7 Burst results for "Brooke Wetzel"

"brooke wetzel" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

03:30 min | 1 year ago

"brooke wetzel" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"I believe the 22nd of October get is always to have you along, everybody. We're going to start today with a story about something in this economy. That is not there that isn't happening. And what That means. We're going to set it up by noting that 787,000 people lost their jobs last week and made first time claims for unemployment benefits less than the week prior. It should be said. And also that the Labor Department adjusted downward its numbers for the previous couple of weeks. That's good. It really is. But the number of people on government assistance because they have lost their jobs is still stratospherically high. Millions of them are running out of benefits. And, as you know, those extra $600 a week went away in August. And that to get back to the thing that's missing is sucking billions of dollars out of this economy compared to earlier in the pandemic. How many billions Marketplaces. Mitchell Hartman gets the lead story today. The answer is $20 billion a week. That's how much is not getting into out of work. Americans pockets since a bunch of federal assistance programs for the unemployed started running out in mid summer, Andrew Stettner at the Century Foundation says based on Treasury data they were getting 26 week. That has come crashing down to just $6 billion. It's much less support two families and to the economy than we had. 600 a week in federal pandemic payments expired at the end of July. The president's partial replacement program ran out of money last month. Also, folks laid off back in March and April are now running out of their 26 weeks of state jobless benefits. Some, but not all are getting a 13 week federal extension. Unemployment benefits now average 3 20 a week across the country, It's even less for gig workers on pandemic unemployment assistance, and that has made a huge dent in the purchasing power of household suffering unemployment, says Mark Hamrick at bankrate dot com. They are really having to scrape to get by these days just for basic needs, such as to pay for shelter, pay the bills, put food on the table and forget about luxuries. That's exactly what Brooke Wetzel's has seen play out in her florist business in Allah when the economy started to open up in late spring sales picked up, But since August Things have gotten pretty slow People not having that, you know, extra 50 to $75 for fire arrangement. So Wetzel's working part time now spending the rest with her homeschooling kids. I'm Mitchell Hartmann for marketplace. We learned in our marketplace Edison Research poll that came out last week that 47% of Americans would have at least some trouble handling an unexpected expense. Of $250. They just don't have the income or the savings companies are starting to realize that and then helping employees save might be a competitive advantage right now. UPS, for instance. Is going to start offering some of its workers a short term savings account inside there. Fora one case marketplaces Kristen Schwab has that one. Zack Champa, a financial planner at John Hancock says making the decision to save money is like starting a diet. Not very fun, easy to mess up and pretty intimidating and I think at that point people just is alone. So you know, I don't feel like taken too much of my time. After managing.

Brooke Wetzel Mitchell Hartman Kristen Schwab Zack Champa Mitchell Hartmann Mark Hamrick Labor Department Andrew Stettner Century Foundation president John Hancock Edison Research
"brooke wetzel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:33 min | 1 year ago

"brooke wetzel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In Los Angeles. I'm a risen on Thursday. I believe the 22nd of October get is always to have you along, everybody. We're going to start today with a story about something in this economy. That is not there that isn't happening. And what That means. We're going to set it up by noting that 787,000 people lost their jobs last week and made first time claims for unemployment benefits less than the week prior. It should be said. And also that the Labor Department adjusted downward its numbers for the previous couple of weeks. That's good. It really is. But the number of people on government assistance because they have lost their jobs is still stratospherically high. Millions of them are running out of benefits. And, as you know, those extra $600 a week went away in August. And that to get back to the thing that's missing is sucking billions of dollars out of this economy compared to earlier in the pandemic. How many billions marketplaces Mitchell Hartman gets the lead story today. The answer is $20 billion a week. That's how much is not getting into out of work. Americans pockets since a bunch of federal assistance programs for the unemployed started running out in mid summer. Andrew Stettner at the Century Foundation says Based on Treasury data they were getting 26 week that has come crashing down to just $6 billion. It's much less support two families and to the economy than we had 600 a week in federal pandemic payments expired at the end of July. The president's partial replacement program ran out of money last month. Also, folks laid off back in March and April are now running out of their 26 weeks of state jobless benefits. Some, but not all are getting a 13 week federal extension. Unemployment benefits now average 3 20 a week across the country. It's even less for gig workers on pandemic unemployment assistance, and that has made a huge dent in the purchasing power of household suffering unemployment, says Mark Hamrick at bankrate dot com. They are really having to scrape to get by these days just for basic needs, such as to pay for shelter. Pay the bills, put food on the table and forget about luxuries. That's exactly what Brooke Wetzel's has seen play out in her florist business in L. A, when the economy started to open up in late spring sales picked up, But since August Things have gotten pretty slow People not having that, you know, extra 50 to $75 for a fire arrangement. So Wetzel's working part time now spending the rest with her homeschooling kids. I'm Mitchell Hartmann for marketplace. We learned in our marketplace Edison Research poll that came out last week that 47% of Americans would have at least some trouble handling an unexpected expense. Of $250. They just don't have the income or the savings companies are starting to realize that and that helping employees save might be a competitive advantage right now. UPS, for instance. Is going to start offering some of its workers a short term savings account inside. Therefore, one case marketplaces Kristen Schwab has that one. Zack Champa, a financial planner at John Hancock says making the decision to save money is like starting a diet. Not very fun, easy to mess up and pretty intimidating, and I think at that point people just is alone. So you know, I don't feel like taken too much of my time. After managing.

Brooke Wetzel Los Angeles Mitchell Hartman Kristen Schwab Zack Champa Mitchell Hartmann Mark Hamrick Labor Department Andrew Stettner Century Foundation president John Hancock Edison Research
The $20 billion missing from this economy

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:48 min | 1 year ago

The $20 billion missing from this economy

"Los Angeles I'm Carl Rozelle Thursday I believe the twenty second of October has always to have you along everybody. We're going to start today with a story about something in this economy that is not there that isn't happening and what that means. We're going to set it up by noting that seven hundred, Eighty, seven, thousand people lost their jobs last week and made first time claims for unemployment benefits less than the week. Prior, it should be said, and also that the Labor Department adjusted downward is numbers for the previous couple of weeks. And that's good. It really is but the number of people on government assistance because they have lost their jobs is still stratospheric. Lee High millions of them are running out of benefits and as you know, those extra six, hundred dollars a week went away in August. And that to get back to the thing that's missing is sucking billions of dollars out of this economy compared to earlier in the pandemic how many billions? Marketplace's Mitchell Hartman gets the lead story today. The answer is. Twenty billion dollars a week. That's how much is not getting into out of work Americans, pockets since a bunch of federal assistance programs for the unemployed started running out in midsummer Andrew Statler at the Century Foundation says based on Treasury data, they were getting twenty six, billion a week that as come crashing down to just six billion dollars, it's much less support to. Families and to the economy than we had six hundred a week in federal pandemic payments expired at the end of July the President's partial replacement program ran out of money last month also folks laid off back in March and April are now running out of their twenty six weeks of state jobless benefits some but not all are getting a thirteen week federal extension. Unemployment benefits now average three twenty a week across the country. It's even less for gig workers on pandemic on employment assistance and that has made a huge dent in the purchasing power of households suffering unemployment says Mark Hamrick. Dot Com, they are really having to scrape to get by these days just for basic needs such as pay for shelter, pay the bills to put food on the table and forget about luxuries. That's exactly what Brooke Wetzel has seen play out in her florist business in La when the economy started to open up late spring sales picked up but since August things have gotten pretty slow people might have that you know extra fifty to seventy five dollars per fire arrangement. So woetzel's working part time now spending the. Rest with her homeschooling kids I'm Mitchell Hartman for

Mitchell Hartman Carl Rozelle Brooke Wetzel Los Angeles Andrew Statler Mark Hamrick Labor Department Century Foundation LEE President Trump Woetzel LA
"brooke wetzel" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:33 min | 1 year ago

"brooke wetzel" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm kind of resolve Thursday. I believe the 22nd of October get is always to have you along, everybody. We're going to start today with a story about something in this economy. That is not there that isn't happening. And what That means. We're going to set it up by noting that 787,000 people lost their jobs last week and made first time claims for unemployment benefits less than the week prior. It should be said. And also that the Labor Department adjusted downward its numbers for the previous couple of weeks. That's good. It really is. But the number of people on government assistance because they have lost their jobs is still stratospherically high. Millions of them are running out of benefits. And, as you know, those extra $600 a week went away in August. And that to get back to the thing that's missing is sucking billions of dollars out of this economy compared to earlier in the pandemic. How many billions Marketplaces. Mitchell Hartman gets the lead story today. The answer is $20 billion a week. That's how much is not getting into out of work. Americans pockets since a bunch of federal assistance programs for the unemployed started running out in mid summer, Andrew Stettner at the Century Foundation says based on Treasury data they were getting 26 week. That has come crashing down to just $6 billion. It's much less support two families and to the economy than we had. 600 a week in federal pandemic payments expired at the end of July. The president's partial replacement program ran out of money last month. Also, folks laid off back in March and April are now running out of their 26 weeks of state jobless benefits. Some, but not all are getting a 13 week federal extension. Unemployment benefits now average 3 20 a week across the country. It's even less for gig workers on pandemic unemployment assistance, and that has made a huge dent in the purchasing power of household suffering unemployment, says Mark Hamrick at bankrate dot com. They are really having to scrape to get by these days just for basic needs, such as to pay for shelter. Pay the bills, put food on the table and forget about luxuries. That's exactly what Brooke Wetzel's has seen play out in her florist business in L. A. When the economy started to open up in late spring sales picked up, But since August, things have gotten Pretty slow people not having that, you know, extra 50 to $75 for a fire arrangement. So Wetzel's working part time now spending the rest with her homeschooling kids. I'm Mitchell Hartmann for marketplace. We learned in our marketplace Edison Research poll that came out last week that 47% of Americans would have at least some trouble handling an unexpected expense. Of $250. They just don't have the income or the savings companies are starting to realize that and they're helping employees save might be a competitive advantage right now. UPS, for instance. Is going to start offering some of its workers a short from saving account inside there. Fora one case marketplaces Kristen Schwab has that one. Zack Champa, a financial planner at John Hancock says making the decision to save money is like starting a diet. Not very fun, easy to mess up and pretty intimidating. I think at that point people just is alone. So you know, I don't feel like taken too much of my time managed to figure this out, he says, a.

Brooke Wetzel John Hancock Mitchell Hartman Kristen Schwab Zack Champa Mitchell Hartmann Mark Hamrick Labor Department Andrew Stettner Century Foundation president Edison Research
The recovery from reopening the economy is stalling

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:51 min | 1 year ago

The recovery from reopening the economy is stalling

"You can take. All those recovery shapes that people have been talking about the V. and the L. and the W and the K.. You can take them in. Well. You know what you can do with them. From American public media. This is marketplace. In Los Angeles I'm. Kai Ryssdal Tuesday day the Fourteenth Day of July it as always to have your long everybody opening, not opening school, no school virus lots of virus. We were batting ideas around at our news meeting this morning. What the what with this economy given where we were like a month ago and where we are now? And we're going around and around as I said, and finally we looked over at Mitchell Hartman I. mean as much as you can actually look at somebody on zoom. And we. Mitchell gotta make some calls, would you? There are a couple indicators. Showing the reopening recovery has stalled out analyst Nick, shields, a third bridge, follows retail foot traffic. It picked up in May, but now the resurgence of covid. In the South and West is taking a toll since late June in the biggest drop. Offs are happening in Mississippi. Texas south. Carolina Louisiana Alabama same story with jobs. Postings at the employment side glass door are down six percent since the end of June. So what kind of recovery does this leave us with Chameleon a chef ski tracks the consumer economy at cf are a research Reagan be seeing w shape recovery down sharply turning up a bit. Then turning down again for the second half of the W Janowski says that's probably where we are now these re closings. They're driving consumers to be even more anxious about potential exposure. It's this fear. That's the biggest roadblock to any near term sustainable improvement. All this fits with what independent florist Brooke Wetzel is seeing in her business I caught up with her. The giant wholesale flower market in downtown. LA, which she says is operating sort of normally. Yeah, normal was mandatory fast. What's shut down in? March started up again a couple months later. She says Folks Still WanNa send flowers. People are still at home and they can't visit each other when they would have for a special occasion. Babies are still being born I. I mean unfortunately people still passing away. Everybody's still having birthdays. Her business has been pretty good, but looking around the flower market, I would say about three quarters of the vendors are back. Not Everybody came back. They're gone for good and with California closing businesses again. Wetzel hopes people don't stop splurging on flowers I'm Mitchell Hartman for

Brooke Wetzel Mitchell Hartman Kai Ryssdal W Janowski Mississippi Los Angeles Analyst Texas Reagan LA Carolina Louisiana California Nick Shields Alabama
"brooke wetzel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"brooke wetzel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Cook at Nicholas Cranko was laid off from his full time job at a restaurant in Portland Oregon in mid March files an employment they got back to me at one point with the letter we found an issue we'll contact you later but I've got a single cent yeah grooving to win about eight weeks without pay and barely made this rant he just started a new job at a food cart that does take out he expected to get state unemployment benefits while he was out of work plus six hundred a week in federal pandemic pay that program also expands eligibility to people who aren't usually covered including gig workers and so low business owners like Brooke Wetzel a florist in Los Angeles she applied was denied and then had to apply again so I stopped working March seventeenth and then the money didn't come through and tell me Mayci advocates for the unemployed estimate millions have applied for jobless benefits are still waiting to get their money I Mitchell Hartman for market place stock index futures are mixed more than half an hour here before the exchange's formally opened the Dow future is up one hundred sixty one point six tenths percent the S. and P. future is up a tenth percent the nasdaq future is down eight tenths percent with Twitter stock down five percent the government said this morning that the U. S. economy shrunk by more than first calculated contracting at a five percent annual rate first quarter instead of four point eight percent just wait till we see the negative gross domestic product for the second quarter that comes in during the summer marketplace morning report is supported.

Cook Nicholas Cranko Oregon Brooke Wetzel Los Angeles Mitchell Hartman government Portland Twitter
"brooke wetzel" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"brooke wetzel" Discussed on KCRW

"March files an employment they got back to me at one point with the letter we found an issue we'll contact you later but I am not a single cent yeah grooving to win about eight weeks without pay and barely made this rant he just started a new job at a food cart that does take out he expected to get state unemployment benefits while he was out of work plus six hundred a week in federal pandemic pay that program also expands eligibility to people who aren't usually covered including gig workers and so low business owners like Brooke Wetzel a florist in Los Angeles she applied it was denied and then had to apply again so I stopped working March seventeenth and then the money didn't come through and tell me thanks advocates for the unemployed estimate millions of applied for jobless benefits are still waiting to get their money hi Mitchell Hartman for market place stock index futures are mixed more than half an hour here before the exchange's formally opened the Dow future is up one hundred sixty one point six tenths percent the S. and P. future is up a ten percent the nasdaq future is down eight tenths percent with Twitter stock down five percent the government said this morning that the U. S. economy shrunk by more than first calculated contracting at a five percent annual rate first quarter instead of four point eight percent just wait till we see the negative gross domestic product for the second quarter that comes in during the summer marketplace.

Brooke Wetzel Los Angeles Mitchell Hartman government Twitter