all the numbers into your distribution you'd say just based on the random statistical fluctuations. How often would I see nine or more? When I'm expecting to see point seven seven you do the calculation which like we said. It's not that complicated. Which is nice and they come up with A number of the tells them. It's very very unlikely that something like this would happen. even taking into account the fact that the that the detector is kind of always sitting there listening you have long periods of time over which you could see fluctuations like this even taking all of that into account very unlikely that you get this from random sources so in this moment there detector goes nuts says like hey nine hits in ten seconds and in this particular moment. Unbeknownst to them there is little shock. Wave of light not a shock wave. That sounds really dramatic. It's a SUPERNOVA. I guess but there's the light from the SUPERNOVA that they would ideally like to observe to watch this actually happen Hurtling towards them at the speed of light but they've got a little bit. The hand has been tipped. I guess because the neutrinos got there a little bit before and so I guess they think like what could cause this neutrino burst. Maybe it's a Supernova like let's pointer telescopes at the most likely candidate stars. Yeah I think they knew right away that it was You know a very strong candidate for a SUPERNOVA. I don't know how easy it is for these detectors to know where the signal came from especially with just one detector. It's like hard to do the direction and the pointing on that. But I think I don't know if you have several different types of detectors It's possible that maybe you detected in a few different places on earth at the same time and you can do some triangulation. I'm so I don't know the details about like let's point telescopes somewhere but yeah you got the right. Yeah Yeah I actually. I read a little bit about this before. Triangulation would be pretty hard because the events are rare so you wouldn't know exactly when the Neutrino burst started but you could definitely say like oh well we know that these stars are really clear candidates for a Supernova. So maybe we'll divide up telescopes and point them out Maybe although there's so many stars that I don't know how much that I don't know that we have like a list of the ones that we expect to Supernova in the next ten years but in practice there lots of telescopes that are scanning the sky all the time so once the light shows up like I dunno the cats out of the bag. But yeah you got this kind of early signal from the neutrinos that something interesting was about to show up. It was the biggest Supernova since sixteen. O four fun fact. It's Kinda funny. I just put these numbers into my little calculator was the probability of this thing happening. Average rate of success is point. Seven. Seven the poussant. Random variable is nine. What's the probability that happens and it's like zero and that's because it doesn't have enough significant figures to tell you how rare this is. It's really really rare. Okay so I just I just looked up. I didn't find anything about whether we can. Frankly but There are currently seven Neutrino detectors who are members of the Supernova Early Warning System which is just a network of detectors and the detectors send their reports of possible Supernova to a computer at the Brookhaven national lab and if the computer identifies signals from two detectors within ten seconds then it sends a Supernova observatories all around the world to study the SUPERNOVA. There we go. Does it know anyone? Statistics Man Okay. Are you ready for another one? Oh that's right. That was so that was. That was the thing that happened but yeah I'm really curious about the second one the second one. This is just one of my favorite novelty stories about Poussin distributed things we've known about the distribution for quite a while Folks have been using it to calculate the probability of all kinds of things happening and so over one hundred years ago. There was a mathematician. He was where he for the PRUSSIAN Army. So this was back. When before the modern German state existed that was still Prussia and Prussia had a big army that was constantly fighting with its neighbors. So there is this guy who's working the army. I'm going to say his name wrong. Something like Berkovitch almost certainly for. Let's let's say that's how you say it and my apologies. If I'm saying that wrong anyway he is working for the army and they have this. You know not a huge issue. But they have an issue in the army where they have horses that will pull their cannons. And that's how they get cannons to and from battlefields and think about horses is sometimes they get scared or they get a little bit frisky. Somebody's standing in the wrong place and they kick and there's somebody who gets kicked and if it's bad enough then you can actually die from a bad horse king and this is something that's quite rare but because you have to be just like wrong place wrong time. But since there's thousands tens of thousands of soldiers who are in the army and then the army is around hanging around for decades. Then you know. Sometimes somebody's GONNA get unlucky and they're gonNA get kicked in the head by horse and they're gonNA die and Usually it's GONNA BE. That's not going to be a very common thing but you could imagine that if there's say a poorly run division within the army or something like that something's something has has slipped and the horses start to kick more often or they're kicking more often in a particular location or group of soldiers Then you could figure out like hey this is usually a pretty rare occurrence but if we start to see it a certain number of times above some threshold than maybe a sign that something weird is going on or maybe it's just bad luck and it's you know the statistics of the situation. So this was the problem. That are here. Berkowitz Berkovitch was trying to trying to figure out what yet all this data about soldiers dying from horse kicks so he goes online and see us online anytime soon into the distribution calculator and so he he measures you know what the average rate of people dying of course kicks measured over very long periods of time. And then you can slice it into smaller units of time or a amounts of sutton pieces of the army or something like that to figure out if there are a little local hot spots that are inconsistent with the overall poussin distribution that you have here so as an example You know usually there's actually nobody who dies 'cause it's pretty rare But one core had four people who died in one year so that was particularly unlucky group. But he you know calculates. How many different. Core years you have in the entire data set And what's The statistic? Or what's the probability that with that many samples that you've taken that you have a a core that has four or more horse kick deaths in a year and it turns out you know? It's it's actually pretty likely that you see that. In the data set that he collected And so there was. You know I told you kind of the outset. There's didn't really bury the lead on this one but there was nothing there. Oh but you could imagine if you were The Guy who's in charge of that army corps. You're feeling a little bit better because you can make a credible argument that you're not doing anything wrong. You just got unlucky. Yeah or imported the point. Soldiers got unlucky. Yep so anyway. I just think that's a fun novelty story about the poussant distribution..

army PRUSSIAN Army army corps soccer Prussia Brookhaven national lab Poussin Berkowitz Berkovitch sutton
"brookhaven national lab" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

09:33 min | 1 year ago

"brookhaven national lab" Discussed on Here & Now

"Can pick up more people. No woman's Land Empire Political Danielle. Kurt Slaven followed Danielle on twitter by the way and the United States could soon have its first new particle collider in decades earlier this year the Department of Energy announced that Brookhaven National National Laboratory and up to New York will be home to the electron ion collider which will investigate what's inside to Subatomic particles protons and neutrons for more. We're joined by Paul debare. Who is Under Secretary for Science for the Department of Energy? He's in Washington Paul. Welcome and what will this new collider do you. How does it work? So if you think about The this will be an electron collider. And if you think about it it's it's very much like an electron microscope where we're going to be accelerating electrons which are obviously much much smaller than a proton or neutron to basically be an electron microscope. Where we're shooting electrons at the protons neutrons to image protons and neutrons and you need to be accelerated to very high levels us Banerjee in order to basically shoot it To do the mapping a little bit like an MRI or a cat scan for the inner workings of of of matter and it will go fast when when it's being accelerated around in a circle right. Yeah so so. The way we work is that we will accelerate we will generate an electron beam and accelerated to very very close to the speed of light We measure it by how much energy level that we will impart into the electron beam. We will start at one hundred Gig electron-volts which is a lot of energy and that will be done by us. Generating these electrons streams and then accelerating them in a circle and we basically Circle around them imparting energy into the electron beam Until it reaches a level that we wanted to so that we can We can weaken image The protons and neutrons do. You anticipate -ticipant any practical applications coming out of this research or these really first and foremost about basic science. Well the basic science research that this country has done and we have led particle physics since World War Two since to Manhattan project and a lot of the technologies that we use today have come out of the basic research that came amount of the national labs including including in physics. The these accelerators can be used for many different things. The first one is medical isotopes that that are used for cancer treatment. So I think it's as many people. Now you look at nuclear medicine and nuclear imaging which was a core part of the medical community right now for treating diseases reasons that these accelerators can produce those isotopes on the nuclear medicine side. That are really critical. And many times. You have to produce some very locally. You have to have accelerators raiders around the country to make these isotopes Because they decay relatively quickly some of them And so for us to move forward. That certainly helps the medical area another one which is which is I think very interesting here in the near term is around quantum information technologies utilizing quantum which is is inputting data into atoms rather than transistors is basically a particle physics problem and so the the same equipment that we're looking ED technology that we're developing here and we've developed in the past for kind of older versions of of accelerators is the exact same particle technology that will be used used for the upcoming quantum computing and the quantum internet. Another area is around detectors The machine came out of the daily National Nuclear Physics Work and so we certainly expect that we will have improvements in. MRI and cat machines. It's from detectors just like When we helped invent them so if there are so many practical applications how come this is the first new particle collider that has been built in this country in decades? There's a bit of a history around these accelerators. They cost a lot of money There was one that was looked at A couple of decades ago called the superconducting supercollider which ran into some siding and challenges the US decided to invest in Sern And the large Hadron Collider in Geneva for that particular piece of science we've been focusing on other areas so one of them has been Uh neutrino piece of infrastructure at fermilab outside of Chicago which we profiled on this show and actually our listeners can go and listen to our story about that here now dot org if they want to that. It's a very interesting research. That's being done out there. Yeah that one that one we accelerate protons in order to generate neutrinos to do neutrino trina research which also helps us evaluate how the universe was created. So we've been investing in Europe for some collider's over last to the near the near term. By the way we continued that is for that particular type of collider we're increasing our investment By the United States and to the European there collider at Sern but we decided to take a look at to building this particular client or in the US I think a key thing for your our listeners. To kind of understand. Is that the budgets for the Office of Science and science in general at the federal level including NASA and the National Science Foundation and National Institutes of health or at all time highs and We're very excited about the support. That very bipartisan support from both Congress and ultimately madly president signing the budgets for all time highs. So we're very excited about this. Collider is going to cost between one point six and two point six billion in dollars and should be up and running by twenty thirty. Why does it take so long to build it? So so first of all one of the one of the advantages ages of this particular site and building. It here is that we're actually. Using some existing collider infrastructure there is a collider at Brookhaven national lab. Right now called Rick which is a directive this Dick Hadrian collider so. There's already there's already a loop there That was accelerating other types of ions ons. There is an accelerator already infrastructure there. And so we're GONNA finish that mission in terms of imaging For for Nuclear Physics in two thousand twenty four between now and then we're actually going to be starting both the The engineering design in more detail as well as design around components like the accelerators then in two thousand twenty four. When we take down the Rick Collider at Brookhaven National Lab Damn will start start actually actually installing And so from that will take about six years to do the construction and then do the commissioning and start up now as you know when you do a big project like this The people in New York state are going to be very happy and there is also a site in Virginia. That was hoping to get this as well. Why why not pick the Virginia site so the the the office science does things by By having a very methodical process and we we had a process in which this recommendation the selection was done by the scientists underneath me. We have seventeen labs. I love them all equally. Just like any like my children but you know we were doing this. Based on the data and the data of cost the data around the team data around the technology. Oh Gee you know so. There's a number of data points that came in to the team. The I think the important thing about the seventeen national lab complex flex we run. Is that each one kind of support. Each Other and the lab in Virginia Jefferson Lab in Newport News. There's certainly an expert and actually manufacturing these accelerators. There's driving technologies and frankly a lot of the other labs like at Fermilab and at Slack Stamford benefit right now from The accelerators that were designed and manufactured at their so we certainly expect that they will have the leading role in that. And there's a number of other things that'd be expected them to also take the lead on in terms of computing and data management which is becoming increasingly important with the amount of data that we're generating out of these facilities. Okay I'm in finally. Just ask you a silly question or you'll probably think it's silly. which is you say that the particle accelerator will be able to accelerate to near the speed of light? You can never actually get to the actual speed of light right that. Yeah that is correct. Grey t-shirt out there. The scientists has which has a t-shirt says speed unlimit and it says see on it and why is that as a piece of matter approaches. The speed of light does a number of different things that happen but one thing in particular is that the mass changes of that particular particle. And so as you approach the speed of light That mass that mass chain makes it increasingly hard to get faster and faster and as you reach the speed of light you reach a an an infinite amount of energy needed to get to that last step and.

Rick Collider United States Brookhaven national lab Department of Energy Brookhaven National National L Office of Science and science Under Secretary for Science New York fermilab Nuclear Physics Virginia Paul debare Washington Paul Kurt Slaven Europe Banerjee cancer Congress
"brookhaven national lab" Discussed on The End of the World with Josh Clark

The End of the World with Josh Clark

04:53 min | 3 years ago

"brookhaven national lab" Discussed on The End of the World with Josh Clark

"It's about here where the story begins of how Sern which actively messes with the mass and energy of particles took up a longtime quest to prove that it's large Hadron collider won't do humanity. Actually, wait. It begins a little before the L H C came along. The story really starts in nineteen ninety nine. That year was as far as anybody knows the first time anyone seriously raised the idea that a particle collider might be able to end the world. Scientific American magazine published a letter from a reader who wasn't. So sure that the relativistic heavy ion collider at the Brookhaven national lab in New York nicknamed the Rick was entirely safe. The reader was concerned that the Rick might produce a microscopic black hole kind of thing the hawking proposed when particles collided inside of it. Scientific American published the reader's letter along with a response by physicist named Frank will check and we'll check pointed out classical physics doesn't allow for microscope like holes to exist at all. That's point one point two was that even if the theories that include additional dimensions theories that are beyond classical physics and actually do allow for microscopic black holes to exist. If those additional dimensional theories turn out to be true, the energies of the particle collisions in the Rick. We're still far too low to actually create a microscopic like whole so no worries. There was one Maury. At least. We'll check did mention that it was much more likely. The Rick could produce an exotic type of matter called the strange lit strange. Lists are heavy particles made of smaller vibrations called strange quarks despite their heavier size. They're actually lower energy than typical strange. Works which means that the universe would prefer them over strange corks. It's just strange lists tend to dissolve very quickly because of their higher mass. The concern over strange Litz is that if one of them didn't dissolve into elementary particles. It could conceivably set off a chain reaction lowering the energy, but increasing the mass of the matter that makes up earth converting our planet and everything on it, including us into a massive in art dead. Bolck? We'll check offhand comment at the end of his reply set off a separate years. Log tangent of uneasiness an investigation into strange. Let's and whether they have the goods to pose an existential risk themselves, but at least microscopic black hole tear was put the bed. So it seems the terribly disconcerting idea of a man may black hole has a habit of winking into existence again and again. A couple of years after the scientific American readers black hole. Question was asked and answered the looming specter of a potentially world ending black hole created in particle collider rose again, like a new universe rising to replace an old one this time the collider and questioned was the large Hadron collider which was beginning to be assembled in Europe this time around the fears weren't quite so unfounded because the energies of the collisions in the large Hadron collider for an order of magnitude higher than the Rix high enough, in fact that if any of those multidimensional theories are correct the LHC should be fully capable of producing microscopic black holes inside of it. So capable in fact that a two thousand one paper by physicist, Stephen Giddings, called the L H see a black hole factory and calculated that it could produce a microscopic black hole every second. It's pro time beams for. Crossed. Now. It's here where certain began its longstanding quest to prove the large Hadron collider safe on the one hand, the idea that the Elliott see might be able to break open, the current understanding of the universe and point. Theoretical physicists in clear. New direction is intensely exciting for the particle physics community. But on the other hand Sern was much less excited about the idea of everybody else seeing their machine as a black hole factory that could end the world. And it's pretty easy to understand why the funding for Sern at any given point is precarious enough under the best of circumstances. They count on public funds from multiple nations and work under the threat of those funds drying up at any time and the stakes for keeping the large Hadron. Collider funded are very high. This is law. Professor Eric Johnson who has written extensively on the risks that come along with high energy physics experiments..

Rick Sern physicist Scientific American magazine L H C Brookhaven national lab New York Maury Professor Eric Johnson Europe hawking Frank Elliott Stephen Giddings one hand
"brookhaven national lab" Discussed on BiggerPockets Money Podcast

BiggerPockets Money Podcast

02:59 min | 3 years ago

"brookhaven national lab" Discussed on BiggerPockets Money Podcast

"Alright Gibb Wang, welcome to the bigger pockets money podcast has today. It's going great. How are you doing? We're doing good. I'm doing good. I shouldn't speak for Scott, Scott. How are you doing today? I think we're all doing fantastic. So why don't we go ahead and start right from the beginning. And Jim tell us about your background with money in and what that was like growing up. My parents are always pretty frugal because they were immigrants to the US coming over from Taiwan. My dad came over with a education visa, and he came in that my mom was able to come year later. And so we were always very frugal saving money because he wasn't earning a lot. But then also every few years we wanted to go back to Taiwan visit family, and so life is all a lot of frugality doing trade offs because we wanted to save as flights back to Taiwan where even today they're expensive. But back then she's thinking about it. It's even more. So and so I just grew up in a very frugal. Family. Even though we were probably middle-class by parents owned, our our home, and we were living fairly comfortably. I think just psychologically we just had to keep it for a little in order to go back to Taiwan and by four tickets every three or four years. So what sort of work did your parents do? My dad was a civil engineer, and my mom was she took on jobs that were they gave her the ability to take care of us after we came home from school. So I remember when we were really young she was a nanny like when I was an infant. She was a nanny. And she was able to take me with her whenever she was taking care of the other kids. And then as we got older she worked in the lunchroom of my school. Her day was done earlier than we were done because I've seen lunch ends before the end of the school day, and then she'd be home we were home. And so that's sort of what they did. My dad worked at Brookhaven national labs is entire career. I in similar engineering and that eventually when a lot of those jobs are serving phased out. He moved over to. Database administration and just did that until he retired a couple years ago. So what did college look like for you? I went to Carnegie Mellon studied, computer, science oser for few years was a fun experience. I mean, it's a kind of a nerdy school. And we found ways still found ways have fun and actually a lot of people talking about side hustles to like back, then college or you have more time really than anything else. I mean, maybe the people who were smart studied more harder in their classes. But I was. Side hustles like finding things to resell on EBay and just different little things you can do to make make some extra like beer money or video game bunny or things like that. And my money journey just about creativity and tapping into the probably started around college do any like specific big wins that you remember from this side hustles. Yeah. There was this might sound a little weird. But before they outlawed the financial transactions supporting playing poker online, actually gambled a lot online. And by that. I mean, so I played poker a little bit..

engineer Taiwan Gibb Wang Carnegie Mellon Scott Brookhaven national labs US Jim four years
"brookhaven national lab" Discussed on BiggerPockets

BiggerPockets

02:54 min | 3 years ago

"brookhaven national lab" Discussed on BiggerPockets

"It's going great. How are you? Red. Do it. Good. I'm doing good. I shouldn't speak for Scott, Scott. How are you doing today? I think we're all doing fantastic. So why don't we go ahead and start right from the beginning. And Jim key. Tell us about your background with money in and what that was like growing up. My parents are always pretty frugal because they were immigrants to the US coming over from Taiwan. My dad came over with a education visa, and he came in that my mom was able to come year later. And so we were always very frugal saving money because he wasn't earning a lot. But then also every few years we wanted to go back to Taiwan visit family, and so life is all a lot of frugality doing trade offs because we wanted to save as flights back to Taiwan where even today they're expensive. But back then she's thinking about it. It's even more. So and so I just grew up in a very frugal family, even though we were probably middle-class by parents owned, our our home, and we were living fairly comfortably. I think just psychologically we just had to keep it for a little in order to go back. To Taiwan and by four tickets every three or four years. So what sort of work did your parents do? My dad was a civil engineer, and my mom was she took on jobs that were they gave her the ability to take care of us after we came home from school. So I remember when we were really young she was a nanny like when I was an infant. She was a nanny. And she was able to take me with her whenever she was taking care of the other kids. And then as we got older she worked in the lunchroom of my school. Her day was done earlier than we were done because I've seen lunch ends before the end of the school day, and then she'd be home we were home. And so that's sort of what they did. My dad worked at Brookhaven national labs is entire career. I in similar engineering, and that eventually when a lot of those jobs are serving phased out he moved over to database administration and just did that until he retired a couple years ago. So what did college look like for you? I went to Carnegie Mellon studied, computer, science oser for. A few years was a fun experience. I mean, it's a kind of a nerdy school. And we found ways still found ways have fun and actually a lot of people talking about side hustles back then college or you have more time really than anything else. I mean, maybe the people who were smart studied more harder in their classes. But I was side hustles like finding things to resell on EBay and just different little things you can do to make make some extra like beer money or video game bunny or things like that. And my money journey just about creativity and tapping into the probably started around college do any like specific big wins that you remember from this side hustles. Yeah. There was this might sound a little weird. But before they outlawed the financial transactions supporting playing poker online, actually gambled a lot online. And by that. I mean, so I played poker a little bit..

engineer Taiwan Carnegie Mellon Scott Brookhaven national labs Jim key US four years
"brookhaven national lab" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

04:24 min | 3 years ago

"brookhaven national lab" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"It's a simple, relatively simple surgery surgery, so it is a known space, radiation effect, but NASA call quantifies it as a acceptable risk because the the surgery for cataracts is fairly simple. It also manifest later on in life, and so it's not an in mission risk. So the thing with the sands risk which stands for spaceflight associated neuro ocular syndrome is that it's been only identified recently. There's still a lot of data to be collected from that. They're not sure if it's caused by microgravity if it's caused by fluid shifts, if it's caused by something else. Us elevated inter cranial pressure. So the there may or may not be some kind of interacting with radiation as well. We just don't know yet. Now, one thing about being a scientist and and you know you're working in the NASA space, radiation laboratory trying to get data points to understand what is happening. We're looking forward to going beyond low-earth orbit. Now, you know, we're talking about missions on the moon missions to Mars. Let's go to the moon for a second and assume we're, we're in the middle of a long duration. Stay on the moon. What scientifically from a radiation perspective and a biological perspective, are you looking forward to? So a lot of the samples, the data we get from astronauts and crew involves blood samples, and what we can gather from those samples is, are there any chromosome aberrations within the within those samples will kind of DNA damage is happening. So I think that is a one very useful tool. We call it by dissymmetry. So it's a biological measure of. Of the Dosimetry the radiation dose a you're gonna get. I think the bio Dosimetry from a long duration mission, long, duration mission at on the moon would be really useful. We don't have that data yet. Other things that would be interesting to look at our same thing in the blood samples, looking at biomarkers that are interest for all four of our wrists, so cancer CNS in cardiovascular disease. Other things that we could look at would be the cardiovascular morphology doing an echocardiogram on the heart or doing an MRI on the brain or even on the heart itself to look and see if there early markers sub clinical, but early markers that we can use to identify potential downstream effects and mitigate them earlier. Yes. So a lot of data that we can get really an to help us understand the environment. So can you tell us about some of the more recent studies that you've been doing for in terms of radiation may be in the NASA space? Radiation laboratory? Yes. We are planning an sorelle actually has three runs a year spring summer and fall in this fall eighteen see. We're planning to do the first test of her g. CR simulator. So we're going to irradiate animals and test out the scheme that we have to simulate the space, radiation GPS your field or going to irradiate them with six days a week. Rena Radi them with the schema, these five ion beams plus hydrogen and proton. And we're gonna see what happens to these animals overbearing lanes of time. And in that way, we hope to simulate a three year Mars mission and the end points that we might see in the human cohort. Okay. Yeah, so so it's coming up this fall where where. Is it again is it is an on the net? Yeah, the NASA space radiation laboratory is house at Brookhaven, National Laboratory. It's on Long Island, Long Island. Okay. So you're going up to. They have a lung to Brookhaven. National labs has a very large linear accelerator. And what they do is they pull off a little bit of the large beam in routed down to NASA space radiation laboratory, and that's very simplified way of what's happening with all the physics of it. But in that way that we can then sort of piggyback off the large lyric celebrator it's not, you know, when you say, oh yeah, we have to simulate this galactic cosmic Ray this galactic cosmic background radiation. That's not an easy thing like it's not. It's not easy at all. And as I said, this is probably the only facility in the world that is capable of doing it today. Yeah, we were talking. We were talking about everyone always asks us, you know, where's your?.

NASA Brookhaven Long Island bio Dosimetry DNA damage Rena Radi National Laboratory scientist National labs three year six days
"brookhaven national lab" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

04:24 min | 3 years ago

"brookhaven national lab" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"It's a simple, relatively simple surgery surgery, so it is a known space, radiation effect, but NASA call quantifies it as a acceptable risk because the the surgery for cataracts is fairly simple. It also manifest later on in life, and so it's not an in mission risk. So the thing with the sands risk which stands for spaceflight associated neuro ocular syndrome is that it's been only identified recently. There's still a lot of data to be collected from that. They're not sure if it's caused by microgravity if it's caused by fluid shifts, if it's caused by something else. Us elevated inter cranial pressure. So the there may or may not be some kind of interacting with radiation as well. We just don't know yet. Now, one thing about being a scientist and and you know you're working in the NASA space, radiation laboratory trying to get data points to understand what is happening. We're looking forward to going beyond low-earth orbit. Now, you know, we're talking about missions on the moon missions to Mars. Let's go to the moon for a second and assume we're, we're in the middle of a long duration. Stay on the moon. What scientifically from a radiation perspective and a biological perspective, are you looking forward to? So a lot of the samples, the data we get from astronauts and crew involves blood samples, and what we can gather from those samples is, are there any chromosome aberrations within the within those samples will kind of DNA damage is happening. So I think that is a one very useful tool. We call it by dissymmetry. So it's a biological measure of. Of the Dosimetry the radiation dose a you're gonna get. I think the bio Dosimetry from a long duration mission, long, duration mission at on the moon would be really useful. We don't have that data yet. Other things that would be interesting to look at our same thing in the blood samples, looking at biomarkers that are interest for all four of our wrists, so cancer CNS in cardiovascular disease. Other things that we could look at would be the cardiovascular morphology doing an echocardiogram on the heart or doing an MRI on the brain or even on the heart itself to look and see if there early markers sub clinical, but early markers that we can use to identify potential downstream effects and mitigate them earlier. Yes. So a lot of data that we can get really an to help us understand the environment. So can you tell us about some of the more recent studies that you've been doing for in terms of radiation may be in the NASA space? Radiation laboratory? Yes. We are planning an sorelle actually has three runs a year spring summer and fall in this fall eighteen see. We're planning to do the first test of her g. CR simulator. So we're going to irradiate animals and test out the scheme that we have to simulate the space, radiation GPS your field or going to irradiate them with six days a week. Rena Radi them with the schema, these five ion beams plus hydrogen and proton. And we're gonna see what happens to these animals overbearing lanes of time. And in that way, we hope to simulate a three year Mars mission and the end points that we might see in the human cohort. Okay. Yeah, so so it's coming up this fall where where. Is it again is it is an on the net? Yeah, the NASA space radiation laboratory is house at Brookhaven, National Laboratory. It's on Long Island, Long Island. Okay. So you're going up to. They have a lung to Brookhaven. National labs has a very large linear accelerator. And what they do is they pull off a little bit of the large beam in routed down to NASA space radiation laboratory, and that's very simplified way of what's happening with all the physics of it. But in that way that we can then sort of piggyback off the large lyric celebrator it's not, you know, when you say, oh yeah, we have to simulate this galactic cosmic Ray this galactic cosmic background radiation. That's not an easy thing like it's not. It's not easy at all. And as I said, this is probably the only facility in the world that is capable of doing it today. Yeah, we were talking. We were talking about everyone always asks us, you know, where's your?.

NASA Brookhaven Long Island bio Dosimetry DNA damage Rena Radi National Laboratory scientist National labs three year six days
"brookhaven national lab" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

03:58 min | 3 years ago

"brookhaven national lab" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Like when we actually send humans there and back. So you understand the environment where the questions lie is what happens to the. Yeah, there is huge uncertainty in terms of the biological responses for the space radiation exposures. So that's where a lot of our research within the human research program focuses on quantifying the biological responses. In doing what we can't amid a gate them. Right? Yeah. And if I'm going to the dentist and they're going around the corner when I'm getting blasted with xrays I'm sure no one's really gonna sign up for to get blasted with radiation as to find out what happens about it. Yeah. No one's unfortunately. We cannot irradiate people scientific. Yes, yes, of course. So we rely heavily on animal and sell their models to to gather the evidence. We need to characterize the risks from space radiation and to evaluate countermeasures. Okay. So what's the technique? What are we doing to most? Yeah, and that's a great question. Most most of the elements here at NASA reliance on former ground down allowed to do a lot of their testing, and we have a similar one called a NASA space radiation laboratory. It's housed at Brookhaven national labs, and it's basically this top of the line facility, probably the most sophisticated facility in the world where you can simulate space, radiation exposure. It's also has a nice facility on site for biological experiments, which which is essential since we are using animal until you're models. So it combines this capability to do long term animal studies and Ciller work along with a heavy ion accelerator. So what to what are they show us? What are we beginning to understand with these with these tests who? So to date, there are four health risks from space, radiation exposure that we identify the first one is cancer, the risk of radiation carcinogenesis, and that includes epithelial cancers and leukemia's, and this is actually the biggest contributor to this permissible exposure limit that it. That's the standard we set for astronauts. The next one is the risk of in-flight and late CNN. Sacramento. CNS is central nervous system, and basically it's the risk of behavioral or cognitive detriments either in-flight or late post. Mission which can manifest in your degenerative disorders like Alzheimers and this one we're targeting a pathology that can have commonalities between those disorders and cardiovascular disease, which brings me to the next res- which is the risk of reaching juice cardiovascular disease disease, but it's not just cardio vascular disease. It includes things like cataracts and other degenerate, tissue facts, such as immune documents, respiratory and digestive dysfunction, early aging, premature aging. And finally, the last one is the risk of acute radiation syndromes this is really a specific one for solar flares, what we call solar particle events. So this one is a more intermittent but large dose exposure from solar flare, and you have things like skin burns, pro Domo responses, nausea, this one is fairly effectively shielded against really. Okay. And is it the nausea? It sounds like a short term thing. It would be like you would go through this blast and a be sort of a short term thing. But the sounds like you know, cancer and cataracts. They seem like very long term effects. Yeah, there's there's these acute effects in their late effects in the latency between the two as can can vary, you know, in terms of minutes, two decades. So for cute radiations drum, you will manifest things immediately and over a period of months, but the ration- exposure you get initially..

NASA nausea Brookhaven national labs premature aging CNN Alzheimers Sacramento leukemia two decades
"brookhaven national lab" Discussed on Probably Science

Probably Science

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"brookhaven national lab" Discussed on Probably Science

"Brookhaven national labs here doesn't in nineteen thousand nine ula lewis friedman and gerhart friedlander of bnl brookhaven national lab assuming that's what that is yeah that is his other fire up described reaction they just stayed up plus the impact uson using accelerates the scientists trump plusses of heavy water molecules at a target loaded with deterioration is heavy hydrogen and found nuclear fusion occurring falsely high levels than expected the group believed that when the pluses of about five hundred thousand heavywater molecules hit the targets the energy of the collision caused some deterioration comes in the cluster to fuse for a hitherto unknown seth purchase you guys are reading this i'm missing even how saturday is that i don't have nice things to say but my grandfather i love my dad my dad is my favorite person on the planet and he's like a healer my dad is a doctor will come he's an anesthesiologist but now he works at the va and he got his acupuncture certification at sixty and has been like pushing acupuncture on veterans instead of like opioids so he's like you know he's really trying to like work in the space like non addictive pain management acupuncture is a listen as roy's good correct stuff but like acupuncture is my belief still proven but it's also nothing disproven in the way that most complementary medicine he he does acupuncture tight she mindfulness all that kind of stuff and people really are a lot of the veterans are really just getting i mean they themselves feel a lot better yet i'm sure a fair amount of that just comes from just feeling kit for and cared about maybe i mean i like i mean we were saying now the opioid epidemic but even as far back as two thousand twelve or before then they were pushing opioids is like what you need for connor pain in the worst thing you can give someone with chronic pain is just like an opioid addiction.

Brookhaven national labs gerhart friedlander roy lewis friedman seth connor
"brookhaven national lab" Discussed on Business Daily

Business Daily

01:49 min | 4 years ago

"brookhaven national lab" Discussed on Business Daily

"Jonathan will there ever be a satisfactory solution to the problem of nuclear waste yes and they're already good develoments on the way one issue with nuclear waste as it has a relatively small volume you use nuclear fuel in iraq to for up to three years it's then a solid it can be stored safely already and then eventually the general consensus is that it should be disposed in a deep repository again that compares to fossil fuels where we basically put the waste up with chimney into the atmosphere six and a half million people every year die from air pollution of which fossil fuel generation is a significant contributor we're not argue about fossil fuel we need to end the fossilfuel age no question that assertion that we can deal that nuclear waste safely is sort of beyond the demonstrated so there's not been a deeper buzzed dorje built yet except for plutonium waste that at an accident a few years ago in the united states the temporary storage and spent fuel polled has been evaluated for instance by the brookhaven national lab in 1997 the published a study i can send it to you mr cobb and their worst case estimate of a severe accident was more than five hundred billion dollars in property damage it happened near big cities and we do have spent fuel pools near philadelphia and new york city so yes other risks small yes are the consequences catastrophic yes and this idea that we should do risk calculations by multiplying that small risk with catastrophic damages is i think ridiculous it's like saying a small probability of getting aids is the same as in large probability of getting a cold that different animals altogether.

Jonathan iraq dorje united states brookhaven national lab mr cobb philadelphia new york five hundred billion dollars three years