15 Burst results for "Brooke Shelley"

"brooke shelley" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

What Book Hooked You?

01:44 min | 10 months ago

"brooke shelley" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

"Interestingly enough they're both the romance and science fiction so the first is well met by gen deluca and that is like a ren faire contemporary romance. And it's very it's it's gonna be good like it was just a warmed my heart in a way that very few things can And the second was the echo life by sarah gaily and it was like if you took amy's monologue from gone girl and then made it into an entire book but then made amiens like a scientist. I feel like. I'm not pitching with very well. But that's essentially what's happening and it is amazing. Just very briefly about This woman who's a scientist who does research on cloning and it turns out that her ex-husband cloned her and then married the clone to be like a better version of her as a wife. It's amazing neither of these are waie. So that's not probably the greatest but no they've been my favorite latest to reads awesome. Well tori your debut. The devil makes three comes out on august the tenth from patriot. Kids and i wanna wish you and this book all the best. Thank you so much. This has been really fun. And that does it for this week's episode wanna thank tori for joining again her debut. The devil makes three his out on august tenth from patriot. Hope you'll check that out of your check out some of the other great episodes we've had with some why in middle grade authors. I'm brooke shelley and until next time keep reading..

gen deluca sarah gaily waie amiens amy tori brooke shelley
"brooke shelley" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

What Book Hooked You?

04:43 min | 11 months ago

"brooke shelley" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

"This is what cook you. I'm brooke shelley and thanks for listening this week. I'm talking to greg vanney. Whose newest middle grade weird kid will be out on july the twentieth. And so in this episode. Greg get into some of his early. Inspirations as far as the books that he was really into and how he came to write great and what is involved and then so really enjoyed talking. Great so listening. So greg what book hooked you. Well When when. I knew that i was going on. This podcast was kind of fun. 'cause i could actually give some thought to what books hooked me and there were a lot of really quality books bottom might talk about like Wizard of earth see by Win or big classics. That everybody's read like the hobbit but to be honest with myself. I felt like what really is the one that I talk about most in my life when i'm reminiscing. And it's the last son of krypton by elliot s magon. So i did a little digging into the history of this book. So elliott's magon was a writer at dc comics throughout the seventies and in the early eighties. Which is when. I started reading comics. And he had around nineteen seventy four written a treatment for what he hoped would be a superman movie. He hoped he gets right. Superman movie as it turned out. That assignment got handed to mario puzo. Of course if the godfathers ignatz elliott has nagy was sad so he took his treatment to the offices upstairs. Dc comics and executive said like well. Aren't you just ride up as a novel and we'll put it out. Because i guess that's how decisions were made back. Then it was just the guy at a desk s- probably smoking a cigar drinking a lunchtime cocktail out. Just put it out as a novel. He did that he wrote it up as a novel It came out The same day that superman the motion picture Was released and the way it's packaged it. Christopher reeve is on the cover The version of the logo. They use the superman. Logo is the same one used in the movie. So i don't really recall this. But i probably picked it up. Thinking was a secret man. Novelization i was big into media tian's at the time they were probably my introduction to science fiction the star wars books splinter. Of the mind's eye by alan dean foster allotted star trek books. I had access to old paperback novelization. The original planet of eight smoothies..

brooke shelley greg vanney elliot s magon magon ignatz elliott Greg greg dc comics mario puzo elliott nagy Christopher reeve tian alan dean foster
"brooke shelley" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

What Book Hooked You?

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"brooke shelley" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

"This is what book you. I'm brooke shelley. And thanks for listening for our first episode of april i have debut author robbie couch whose book the sky blues is a health on the six of april. And in this conversation we get into just his reading life growing up and really what brought him to pursue fiction writing and develop the sky blues. So isn't it so robby. What cooked you the book. That really hooked me when i was a kid was. Nt maine Which is an old one it was. It was published in the nineteen fifties. So certainly an older book by patrick. Dennis and i remember being just absolutely enthralled and it was the first book that i read that i truly could put down. I was really continue to be kind of a slower reader. It usually takes me at least a few weeks to get through books to be honest and that was the first book that i just read through. I think probably in a couple of days which was like lightning speed for me and Yeah it was. It was a a big moment for me. Because i escaped into a world in a way that i really hadn't done before and it made a huge impact on on my life and really my trajectory as as a storyteller in as a writer and someone very interested in story a made a big difference. So i'm not familiar with it so tell me a little bit about the book. Totally goal yes so as mentioned it was published in nineteen fifty five by patrick dennis. In since then it's become a a stage stage. I think it was on broadway. It's been a movie so there's been a lot of different Depictions on it in different mediums And it's essentially. The basic plot is a boy who was orphaned as a young kid and his father who had been alive was a very conservative businessman. And because he's an orphan he then goes to live with his very flamboyant eccentric. Just like the most fun wild character. Auntie mame at lives in new york city and so a complete one eighty two all experiences and the life that is used to and they go on these adventures together and they kind of explore the world So off the wall. It's so much fun and in the main antagonist is the I don't know what you'd call a trustee a conservative trustee over his father's estate in he's constantly trying to get patrick back into these conservative schools. Like have a conservative upbringing and Auntie mame was just like constantly pulling them away on these adventures and this is just an absolute blast. There's nothing there's nothing explicitly queer about it but as a young queer kid in now looking back as an adult. There's just a lot of themes that i think are queer and ten generally queer could say that really drew me to the story Before i you know i was still closeted. This was way before..

patrick dennis Dennis brooke shelley patrick six of april ten first book april first episode new york city robby robbie couch one nineteen fifties eighty two blues nineteen fifty five
"brooke shelley" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

What Book Hooked You?

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"brooke shelley" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

"Well again. I have to richard powers. Wrote a book called over story which is about trees and about our cultural understanding of trees and It's structure is like a forest at tells the individual stories of individual organisms like trees and then it branches out into a larger Communal understanding of human society and tree society. And it's You know award winning book. But i was blown away. I couldn't believe how devoted was to by the end of it. It's not that easy to read and But by the end of it you know you you feel the love for the For trees the way the people who are in it are defending sequoias by living in their top branches so no one can cut them down and the trees own devotion to their communities and their ability to communicate with each other. And you find out that it's not entirely fiction but you could stuff. Oh there's my dog barking. Then the other book i would throw in. There is a book that i got From my own publisher sent me other another book called dig by king which is gorgeous and i'm insanely jealous. It's five different. Teenagers experiencing life from the point of view of completely Dysfunctional families and they build a new worlds five of them in a way that by the end of the book. I just started. I'm never riding again. If she's screw that's the truth well then. City of the uncommon thief is out on february. The eight and i wish you in this book all the best. Thanks very much practice. Really nice talking to you and that does it for this episode. I want to thank lynn for joining me again. Her book is the city of the uncommon thief. So i hope you'll check that out also hope you'll check out some of other great episodes out with some way authors. You enjoy as they reveal. Not only their books that were important to them. Put the books that they've wrote and shared with us. I'm brooke shelley and until next time keep reading..

february brooke shelley five lynn eight City of the uncommon thief richard powers dig by
"brooke shelley" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

What Book Hooked You?

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"brooke shelley" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

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Then finally, <Speech_Male> and this might be hard because you kind <Speech_Male> of started out started <Speech_Male> off this book <Speech_Male> if you want the same answer you can. <Speech_Male> But what is the last <Speech_Male> great <Silence> book Okay. So <Speech_Female> I recently <Speech_Female> read <Speech_Female> this book <SpeakerChange> that I. <Speech_Female> Did a blurb <Speech_Female> for cult hurricane <Speech_Female> summer by <Speech_Female> Oshawa boots <Speech_Female> filled and <Speech_Female> It's GonNa. <Speech_Female> Come out. <Speech_Female> Next <Speech_Female> summer <Speech_Female> I believe but <Speech_Female> it's about <Speech_Female> it set in <Speech_Female> Jamaica <hes> <Speech_Female> and it's about a <Speech_Female> girl and her <Speech_Female> sister who <Speech_Female> go to spend <Speech_Female> a summer <Speech_Female> in Jamaica with her father <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> It's <Speech_Female> it's <Speech_Female> such a beautiful <Speech_Female> story <Speech_Female> and definitely sort <Speech_Female> of. <Speech_Female> A social <Speech_Female> installed story for <Speech_Female> me I spent <Speech_Female> a summer in Jamaica and <Speech_Female> my grandparents though <Speech_Female> I. saw <Speech_Female> so much of myself <Speech_Female> in these characters <Speech_Female> and the <Speech_Female> people of Jamaica <Silence> barely started like <Speech_Female> like slip <Speech_Female> in and <Speech_Female> just infant <Speech_Female> on you <Speech_Female> and I <Speech_Female> found myself like <Speech_Female> just smiling <Speech_Female> broadly entire <Speech_Female> book. <Speech_Female> And just remembering <Speech_Female> so much <Speech_Female> and remembering <Speech_Female> what that was like <Speech_Female> to be like <Speech_Female> a child <Speech_Female> or a teen. <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> being in this <Speech_Female> whole other place <Speech_Female> and it feels like <Speech_Female> you're an entirely <Speech_Female> different galaxy <Speech_Female> but you're just on <Speech_Female> this tiny island <Speech_Female> <hes> that <Speech_Female> is in beautiful. <Speech_Female> So I <Speech_Female> <hes> <Speech_Female> I can't talk <Speech_Female> about the NAFF <Speech_Male> on <SpeakerChange> it was <Speech_Male> gorgeous. <Speech_Male> It's great. We actually <Speech_Male> my family we <Speech_Male> went to Jamaica <Speech_Male> in the winter before all <Speech_Male> this started <Speech_Male> and we're so glad <Speech_Male> we had <Speech_Male> experienced before <Speech_Male> we're all trapped here. <Speech_Male> Yes. <Speech_Male> I think <Speech_Male> to how Great <SpeakerChange> Jamaica <Speech_Male> what's so great <Speech_Male> Great. <Speech_Male> Well <Speech_Male> tiffany grown <Speech_Male> is out now <Speech_Male> congratulations on <Speech_Male> your fourth book and we <Speech_Male> can't wait to see <Speech_Male> all the other ones you have for <Speech_Female> us. <Speech_Female> Thank you so much <Speech_Female> I really appreciate <Silence> <SpeakerChange> it. <Music> and. That <Speech_Male> does it for this episode <Speech_Male> I'm <Speech_Male> GonNa Think Tiffany <Speech_Male> the Jackson for <Speech_Male> join me again, <Speech_Male> her book grown <Speech_Music_Male> is <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> out now <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> check that out <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and we haven't already be <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> sure to check out her other <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> books allegedly <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Monday's not <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> coming and <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> let me rhyme. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Hope you <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> also check out some of the other <Speech_Music_Male> great episodes we have <Speech_Music_Male> with a and <Speech_Music_Male> mitigate authors <Speech_Music_Male> I'm Brooke Shelley, <Speech_Music_Male> and until <Speech_Music_Male> next time <SpeakerChange> <Music> keep

Jamaica Oshawa Brooke Shelley Jackson
"brooke shelley" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

What Book Hooked You?

03:37 min | 1 year ago

"brooke shelley" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

"This is what Cook do you. I'm Brooke Shelley, and thanks for listening. So have you on the podcast to have tiffany Jackson? Whose other such books as let me HEAR RHYME Monday's not coming in allegedly her newest book. Grown is out now. I'm so excited to finally get the chance to talk to Tiffany. So listen in. So tiffany what book hooked you? You know. It's funny because of course like. I as Pistons chi-chi's and. You're on to the title itself because. You can interpret hooked. So many different ways ray it could be like the first page got sure it could be the book that you just can't stop thinking about out or it could be your child book that you loved and stop. So I am going to go with a such a fun age by read which is not a way. is an adult book, but it was one of those books that I read earlier this year that you know I just wasn't expecting it to me. So long I have been thinking about this on and off the specialty throughout you know. Throughout the pandemic quite frankly and throughout the protests and rise and I. Can't thinking about the ALCOM and I know that sounds really big. It's one of those books that that's exactly what it's like. It's. Tap to read it to really feel like unease about every single character that's in the book except for the children, the children are always the bystanders but I really love it and it was of leathers books that even though it isn't adult book I fully. Feel like teens especially can read it really grasp the concepts. And so I think I've heard of the title title's ring a bell but can you tell me anything about like what the books about? Sure. So Gosh That's kind of the right because. That there is no leg like I don't know if there's like a law glider elevator pitch but basically, it's about. This family is white family hires a babysitter and one night. She has an issue with whether the children when she brought her out to go shopping and it was a question of whether that child you know. Whether she. She belonged bat child and it sort of brings about ideas of race and privilege and class, and you know best quote unquote best intentions So I guess that's Kind of the best way to describe trump. With some very big but crepe lake the. You step into the book and you just run right into the accent immediately Which starts with you know the babysitter bringing the white child to the store, and then you know this incident Kinda ensues and the story clearly starts from there and you have the father who comes and like claims the child you know the mother who set the babysitter up and then your babysitter to and it really It's..

tiffany Jackson Brooke Shelley Cook crepe lake Pistons trump
"brooke shelley" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

What Book Hooked You?

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"brooke shelley" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

"I was reading in got really really really into a song of rates and ruin by Roseanne a brown. And then it disappeared. And while it disappeared I, started incendiary by Zurita, Cordova I and then it disappeared. I got a song of rates in ruined back and read a second bit, and now I'm currently like three quarters of the way through incendiary i. have it locked in a room where the toddlers can't get it. There's so interesting to be the way. I can tell they're truly fantastic boxes I usually read straight pre toddlers read straight through. I was not a person who read a book over multiple days. Let alone weeks. But the characters and situations are just living in my mind and it's probably the first time in my life that I've been able to do that for two books at once, and it's so interesting having babies to books because they are both. High Fantasy. They both involved both royalty and possible assassination fastens. In yet the hair so different and I can hold them both in my mind at the same time and I'm in love with the characters. For both of them. which again is a total I for me. So my goal is to finish incendiary tonight and then like. Trail the toddlers I make out what they did when the song of a rates in ruins. So I can finish that one do that's so funny. Whatever the inheritance games comes out on September I can't we treat it and I wish you in the book all the Best I think you so much for having me. And that's rap on this week. So I WANNA thank Jennifer. Lynn Barnes for joining me again. The inheritance games comes out on September the first. And hope you check that out. Thanks for listening be covered a keep an eye on this feed for some other great conversations we have with why writers coming up. I'm Brooke. Shelley until next time keep reading..

Lynn Barnes Zurita Roseanne Shelley Jennifer
"brooke shelley" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

What Book Hooked You?

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"brooke shelley" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

"Let's down things <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> I. Ask you a few questions as <Speech_Male> we do the first one being. <Speech_Male> What <Speech_Male> is your favorite movie? <Speech_Male> That's based <Speech_Male> on a book. <Speech_Male> clueless <Speech_Music_Male> okay. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> You know that <Speech_Male> is a <Speech_Male> absolutely look <Speech_Male> I love Jane Austen, <Speech_Male> which I know, <Speech_Male> technically not Victorian, <Speech_Male> but she was part of <Speech_Male> Victorian phase. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> I love <Speech_Male> Emma at Love <Speech_Male> Emma so much. I <Speech_Male> love the new Emma to. <Speech_Male> <Silence> The way that. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> CLUELESS <Speech_Male> RE contextualised <Silence> it. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> Is <Silence> just so. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> On the nose, <Speech_Male> young and Mike you <Speech_Male> called <SpeakerChange> classic, <Speech_Male> you said. <Silence> Perfect. <Speech_Male> And the <Speech_Male> next question. Is there <Speech_Male> a book or a series? <Speech_Male> You're willing to admit you've <Speech_Male> either never <SpeakerChange> read or <Speech_Male> never finished <Speech_Male> I never finished <Speech_Male> the Harry <Speech_Male> Potter books or the <Speech_Male> movies no regrets. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> That's the popular <Speech_Male> answer <SpeakerChange> for this question. <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And, not, allowed, <Speech_Male> I didn't. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Like afraid, <Speech_Male> I was GONNA! Scream <Speech_Male> at me on twitter. After <Speech_Male> this, it's about <Speech_Male> a third of the <Speech_Male> guests. That's their <Speech_Male> hands. I would say <Speech_Male> what does that. Say <Speech_Male> about US as a culture? <Silence> <Speech_Male> It <Speech_Male> could go way <Speech_Male> depending on how you <Speech_Male> feel about that <Speech_Male> for days. <Speech_Male> Like most people <Speech_Male> haven't finished it, but it's <Speech_Male> like such a touchstone <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> for today. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Think about that for. <Silence> <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> then finally, what <Speech_Male> is the last <Speech_Male> great book that <Speech_Male> you read Oh <Silence> that's an impossible <Speech_Male> one. <Speech_Male> Can name more than <Speech_Male> one I know <Speech_Male> I know there's so <Speech_Male> many <SpeakerChange> wonderful <Silence> wonderful books. <Speech_Male> <Silence> <Speech_Male> I have <Speech_Male> so many friends in Waie <Speech_Male> but I <Speech_Male> think it's safer <Speech_Male> to steer away <Speech_Male> from. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <hes> suffered <Silence> to say that. <Speech_Male> <hes> <Speech_Male> there are <Speech_Male> many wonderful <Speech_Male> books in <Speech_Male> a tweet about them. <Speech_Male> Constantly <Speech_Male> use read all <Speech_Male> of them <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> But <Speech_Male> the monstrous <Speech_Male> recent <Speech_Male> book that I read that I <Speech_Male> really loved Sunburn. <Silence> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> By <Speech_Male> Laura, <Speech_Male> Lippman does that sound <Speech_Male> right. It <Speech_Male> sounds familiar, <Speech_Male> but <SpeakerChange> it <Speech_Male> say <Speech_Male> it's an Warr. <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> And it's <Speech_Male> got <Speech_Male> sort of rotating <Speech_Male> perspective, but <Speech_Male> like does <Speech_Male> the thing where keeps <Speech_Male> it? <Silence> Distant. <Speech_Male> In <Speech_Male> a way that <Speech_Male> I am deeply <Speech_Male> envious of like. <Speech_Male> It's something <Speech_Male> I really try to do <Speech_Male> I. Have <Speech_Male> Adult Noir. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Fiction of <Silence> our book. <Speech_Male> and. <Speech_Male> I tried to keep <Speech_Male> a certain distance <Speech_Male> while <Speech_Male> still making them really <Speech_Male> fascinating, <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> it's so <Speech_Male> hard and I <Speech_Male> don't think that <Speech_Music_Male> she did it <Speech_Male> like I i. <Speech_Male> think I did to an <Speech_Male> extent in depth, but <Speech_Male> the way <Speech_Male> she does it in <Speech_Male> Sunburn <Speech_Male> is so beautiful <Speech_Male> like <Speech_Male> everything is intriguing. <Silence> <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> you feel like <Speech_Male> you know these <SpeakerChange> people, <Speech_Male> but you also know <Speech_Male> that you don't <Speech_Male> and that <Speech_Male> is wonderful <Silence> <Advertisement> and I <SpeakerChange> think that. <Silence> <Silence> <Speech_Male> I think that <Speech_Male> it's just <Speech_Male> so beautifully <Speech_Male> written to <Silence> the language. <Speech_Male> The way <Speech_Male> things <Speech_Male> are drawn <Speech_Male> it. <Speech_Music_Male> Yeah, I really <Speech_Male> loved that book. <SpeakerChange> I loved <Speech_Male> it a lot. <Speech_Male> Great Well <Speech_Male> Love Campers. <Speech_Male> Your newest book. <Speech_Male> Congratulations <Speech_Male> on this. We can't see. <Speech_Male> Wait to <Speech_Male> see what else you have forest. <Speech_Male> CAN WE SEE <Speech_Male> HBO? Max <Speech_Male> Series and <Speech_Male> wish all the best. <Speech_Male> Thank you so much. <Silence> Thank you for having <Speech_Music_Male> me. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> And <Speech_Music_Male> that is a wrap <Speech_Music_Male> on this episode <Speech_Music_Male> on a think <Speech_Music_Male> Elsie for joining <Speech_Music_Male> me again. <Speech_Music_Male> His book camp <Speech_Music_Male> is out now. <Speech_Music_Male> Pick it up <Speech_Music_Male> great read. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> Great summary <Speech_Male> especially <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and hope you also <Speech_Male> take out some of the <Speech_Music_Male> other episodes with some great <Speech_Music_Male> writers. <Speech_Music_Male> I'm Brooke, Shelley? <Speech_Music_Male> Until. Next <Speech_Music_Male> time <SpeakerChange> keep <Music> reading.

Emma Jane Austen US twitter Waie Mike HBO Elsie Shelley Laura Lippman
"brooke shelley" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

What Book Hooked You?

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"brooke shelley" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

"This is what book cooked you. I'm Brooke Shelley and thanks for listening this week. I'm having to have Leah Johnson on the PODCAST. Her debut see me in a crown his out on June the second from scholastic. So we talk about a lot about her early reading and Writing Life. And what drove her to kind of switch careers and pursue writing and then what went into her debut. Great Conversation so listening Soliah. What Book Hooked You you? I think that's such an interesting question. Which obviously it's the premise of your podcast. But I don't know that I could put it to one book but I can tell you the exact author that was the one who like brought me into this was like okay. Books are cool like this. Is the thing that people do for fun In that's Margaret Peterson Haddix. Who is in my opinion? An underrated dystopia legend. Like she was doing what? A lot of these girls started Late dots in like nineteen ninety. Nine for why Shoes so incredible. She has a series called a shadow. Children's series starts with this book called among the hidden and it's a world in which she imagines like. What would it look like if there was a totalitarian government that was limiting resources to maintain power and they wouldn't allow you to have more than two children and a family Which is not that absurd. Given given everything that's events going on in our world. It's very Margaret Atwood esque In that way and so I remember reading the first book in that series when I was in fifth grade I wasn't a veracious reader. Before that point I had like come to reading really late Like we always had books in my house and my mom was really an advocate for literacy but I started reading really late I remember being in like second grade and being in the group of kids that got brought out of the classroom during like the language arts portion of the day so that we could get more like specialized attention. I was like I was not locking in. I was not getting it. I wasn't understanding the importance of it And so after I I learned to read. I guess I was like okay. So these words on the page are coming together to make some sort of narrative. Art Sure It still took years for me to buy into it as a tool of recreation and so I had switched schools in fifth grade My parents had just gotten divorced and you we were trying to find our footing and I think that all those things sort of confluence of things that came together that like drew me to this series That had this element of chaos this element of anarchy. And I think something about it. Mirrored what I felt was going on in my life at the time but the series always at the end there is moment of triumph for these kids In so it's likely that I just needed something like that in my life at that moment and so I've read among the hidden and then I read the rest of the book. She did a series like one book a year for like eight years straight And they were all published by scholastic Which who knows. Maybe that also includes I found my way back to scholastic later But I like in the in between those books coming out. She had also put out the stand alone in the years prior that I just devour. Don't you dare read this. Mrs Done? Free like Leaving fishers turn about Running out of time She Martin. Peterson was my girl. Okay I learned the stand by Standing Margaret Peterson headaches. And so yeah. I think I think that's the author in the series that hooked me.

Margaret Peterson Haddix Leah Johnson Margaret Peterson She Martin Margaret Atwood Brooke Shelley Peterson Mrs Done
"brooke shelley" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

What Book Hooked You?

14:08 min | 2 years ago

"brooke shelley" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

"This is what book you. I'm Brooke Shelley and thanks for listening on this episode. I have June. Her whose debut novel silence of bones comes out on April. The twenty first we talked to June Learn about her kind of influence is growing up what she liked to read how she transformed that into some of her early writing and then just from their her journey on and giving us this debut and what she learned about herself throat grey conversation so listen so June. What book hooked you so for me? It was president prejudice. Spe Jane Austen I read it when I was around twelve because my dad was trying to find ways for me to read his. I I hated reading. I hated English class. I was failing it So yeah he just like try to find different books for me and she got me pride and prejudice and I watched an adaptation of it as well and I fell in love with it and then from there on I started writing pride and prejudice fan fiction and so it really opened my mind up to like how powerful books are. Help you escape into a world. That's totally different from yours. So that was it yet prejudice so I know a lot of adults that can't get through pride and prejudice. So what was it about it that as a twelve year old you sort of fell in love with this book so when I read it when I was twelve I the experience is probably much different from what I read it when I was much older. I reread it again in university completely different but when I was younger I saw the loves Germanic. Oh Mr Darcy Elizabeth. Oh Gosh so romantic. That was all I sign. I skimmed through all like things. Social Commentary I it. It just flew over my head so just the love story. I think that was the first love star I read and yeah that that made me fall in love with the idea of like Romance Romance novels and then I read j near her. And then I transitioned into lake. You know historical romance in general like written by more modern de Raiders. Say it was. It was a romance that hooked me so and then when it came to your fan fiction. Did you find you were primarily writing? What were the plots of those stories? Typically about L. is it was very interesting So when I was twelve I I wrote so. When one of the stories are the longest was Mr Darcy was a French spy working for Napoleon and Elizabeth was a British spy working for the Queen and so it was like a forbidden romance like they realized right before. They're going to get that. Oh no we'RE SPIES FOR THE OFFICE. It Nick countries who can't fall in love and it was that that's great. Yeah so as you got older now. You're writing Waie so and you were more the age of the audience. Was it still very much historical romance your into or are there other books that you can really remember from that time that were important to you. And so when I was a teen I read mostly historical romance am I did I also I think I just love the nineteenth century in general site. I got also into classics so I read. You know like I said all of Charlotte. Bronte's work the Bronte sisters And all of gene ears. Jane austen's work and several others But those are the books. I focused moron and it wasn't until university that I got more into literary fiction like contemporary literary fiction through indigenous books and I think that was what really changed the game indigenous Rex. I don't know what it was. I think when I was just the way just how unique and and well written the books that my professors selected for us was it. It just helped me appreciate words. More just words in general like how authors choose to use certain words and not other words and that that just changed my writing as well. Yeah and so. Does that imply because you say it changed? Your mind does imply during this entire time you were writing in there and there was an idea of you wanting to be a writer so I I was always reading always writing some kind of fan fiction. I started with pride and prejudice. And then I wrote enemy Fan fiction and then I got back into historical romance and that was when I started to write my own original work but I never considered publishing until around university after I guess yeah like reading in Indigenous Literature and falling in love with the craft of writing in general. I think that really Made me consider taking my writing in a more like taking it more seriously and then yeah university was when I first grade agents. And what was that? What are you writing at that time? Then you were taking the agents. It was it was actually stucco Romance And so throughout university like as I read different kinds of books I think I still love roam the romance genre but I think I realized that much more like I have a bigger interest in things like identity and The theme of home and so slowly over the years as I was in school I the themes that wrote about transition and so I think I just ended up transitioning out of Romance And then I ended up writing women's fiction so the book that I'm debuting with right now. I actually tried to write it initially as a women's fiction as a women's historical fiction but for some reason the heroine's was so strong I she's sixteen years old so she's the one I blame her. She made me right away and I'm so glad that I did. I realized that the things I care about our thing like themes that youth are really passionate about like trying to find who you are trying to find your home So yeah it. Just it just evolved naturally over time by being exposed to different types of books so central. Let's start talking about debut. The silent of bones comes out on April twenty first so give me the rundown of what the books about. Aso It set. In Chosen Dynasty Korea specifically eighteen hundred. And it's about an indentured servant named sell who must assist a young inspector with the investigation of murdered novel noblewoman but more to the case than meets the eye and they'll be out yet like you said April twenty first and so you already mentioned how the initial idea this book it was more. You were thinking women's fiction but what was that initial idea that got just reading this book So I was reading British historical for most of my life but then after two failed rounds of crane over the span of nearly a decade. I think I just got really burnt out. And and it was just. Whenever I thought of writing about Britain again I just felt so insecure and I just remembered all the rejections received and so finally I was just like I. I love history Let's try to write about a different type of history and so I- research initial I researched a bit about American. History is that it's it's just a big general but I am not an American. I don't know how to connect to that history like there's just so much work to be done to like you know build my knowledge from scratch and saw. I considered Canadian history. But it just wasn't clicking with me and suddenly go let me let me Decree in history bit since I'm Corinne and then I had no idea. I had very little knowledge of but after researching but I just fell in love with it. Like head over heels. I never felt this way but any history before and and it was. I think it was just like the idea that I never felt very Korean until I learned about history and then I realized like I have roots that are aspects of history that have come to influence me and who I am today and so I think being your reflection of myself in history really made me want to dig deeper into it and I was mainly fascinated by this event called that she knew but K. It happened in eighteen hundred eighteen o one and it was the mess persecution of Catholics. And I found it really fascinating. How back then career was close-door kingdom and so I was fascinated by this tension between the people who wanted to maintain tradition and to a block off any kind of Western flints and then Western power sort of kind of a finding their way into Korea through the means of religion. And there were like sincere Catholics but then there were also people using Western knowledge Western teaching in general as a way to just regain power and I found that tension really fascinating and so I tried to think of a way to read a book around this tension and that's how I ended up with the silence of bones and so you had mentioned earlier that originally The main female character you thought would be more of a woman who's ended up changing that. How did you come to that realization? So when I I wrote her I think I projected what I wanted her to be liked. I wanted I imagine this like maybe twenty one year old amateur sleuth and she's like a bit cold and cynical and a bit tormented. I like the idea of the tortured. Tormented detective kind of trope But as I wrote her like she just constantly like I'd be writing and then suddenly she like she leaps off stairs and she's like running around the capital and her eyes are like sparkling with so much curiosity. I'm like no. This is not the cynical woman I'm imagining. And she kept acting out in different ways. That was outside of the trump Trenton. Like traveling and so in the end the book just felt so split. Like there's this one heroine who I'm trying to make you know more cynical and then there's this other side of her where she's a totally different. She's a bit naive and full of energy and kindness and it just felt so off so I think as began revising the book I had to just let go of that control and just let the story run on. Its own so when it became clear to you that it was going to be a A. Why a book is that a category that you already had some familiar airdie with or did you have to sort of figure out. What would that take really align within this category? Yeah that's a great question So the only way was exposed to was basically like Harry Potter twilight and and the books that weren't specifically marketed. As why but ended up in books for teens and of Green Gables. I love that series So I read a lot of the classics that were meant for teams but weren't specifically targeted towards teens. And some of my favorite adult books are actually coming of age books. So when I wrote why I didn't really think of like you know the hot and trending books of today but more more just like I did what writers are not advised to. I didn't really write for an audience. I just wrote you know just a coming of age story. I didn't really think about whether it was a wii or an adult like I initi- thought my book was an adult but it turns out it was better suited for the white audience This second book. I wrote the signs of what was actually just a book. I wrote when I was about to give up on publishing so I wasn't really thinking of target And whence my agent decidedly go? This might be better suited for the white audience. That's when I began reading more..

Jane Austen Mr Darcy Elizabeth writer Brooke Shelley president Chosen Dynasty Korea Bronte Mr Darcy Korea Nick Green Gables Harry Potter enemy Fan Charlotte Indigenous Literature Corinne Britain Trenton Napoleon
"brooke shelley" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

What Book Hooked You?

09:22 min | 2 years ago

"brooke shelley" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

"It's sort of more separate from me because I meet new characters and plots and I get obsessed with those and I forget the details of the old ones. It's like friends you haven't seen in a while. They sort of fade out but to keep fond memories of them I don't know that I cringe because I think I had to decide not to cringe at some point. You know because this is something that people ask me a lot. When I was young in the books folks were coming out? They said let's using to. You're going to be embarrassed later on. Oh probably so. It's Kinda Mike so I have a lot of tattoos and people are like what are they gonNA look like when you're old and I'm like probably ugly like the rest of me. I'm going to be really old so I think no matter when you start writing. You're always gonNA have older books so let's tap and have mind from when I was younger I've talked to so many authors and I you know being an education I deal with all the kids that had these dreams of becoming a writer and and you know and working towards that because it happened to you at such a young age was that benefit or was it hard that you got you know success that early that you may be assumed that it was always going to be that easy that makes any sense. Yeah it does I do think it was. It's easier to get published In two thousand nine regardless of old you're the market wasn't as saturated then People are more likely to give mid list advances where now what seems to be more huge amount or nothing and it used to be more in between I definitely have struggled more than I expected. I had several books in a row not sell. I had several years ears. Were nobody came out. And it wasn't for lack of trying I think I think it was a benefit because it it Alaba save up some money when I was young which was great It got me acquainted with publishing and how that works before I needed to support myself with it And it. It gave me some time to be a fulltime writer before I had to transition into not being a full timer which was a nice experience to have It wasn't sustainable stable. But for a few years after I was out of college I got to just right and that was nice and a lot of people never got that so even though it was temporary it was cool and as you moved moved on with your career. You've also seen Why grow as as a category? So what has happened like what has been from where you started from you know even if we go back to age twelve Visiting your sister in the library too when you're first published to just how why has has exploded does feel you've sort of had a front seat for it or at least how's it been the sort of be inside as this has all been happening. I think it's more of like a clinging to the back bumper seats feeling Why is incredible when it comes to progressiveness diversity why he does everything? I so voices like mine are becoming less and less relevant and of course that's a good thing on a macro level it kinda sucks on a personal level because I am me but There are plenty of white women in publishing and we've been talking for a very long time so the fact that my voice is becoming less important is good good on a on a grand scale. So I've gotten to watch diversity really come alive Ave just released the annual publishing survey which said right. I think eighty six percent of publishing professionals are white. which is of course Rendez? And I've gotten to watch way. I mean we still have a long way to go but we invite invite authors of Color on in their books. I think at a much better rate. I don't have numbers on me than other. Categories are and. That's one reason too that I like to write about stuff like Jewish kids and sick kids. Because I'm like these are topics that are mine and topics that are still under-represented. It and I can bring so rather than writing when I was started out. I was just writing about like Christian ish straight white kids so now. I'm Mike Okay. I'm a gay sick Jewish author. Why why am I not using those experiences and bringing those two guys sick Jewish teenagers? So that's more of my goal. Now is to really harness the parts of myself that I think have been underrepresented and bring those for it. Because that's what I can offer but why I mean now with Netflix and everything. We're getting a bunch of movies And we're really seeing the public become more aware of why as a Jonah and it's been scary carrion exciting sure and beyond the your goals for the topics of stories that you WanNa tell you know you've obviously league renoir. You've middle grade books you've collaborated. What other kind of ideas or our our ambitions do you have for? Maybe the genres different categories are different styles. Are you know however far you WanNa take that when it comes to your storytelling I would love to do something with TV and movies. I wrote a screenplay of sick kids just as an exercise and a screenplay of one of my other books as well and it was really fun to do. Oh and I really liked it and I would love to see in the movies whether or not I wrote the screenplays But I I also love theater so anything with writing plays I think it would be great. Sometime I do think. Someday I'll venture into adult books. I feel like the protagonist of a lot of adult books are still quite a bit older than I am. Twenty eight and I feel like a lot of adult books are still about like I discovered my husband's cheating on me and my daughter is in college and I'm like I'm not there yet. So I think navy went on like forties fifties. Alright until book when I I I feel like I understand what being an adult. It's like because now I'm just like a ugly teenager so I'm Hopeful about these for that. I don't know that I'm gonNA write more Middle Great. I might if I get a good idea I don't see myself writing chapter of picture books but you never know But I do expect that. I'll I'll stay in why a As publishing changes I have self published a few books and I did really enjoy that process so I think there's a good chance that if I'm at a place where I'm not worried about getting money from publishing that I might transition into just publishing in order to have that control over what I'm doing win and to not have to answer to people and to get a more Hands on view of what. My sales are looking like what my readers liked. Because now there's filter and I would like that for the future but right now. It's not the smartest idea so wait. Yeah great well. Let's wind down as we do. Ask you a few questions the first one being. What is your favorite movie? That's based on a book. I have so many but my I very favorite is fantastic. Mr Fox okay. Which is my second favorite movie of all time It has absolutely nothing to do with the book whatsoever. So saying it's based on a book. It's pretty much a stretch but I asked. I did love the book when I was Little Rhode Doll I mean Anti Semitism side where it's good shit so I Fantastic fantastic. Mr Fox was actually one of my favorites growing up so I was so excited when the movie came out and oh I love it so much I watch it every report. Because they're hungry and I'm hungry so it's one of my favorite's next question then is Is there a book or a series. You're willing to admit you've either never read or never finished. I have never for even started either. Twilight Hunger Games which is weird for Y author. I know nothing against them. Just never did I. I saw the first hunger games movie and I enjoyed it But I never thought near the twilight movies either so I just missed that completely and then finally what. What is the last Great Book that you've read flats great one? I'm going to say it was neanderthal. Opens the door to the universe by Preston. Norton it's uh-huh really. It's it's kind of the way that I was talking about boyfriends. It's very satisfying The dialogue is incredible and The characterization is great. There's this one little scene where the two main guys or sooner on the walking dead and one of them's like it's just too too dark for me and the other one's like I know. Can we have an episode. They just like sit around and enjoy a meal or something like I loved that like when I was reading it I was taking all these pictures on my my phone and like tweeting out little quotes from it. Because I thought it was so charming. And it's by a debut author so it's always really fun to to find something new from a new author so yes neanderthal. Open the door to the Universe Press Norton. Good Buck Great. Well Hannah your newest book. Sick kids in love is out now. And congratulations on this one. We can't wait to see what else you have for us. Thank you so much. And that's all for this episode on thank Hannah Moskowitz for joining to me again. Her latest book sick kids in love is out now. I hope you check that out as well as many other books that she's published over the years also check out some of the other great episodes we have with some why people I'm Brooke Shelley and until next time keep reading..

writer Mr Fox Netflix Mike Okay Hannah Moskowitz Brooke Shelley
"brooke shelley" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

What Book Hooked You?

13:40 min | 2 years ago

"brooke shelley" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

"Okay let me just re totally revamp this and And I I after a lot of that I really really have been wanting to keep the superhero aspect in some kind of superpowers in their room. At how much I change it and I I think it was because my first two books then bones have the speculative element and I felt like. That's my thing. Like if I don't have a speculative element. I can't just write like a realistic story. Laurie who's GonNa WanNa read that But ultimately I realized I had to let that go using crutch and I decided I was going to write a very realistic version in a December. Bring an Improv. That I'm passionate about and said when he was going to be passionate about improper Her Dad was going to be the one who inspired her love comedy. Yeah but but That is as to became that like instead when have superpowers she has comedic superpowers. But not in a fantastic away like in in real life and as her dad's getting sticker. She's at that same time coming into your own power so it is really interesting journey and very painful will jeremy because throwing after pages of some of you written just sucks and maybe I'll do. Some of those pages is literally just totally different. Likes your best brand is different. Because everything's different about that that draft but You know now. Obviously that I have gotten to the point where the book is coming out. I made peace with it. And it's cool. Wow what the creative process. What a marvelous wonderful thing but That that is the long journey. Thank you for taking you with me. Braga Atacama Yeah. I've I've been excited to tell that story. You know ever since you know as as as a writer when you're going through these terrible things like throwing out the old bugs like well. Jeez if I can really make this new Berge work and actually make that into a book. I can't wait to tell this story spires somebody make it worth it. Somebody do you think go because you had to do that because you pretty much had to turn around and create a whole new book the facet the new book had so many parallels else to your life and and you could make it personal you could put yourself in. It made you able to write it. Yes yes is just. It's just a better bucket. Is I recognized that like the old version I think I was. I was a little distance in scared to go there. Some ways and then once I did the new version and made it more parallels to my life. And you know it's it's by no means a by my life exactly And the story of the parents in the book I should say is not the story of my parents but this certainly a lot of a lot of little bits and pieces that are taken and yeah it feels very personal and I feel happy that yeah that I was able to go there now when you because your books have this humor element into it and humor. I is probably one of the hardest things to write right because it. Because it's just so subjective when it's on the page and not you know there's no tone that can be visually seeing you know audience. You're saying you I mean so how you kind of work on that aspect of these stories and and refine them and really kind of try to find the right voice. Jason and the right wording can get that humor across to the reader. Yeah I I think sometimes with dialogue at certainly I mean I feel like for my time acting in and writing sketch. COMEDY DO ADVOCATE EAR for dialogue. Which I'm glad there's a lot of things? I am not good at reading of books but I I have an ear for that so that's really helpful and I think a lot of humor for me comes in just like those honest exchanges you know and and end just a the band between friends. I find very satisfying to write in all my books Zoe's funny And and just y'all I'm times. It's just trying to find the honest. The honest way we feel about things that are happening our lives at that that we don't always voice. I mean that's that's a stand up comedians doing right. They're having their own perspective on these things. We all go through but they can share their own specific viewpoint that then become so universally. Oh yeah wouldn't have thought of it like that like that specific way. They sentenced so great. And so definitely when I'm in Winny's head. And she's the first person protagonist this book. I'm trying to think about obviously my own perspectives on things and just whenever possible leaning into the honesty like honestly feel about that and and what is The honest reaction you saw when he would have in the situation and oftentimes I. Do you feel that honesty equals funniness. Truth in comedy is actually a big Improv book. That is an crying laughing that like her abrupt teacher gives out to the students to learn from But it's it's hugely influential. In the way I approach comedy is just trying to find the truth of it rather than searching I like what is the joke per se. It's like your looking for the job will be my way in like what would honestly happen in. What's was the a funny version? What can happen with that? You know Comedy writer especially if they're like writing for Sitcom will try to throw up different different lines or punch up a script to kind of make better are are a standup will workout routine in front of different audiences to kind of find the right thing do you any. Do you do anything anything similar where you're trying to workshop or some sort of our bounce live situation something off of other people to get their reactions to IT I. It's a great question. I mean other than the reads. I have people do in close friends and my wife and you know hopefully people will point out in those reads like this isn't hitting our. This isn't funny but I don't do any actual like out loud bouncing I think for me. It's happening much more looking at their notes and and went on. Just rereading just sticks out like a VAT that doesn't work. What was I thinking that doesn't hit And to sedan it's trying to find just the version which might involve like speaking aloud to myself find the rhythm like what's what's the funniest way to say this or with the funniest rhythm of this but but definitely there's no like you know inviting friends to my living room takes can reach reach of lines and give them a couple alternate versions in everybody votes on on the Basilan. But that's a yeah. That's a great question and thinking about my process. I think it is just like you know in the rewriting when there's a lot of trimming naming happening it's just finding like what are the best jokes. Let me let me trim around these that joke pops more so than as if you have like too many jokes or too many The moments that are less story driven than cut some of those. Because it's just you're just GONNA lose energies things like that where it's just more instinctive kind of feeling of just like this is. This is too much or this isn't hitting or yeah. Is there when you think of books are that are funny whether they intend to be or not. Is there anyone that come to mind that you've read over the years that you've found to be some hilarious writing that you can remember. Yes well early on Deep Thoughts by Jack Candy. This is not not a fiction but but Deep Thoughts by Jack Candy. That whole sensibility was just so funny. It's either on Saturday night. Live you know and it was just like a couple of sentences thought from threader Gigante. But then I had bought the actual book in like that made me laugh so much Is it the book. Letters from a nut Again not not efficient novel but but a book where this guy you know wrote letters to different companies that are just ridiculous requests to companies been so dry hi You know how. Write a letter like starbursts. Being like I don't even remember what the requests are but those are making lasso much. Okay so those are those are two examples not fiction But do you have been under a lot of books. That are funny trying to think of some very funny books have read recently. The funny books are fewer and farther between becomes becomes a harder thing What am I favor it's You know the director Paul Fig He did freaks and Geeks and he did one. He wrote a book. It's called superstar. It's a memoir her about him growing up and it's ever read that I need to. It's Hilarious I recommend it It's David Sedaris as was actually also Was Right after college. Starting to read those essays knows would make me laugh out loud. It is like to laugh out loud from the book. Is I guess a special thing because you know you sitting alone. I'm then we read words and they grow up at. That's that's very cool feeling absolutely certainly well. Let's wind down and as we do ask you questions. I ask everyone the first one being. What is your favorite movie? That's based on a book. One of my favorites. It came out recently actually And it's Love Simon which is dappled from Zaman Brazil misstatements agenda. I love the book and then I love the movie I loved the way they adapted I felt like they just captures. made the book great while like making it work for film And I just love that. It's such a so much harder so much humor in that book that that's a that's a book some of the Homo Sapiens jet. Actually that that maybe laugh a lot and yeah just thought it was so well done. Is there a book or a series of books that you're willing to admit you've either never never read or never finished So many brock I debuted the debut group my year. My first came out two thousand fifteen every year. There's a group. The authors have group name into the field fifteen years and I've bought so many of my fellow authors books. I've read a lot of. There's still some I haven't read and like I need to and want to and I'm like slowly been making my way through not gonNa name them right now but but it's like it's so hard to read all the bucks another series though I've not yet read his dark materials. And that's just one on that like when I hear people talk about on the I need to read it and now there's going to be an HBO show these bureau show has started By the time this is people are listening to this So hopefully by the time people listening to this I have started reading Golden Compass the first book because I knew GonNa love those books and it's just like they Bam. I shall literally fifteen years. Have your this I have not have not. You're with me. Were together Matt where where team and then finally. What is the last great book that you've read? Yes the last great book than read. I get to actually 'cause I just love these two bucks The first is a book coming out. In April twenty twenty called unscripted by Nicole Crohn's or its debut and it also it has to be another book that involves Improv comedy And it's so so well done It's about this girl. Who goes to an Improv camp? And she's really good at it and she ends up on the best team in camp but she's the only girl on the team the book kind of dives into the just the misogyny of men in comedy in this way that so nuanced and so on point and saw unflinching shing and Zelda's is really smart character too so it's not like she's just kind of walking into it naively she's from the very beginning she's trying to fight back against misogyny Johny but it's just it's not working you just see all the traps of misogynistic culture and I thought it was brilliantly done so unscripted second book that I just read back to back with. That was middle grade novel. Hello Universe by Aaron and Trotta Kelly Newbery Medal winning book so I had high hopes going in but it's still exceeded exceeded expectations. And that's about these kids who don't really know each other that well. But his lives we come intertwined one day it's so good just like Just the way characters are established in the way you instantly like understand with these characters want and go on. The journey with them is just amazing. So I'm happy reader because it's just a really good book this is the Best Feeling Lance crying laughing your the newest book Congratulations can't wait and see what else you have for us. Thank you great to be here. And that does it for this episode I WanNa Think Lance Rubin for joining me again. His book crying laughing is out now. Hope you'll check it out. Check out this other book. Dutton little's death date and also while you're at it go ahead and check out some of the other episodes. I have with some great white people. I'm Brooke Shelley and ED until next time keep reading..

Lance Rubin Jack Candy Laurie jeremy Braga Atacama Basilan David Sedaris Berge Winny Zoe Jason Brooke Shelley HBO Aaron Dutton shing Zelda brock
"brooke shelley" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

What Book Hooked You?

12:14 min | 3 years ago

"brooke shelley" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

"This is what book do you. I'm Brooke Shelley and thanks for listening to this episode. Derek Millman is back on the PODCAST. He was on last year for his debut swipe right for murder. When I was in New York recently I met up with him at Kid Fricks Launch Launch Party. She's another guest. She has a new book out called all is on us and so there can I talk about doing the pockets again because he has a new book out <hes> swipe right for murder teen thriller perfect summer read that he talks all about it in this episode so listening doc.

Derek Millman Brooke Shelley murder New York
"brooke shelley" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

What Book Hooked You?

11:22 min | 3 years ago

"brooke shelley" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

"This is what book you I'm Brooke Shelley and thanks for listening on this absurd. I Have Jen Malone who newest book the arrival of someday comes out on July. The twenty third from Harvard Teen and Jen has written many books from younger kids to Waie and this book she explains their arrival of someday that was very different for her and you'll hear why so listen yeah so jen. What book cooked you okay so I'm not sure if I two antics I'm GonNa give you book and a method actually because because when I was about four and a half my mother used in probably wasn't officially hooked on phonics because I don't even know if that existed then but version of phonetic teaching to teach me how to read and I have really vivid early memories of of of laying on her bed with her at night and flipping through index cards that had letters on them <hes> and I she had just had a little sister introduced to the household so it was really treasured what on one time with my mom and it also allowed me to skip kindergarten because I could already read at that point and so from very early on I was always giving the message that I was special because of my reading and that it was kind of my superpower and made me <hes> was was kind of something that set me apart from the other kids and so I really embrace that as part of my identity and it turned into a lifelong reader and now writer course just because of the way that it always had had a really special place in my life and myself identity as well but if we're talking strictly books one of the very early ones that I remember reading again with my mother on her bed alternating chapters that we read out loud was was whites the trumpet of the Swan and that I still have that exact copy and every so often I go back and revisit? It and I don't want anyone to tell me anything bad about A._B.. White or that book nothing problematic please because I claimed to that one that's great and so that's a great little story of sharing time with your mother especially with the with the newborn sibling I get that and so it sounds like you know that really was the spark for you. You were a big reader so beyond just trumpet of the Swan <hes> At that age was there something like a series or some other types of books that you kind of always gravitating towards <hes> always kind of interested in topic or theme whatever it may be yeah and it's interesting because it's so much a part of what I right now always gravitated towards funny contemporary stories so I loved all of the Ramona books I I loved anything Beverly Cleary N I find that when I especially when I first started writing <hes> that I had that sort of pacing and style and humor in the back of my mind as I wrote because because those for me that was middle grade yeah and then as you grew up moving into your teenage years you're y years what was was reading still as important or did kind of adolescence social life school just in general kind of get in the way and reading kind of slow down during that time period yes so it's interesting reading never slowed down for me which I have three teenagers. There's myself now and I see how that transition happen. Of course we didn't have smartphones and Youtube and all of this other exciting things <hes> so whatever was on T._v.. was what you had to watch and it wasn't always something you're interested in so I definitely definitely stuck with books <hes> but I also <hes> when I was forty was diagnosed with A._d._H._d.. And have now come to realize in sort of working through all of that <hes> that I definitely used books as a way okay to escape in a way that was socially acceptable. When I was overwhelmed and over stimulated I would disappear into a book and you know what parent is going to say? Put Down Your Book. It's not quite like put down the video dame so my parents it's always encouraged it and left that and it gave me a really easy escape that I didn't realize at the time was a way to sort of shut out the rest of the world and and let myself come back from the that over-stimulation and so then at what point the idea because you were such a big reader at what point did the idea of wanting to create stories of your own really come into play yeah so I would say epton flowed. I was definitely definitely a big writer as a little little kid no early elementary school and but I remember being in third grade so maybe eight <hes> I was a little younger because I had skipped. Kindergarten says a little younger than the other kids but <hes> I want to a contest in elementary school for the best Halloween Short Story and the prize which I considered a terrible punishment was that you got to read the story over the morning announcements after the pledge of allegiance and I was really shied kid so for me that was so intimidating and so vulnerable that I remember having sleepless nights over it. I never told a teacher or parent or anything. I'm sure they would have let me off the hook but I did. It went fine but interestingly I sort of compaign point that experience to win is transition from writing short stories to <hes> not and becoming more interested in middle school in high school in journalism which is what I went to college for and then switched majors halfway through to do copywriting for advertising so always writing but not necessarily always reading stories and so it wasn't until my youngest on just learning to read in kindergarten I have to say we did not do the note cards on on my bed. She never have had the patients for that <hes> but she was reading kindergarten and there was literally one afternoon where I just said. Wouldn't it be fun to write her a little story that she could read to me at bedtime now that she can read instead of one of our picture books and I had no idea at the time that that was going to spark such a big transition in my life with reading <hes> when you became more of a young adult. Do you remember number <hes> some of the big books on the books that you really gravitated towards you really loved during that time in your life yes. They were all the sex because I was so curious as a teen. And that was my way of <unk> asking the questions that I was too shy to ask anywhere else and and it was a very safe place to sort of explore those questions so I remember Judy blume's forever as being being one that I really read and reread <hes> clan of the cavewoman that whole series was really captivating to me and I I didn't really remember at the time that it it had so much explicit romance <hes> and graphic romance but it did and <hes> that was also there wasn't young adult fiction. Really I mean I remember Judy. BLUME had some tiger is but there wasn't a lot that was there certainly wasn't in a category in the library that was called young adult fiction so I was twelve when I was reading Stephen King and definitely all of my grandmother's books whenever I went to visit her she had all the Danielle Steel's and committee P._G.. Rated I would say romances but more than I had been exposed to at that point so it was definitely a peek into an adult world that I really didn't see in my day to day life. That was really intriguing to me. I it was very curious about it and so you had mentioned that your first idea to as an adult into creative writing because you were doing writing professionally was for the idea of a book for for your child and so did how did you then dive in. Did you really right up something. Come up with an idea and then do the research or how did kind of what was your kind of journey through that yeah I would. Let's say in the best possible way in hindsight because it was one hundred percent accidental so I sat down one afternoon. I had this little idea that I don't remember at now where it came from what was sort of the instigator for it but I had this little idea about a girl who was upset that the penny was going to be eliminated from currency or possibly because her name was penny and she identified strongly with it and she was little just like a penny was little and she felt like it should get more respect it so that was the germ of the idea and <hes> and I sat down to write as they said just a short story and it was one of those experiences where time stopped you know you look up three hours later and you think when did it get dark out mm-hmm and I have A._d._H._d.. So my brain is going constantly that doesn't happen very often for me so it was just a a relief <hes> and really captivating and I didn't WanNa stop so the next day I said well. I'm I just had to the story and little by little every day mostly just to have that feeling of time stopping in getting so deep into something that you were just completely consumed with it. I added to the story until maybe maybe a month and a half later. I looked up and said I think I accidentally wrote a book. I didn't write short story and I never still never have written a short story <hes> but but I accidentally wrote a book which I have to say is a really great way to do it especially the first time because it's a daunting task to sit down with a you know a blank page cursor blinking at you and know that you have two hundred pages or three hundred pages to right and so doing it accidentally and falling into it always allowed me to say well. I did it once once so I know I can do it now. I have to do it again and I still say that to this day still daunting to open up a new document and start a new book but but now of course I've done many times so I can build on that and your latest attempt at that the arrival of day which comes out on July twenty third year from Harper teen so let's start talking about that and gave me the synopsis of what the Books About <hes> so <hes> so this book is a little bit of the departure for me because my books previously had been very plot driven and this one is very character-driven <hes> as a quick synopsis it is about a girl who is <hes> extremely confidence kind of a bad ass and she he finds out one day sort of very much out of the blue and unexpectedly that a liver disease that she was born with that has not affected her life..

Kindergarten writer Jen Malone Judy blume Brooke Shelley Youtube Beverly Cleary Waie liver disease BLUME epton Danielle Steel Harper Stephen King one hundred percent three hours one day
"brooke shelley" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

What Book Hooked You?

11:32 min | 3 years ago

"brooke shelley" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

"What was that? Maybe spark, or what kind of got you that initial idea that got you writing this book. Where I think part of it was having a lifetime of reading and watching stuff about which is so that's always sort of maybe percolating, a conscious, but I would just one day mighty my own business. And all of a sudden I had this character, my head, and she was working on the touristy magic, Sean Bensalem and was just irritated about the whole thing because she was real, which, and that was kinda the seed of who is this person? And what is her story, and it kind of snowballed from there until you're much in that? You always, you know, grownup sort of watching, and, you know, experience different medias. It had to do with witches. So what may have been some of those that may have in direct or indirect way influenced this book? Many. I definitely I think the Tiernan book first week, he reads when I was a kid. I think that just really solidified like the love, which is the magic system. Isn't it all the same? But I think what if I became that in Harry Potter, there was no no going back. I was going to be anywhere. Just forever. I think I would have the Laskar vendor also played a big role really got me into the elemental magic, which pinks makes up part of the book goes, it'd be the main ones. I did. I read this any kind of which book and I read twitches when that was for coming out, and those were scholastic like books are books. I remember getting those out anything 'cause I would read. So you mentioned an if I think I'm counting. This is was is your fourth attempt at at a book to get published, or at least complete. So when you look at this one and you compare it to the other three what kind of stands out that this one is the one that ended up kind of coming together and, and working, we'll say. Listening for book that I had written very and I think the thing that made it different when ended up being the one, I think, with the most heart in the most authenticity. And I think part of that was as I was writing all these books, I kept writing books with more and more, your characters in them, and not really knowing one, I and then Louis book, finally, after I'd written the first draft the light bulb went up, and I was like, oh, I live living. That's why I keep reading these books. And so once I had come out and was experiencing life. And I bet my wife, Michelle mauve and, you know, experience lives, as somebody who is longer street changed a lot about what I knew about these characters. And I think infusing that into the book made it much more like authentic and real and also just every books I tried to level up my skills, as far as characterization. Apply. And I think it was the combination of, you know, kind of like getting getting to that point as a writer, where I was reading and all of us feels I need interests, but also has the heart that needed to go on it, too. And. Taking a step back. Was it always sort of when you initially kind of set off to right? Did you always sort of having in mind that you would be writing within the why a space or did it kind of come that, as you were writing the type of stories that you were ended up kind of gravitating towards on the page would end up in just happened to fit back into why? Or was it purposeful that you were writing why? Yeah. It was it was always intentional that I was writing. Why novels only from the first one those are always the books that I loved the most. And I never really because I stopped reading more or less when I meant to Paula JR. And then when I came back to reading, and it was back to why. And I haven't really got too much into it. Delta. Who's always meant to be right from the beginning. And so what through all this, what is your reading life like now as a writer, is it something where you really try to kind of get immersed in other fantasy type stories and just wanna kinda soak in? Maybe what other people are doing their do you try to maybe avoid that? So as not to get to impressionable and you know, fearful that you might end up borrowing too much from someone. Actively drafting in new project, typically, don't read much during that like six to eight week period. Smokey just don't have time because I tried to write as much as I you know, right in the morning, and I go to work come home owner. And there's what time to read so much, so during them, they usually and more going to be doing like industry type pud tax and stuff. But when I'm actually drafting I try to read, I'm trying to read more broadly, in general, but I try to read as many different genres. You know, to top of the fantasy. So I kinda know what's happening in my sphere. But I also branch out to, you know, contemporary around palm and thrillers and try to get his wine of abreast of different genres, mostly within why that just kinda my happy place, though. I am trying to relive it more adult stuff just to, you know, learn from other authors and see what they're doing, but I don't actively ever like a voice something or. I was trying to read broadly. And they thought you to in terms of the authors that I'm reading trying to make sure I mean here, even different voices that I have heard. And as you've been reading widely I'm wondering is there a book that maybe really surprised you as far as you know, because it's not necessarily, maybe a John RIA, or a topic that you would typically, you know read on your own, but Reno really just kind of grabbed you in surprised you with the story and the writing? Yeah. I think probably your three that immediately come to mind. I, I just read this weekend, I red white and Royal blue, which is an ill. Don't wrong calm. And it was so good. I can't even speak intelligently about it yet because it was so good. We're just a characterization was, so deep and the tone and the voice is just so like snappy, and funny to that one I normally don't go for the you don't stuff. But it was amazing. And then that one, I think Casey, Kristen, I think, is the author of that one. And then actually devoiding from was, like, I don't wanna read that it's not really my thing. I don't wanna read that and the girls from everywhere they hide you highlight. I kept putting on my I don't know if I like time travel, I'm sure him like this and turn tastic in totally on my mind. And I was mad that I should. Sooner 'cause it was so good. And then the other one I just read recently with the called once and future, which is the like gender Benz King Arthur in space, so good. Muslim that really like a stays person typically, but it was based was magic. And you know there's a ton of your character. So I was having to give it a try. And again, it was so good. It was so tightly plotted. So those are ones that I probably wouldn't normally pick up but I just loved. And then when you kind of look over the years that you've been writing, you know, actively in kind of purposefully. What do you think maybe is the biggest kind of lesson? You've learned through the whole process. Good question. I think the biggest thing that I've learned or that I'm trying to learn is your patient, and let him books, take the time they need to take. So with my sequel that's supposed to me now in twenty twenty. Was super disaster to write had to write it from scratch board time. And I think a lot of that was because I kept saying, like, well, I don't really know strike to be that was gonna write it figure it out and pushed through and gotta hit my deadlines when they're just get it done. And I think doing that as taught me, you know, you need to allow yourself time to figure out what the story is you can't just force yourself. Look out the words down, and I'm gonna keep going forward when the word part golden right direction. So I think patience has been the thing that I have learned that him continuing to learn. Right. So let's we're gonna wind down. Now, I'm going to ask you a few questions as we do the first one being what is your favorite movie, that's based on a book? Probably the Harry Potter movie. So they're always feel good like going back to those. Okay. But when everybody answers that I always make them, choose, which one maybe all of them is your favorite. That's really hard. Probably prisoner of asking, and I think that's the one where her mind it gets the punch Malfoy the say, so we'll go with that. And then my second, not Harry Potter, one, I think, by more recent one would be left Simon love that movie an episode. Great. Next question is there a book or a series that you're willing to admit you've either never read or never finished? I not finished the rainbows series that one. I started it. And then I just fell off. Good. And then finally, what is the last great book that you've read? I'm going to stay the red white and Royal blue again, I am obsessed with that book. I read it in twenty four hours a guy stayed up late. Got up early. Read it for like six hours about eating taking a lunch break. It was so good, and like most books that kind of like gets into your soul. Mate sucks. All the right heartstrings, and I mean new very happy. Willows. Well, the book is these, which is don't burn and I wish you and the book all the best. Thank you. And that wraps up this episode and I wanna thank Isabel sterling for joining me, again, her book, these witches don't burn is out now. I hope you enjoy that. Summertime is upon us. So if you're looking for books to devour this season, go through the archives, checkout, some of my other conversations with why writers to give you some of those ideas. I'm Brooke Shelley at until next time keep reading..

Harry Potter writer Sean Bensalem Tiernan Michelle mauve Laskar Paula JR Louis Isabel sterling Brooke Shelley Smokey Delta John RIA King Arthur Reno Malfoy Casey Simon Kristen twenty four hours