18 Burst results for "Brooke Gladstone"

"brooke gladstone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:31 min | 1 year ago

"brooke gladstone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is on the media I'm Brooke Gladstone as the prospect of Britain's yet unresolved exit from the European Union looms large many parts are experiencing what officials pundits and the media have termed Roeg's it anxiety four out of ten people report brexit has had an impact directly on their mental health and one in ten of them say it's been a large impact Britain is suffering from brexit blues according to health experts and academics there were warnings that in response to the stories about a surge of Roeg's it related anxiety the ailing masses have been advised by mental health professionals and the media to direct their attention away from the winds of politics focus instead the urged on the aspects of your life you can control like family sleep and exercise damn day government as a researcher in philosophy at Lancaster university his research focuses on the connection between the medicalization of negative emotions and political agency he told us that the whole brags that anxiety thing was bogus from the get go there was actually very little evidence to support these claims about an increase in the number of people seeking mental health care a lot of these articles referred back to mental health logs which were written by they were really saying that their existing patients wanted to talk more about it which makes perfect sense right because that was the thing about day still is really and the reported consequences of not following professional advice you could spiral into a serious mental disorder thank them and dug up evidence to support the idea that the Brandt's were having their legitimate feelings of anxiety about the future of their country de legitimized being advised with groups like sincerity to search inside themselves for calm he found one such video on you too the whole video started with that he was our main describing how upset he was over bags it and how we have gotten into these arguments with people how is this session help too this way we realized that I can't do too much about that and it is really what it is mon somebody to just accept Medicare of office and screen shot cake on an extractions he's a good guy he wasn't really about the world it wasn't about brag it was about him so if the problem is us no need to take to the streets right I asked what his advice would be to sufferers of the brexit blues a kind of a British you say my advice to people would be zero nine keep calm and carry on with their lives but he really could be emotional about political issues I do find ways of acting their motion with other people so another voice in favor of not walking away but is that really the answer maybe it depends on where you go and for how long I've just read a new book with what to some may seem an objectionable title how to do nothing resisting the attention economy it's by artist and writer Jenny dal she questions the wisdom of staying plugged in she notes that we've all signed on to a project in which the external conflict that consumes our lives the very words that define it have been determined by other people people seeking nothing more from us and nothing less than our attention our time the most precious thing we have but del says certain kinds of thoughts requires certain kinds of places we have to walk away to find them and do something that looks like but really isn't nothing I really mean nothing from the point of view of a very narrow sense of what we would consider something productive not only does it seem like we're all working more but even when we don't think we're working we're producing something like representations of our vacations or constantly checking back on things like Instagram and Twitter always needing to have something to show for your time just the decision not to do those things all the time appears strangely radical and so doing nothing really means doing something else that's closer to maybe observation our curiosity and doesn't necessarily have results that you can point to at the end of it what makes your argument different from the one about information overload that has been made ever since the creation of the internet I really lean pretty hard on metaphors from ecology ecology in general especially my local ecology not only provides me with some sort of grounding that feels very different from the kind of please listen as of my online experience but looking at an ecological community as a lesson in how there may be things or entities or individuals but they're so intricately bound up with other beings in other systems that it almost becomes hard to draw a hard liner on anything I mean if you think about like the experience of reading a headline especially click bait headline and having a knee jerk reaction to it you think you have a cross with something and you think you know with the hard outlines are of that thing when you look at something in an ecological system you have to acknowledge that everything is influencing other things in real time in a way that is maybe unpredictable or at least kind of hard to pin down that provides a really really crucial lesson for the importance of context and contacts is something that I see being lost very quickly online where you have like bits of information spreading very quickly out of context and then that imposed to see context becomes difficult to cultivate when everything is moving so quickly and in your book you really do go beyond as you say informational context online to an ecological context you talked about atmospheric reverse yeah that was a really big moment for me in terms of thinking about wider and wider contacts I had seen in a newspaper headline about an atmospheric river that was going to be arriving from the Philippines and and half Filipino I've never been there but it just kind of struck me that I had never thought about with the rain here comes from an atmospheric river is basically it's what it sounds like it it looks almost like a river when you look at radar images so it was just kind of direct almost like transmission of water from the Philippines to the bay area so I I collected some of that water in a jar and actually still have it on a test just as a kind of reminder right you know when you look at clouds they came from somewhere else that everything is kind of constantly moving and being influenced if we spend too much time on the internet we become sort of place less I mean obviously it's such a cliche people walking down the street looking at their phones people dental can't their phones and so on and so on you took a bird watching and then you discovered that as you grew to identify the birds you started to identify the way they sound then you knew about the trees they spent a lot of time in how the impact of the birds on the trees affected other organisms and this all sounds very touchy feely but the fact is it does have an impact you're arguing it doesn't just make your life better it improves the quality of your engagement on a political level any place has not only an ecology but a history and I have been very humbled by how much I have learned about those two things relatively recently especially given that I have lived around the bay area of my entire life so I think that humility is also something you can learn right this technology meant that there is always more for you to learn that you will be surprised that someone will tell you something that you don't know you might change your mind about something these are all things that to me feel very different than friends and having like a personal brand on Twitter where you're kind of not allowed to change your mind and you have this very monolithic and stable personality spending time thinking about any kind of context is really helpful for having more complex and nuanced conversations or even thought processes about something that might seem you know more cut and dried out without looking at it more closely so Charlie was L. wrote in The New York Times online this week about the women's US soccer teams striking victory over Donald Trump he described how trump's ability to hijack platforms in turn unrelated discussions into fights about him has scrambled the brains of his political opponents because the traditional approaches for fact checking for instance require lending some portion of your platform and attention to the hijacker meeting the president on his own terms but the women's team refused to do that the team was occupying what you called a third space neither submitting to a demand for attention nor blindly refusing it but just negating the terms of trump's demand all together yeah I think that it's a really good example of this kind of phenomenon in which you know if you ask someone a question you're already framing possible answers especially think of something is asked in an aggressive way it can sort of bring up this fight or flight response and someone where they're already just thinking about like okay what's my answer instead of this larger question of like do I need to answer this question or can I answer different questions kind of like do you prefer chocolate or vanilla is the weather nice today is your response I started to really understand what you meant by the third space not answering the question in their terms are answering a different question when you pulled in Bartleby the Scrivener which is the title character in Herman Melville's famous short story to illustrate the third space the narrator in that story is a comfortable well intended Wall Street lawyer in the nineteenth century who hires a copyist named Barnaby who performs its duties well enough until he's asked to check his own writing against.

Brooke Gladstone Britain European Union Roeg
"brooke gladstone" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

02:52 min | 1 year ago

"brooke gladstone" Discussed on On The Media

"This is on the media. I'm Brooke Gladstone, depending on your tribe. There was either a Blue Wave of blue rivulets or whatever the president says in the realm ballot initiatives. However, there was big unity Americans and states across the country voted for the progressive option on matters repeatedly blocked by the Trump administration and the Republican congress marijuana was a big winner in the midterms look at Michigan fifty six percent of voters supported legal recreational use and possession of the people of citizens of Nebraska and Utah are now requiring their conservative states to accept Obamacare's Medicaid expense. And in a historic move in Florida voters have restored voting rights to one point four million people with felony convictions. But it Mary Jane, Medicaid in the fourth amendment were a few of the night's big winners. The big loser was planet earth. Several key climate. Change initiatives where handily voted down including him Bishop proposal in Colorado. If passed it would result in the heaviest restrictions on fracking in the country known as prop one hundred and twelve it would increase the distance new well-sited can be located from such places as schools and homes. Kate aaronow a contributing writer for the intercept has been tracking the path of two of those propositions. She says the forces arrayed for the battle over proposition. One twelve were unusually lopsided, the oil and gas industry outspent the people who are pushing for it by forty two one. So they spent about forty million dollars to fight proposition. One twelve and the folks who are pushing for it had about a million dollars. How big was the campaign to support the proposition? I mean, how much grassroots support what's they're pretty massive for almost a decade. Now folks who live near fracking sites near sites of oil drilling. They have. Fighting for you know, even just basic protections. I spoke to some folks who live in weld county, which has the highest concentration of drilling in the state of their twenty three thousand wealth there, Colorado, the whole has fifty thousand and just in weld county. There are infant mortality rates twice the rate of surrounding counties. And so one thing they fought for was to change existing setback requirements. So that it would include not just occupied school buildings with things like playgrounds soccer fields and that got rejected in legislature. So this is kind of like a last resort measure after years and years and years of pushing for basic common sense demands who were the anti Colorado, preposition, people almost overwhelmingly oil and gas interests, they published a lot of TV ads. They knowingly misled.

Colorado weld county Brooke Gladstone president Medicaid Trump Kate aaronow Mary Jane legislature marijuana Florida Nebraska writer Michigan Utah forty million dollars fifty six percent
"brooke gladstone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"brooke gladstone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Independent journalism in the public interest ninety three point nine FM and AM eight twenty NPR news and the New York conversation. This is on the media. I'm Bob Garfield. And I'm Brooke Gladstone we've entered a new phase in the metoo era. What seems to be a compact tour the comedian Louis C K is facing backlash for returning to the stage. The disgraced comedian found to have nonconsensual he masturbated in front of multiple female comics did a surprise set at New York's comedy cellar last month with mixed reactions. Indeed, the dust of the metoo era has not yet settled but accused offenders pure out from exile, calculating weather safe to reemerge take former CBC hosts John Domenici way back in two thousand fourteen he lost his job is host of the popular interview show Q after an expose in the Toronto Star. At least eight women have now come forward alleging physical abuse by former CBS. Broadcasters. John Gomez, he immediately threw me up against the wall. He started to see me. Stairs. He told me to get on my knees. And then he proceeded to start hitting the hard across decided out of nowhere. He grabbed my head pulled my hair threw me in front of him. And started hitting me close fist inside of my head..

John Gomez New York Brooke Gladstone Bob Garfield NPR John Domenici Louis C CBS Toronto
"brooke gladstone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:57 min | 2 years ago

"brooke gladstone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is on the media i'm bob garfield and i'm brooke gladstone as the argument over civility rages in washington in the media civil society is quietly thriving in small towns all over america and two thousand thirteen james follows of the atlantic and author and linguist deborah follows started what would turn into a five year expedition to small towns mostly overlooked taking the measure of lives lived outside the media lens they chronicled lessons learned in their book our towns a one hundred thousand mile journey into the heart of america we have this vehicle literally and figuratively of a propeller airplane that would use for a long time so he thought what would it be like to go out into the middle of the country and not ask people how they felt about obama hillary clinton the republicans but how they felt about the life of their towns and i'm supposed to believe that this was really about using the plane to take a trip and not what about creating a trip in order to use the plane we might have different answers more than five years ago i put a post in the atlantic sites saying tell us the story of your town we're looking for a place not usually in the media and a place that had some kind of problem factory closing natural disaster whatever we got about a thousand replies that we heard from forty nine of the fifty states and lots of small places where we ended up going on average they were poorer than the national average first day in town we go see the usual suspects is someone from the newspaper somebody may be in the economic development territory we'd talked to the library and we'd asked what's the story here who drives this town so after that first day i would go to the library in the schools and jim would go down to main street and talk with the city officials and then we'd meet up at the brew pub the brewpubs they seem to come up with a lot yes and just as you have correctly into twitted that i was looking for a way to take a long airplane trip so to been looking for a way to hang out at brewpubs every state now has a thriving craft brew industry that employs a lot of people and it's been a real vector of urban redevelopment because worries look for a lot of real estate cheap they go to fringe areas of town it's sort of like the art and being a way to rehabilitate parts of town a brew pub is a sign that a town is doing well you offer a number of indications canada and a half signed civic success and ten of mercer and the half is the brew pub city by city we would say most places there's a sense of reinvention and renewal and agency and we ended up with this matrix of things that would make you think this town was moving ahead one sign of civic success is that people living in the town no the civic story what's that mean columbus mississippi kids in the high school go to the town cemetery their seminal history happened during the civil war it was a hospital town they'll choose people in those graves do the research at the county libraries and then create reenactments of stories that would have happened in everyday real life there and you can imagine that they're heavy with racial confrontations and they go to the cemetery in full regalia and present them as plays and as musicals for the people of the town they do it every year you also talked about the use of language in recasting the narrative wasn't east portman where they were underplaying the d words like decline or depress the d words became the re words right the depressing denounce deplore became reinvigorate renovate renew a few of the influential people in the town just fed up with the negatively about which there town was written well in an education campaign to take out those words and put in those rewards and make people use those words and it's a small enough town that actually seemed to kind of work another element of civic success which i think is really relevant now is the successful town is open communities are aware of this as a way to to revive themselves yes we actually just happened by chance to three or four towns where there was a significant portion.

bob garfield brooke gladstone five years five year
"brooke gladstone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:58 min | 2 years ago

"brooke gladstone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is on the media i'm bob garfield and i'm brooke gladstone as the argument over civility rages in washington in the media civil society is quietly thriving in small towns all over america and two thousand thirteen james follows of the atlantic and author and linguist deborah follows started what would turn into a five year expedition to small towns mostly overlooked taking the measure of lives lived outside the media lens they chronicled lessons learned in their book our towns a one hundred thousand mile journey into the heart of america we have this vehicle literally and figuratively of a propeller airplane that would use for a long time so he thought what would it be like to go out into the middle of the country and not ask people how they felt about obama hillary clinton the republicans but how they felt about the life of their towns and i'm supposed to believe that this was really about using the plane to take a trip and not about creating a trip in order to use the plane we might have different answers more than five years ago i put a post in the atlantic sites saying tell us the story of your town we're looking for a place not usually in the media and our place had some kind of problem factory closing natural disaster whatever we got about a thousand replies that we heard from forty nine of the fifty states and lots of small places and where we ended up going on average they were poorer than the national average first day in town we go see the usual suspects from the newspaper somebody may be in the economic development territory we'd talked librarian and we'd ask what's the story here who drives this town so after that first day i would go to the library in the schools and jim would go down to main street and talk with the city officials and then we'd meet up at the brew pub the brewpubs they seem to come up with a lot yes and just as you have correctly in twitted that i was looking for a way to take a long airplane trip so to the looking for a way to hang out at brewpubs every state now has a thriving craft brew industry that employs a lot of people and it's been a real vector of urban redevelopment because breweries look for a lot of real estate cheap they go to fringe areas of town it's sort of like the art in being a way to rehabilitate parts of town a brew pub is a sign that a town is doing well you offer a number of indications ten and a half signed a civic success and ten of mercer areas in the half is the brew pub city by city we would say most places there's a sense of reinvention and renewal and agency and we ended up with this matrix of things that would make you think this town was moving ahead one sign of civic success is that people living in the town no the civic story what's that mean columbus mississippi kids in the high school go to the town cemetery there seminal history happened during the civil war it was a hospital town they'll choose people in those graves do the research at the county libraries and then create reenactments of stories that would have happened in everyday real life there and you can imagine that they're heavy with racial confrontations they go to the cemetery in full regalia and present them as plays and as musicals for the people of the town they do it every year you also talked about the use of language in recasting the narrative was it east portman where they were underplaying the d words like decline or depress the d words became the re words right the depressing denounce deplore became reinvigorate renovate renew a few of the influential people in the town just fed up with the negatively about which there town was written well in an education campaign to take out those words and put in those rewards and make people use those words and it's a small enough town that actually seemed to kind of work another element of civic success which i think is really relevant now is the successful town is open communities are aware of this as a way to to revive themselves yes so we i actually just happened by chance to three or four towns where there was a significant portion.

bob garfield brooke gladstone five years five year
"brooke gladstone" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"brooke gladstone" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is on the media i'm brooke gladstone i'm bob garfield the tape of sobbing children obtained in released by propublica this week didn't only reverberate in the us carlos dada is an editor at l faro digital newspaper based in el salvador and he says the recording and all the other reports about separated parents and children are changing the way central americans are seeing their relationship with us i have to tell you that undo what is what are some of the countries where the united states is a very popular country but now we hear and see your children crying this has caused an unprecedented wave of anger against the united states will you're describing public outrage in grief and pain but then there's the governments of honduras el salvador and guatemala who have been markedly less demonstrative in their reactions why because of course the united states is such a huge power it seemed through wednesday so big no one wants to be in a fight with the united states take for example honduras its president was reelected november last year through what every single international organization considered a fraud what he's there because he's fraud was approved by the united states in he's holding that position by the united states take water malla it's precedence body has been accused of corruption it's being investigated by united nations commission on his asking the united states to stop fuelling money to these united nations commission it'll salvador is a bit more independent but we still depend on some foreign aid that the united states since so that explains a big why popular outrage has not found any violent among central american goblins the spokesman for the president of guatemala head told the press that guatemala respects the united states is application of law in its immigration policy and it created an uproar yes indeed the answer from the whole what the modern society was anger because it's what children so the president was obliged to fire him the next day and said they were seeking a new position of the mellon government take those statements and what about the media.

brooke gladstone bob garfield propublica editor el salvador united states guatemala honduras president fraud united nations commission carlos dada l faro honduras el salvador salvador
"brooke gladstone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"brooke gladstone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is on the media on brooke gladstone bob garfield canada rugged and even keeled neighbor to the north progressive peaceful and too small to really much matter in the hurlyburly of global affairs until last week when canada apparently found its way into the axis of evil in the midst of a public feud about trade tariffs in fraught g seven summit the president of the united states accused candidate of threatening our national security and personally attacked canadian prime minister justin trudeau as quote meek mild week and dishonest while other members of trump's administration piled on here's white house economic adviser larry cudlow here's the thing me he really kinda stabbed this in the back he did a great disservice to the whole g seven e betray yes he did and white house trade advisor peter navarro there's a special place in hell for any foreign leader that engages in bad faith diplomacy with president donald j trump the whole episode has suddenly reminded the us press to the presence of a hostile power on our northern border and awakened a slumber ring frosty nation in defensive its reputation jesse brown is a canadian journalist and host of the candidate land podcast jesse welcome to garfield how are you.

bob garfield global affairs canada president united states prime minister justin trudeau trump larry cudlow advisor jesse brown brooke gladstone economic adviser peter navarro donald j
"brooke gladstone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:37 min | 2 years ago

"brooke gladstone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The media i'm bob garfield and i'm brooke gladstone just a heads up there are ethnic slurs quotes from a policeman and a president in the next segment seymour hersh is famous for consequential scoops from exposing the massacre of vietnamese civilians me lie to cia surveillance to the torture of iraqis in abu ghraib most recently he's the author of reporter a memoir he's also a twin and once when asked by the parents of twins what it's like to be one he replied it's great i won i have twin sisters to he's a physicist from uc california but he's got a specialty in wave theory here's the story about america there was a program called you got a second cure deep sea submergence program was run out of hawaii undercover was one of the biggest secret programs in the government people who knew wave theory noise underwater my brother's expertise would monitor russian submarines so a new submarine would come out and we pick up the sound of the engine and there were people that would translate this gino where every russian submarine particularly the boomers with nuclear weapons were at any time my brother was brought into that program that helps them in in the seventies when he got in iras writing about the program and exposing all that stupid things and he said about nineteen ninety or so you know he said i was at a very secret program and you didn't know your brother was in it and i thought to myself what a nice story about america it is they didn't ever suspect him of talking to me as you describe in the memoir he was the one who was allowed to go off and pursue the sciences until he graduated you're going to take care of your mom your father had died took over your father's dry cleaning business then you worked in a liquor store you did a bit of flailing around but there was an intervention what happened was back in the nineteen fifties in high school in my third year my father got cancer my father had a business a ghetto business laundering cleaning a small shop that kept the family going my parents have both eastern european didn't talk much there was not much communications i had some tests that i took in the.

bob garfield brooke gladstone president abu ghraib reporter california america hawaii seymour hersh cia
"brooke gladstone" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"brooke gladstone" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is on the media i'm bob garfield and i'm brooke gladstone in a sense america has always been that war with itself wars of politics of ideology of values even tooling realities the election of two thousand sixteen what's an epic battle and trump's ascendancy a victory for a huge voting block that sees itself is under siege in the next couple of segments we will consider some of the assumptions that fuel the fight or could begin to resolve it but we begin with a counter proposition that there may be something more powerful than immigration than civil rights and abortion then the environment than any of the cultural battlefields that so polarize america the economists stupid couple of weeks ago on tax day usa today published an op ed by donald trump according to the president the benefits of the gop tax law which significantly cut the corporate tax rate of already begun to trickle down to workers he said three million jobs have been created on his watch and with a forty four year low unemployment rate wages are finally beginning to rise it would seem that the economy he promised on the campaign trail is coming to fruition america will truly be the greatest place in the world to invest higher grow and to create new jobs new technologies and entire new industry the economy is on the rise prompting author thomas frank to muse how prosperity might influence the next presidential election in harper's this month franks specifically wondered what would it take for donald trump to get reelected history tells him it is not a naive question we have seen presidents who have screwed up all sorts of other things get reelected on the backs of good economies in less you've got a war or something like that that's what people vote on now for example you point us to bill clinton yeah clinton ran the ablest technocrat out there and he was going to focus like a laser beam on this economy and make it prosper and lo and behold it did wages actually started to grow in real terms for average blue collar workers the only time since the nineteen seventies and so when people look back at the late nineties they remember it good times there's this kind of halo of happiness i remember the companies in north carolina were paying wage workers moving expenses to come from.

bob garfield brooke gladstone america donald trump president harper franks north carolina gop thomas frank bill clinton forty four year
"brooke gladstone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"brooke gladstone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is on the media i'm bob garfield and i'm brooke gladstone in a sense america has always been at war with excel f wars of politics of ideology of values even dueling realities the election of two thousand sixteen what's an epic battle and trump's ascendancy a victory for a huge voting block that sees itself is under siege in the next couple of segments we will consider some of the assumptions that fuel the fight or could begin to resolve it but we begin with a counter proposition that there may be something more powerful than immigration than civil rights and abortion then the environment than any of the cultural battlefields that so polarize america the economy stupid couple of weeks ago on tax day usa today published an op ed by donald trump according to the president the benefits of the gop tax law which significantly cut the corporate tax rate of already begun to trickle down to workers he said three million jobs have been created on his watch and with a forty four year low unemployment rate wages are finally beginning to rise it would seem that the economy he promised on the campaign trail is coming to fruition america will truly be the greatest place in the world to invest higher grow and to create new jobs new technologies and entire new industry the economy is on the rise prompting author thomas frank to muse how prosperity might influence the next presidential election in harper's this month frank specifically wondered what would it take for donald trump to get re elected history tells him it is not a naive question we have seen presidents who have screwed up all sorts of other things get reelected on the backs of good economies in less you've got a war or something like that that's what people vote on now for example you point us to bill clinton clinton ran the ablest technocrat out there and he was going to focus like a laser beam on this economy and make it prosper and lo and behold it did wages actually started to grow in real terms for average blue collar workers the only time since the nineteen seventies and so when people look back at the late nineties they remember it good times you know there's this kind of halo of happiness i remember that companies in north carolina were paying wage workers movie expenses to come from.

bob garfield brooke gladstone america donald trump president harper north carolina gop thomas frank bill clinton clinton forty four year
"brooke gladstone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"brooke gladstone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And the new york conversation this is on the media i'm brooke gladstone and i'm bob garfield a warning here this next segment includes graphic and difficult conversations about suicide just before dawn this past saturday early morning joggers and cyclists in brooklyn's prospect park were met with a gruesome sight charred remains of a body david buckle highprofile lgbt rights lawyer had set himself on fire as a protest against climate change handwritten suicide note found next to his body he explained he doused himself and fossil fuels before lighting himself ablaze as a metaphor for the destruction of the planet he wrote that pollution was ravaging the planet he was the lead attorney in a famous case involving transgender murder victim brandon teena it was the subject of the nineteen ninety nine hilary swank movie boys don't cry in a letter to the new york times this week to suicide prevention leaders wrote that it's a mistake to describe suicide as an understandable response to struggle and quote bad events decades of research they wrote suggests that mental health factors like depression and anxiety lead to suicide not concerns over policy issues therein lies the dilemma for journalists covering suicides that are so horrifying precisely to get the public's attention andrew powell was a professor political science at amherst college and is working on two books about politics and extreme protest self immolation he says is defined as any suicidal sacrifice but has been increasingly associated with death by fire since the nineteen sixty three suicide in saigon of the buddhist monk tick kwong duke duke acted in protest to south vietnam repressive dm regime and the associated press photo of him his face half engulfed in flames is among the most famous images of the twentieth century and the media reports were instantaneous and he assumed the lotus posture and another step forward and cord gasoline over him and then suddenly a towering flame and what was the priests and the nuns in the audience prostrated themselves towards this burning figure unflinching the smell of gasoline burning flesh in the air for ten minutes it required several monks nuns coordinating some lying in front of fire stations and police stations that might have been alerted to an emergency taking place others preventing anyone from the.

brooke gladstone bob garfield brooklyn attorney brandon teena new york times depression amherst college saigon new york murder andrew powell professor ten minutes
"brooke gladstone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"brooke gladstone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And the new york conversation this is on the media i'm brooke gladstone and i'm bob garfield a warning here this next segment includes graphic and difficult conversations about suicide just before dawn this past saturday early morning joggers and cyclists in brooklyn's prospect park were met with a gruesome sight charred remains of a body david buckle highprofile lgbt rights lawyer had set himself on fire as a protest against climate change handwritten suicide note found next to his body he explained he doused himself in fossil fuels before lighting himself ablaze as a metaphor for the destruction of the planet he wrote that pollution was ravaging the planet he was the lead attorney in a famous case involving transgender murder victim random tina it was the subject of the nineteen ninety nine hilary swank movie boys don't cry in a letter to the new york times this week to suicide prevention leaders wrote that it's a mistake to describe suicide as an understandable response to struggle and quote bad events decades of research they wrote suggests that mental health factors like depression and anxiety lead to suicide not concerns over policy issues therein lies the dilemma for journalists covering suicides that are so horrifying precisely to get the public's attention andrew po was a professor of political science at amherst college and is working on two books about politics and extreme protest self immolation he says is defined as any suicidal sacrifice but has been increasingly associated with death by fire since the nineteen sixty three suicide in saigon of the buddhist monk tick kwong duke duke acted in protest to south vietnam repressive dm regime and the associated press photo of him face half engulfed in flames is among the most famous images of the twentieth century and the media reports were instantaneous and he assumed the lotus posture and another step forward and poured gasoline over him and then suddenly a towering flame and what was in the priests and the nuns in the audience mon prostrated themselves toward this burning figure factor unflinching the smell of gasoline burning flesh year for ten minutes it required several monks and nuns coordinating some lying in front of fire stations and police stations that might have been alerted to an emergency taking place others preventing anyone from the crowd from attempting to douse the flames or extinguish.

brooke gladstone bob garfield brooklyn attorney new york times depression amherst college saigon new york murder andrew po professor of political science ten minutes
The migrant caravan denounced by Trump will end in Mexico City, but some people vow to go on alone

On The Media

02:08 min | 2 years ago

The migrant caravan denounced by Trump will end in Mexico City, but some people vow to go on alone

"And the listeners who support this npr station president trump promised to defend the country from all threats foreign and domestic we just never anticipated that there would be free two day shipping we'll ask alexa what's up with that plus we'll talk to ohio governor john casick and columbus about the days when politics were saved mostly join us for this week's news quiz from npr today at eleven ninety three point nine fm wnyc from wnyc in new york this is on the media bob garfield is away this week i'm brooke gladstone it's not a that a protest creates an international incident but here we are the pentagon has now preparing options after president trump signed a proclamation directing the national guard to be deployed to the us mexican border the move to mobilize came after several days of tweets which the president focused his rage on a group of central american migrants who have gathered to travel through mexico many are seeking asylum there summer planning to seek asylum in the united states and a few are planning to cross the border illegally now the caravan which is over a thousand people coming in from honduras thought they were going to just walk right through mexico and right through the border on thursday after five days of tweeting about it trump said the caravan was largely broken up no it's not carrie kahn is npr's correspondent for mexico central america and the caribbean they spent all day wednesday with them and there are hundreds of men women and a lot of children many sick now if i can have that in this park it's a recreational filled with soccer fields and a couple you know swing sets and stuff in this small town in southern oaxaca state and they're still there and they're united front and they're gonna continue travelling north just how far north.

President Trump Oaxaca Soccer Wnyc Ohio Alexa America Carrie Kahn Honduras Mexico Governor John Casick United States Donald Trump Pentagon Brooke Gladstone Bob Garfield New York NPR Columbus Five Days
"brooke gladstone" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"brooke gladstone" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is on the media i'm brooke gladstone in the weeks before the us led coalition forces invaded iraq in march two thousand three john burnett now a southwest correspondent for npr was chosen to take part in the military's embedded journalists program the pentagon promise john both safety and access to soldiers on the front when we checked in with john during his first week with the marines he had real confidence that the program would foster clarifying coverage far i'm really encouraged that harry is following through they were going to do i mean i've only actually been out here in the desert with the troops for three days now but it didn't last by week three john was saying that the pentagon had become more and more insistent about their version of events we are clearly being used by the pentagon and let me give you an example we talked with the head of the intelligence section a week or so ago and he was telling us all about the fearsome firepower that the marines were going to bring to bear and this battle and they were going to overwhelm they're coming in with airpower in ground forces and i counted it sounds to me like you're using the journalist is your mouthpiece for this and he said you know we yes we are weak five john left his embedded post knowing he would not be allowed to return to visit villages left in the wake of the invading forces npr international correspondent deb amos who arrived shortly after the invasion to cover the occupation also worked outside of the pentagon's stricture cheers with a crew and a translator she connected with iraqis living in a postsaddam nation there are still plenty of officials who walked the streets here and if they were gone and saddam was gone that power that sense of fear might be lifted whether it would stop the resistance i don't think anybody can say we ask them in for recollections and to look back on what they learned and what we haven't it was really kind of straitjacketing to be an embedded reporter since as you said you were under the dragon's wing the safest place to be was with the military but you only got blinkered view of the battlefield you only saw what they saw and i didn't have a translator i couldn't go and talk to.

brooke gladstone us iraq john burnett npr pentagon john harry deb amos saddam reporter three days
"brooke gladstone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"brooke gladstone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is on the media i'm brooke gladstone in the weeks before the us led coalition forces invaded iraq in march two thousand three john burnett now a southwest cars spawning for npr was chosen to take part in the military's embedded journalists program the pentagon promise john both safety and access to soldiers on the front when we checked in with john during his first week with marines he had real confidence that the program would foster clarifying coverage so far i'm really encouraged that harry is falling through they were gonna do i mean i've only actually been out here in the desert with the troops for three days now but it didn't last by week three john was saying that the pentagon had become more and more insistent about their version of events we are clearly being used by the pentagon and let me give you an example we talked with the head of the intelligence section a week or so ago and he was telling us all about the fearsome firepower that the marines were going to bring their this battle and you know they were going to overwhelm their opponents with air power and ground forces and i commented it sounds to me like you're using the journalist is your mouthpiece for this and he said you know we yes we are five john left his embedded post knowing he would not be allowed to return to visit villages left in the wake of the invading forces npr international correspondent deb amos who arrived shortly after the invasion to cover the accusation also worked outside of the pentagon's strictures with a crew in a translator she connected with iraqis living in a post saddam nation are still plenty of officials who walked the streets here and if they were gone and saddam was gone that power that sense of fear might be lifted whether it would stop the resistance i don't think anybody can say we ask them in for recollections and to look back on what they learned and what we happened it was really kind of straitjacketing to be an embedded reporter since as i said you were into the dragon's wing the safest place to be was with the military but you only got a beleaguered view of the battlefield you only saw what they saw and i didn't have a translator couldn't go in talk to citizens in arabic i couldn't find out what was.

brooke gladstone us iraq john burnett npr pentagon john harry deb amos saddam reporter three days
"brooke gladstone" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"brooke gladstone" Discussed on On The Media

"On the media is supported by magoo students applying to college or grad school should not have to settle for boring overpriced prep classes that's why magoo makes online test prep for exams like the act sat gre and g mat accessible effective and enjoyable magoo students gain access to the highest quality video lessons practice questions and expert support at a fraction of the cost of other courses enter promo code otm at magoo dot com for twenty percent off online test prep this is on the media i'm brooke gladstone and i'm bob garfield it's too early to estimate the impact of the cambridge analytica scandal on facebook or on the rest of the tech platforms now mining and selling every nanosecond of our lives but one can't help but feel that whether through legislation regulation or customer revolt something's gotta give it may seem as if it were ever thus but it wasn't in fact back in october of two thousand twelve i spoke to author educator and all round new media visionary clay shirke about whether facebook's rising star would ever fall and he said it's hard to guess how long facebook will be around i mean everything ends at some point but i don't think that there's any foreseeable future in which facebook goes away or even becomes significantly smaller or less important than it currently is make list of their advantages enormous user base incredibly communists get worldclass infrastructure advertisers are tripping over themselves to get involved no one wants to call themselves a competitor now make a list of their disadvantages right up a handful of privacy nuts or cranky.

magoo brooke gladstone bob garfield facebook cambridge analytica twenty percent
"brooke gladstone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"brooke gladstone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is on the media i'm brooke gladstone it are bub garfield we in the media often attribute a portion of donald trump's election to fake news and here i'm using the original meaning of that term you know macedonian teens making bank on preposterous headlines the islamisation of texas pizza shop childsex conspiracies that kinda baloney such fabrication we worried reverberated around the political echo chamber s so resoundingly that are very democracy was imperilled or you know not brendan i hand is a professor of government at dartmouth college earlier this month niane along with scholars andrew gas and jason rifle are published new research on the consumption of fake news during the 2016 campaign and their conclusions undercut air most dire characterisations of the threat fake news wasn't is widely consumed as people think at least when it comes to visiting fake news websites as we defined them in the study only about one in four americans actually did that and that consumption was overwhelmingly concentrated among the ten percent of people who have the most conservative online information diets all right your college professor so of course let us define our terms fake news how do you define it the site we classified as they can use web sites had been identified by fact checkers as repeatedly publishing false or dubious information that was overwhelmingly in favor of one of the two presidential candidates we excluded from that list sites that previously existed in and been identified as already covering hard news topics so that includes sites like breitbart or infowars which existed prior to 2015 in 2016 so what were measuring here is not every dubious site on the internet it instead people who are visiting these new sites that are publishing do ubs konta do you have any reason to think that your conclusions would change had these pre existing sites been factored in no and in fact we show in an appendix to our paper if you really want some exciting reading that if you adjust for a couple of the the borderline cases like breitbart the results are very similar i was particularly interested in your methodology which i read every word of an absolutely do not understand can you tell me what combination of outside data sets in your own surveys that you used to track the impact of fake news this study is unique because we actually measure people's behavior in.

brooke gladstone donald trump professor dartmouth college web sites breitbart texas brendan andrew gas ten percent
"brooke gladstone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"brooke gladstone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is on the media on brooke gladstone also what the coverage of eric garner staff tells us about the narratives that always seemed to follow police killings of unarmed black me the police are often depicted as you sir helpless weaklings who are struggling against these superhuman creatures and as new jfk a fascinating documents go public we consider the impact of fifty years of unanswered questions jfk conspiracy culture has done its part to destabilise the believe that there is such a thing as genuine true if all coming up after this and live from npr news in washington i'm jack spear the state department has published a list of russian individuals and companies have plans to sanction for russia's interference in the 2016 us presidential elections and actions in ukraine and bureau's jackie north of mixed planes the list is nearly month overdue many of the russian companies and individuals on the state department list are tied to the country's defence and intelligence networks among the are boat on export one of russia's largest defence exporters two key intelligence agencies the fsb and the gru are also named the state department is making the list public at least two months ahead of when the sanctions actually kick in that will allow any companies here in the us or among american allies to extricate themselves from the russian entities otherwise they too could have their assets frozen this put some allies in a quandary for example turkey which uses russian military equipment and we'll needs spare parts jackie north them npr news washington in her first public comment since accusing producer harvey weinstein of rape actress rose mcgowan said today she has been silenced for twenty years but won't remain quiet any more about the problem of sexual assault and harassment in hollywood mcgowan deliver opening remarks today at the women's can russian in detroit where she said the men of carried out such actions need to be revealed for what they are you're given one view and i know the men behind that deal and they should not be in your mind and they should not be in mind it's.

harvey weinstein rose mcgowan rape producer npr eric garner detroit harassment assault brooke gladstone military equipment us jackie north ukraine presidential elections russia washington jfk twenty years fifty years two months