17 Burst results for "Bro Topi"

"bro topi" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

11:06 min | 2 years ago

"bro topi" Discussed on KGO 810

"The Commonwealth club. I'm a lean Lee, a partner at cowboy ventures and co founder of all rays and tonight, we're joined by the estimable, Emily Chang. Anchoring executive producer for Bloomberg technology and author of the twenty eighteen national bestseller Broto Pia, breaking up the voice club of Silicon Valley. Thank you so much for being here. And honestly, it's an honor for me to share the stage with alien who's been such an critical part of changing this industry for the better. So thank you for. Well, we're fortunate to have each other. So was let's rewind the clock and talk a little bit about how you started the process of deciding that you're gonna write this book, when did you I think of writing the book was originally going to be called, bro? Topi what was the original idea? Well, it was originally called the value of opportunity, which I thought was quite cute. Played off this idea of the valley between men and women and about a year into the process. My editor called me and said, yeah, that's sweet. But how about bro Topi? I actually remember like my stomach just dropped because it felt so strong and my day job relies on getting text ios and investors on my show and having to talk to me, and I felt like calling my book, bro, topiary might not be so welcoming, but. The book came out was that was in twenty seventeen. Okay. So middle after the election after the election. So things were starting to change. But I decided to write this before me to before Trump was elected before any of this became part of the national conversation. And there were people in my circle who didn't think it was a good idea. Or didn't think it was a book worth writing clearly that has changed and I also came to embrace the term wrote Opio, by the way, I sent them back like five hundred different alternatives. My husband knows the audience and my agent said well, most of these suck. But what I realized is topa says a lot in one word captures this idea of Silicon Valley as a modern utopia where anyone can change the world anyone can make their own rules, if they're man. But if you're a woman, it's incomparably harder. Yes. And you asked what was the spark? Yeah. And it was at the end of two thousand fifteen where I was interviewing very prominent male venture capitalist chapter five. And this man running affirm that is very successful interview with Michael Moricz. Yes. Okay. Mic more. It's the quick apple and has done so many incredible things in his career and invested in incredible companies, and yet they had no women at the firm at the time in their US firm. And so I asked what was becoming more standard question for me. What are you doing about hiring women? And what do you think your responsibility is normally I would get a very politically correct answer people would kind of squirm in his case. He said, well, we're looking very hard. But really what we're not prepared to do is to lower our standards. Even louder. I know you go find it still on. And it hit me, and it was like a punch in the gut and everywhere I went for the next three months. People wanted to talk about what he had and that clip actually went quite viral, right? Like it got a lot of play. So the next day Vanity Fair had a story that said, here's news for small. All you smart talented, young women out there who want to work in tech. Apparently, you don't exist. And let's put aside what he said, maybe he didn't mean it quite that way. Let's judge them on their actions. This is a firm that in forty four years couldn't find a single woman who met their very high standards. And it was a moment that I just had to call BS, Mike, you cannot tell me you can't find one or many women who could do a very good very brave thing that a lot of people in that interview would not have done like you did not drop it. It was I'm not gonna lie it. It was scary. When you cover business news. You're you're interviewing people you have to find this balance of being, you know. Scrutinizing? Not attacking fair way. And you know, I I knew that deciding to write the book in the first place was going to be a to some extent of professional risks. And I didn't want to burn down Silicon Valley. I wanted to help make Silicon Valley better. And so the book was really journey of many conversations like that of calling calling industry out when I felt it needed to be called out. Okay. Let's go prior to the book came out in twenty eighteen so twenty sixteen to twenty eighteen you start talking to people about this concept, and you're talking about your process, how many people did you talk to three hundred people. What we're like what what I base protagonist. We're going to be or like what you were going to write about. And what did you figure out in the process? No, I had no idea. I have never in a book before it's really hard. And I didn't know how to write a book. And there was no beginning and end to this issue. It's not the Facebook story which starred Mark Zuckerberg storm room, right? And so I actually didn't know where the beginning and end would be and I had an amazing writing coach who said to me, look if you knew the answer, it's not worth writing a book about the fact that you don't know the answer that this really will be a journey that makes it worth writing about. And so I think the first chapter I wrote ended up being chapter six I wrote completely out of order, and it was it was truly a discovery process and an investigation where I learned a lot along the way and was surprised a lot along the way, and it happened just by talking to people mean, I do a daily show on Bloomberg television. And so I have the opportunity where people like you are coming in every day. And I'm like Kenneth talk to you about something else. And I would get these great tidbits and people would call me once they found out. I was starting to write this, and they would refer me to certain women or certain guys, I should check out. And honestly relied on the bravery of a lot of women telling me their stories, but it was not when I started doing this. It was not like thing. It wasn't obvious kind of who are the bad actors intact. But needed what was rumor what was real? So what are some of the things that you discovered? Well, and look, I know you're. Lena's in the book and plays a very important role. Very. Interview. Your your your book interviews, actually, good example of part of the journey because I remember sitting down with your like shirl to it. You sit down and I said so tell me that working at Kleiner Perkins. And maybe I will not do it. You're like, oh my gosh. She said she said, I've never talked about this before. And so I really appreciate that. And so it was the bravery of women like you being willing to tell their story and being willing to take that personal risk not knowing what the consequences would be. And by the way, you know. I think one of the things we forget in this whole metoo movement. Is you know, yes. A lot of men have been exposed people have lost their jobs, in some cases, women are replacing them in most cases, hopefully, people who are going to behave better replacing them. But we forget about what's happening to these women and some of the women are thriving some of the women are lonely, and they took these risks not knowing what was going to happen multiple. And and I I am just so grateful for their courage. Hey, man, I think when you wrote about a number of them some of some of the women who we in the tech industry may have heard of before like Susan Fowler. And I think hopefully, you share that's very much more broadly than outside the tech. But a lot of individual stories women of color people who didn't go to Stanford or Harvard or Yale who really kind of came to tech outsiders had a lot of challenges. Women engineering women who are more at the individual contributor or manager level who just have had such a tough time. I so it was actually the Susan Fowler memo that came out in February of twenty seventeen I was writing the book in that moment. And I realized I had focused on trying to talk to Sheryl Sandberg and Marisa Myron alien Lee that it hadn't done enough talking to women who are really in the trenches. And so three weeks later, I had this dinner at my house had a new baby. My husband was stairs taking care of the kids. And I'm like, oh my God. I just have to make this work. And these twelve women engineers who worked at all different kinds of companies. Begins mall came to my house on a Sunday night. And it was just sort of an open forum. We'll what do you think of what Susan had to say? Have you had an experience like that and became this four hour like super emotional? They none of them knew each other conversation, and they all loved what they were doing and that this opportunity to change the world, but they all sell so alone, and so frustrated and the book focuses on gender, but I think race could be a whole nother book. I think ageism is under reported in the tech industry, and we had women in the room who were you know, quote, unquote, double and triple minority. So if you think it's hard to be a white woman engineer imagine being a black woman engineer or a black woman engineer who didn't go to college or a Latina woman who one of them was like an emergency. She drove ambulances, and then learn how to code and was now working at a Dobie and. Some of them were parents, and that was hard the women who shared their stories that evening on the women that you talked to how many of them had reported what happened to them. Well, many of them haven't reported what most probably have not. And why why don't why don't because it's scary because they don't wanna lose their jobs because they think maybe it's not worth it. Or it happened too long ago. I was speaking to a woman who works as therapist in Palo Alto. And she said it was around the Christine Blasi Ford testimony. And I said, do you think it's do you think it's getting better? And she said actually think it's going to start to get worse before it gets better. Because you have all these women out there who are just realizing these things happen to them realizing what has happened to them as a problem, and who are now grappling with it. And it's been sort of buried under the rug for many years. Let's go back. We're going to make this linear again in terms of writing the book did people try and talk you out of it did people tell you is about idea or like keep in the closet. Let's not talk about our industry's problems. Do people give you are I vividly. Remember, this one male investor who said to me that's not a book that's biology. Really, do you wanna share who that person was? I know you would love to hear his name. That's not why we're here. Tell me later. He literally said women want to stay home with their kids. And he's like, honestly, my kids want to be with my wife more than they wanna be me..

Silicon Valley Susan Fowler Lee engineer Emily Chang Commonwealth club Bloomberg editor Broto Pia Bloomberg technology executive producer apple US Kleiner Perkins cowboy ventures Facebook Trump Vanity Fair Michael Moricz
"bro topi" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"bro topi" Discussed on KGO 810

"Talk rec-. How can anyone right believe? This is the story that has been marketed about Silicon Valley. It's it's it's ridiculous. And so I mean, certainly ply the word bro Topi to Wall Street and Hollywood and Washington and Silicon Valley in many ways is in different from these places. But it is different in the sense that it styles itself as a place that is better than anywhere else. And there's a sense of moral exceptionalism. Yes, I believe that sets Silicon Valley apart and not in a good way. And, you know, many people here as I said, I've done great things. But there's also been a lot of wealth and power amassed in a short span of time that I think can lead to a great deal of arrogance and disconnection from real world people and some of these are really powerful. And if they said, you know, what we need to hire more women, actually, I want this by the end of the year. I want the numbers to change and it would happen. It would it would happen so much faster than it is happening. If the leaders of these companies really made it a priority. Build rocket ships to Mars, you can hire more women. Yes. That is true. Yes. I would add to what you said is that this is a place where people have come a lot of immigrants have been super successful. Right. So people who did not. Come from family money, come from very humble beginnings. If you're an immigrant, you can be successful in Silicon Valley, just not a female one. Okay. So you alluded to this a little bit which was one of the things that you uncovered in the book was this myth of pipeline problem right from the inception from the birth of Silicon Valley and the birth of the technology industry. I think it'd be easy to sue that. It's always been like this. And you uncovered some really interesting insights about how actually maybe it actually has gotten worse from when we started. If you go back to the forties and fifties women actually played a very prominent role in the early computing industry, men were predominantly the makers of the hardware, but women were really well represented among software programmers, and they were programming computers for the military and programming computers for NASA, and it really was like the movie Hidden Figures, but industry-wide and then in the sixties and seventies as the tech industry started to explode. There were so desperate for new talent that they started doing these personality tests and aptitude tests to identify good programmers and programming became sort of like people thought of it is like a dark art like this like genius thing that you. You know, people who could do it. You just didn't really understand them. And there were these two psychologists who were men who decided that good programmers. They develop this personality test good programmers like solving puzzles. Okay. That makes sense. They also decided that good programmers. Don't like people anyone who can program. They don't like people. They don't like people. They're more likely to be a good programmer. So there's no evidence to support the idea that people who don't like people are better at computers than people who do. In fact, there's a great argument to be made that you need people who like people or have empathy for the users whose problems are trying to solve to be building the products that are supposed to be changing the world. But actually, the research tells us that if you look for people who don't like people you're going to hire far more men than women. I did not say that the research. And women were thus essentially pushed in profile out of an industry that they were already in. So in one thousand nine hundred four women hit the high point of the number of degrees. They were running in computer science. They were earning thirty seven percent of computer science degrees. That has plummeted to eighteen percent where it's been flat for a deck. So we're at a level. That's basically fifty percent of where we were. Right. So my argument is yes, there is a pipeline problem now, but the tech industry created the pipeline problem and today the tech industry reinforces the problem. It is not an aptitude problem. It is not an it's not an aptitude this at all it is not. And there are.

Silicon Valley programmer NASA Hollywood Washington thirty seven percent eighteen percent fifty percent
"bro topi" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:39 min | 2 years ago

"bro topi" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I the reaction I have felt has been largely positive, and I have been invited to speak at Amazon, and Microsoft and linked in YouTube and companies that easily could have said your book is called, bro. Topa? No. Thank you. Right. And they are there are employees who filled the room they're coming up to the microphone. They're fired up. They're asking questions, and I honestly that has just made me feel so proud and so excited about the conversation that is happening now that wasn't happening before. And it's not all because of me. I mean, there's been some incredible journalism incredible journalism nationally, but in in Silicon Valley in particular, the information, the New York Times have done some incredible stories that have really made a. Difference. That said, yeah, there were some people who were not happy with me. There was an excerpt of the that was published in Vanity Fair amount before the book came out that really shook a lot of a lot of people. And there were some men who were involved in that who are very powerful who both things difficult for me. Are we talking about sex parties? We will definitely talk about. But overall, I have felt that that has been a very tiny voice. And you know, you can't make change without some people feeling a little bit uncomfortable and people feel a little bit uncomfortable. I think that's a good thing. So what's your? What's your definition of bro? Topa? Well, you know. It doesn't necessarily just apply to Silicon Valley. Yeah. But I do think it's a perfect moniker or your use of the term four Silicon Valley because Silicon Valley likes to style itself as a utopia where everyone is perfect and changing the world and changing the world for the better. But it is such a misnomer because yes, Silicon Valley and many people in Silicon Valley have done incredible things. But if you just look at the numbers women, hold twenty to twenty five percent of jobs. Eight to nine percent of venture capitalists, women led companies. Get two percent of funding in an industry that calls itself. America, chrissy. How can anyone right? This is the story that has been marketed about Silicon Valley. It's it's it's ridiculous. And so I mean, certainly, you can apply the word, bro. Topi to Wall Street and Hollywood and Washington and Silicon Valley in many ways is in different from these places. But it is different in the sense that it styles itself as a place that is better than anywhere else. And there's a sense of moral exceptionalism. Yes, I believe that sets Silicon Valley apart and not in a good way. And, you know, many people here as I said have done great things. But there's also been a lot of wealth and power amassed in a short span of time that I think can lead to a great deal of arrogance and disconnection from real world people and some of these are really powerful. And if they said, you know, what we need to hire more women I want this by the end of the year. I want the numbers to change and it would happen. Yes. It would it would happen so much faster than it is happening. If the leaders of these companies really made it a priority. We'll build rocket ships to Mars. You can hire more women. Yes. That is true. Yes. I would add to what you said is that this is a place where people have come a lot of immigrants have been super successful. Right. So people who did not. Come from family money, come from very humble beginnings. If you're an immigrant, you can be successful in Silicon Valley, just not a female one, right? Right. Okay. So and you alluded to this a little bit which was one of the things that you uncovered in the book was this myth of pipeline problem. Right because from the inception for the birth of Silicon Valley and the birth of the technology industry. I think it'd be easy to soon that it's always been like this, and you uncovered some really interesting insights about how actually maybe it actually has gotten worse from when we started. If you go back to the forties and fifties women actually played a very prominent role in the early computing industry, men were predominantly makers of the hardware, but women were really well represented among software programmers, and they were programming computers for the military and programming computers for NASA, and it really was like the movie Hidden Figures, but industry-wide and then in the sixties and seventies as the tech industry started to explode. They were so desperate for new talent that they started doing these personality tests and aptitude tests to identify good programmers and programming became sort of like people thought of it is like a dark art like like genius thing that you just you know, people who could do it. You just. Didn't really understand them. And there were these two psychologists who were men who decided that good programmers. They developed this personality tests, good programmers like solving puzzles. Okay. That makes sense. They also decided that good programmers. Don't like people anyone who can program. They don't like people. They don't like people. They're more likely to be a good programmer. So there's no evidence to support the idea that people who don't like people are better at computers than people who do. In fact, there's a great argument to be made that you need people who like people or have empathy for the users whose problems trying to solve to be building the products that are supposed to be changing the world. But actually, the research tells us that if you look for people who don't like people you're going to hire far more men than women. Minding not say that the research. And women were thus essentially pushed in profiled out of an industry that they were already in. So in one thousand nine hundred four women hit the high point of the number of degrees. They were earning in computer science. They were earning thirty seven percent of computer science degrees. That has plummeted to eighteen percent where it's been flat for a decade. So we're at a level. That's basically fifty percent of where we were right decades. So my argument is yes, there is a pipeline problem now, but the tech industry created the pipeline problem and today the tech industry reinforces the problem. It is not an aptitude problem. It is not it's not an aptitude at all. It is not and their countless women who were were were good at this. But dropped out. Girls. And we we can talk about this later need encouragement every single step of the way because there are just so many forces pushing women and girls out of this industry. The tech industry can't sit here and say, oh, well, it's like an education thing. It's like teachers, parents know, we also can't wait ten years or fifteen years for the girls who are doing girls who code to get there. You know, there's so much of the industry can do now. Different even so we'll get to the friend who said that it was up pipeline prob. And that we were not willing to lower standards, right? Because it's really important that everyone has a computer science degree the data shows. That's not true. Well, and so the book which is out in paperback now has a new afterward. And one of the companies that highlight is is red fin. Which did this really interesting thing? You know, they couldn't find enough women with technical skills for their engineering team, and they had very very few women. And so not only did they promoted a female engineer to be CTO, and she took this on. Okay. How are we going to get more women? So they started pulling women from non traditional backgrounds. They even pulled women off their marketing team and taught them how to quote, and then like a year into it. They love it. They they started collecting data will is this working are these women's successful. And these women were getting promoted as at the same rate as everybody else and not only that they did they had failed for many years to create a home pouring product that really worked and the home touring team was mostly men and actually many Redfin. Agents in the field are women and many of them actually don't have college degrees. And so the engineers would be the little bit snooty about their problems. Whatever. And so they made the T more diverse and that newly diverse team decided to take a different approach. They said, maybe we should go. Visit the agents in the field what a novel idea to talk to them about their problems, and they came back and this team built a product. And for the first time it worked, and they made an extra thirty million dollars that year. Let's talk a little bit about the role that venture capitalists play in the situation that we're currently in Peter Thiel who you ask and you note in the book of their FM, venture capitalists. You said he talks you talk a lot about what he is. A lot of thoughts about a lot of things, and you ask them about what what should we do about the gender disparity in the power dynamics in our industry. And he literally said, I don't know. He literally said, I don't know what to do about that. But he can create floating ocean communities off the coast of California, and you know. Is trying to is like drinking and eating all these things that he thinks they're going to make him live forever. You know? And I don't want to undermine the many great things that Peter Thiel has done. But at the same time he is part of a system that has just thrown up their hands and sad. Well, I don't know what to do about this. This just how it is. But it's not just it's it is how it is. But it's not how it has to be. I don't even take it as this is how it is that I don't feel like thinking about it. And also just too lazy? It's not my problem. He he's a among a group of people who doesn't take responsibility for being part of creating this problem. And Peter Thiel co founder of PayPal. The other co founders max love chin, they very different views on this. And I interviewed both of them in the book pay pal called itself. America Crecy, we only hire the best. That's they talked about it. It was a word that was frequently used at the company, and if you look at the people who succeeded at PayPal, they were all friends at Stanford, and they're almost all white men. So they didn't hire the best people. They hired their friends. They called it America. Crecy right now. Peter Thiel doesn't seem particularly worried. Travelers that he he did this whereas max left, and I said, yeah, we did that. And it was a big mistake. And here's how I here's like when when pay is trying to scale was really hard to hire women because there were no women on the team. But look at what pay pal became all of these men who were given these opportunities because of their network went onto found tesla and SpaceX and linked in and yelp and YouTube. I mean, the list goes on and guess was on the board. Mike. Okay. So VC's are part of the problem. Right. Some of them just are not making an effort to think about it or to try and fix a fixable situation. What are other things that tend to do? I feel like. That's very comedian yours sitting there. I look. VC's are the king maker of Silicon Valley, and they could be the Queen. I was gonna say they couldn't be. But they are the ones who are deciding what gets twenty five million dollars and gets a chance to succeed. And and you could look at like a company like Uber, which has gotten billions and billions of dollars in funding, and you could look at a company like rent the runway, which is very successful run by a woman alien is an investor which has gotten hundreds of millions of dollars in funding. Well, Uber has so many more chances to figure it out and get it. Right. So many more years of runway then rent the runway has and that is where the disparity lies. You know, you can even look it's not just about how many women are getting funding. It's well how much money are they getting who's writing those how big checks stitch fix is a perfect example where Katrina lake had this idea personalized clothing for women. She talked to fifty venture capitalists who were almost all men who said, no. Because our I checked with my wife. She said she would not use..

Silicon Valley Peter Thiel programmer America PayPal YouTube New York Times NASA Uber Amazon Redfin Microsoft America Crecy Katrina lake California tesla Hollywood
"bro topi" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:58 min | 2 years ago

"bro topi" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Welcome back to all of it on WNYC. I'm Alison Stewart. Thank you so much for joining us this hour, the five biggest tech companies, apple Google, Facebook, Amazon and Microsoft or valued at more than three point five trillion dollars, and they touch every aspect of our lives. How we communicate how repair bills how we access information. But the vast majority of people who make the decisions at levels in those companies higher up levels. Well, let's just say it's a homogeneous bunch report from reveal aside from the center for investigative reporting showed it the median percentage of jobs held by white women in Silicon Valley. Fifteen percent for Latino women around two percent, even though many companies had zero present and black women. The numbers were lower fewer than one percent, and again many zero how that came to be and what can be done to change. It is what drives the book, bro. Topi breaking up the boys club of Silicon Valley. And it's been written by our next guest. Emily Chang is a veteran journalist and host of the TV show blurred technology. The paperback edition of her book, bro. Topi it will be. Released tomorrow, only Mara. Yeah. It's got a new afterward, which is great because so much has happened since the hardcover came out. Thank you so much for coming on in. Thank you for having me on what a great introduction. You out. Why this is important as well. Let's think about this somebody's sitting at home here on the east coast thinking, I'm really not quite sure why this makes a difference in my life. Could you just give a couple of very simple examples about how having homogeneous C suites in these companies might affect someone their everyday life. This is an industry that is changing our lives, probably faster than any other. And it touches everybody. Billions and billions of people Facebook alone two billion people use it. But the vast majority of people working at that company are young white men. And I would argue if they had more diversity at the table more women more people of color more people have different sexualities that you might have a different product. For example, I interviewed Evan Williams. Who's the co founder of Twitter in my book who tells me he believes that if more women had built the Twitter product. In the early days. Maybe online harassment and trolling wouldn't be such a problem. Imagine if the internet was a friendlier place. Here's another example, Amazon's facial recognition technology, which they are marketing to government, which they are marketing to police department. It gets white men. Right. Almost one hundred percent of the time. It gets darker skinned women wrong thirty five percent of the time. So imagine if you're accused of something that you didn't do just because the tech got it wrong. The tech is supposed to be working against bias leveling bias. But in fact, it can actually amplify bias and building into these systems for decades to come. What's an example of when there was a woman or a person of color at the table where a decision was made because Cheryl Sandberg. She she has to have influence in some way, of course. And I interviewed Cheryl a few weeks ago. Facebook's going through a lot right now. They have a lot of work to do a lot of work to earn back trust, and Cheryl personally admits that and knows that she has a lot of work to do. I don't think Facebook's issue comes down to just one person. If you look at Mark zuckerberg's product team, and I actually think many of these issues are product issues of the top fifteen people on the product team. But one of them is a man. And so I would argue that Facebook might have made different choices in terms of what content goes up what comes down. How do people connect to each other? What do we do with your information? Once we have it who do we share it with women and men actually have very different views on data privacy. And emerging technology and women actually are more concerned about the risks associated with that. And so none of this is black and white. There's a lot of grey, but women need to be part of these debates part of designing the. These products because these are products that are changing the world. And when if we want them to change the world for the better, we need to make sure that women and minorities and people with different points of view are at the table. There's also another bigger economic issue is that the next generation of wealth is coming out of this part of the world. Absolutely. You said it these are the five biggest companies in the world. We don't have a choice our children. Our children's children are going to be working at these companies. And so it's not only about these places being healthy places to work places that people want to work, but about making sure that the next generation of technology, which is going to change her lives faster than this generation of technology is doing that in the right way. Because you write in the book that this technology can reproduce age-old inequities, wasn't example. Absolutely. So Amazon has recruiting technology and AI artificial intelligence that trained itself to reject the resumes of female candidates. So many men getting I know your face like so many men were getting hired that it basically decided that men were better. Why were those men getting hired because Amazon is male dominated like other companies? Imagine knock getting a job or not getting alone because you're singled out by technology for the wrong reasons. This is why this matters to everyone. My guess is Emily Chang. The number for book Hasbro Topi breaking up the boys club of Silicon Valley. Do the leaders care about this some leaders care about this because they're supposed to be the smartest best and the brightest. So they should be able to fix. There are some rights. I in the book right about a guy named Stewart Butterfield who's the CEO of slack which is a workplace chat app, and he has made hiring and promoting women a top priority, and it shows in the numbers, and it also shows that if you have real leadership on these issues companies can change and can change fast. So almost half the company's women almost half of managers are women and people want to work at this company men and women because they get it. It's a cool place to work red fin the real estate tech companies another place where they couldn't find enough women with technical skills. So they decided to do something unusual. They started hiring women from non traditional backgrounds and even pulled women from their marketing team and taught them how to code and a year in they started gathering data will is this working. And these women were getting promoted at the same rate as everybody else. So people can learn and it doesn't have to take forever. You can hire diversity. But it's not gonna matter. If those people who get to the table don't have a voice, you also make sure need to make sure that you're thinking about the culture thinking about inclusion and diversity it might take a little while. But inclusion starts today it's interesting that you should mention slack Redfin. When you have these legacy companies like pay pow, and we'll talk a little bit about these the answer, the Stanford cabal feeder THEO and his his type which people refer to it that way, I'm Silicon Valley. It's no it's no secret known as the pay off. Yeah. The PayPal mafia, you know, so pay pals Peter THEO pay PayPal, mafia, they sort of. It's in the original fabric of the company that everything's Amirah talker. See, and it's based on their the way they wanted to see the company now, they're gone. There's a new guy, Dan Schulman. He's seems to be a good guy. He seems to be really invested and really care about trying to make change for those legacy companies like pay pal. Can they turn the ship? You know, what I'm optimistic that companies can change. Let's look at the Google example where in the early days, the co founders of Google actually cared very much about hiring women. They did hire some very talented women like shell sambergen Marissa Mayer, but they lost focus. They started thinking about flying cars and self driving cars and the numbers settled at average the other thing that went wrong at Google is they turned a blind eye to quote unquote, visionary men who were behaving badly and the New York Times reported on Andy Rubin who is the co founder of Android who was paid ninety million dollars by Google after sexual harassment allegations. And was allowed to leave the company quietly and then Google invested in his next company. Well, employees weren't so happy about this. And last fall, we saw twenty thousand employees men and women walking out of Google protesting their policies protesting things like four star patrician whereby you basically have to sign a vow of silence to work at any of these companies and agree if something goes wrong, you'll never see the company you'll never talk about the company Google has now done away with that policy. So if you have a sexual harassment claim or a discrimination claim, you can take that case to court. So Google is changing. That's just goes to show that the activism the employees pressure. We need to keep that up because these companies aren't going to change on their own historically. It's it's funny. There's a there's a chapter in here. You talk about nerds for nerds to broS. Why didn't stay nerd Topi? What made vont launched into bro? Topa? Well, money changes. People our changes people and over time Silicon Valley just amassed so much wealth, and so much power that that created a sense of arrogance and moral exceptionalism that increasingly made a lot of these people disconnected from the real world. And it's easy to sit back and say we're changing the world when you don't have a lot of contact with the real world. And I don't want to underestimate what Silicon Valley has created Silicon Valley has created many incredible things Silicon Valley is changing the world. But I believe that we need more voices at the table if Silicon Valley is truly going to change the world for the better. It is not about robots taking all our jobs. We should be asking the question who is programming these robots with what values and how are we going to take advantage of this technology to create the world that all of us want to live in. I'm curious as a reporter what you think I was sharing with you. I've I've moderated a couple of panels in Silicon Valley about inclusion and diversity and you have to different. Camps. You have the code twenty forty camp. They wanna have a model majority. Jordan minority in Silicon Valley by twenty forty have. Well, they there will be a majority minority in the country by twenty four they want that to be matched in Silicon Valley. That's the idea. And then you have some folks who are a little more conservative than the chief diversity officer EBay. I think they just he came like twenty sixteen and lift has one and they're a little bit more like, let's work within the culture versus let's work with outside of the culture. Just as a reporter, do you think which one do you think Lee more effective to be honest? I think we need both. I think you need internal advocates who can work within the system to make change. But you also need advocates on the outside pushing the boundaries and trying to break down those walls, and none of this is going to happen overnight. But I do think that you need both internal and external forces to make a difference. And we've really seen that in the example of Amazon which was put under tremendous pressure..

Silicon Valley Google Amazon Facebook harassment Emily Chang Alison Stewart Cheryl Sandberg co founder Evan Williams apple Twitter Mark zuckerberg Stewart Butterfield PayPal Hasbro Mara Marissa Mayer Dan Schulman Stanford
"bro topi" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

07:55 min | 2 years ago

"bro topi" Discussed on KGO 810

"Is the time of metoo and time's up and we've been discussing it extensively on this show. Silicon Valley is tough. You've been hearing talk about Silicon Valley and the promise broken culture for a long time. Now here on this show. Great new book out that's really important. She should pick up a copy. It is called, bro. Topa breaking up the boys club of Silicon Valley, and the author is joining me on the phone. She is host of Bloomberg technology in studio one point. Oh, Emily Chang. Emily. Thanks so much for coming on the show today. Thank you so much for having me. It's great to be here. You know, right here in San Francisco. Right. So this is I mean, you're here you are here. We are this stuff's been going on for a very long time. And I I mean, this is the question I always have to start with when we start talking about Silicon Valley. Is it started with dude? So I'm in no way, ever excusing it. But guys hang out playing video games. They kind of ran this whole little thing. And now, we're another big companies with billions of dollars. So it's time for a change. But but we're just saying. Too. And you need to hire more women. That's not even how we really get started with. This is way more calm. I in my mind, it's more complicated to really break it up. And where do we go from here? Now that we have our eyeballs on it and the spotlight's on it. And we're talking about it in your book is out. What where do we go from the inside? Now, one of the things that surprised me. Most is that it actually didn't start with dudes in fact in the early days, the forties and fifties women were well represented among software programmers. They were programming computers for the military and computers for NASA. And in the sixties and seventies as the industry was exploding the jobs that they were doing started to take on higher status, and they were higher paying and men wanted those jobs. And so in some ways women actually got pushed out of the industry. There were also these personality tests that were used to identify good programmers. And those tests were still touring for people who don't like people and first of all. If you look for people who don't like people, you'll hire far more men than women, and there's no research to support the idea that people who don't like people or men are better at computers than women, but these stereotypes have been widely held in perpetuated for decades until you have people looking to hire people who look like Mark Zuckerberg people looking to fund people who look like, Mark Zuckerberg, and therefore, you know, an industry that has systematically kept women out to the last several decades. I think in my mind, at least you just hit the nail on the head, Emily Chang. Because it's the funding. Right. If the VC community has this weird little insular community that says I only wager on people like Mark Zuckerberg, right or or Jerry Chang or somebody like that. And they never even consider what a woman brings to the table because it's a woman, and by the way, ageism becomes part of this too. And if you're a woman who's forty by the way, absolutely forget about. About it. You know, isn't that really is the key? So, but how do you break up a venture capitalism culture because it's their billion dollars. Not yours. First of all venture capital firms need to hire more women. And it can't just be one woman you need to three four one can make a real culture change, the people who have the power here are really the people who fund venture capitalists, and they're called limited partners. And what's interesting if you'll see more women represented among Alpay's than in the community. And while they care about diversity what they really care about is making money is making returns. And so when I spoke to L P, they said, well, some of the best investors aren't the best people. But they have the best returns and not kind of an attitude guest is an acceptable. So what you're seeing is actually a lot of women venture capitalist leaving male dominated firms and starting their own funds. And I do think that they'll slowly start to change the norms of behavior. And I interview some of these women in this book where you know, they're pitching for an investment from LP's, and the LP's will say, well, wait, how many kids do you have? Oh, I have three. Oh. Are you going to have the kids and the fund? That particular investor was wondering if she should take their money at all. But decided that yes, they have a weirdness about her being a working mom, but maybe if she takes the money, and she you know, knocked it out of the park. She can prove them wrong and pave the way for more women. Bloomberg host, Emily Chang. Joining me talking about her new book, bro. Topiary breaking up the boys club of Silicon Valley wanna go back to something. No. Because one of the things that I hear from my friends on the right goes right back to the heart of something that you said, though, about VC all they care about is getting maximum return. We mean, we still I mean, you're unplumbed, right? We talk about money a lot. I go on FOX business. We talk about money money. Are we are we saying we should change? You know, I talk about capitalism. Two point. Oh, she'll be she'll be changing that it's not just about profits and returns, and we need to start contemplating morality and ethics beyond beyond just maximizing my return on my investment. Well, here's an idea. And I am s study shows that if you add one woman to the board or one woman to the leadership team of a company that profits go up three to eight percent. I argue in the book that this isn't just the right thing to do. This is the smart thing to do for business. If you think about a company like Google, this is a company that actually in the early days focused on hiring women. They got people like Sheryl Sandberg who scaled the entire ad business. And then did it again at Facebook and Susan widget ski who convinced them to buy YouTube, and is now running YouTube one of the interesting exercises that I did in this book was considered the idea what if women had been involved in more equal numbers from the start. How different might the world be. We have no idea what companies and people might have been funded. If women have been given a seat at the table. You know, we we think that this is how it was supposed to be here. This is the best way it possibly could be because this is how it is. And these companies have made a lot of money, but we don't know how much better, you know, the business world, and how many how much more wild could have been created. If women were involved and on top of that I interviewed at an Williams who's a co founder of Twitter. And he told me that he thinks if there had been more women on the founding team at Twitter early on that online harassment and trolling wouldn't be such a problem. They weren't thinking about how Twitter could be used to hurl death threats or harass people. They were thinking about wonderful and amazing things that could be done with Twitter. And so I think it's really important for all businesses to have a diversity of people at the table, especially women, and especially in an industry that is changing our lives every day. We take it for granted. We don't realize and think about the companies and the people who are making these products, but this is an industry that is changing. What we read what we see how we communicate how we shop. The games are children are playing the social media that they use ninety five percent of the people making the decisions about how these products are made. Should not be mad. Yeah. I actually totally. Oh, man. We have we have so much more to talk about. But we just have limited time you got to pick up a copy of this book. It's called, bro. Topi breaking up. The boys club of Silicon Valley. Bloomberg technology host, Emily Chang. L E. Thanks so much for coming on the show. I appreciate it. Thanks for having me. Great to be here. Absolutely. Thank you so much, bro. Topi? Now man is such a it is I what an interesting point, though, if Twitter it had more women representation and went be so full of all the hate that. Sometimes I get. Embarrasment on K G O.

Silicon Valley Emily Chang Twitter Bloomberg Mark Zuckerberg Jerry Chang San Francisco NASA YouTube Sheryl Sandberg FOX Google Alpay Embarrasment Facebook harassment
"bro topi" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"bro topi" Discussed on KGO 810

"Officers are mourning the loss of one of their own nine thirty at HBO. I'm Bradford a young police officer and Davis was gunned down in the line of duty KGPS Terry rest tells us authorities say twenty two year old officer Natalie corona was shot while responding to a three car accident in the downtown area last night. She was taken to the hospital where she later died from her injuries. Davis police chief Darren pie tells us corona had only been on the job for a short time. And it was well regarded by her co workers, describe our officers tonight as our daughter, and our friend and just Justice sister that we all want. This is just an absolutely devastating loss to the police department. A full-scale manhunt for the suspect ended early this morning when he was found inside a home at fifteen eastern did from an apparent self inflicted gunshot. Officers have not released the gunman's identity owners of three bay area restaurants have been ordered to pay more than a million dollars back paid a dozens of workers the mango. Garden restaurants are located in Freemont, San Jose and San Mateo the Alameda. DA's office says the workers labor sometimes up to twelve hours a day six days a week for as little as two dollars an hour. They were also reportedly died overtime medical treatment. They lived in squalid, conditions and had tips stolen by management. The owners have also been convicted of several felony violations. Ten business rubles parent company. Alphabet is being sued by a shareholder. Jason Middleton reports. Only a few months after a blockbuster New York Times story about sexual harassment claims at Google a shareholder is suing alphabets board of directors bugles parent company, the headline number from that story was the head of Android. Andy Rubin being allowed to leave with a package of around eighty million dollars after a sex harassment. Claim was found to be credible by Google it self Ruben denies the claim the lawsuit alleges that the board shielded senior executives from accused of sexual misconduct. The suit also asserts claims for breach of fiduciary duty abusive control unjust, enrichment and waste of corporate assets boards of directors and Silicon Valley are notoriously lapdog ish with CEOs sometimes serving as chairman as well with the momentum of metoo and the legacy of the valley being a, bro. Topi? I think we can. Expect more of this type of lawsuit. I'm Jason Middleton. You with the rhinestone dot collar between us dogs. I just convinced my human to upgrade to a new home with the twelve hundred square foot bathroom. I think she.

Natalie corona Jason Middleton Davis Google officer harassment HBO Andy Rubin Bradford New York Times Justice Darren pie Freemont fiduciary San Mateo Alameda Ruben
"bro topi" Discussed on Perception Gaps

Perception Gaps

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"bro topi" Discussed on Perception Gaps

"Yep. And now, it's totally shifted, and it's kind of a male dominated area and women, but women were the ones who started it. So I just I guess I'm like how did that happen? Yeah. For the audience of a fantastic book that just came out earlier this year, bro, Topi written by Emily Chang. She's been a longtime tech reporter of Bloomberg. She went on this long quest. It's really it's could almost be a gossip column. It's so good. But she goes through the history of the tech. Industry and really lays out some of the very specific things that happen while the tech industry was being created that made it male dominated. It's everything from when you're hiring. You usually go like to like so white men were some of the the original founders of some of these companies, they just continued to sort of higher their friends and kept going, and then there is the culture of it. You know, various sort of fast pace never sleeping, then we're going to sort of go out and party. It's really a lot of stuff that's gone into it. But those are a couple of the real things and women just eventually got cut out of that process in a couple of different ways along the way, you know. That's that's exactly what we're hoping reverse. And that knowledge that that is what happened the knowledge that there were hurdles is one of the most important things that I think. The industry is talking about. It's one of the huge things. We try to address is the first step is knowledge ING that those hurdles have existed and that the scene that we're seeing right now is not by chance and it's not by a woman's biological makeup. The industry needs to be talking about these things before they can fix them. How does women to empower both men and women to chief gender parody. We feel that the longer term impact we can have will be if we can work with companies as their starting and ask their building teams, and as they're building out their policies, and we really talk about. Okay, you're ten people. If you're trying to grow by twenty you have to think about things like code of conduct. You have to think about things like parental leave policies, and how is that going to support your workforce? So how is it going to be inclusive is sort of the buzzword? And then, of course, through our men as allies program part of it again is education. And then we do some fun things were working with a great guy at a Silicon Valley to to co develop a twenty one day challenge. So very simple. A very simple challenge every day for twenty one days just to increase your awareness as a man in a gendered world. I actually spoke recently to a man who was talking about his own wife who had removed herself from. A healthy career intact to raise their kids for four or five years before they went to school, and she tried to get back in and it was really difficult, and he really analyzed the salary piece of it. He said, it's you know, it's not fair that I got five years of salary growth and my wife had to take a pay cut from when she laughs. This goes back to what Claudia was saying. It depends on how couples make choices in this situation. The wife decided to stay home to raise the children until they go to school. But now that it's time to go back to work the family is experiencing the structural problems that come with making that choice. Kate said there are some very clear best practices for workplace structures that could help if you subscribe to the perception gaps newsletter. They'll see I've included some resources on these best practices..

Emily Chang tech reporter Topi Bloomberg Kate Claudia five years twenty one days twenty one day
"bro topi" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

03:52 min | 3 years ago

"bro topi" Discussed on Recode Decode

"The problem has been a lack of focus and prioritizing of this issue by by leadership teams ceo's it cetera i think that you know we could we could definitely i i think we could we could certainly blame the pipeline although i don't know if you've fully read bro topi of for mentally and but it was actually really interesting because like you know today we're blaming the pipeline but we caused the pipeline problem that decades ago yes so it's like well well yeah i mean we created the the the very problem that we're now facing blaming on and we're blaming on the pipeline ing votes for those that didn't see that on the podcast so the the i i so i think it fundamentally is is the has to be the focus of the ceo the leadership team in the organization which means you have to evolve your hiring practices it devolve you're recruiting programs you have to think about internal promotion equitability across people there people bring people in and then lose them i've seen that happen yep so you've gotta make sure that that you don't have very very small pockets of of underrepresented groups that that are sort of like not fully integrated within the rest of the culture in the organization which obviously also means you have to get the critical mass and your organization has to look a lot more like the broader population so i i don't think there's a silver bullet other than it being a focused in priority of change you eat now we were missing my said your wife is a very famous your now famous person in syria joel is is deeply focused on on on these shoes and she was a lawyer by training and did a lot of public interest law and and kind of employee lawsuits and whatnot and kind of realized that you know there's there's a legal dimension to this which is like let's let's sue in the harassment has gotten so mad but also there's a cultural dimension which is like why don't we just fix the underlying practices that 'cause it's harassment and cause these diversity diversity issues so so you know a lot of a lot of my own evolution personally in thinking through this is obviously kind of come and been influenced by her and and and this but again it's it's sort of how you hire how you attract talent how you retain talent right on and then the culture that you're driving from an inclusion standpoint and every one of those dimensions matters what do you think you've done well in this area what do you think not well on so i'd say a few few things that we've done well i think that we've implemented the rooney rule basically which is for for any leadership higher director and above so not just our executive staff but but the population that is a few hundred leaders within box we make sure that we have a couple underrepresented candidates in any single before we were able to hire anybody and that's dramatically changed the mix of canada pull that we look at and it has changed and impacted the director hiring which then goes on to change the hiring that they will then do in their own team right because now you have a leader that you know might be a woman or a person of color so that's that's one area the we have we've tried to put a huge focus on internal inclusion so focusing on our employee resource groups and the organization's internally that are meant to drive much more much more community within the company but then us be able to hear the lessons and issues that different groups are facing and how do we better support immigrants what how do we better support our latin next population and how do we make sure that that is a you know these things are much more tied to the the culture in the company i think it's it's it's making sure that we hold teams accountable to diversity within their their the ranks of the organization we look at metrics every single quarter as to the population of each individual function within box of sales marketing engineering etcetera to ensure that that that we think it's trending in a much better direction where we can get to fifty fifty from a gender standpoint at least in the next few years and then and then additional programs on the recruiting side we created a.

ceo
"bro topi" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

04:51 min | 3 years ago

"bro topi" Discussed on Recode Decode

"And why you should to the wonderful thing was buffeted never heard of it in the the first review on amazon and so i believe that particularly and it gets back to some of your earlier questions particularly in in today's world where the old power structures don't work that the sensibility that women in general bring to this stuff and the evidence for god's sakes cannot dodge it anymore i worked at mckinsey if they are one thing they're analytically brutal one study they had said and this was worldwide companies with truly mixed gender boards wildly outperformed others financially including a fifty six percent higher profit margin so you know i i get into this twitter all the time and i said well if you really wanna know who i am i believe in tokenism tokenism is every board should probably have one or two men ruth bader ginsburg which i loved i know if you're not love with well we both candidates tougher for me but when we can both do it and somebody said well you know what we feel is the right genderbalanced for the supreme court just had nine to nothing women next sense i two hundred twenty five years we had nine thousand men right but i i mean i first of all it goes back to economics number one when i started talking about this twenty two years ago i said listen social justice is incredibly important to me i'm marched on washington choice but that's not what i do for a living i i am here because the simple fact of the matter is that women by everything eighty percent of consumer goods women are now well over fifty percent of professional purchasing officers so there is likely to sign the ten year fivebilliondollar isi t outsourcing contract choose the family vacation and i have what i call the squint test and my squint test is show me a photogr of your executive team i ain't count and we're not talking quotas when i squint the composition of the team auto look kinda sorta like the market that you're serving right and so i think that any board that is not an gender balance i wrote this in the book i gender balance i'm trying to engineer i'm shockingly sophisticated mathematically if you have a board of directors of ten people gender balances take ten divide by two five women minimum and frankly i think it ought to be six or seven the mckenzie study again mackenzie is not into overstatement they said if you want to succeed in today's world start by promoting women and i believe it is different what happens in in these industries because what is considered most innovative industry which is silicon valley tech really is mired in not just not women people color diversity of thought versity of age everything where they do not seem to be moving the needle where does that go in the current environment i don't have a clue okay because i completely agree with you and i don't know how this maybe there'd be did you interview the woman i can't remember name who wrote bro topi yes yeah she we ended up with a great converse i mean bro topiary i read it in a book with hard covers and if you went through the book you would see barf stains on half the pages it was ten times worse than i thought it would be but how do you know throw the question back to you how do you fix something that bad and that's not one can be fixed by the most fascinating thing i thought i think it was bro topiary might have been in the in the book that came out most fascinating thing and i think she was the one who said it relative to what we're looking at with she said they're probably would one of the problems of have all your code written by boys who end general don't have the social skills they might have women would have brought a different sensibility to the writing of that comb and i think that is absolutely true one hundred percent how do we make it happen in silicon valley god alone is happening other places well give me some examples but one of the tragic which i happen to read when i was on the train coming down from providence this morning is and i tweeted it and i said melinda gates gets the quote of the year and she said we have a lower number lower our number of women fortune five hundred ceo's than we have ceo's is first name is jim i.

amazon two hundred twenty five years one hundred percent fifty six percent fivebilliondollar twenty two years eighty percent fifty percent ten year
"bro topi" Discussed on Katie Couric

Katie Couric

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"bro topi" Discussed on Katie Couric

"Branch dot com promo code k a t i e bollandbranch dot com promo code katie and now back to our conversation with journalist emily chang author of bro topi so you got a lot of attention when the first excerpt for bro topi was released in vanity fair you wrote about wild monthly sex parties attended by the tech elite the sub head of the piece was the guy's got laid but the women get screwed which i thought was clever and also a bit depressing and can you explain these parties how important are they and what the effect is for women in tech so first of all one of the interesting things about silicon valley that may set it apart from some other industries is that work bleeds into life in fact life is work and that's just the way things go and so you know if you're working at one of these companies you're going out for drinks after work maybe for drinks in the middle of the day and you know there's this implicit pressure to be one of the cool kids and you know there is a subset of people in silicon valley who believes they're not just changing the world when it comes to the products that they're building their challenging social mores and challenging traditional morality challenging monogamy and that's all great the bay area has been you know this this this hotbed of sexual exploration and liberation for so so long but if you look at actually how some of the socializing happens and you know i am quite descriptive about some of these parties where you have powerful men inviting women to to one so that the odds are in their favor it's not challenging traditional mores at all in fact it's a tale as old as time you know these women who participate are discredited and disrespected when for the men it's like a networking opportunity even though they're not trying to do business business gets done and so women sort of feel like they're damned if they do and damned if they don't and for some people this lifestyle was ever present and they felt like they could not escape it and especially some women entreprer.

bro topi emily chang
"bro topi" Discussed on Masters in Business

Masters in Business

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"bro topi" Discussed on Masters in Business

"Legs apart in my hands at my side of this and i get all shrill and i'm like fix pay we own it the we own compensation so like we are women we own our own compensation so let's fix the systems that keep it down so so in other words the women in the accounting department hr these are the people who helped determine what the internal pay structure of a company is going to be yes which is a lot of what my company is about my company i'm sorry which is a lot of what my book is about what my book is about is reexamining all the institutions inside of a company and saying if we had to start over again would we do it the same way right so that's the reason i wrote the book powerful is that i believe that we're actually harming ourselves by using the same methodologies for managing people managing compensation in managing recruiting that we've been using since the sixties mean really it goes back a long long way so when you have a merit increased budget that once a year at the end of your annual performance review we give you a six and a half percent merit increase budget on a bill curve distribution with ratings and rankings and salary ranges and lemon limb and you start out underpaid you'll never catch up you'll know catch up we were just discussing the challenges in setting up a corporate culture or helping to turn a one around at a bro topi type shop like uber but let's talk a little bit about about the corporate culture and and there's a quote from the book that i really like a great workplace is not expresso or lush benefits or sushi launches grand parties are night nice offices what is a great workplace and how does culture plan to that question i often ask people when they asked me that's all ask you that if you think about the time.

"bro topi" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"bro topi" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Tech industry created it and pop culture repeated it and so you know in nineteen eightyfour women actually peaked in terms of the number of degrees they were earning in computer science they were earning thirty seven percent a computer science degrees that has since plunged to eighteen percent where it's been flat the last decade and same with jobs women had more than a third of jobs in in silicon valley in the eighties and now that's down to the low twenty s and so you know the stereotype a who's good at this shuts out more than half the population emily chang is the author of bro topi breaking up the boys club is silicon valley one of the big i think headlines that was generated over the last year was when the google engineer wrote that big memo james day more i think his name was wrote a memo in which he argued that men are more biologically suited to this job than women did your head blow up when you read that it deed and in fact after he wrote that after that mental went public i had him on my show two days later this is right after he got fired and we had you know sort of healthy debate but basically what he was arguing is that men are biologically more suited to computers than women because men like things in women like people and people who like things are better at the job and again there's no evidence of this in fact he was perpetuating the same sort of toxic assumption that those psychology just may when they were developing those aptitude tests fifty years ago and there's a great argument to be made that we need people who like people or care about people are empathetic to the users whose problems they're trying to solve to be doing these jobs as well you know it makes absolutely no sense to have sort of monolithic kind of culture building products that are changing the world that are used by billions and billions of people of all kinds emily chang thank you so much for making time for us author of bro topi breaking up the boys club of silicon valley appreciate it thank you so much for having me and shining a light on this topic i appreciate absolutely are we come back we're going.

emily chang engineer google thirty seven percent eighteen percent fifty years two days
"bro topi" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"bro topi" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Me let me get this right you talk to an expert in a state that i don't practice law in and you called me after the fact to see if he was right i have that right may i trump you yeah well i wouldn't may that's a big mistake stay connected handel on the law tomorrow morning at six am six forty gary and shannon kfi am six forty we are going to get an update on losing streak lowest the grandmother that authorities nationwide were hunting for after she murdered two people that updates coming up next but i talked about this book awhile back bro topi up breaking up the boys club of silicon valley emily chang wrote this book hosted bloomberg technology and it's a real in depth look into what goes on up there in the boys club and you won't believe the story she had emily thanks for joining us thank you so much for having me hey talk about being a woman in the world of silicon valley is just an awkward place to be you know it is really isolating is what i would say and obviously everybody woman has their own experience but i mean if you just look at the numbers women hold about twenty five percent of jobs across the industry they account for about seven percent of investors and companies led by women get just two percent of funding so it's an uphill battle i hardly believe that women are getting just two percent of funding because they have just two percent of good ideas.

bloomberg technology gary shannon kfi emily chang two percent twenty five percent seven percent
"bro topi" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"bro topi" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"I think of all the thing that's the fact that he used the term golden showers troubles me there is also we'll get more into this in twelve thirty when we jump into swamp watch but earlier today the democratic national committee filed a lawsuit against everyone the dnc filed a multimillion dollar lawsuit against russia against the trump campaign against wikileaks all of them saying that there was a big conspiracy to disrupt the two thousand sixteen campaign until the election towards donald how did we just run out of time to talk about that what we're going to talk about that and we ran out of time when we were talking about hookers and stuff oh yeah we always get lost that's true when we come back though the the author of bro topi we've talked a lot about the environment the work environment in silicon valley emily chang is going to join us and talk about her book bro topi breaking up the boys club of silicon valley you won't believe what these guys are up to on their off time and not off time gary and shannon kfi am six forty any amy she just mentioned the democratic party has sued russia the trump campaign and wikileaks the democrats claim those groups conspired to help president trump win in two thousand sixteen democratic national committee chair tom perez calls the alleged conspiracy an unprecedented act of treachery peres says russia found a willing and active partner in the trump campaign news brought to you by veteran owned semper four men have been charged for committing lewd acts.

democratic national committee russia wikileaks democratic party tom perez peres partner donald emily chang gary shannon kfi president
"bro topi" Discussed on GeekWire - Geared Up

GeekWire - Geared Up

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"bro topi" Discussed on GeekWire - Geared Up

"Chris apparently was not and part of it is because it is just so male dominated there are no checks and balances imagine six men around a dinner table if you walk in one woman you know the conversation changes slightly if it's halfandhalf it's completely different conversation than it would be if it was all men and so i think we really need more women at the table at these companies for organic cultural change to happen i do think there is a lot of ignorance and it's not always malicious but at this point i mean i've written three hundred pages about it ignorance can only be willful like we know there is a problem now we need to talk about how we fix it also includes some examples that are counter examples where companies have done well by including women from the beginning and we're gonna talk about that when we come back our guest this week is emily chang she is the author of bro topa many of you know her as the host of bloomberg technology and we'll be right back with more on geekwire welcome back to geekwire from ecuador common seattle i'm todd bishop grain we're talking this week with emily chang she is the host and executive producer of bloomberg technology and the author of bro topi breaking up the boys club of silicon valley emily you talk a lot about silicon valley in the book it's interesting i've followed microsoft over the years from our perch up here in seattle and a lot of the cultural things just sort of subtle cultural things that you talked about man they were very typical of microsoft especially in the bill gates era you know gates would arrive in check the parking garage to see whose car was first in line you know amazon obviously has a culture of its own you didn't really address you know the the seattle tech giant's do you see some characteristics at those companies that you also see the silicon valley company.

Chris seattle emily chang bloomberg technology microsoft amazon geekwire ecuador todd bishop executive producer
"bro topi" Discussed on GeekWire - Geared Up

GeekWire - Geared Up

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"bro topi" Discussed on GeekWire - Geared Up

"So what is the birthplace of some of the most innovative companies in the world but these days it's also become infamous for something else bloomberg technology host emily chang calls that something bro topi a culture that has built giants like google and facebook but has made the tech industry toxic and even dangerous for women and other minorities from geekwire dot com and seattle i'm todd bishop and emily chang is with us in the geekwire studio today thank you so much for having me i love seattle any chance to come to seattle it's great to have you here and i know you've been visiting some of the tech companies locally i want to ask you about that later but both claire and i have read the book and really got a lot out of it in fact i don't want to give you your next blurb but i think this should be required reading for everybody in the tech industry really opened my eyes to a a lot of things both subtle and clear and it was just a an important book to read but i want to ask you first what is bro topa how do you define it broke hope in my mind perfectly encapsulates this idea of silicon valley as a modern topi where anyone can change the world make their own rules if they're a man but if you're a woman it's incomparably harder and i mean it shows in the numbers and i feel like we should just get these out there women account for twenty five percent of jobs across the industry seven percent of venture investors and women led companies get just two percent of funding in no world is that a utopia and you know i know that it's a strong phrase and and it really makes a statement and initially when we started talking about the title on this word came up i felt like maybe it was taking it too far but just like you i was surprised as i was doing my research over and over again and i believe it perfectly captures the fact that is just not eleven playing field so you start the book by talking about some of the stereotypes that have led to.

google todd bishop emily chang claire bloomberg technology facebook seattle geekwire twenty five percent seven percent two percent
"bro topi" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"bro topi" Discussed on KGO 810

"About it you know the isn't that really is the key so but how do you break up a venture capitalism culture because it's their billion dollars not yours first of all venture capital firms need to hire more women and it can't just be one woman you need two three four women to make a real culture change the people who have the power here are really the people who fund venture capitalists and they're called limited partners and what's interesting is you'll see more women represented among lp's than in the vc community and while they say they care about diversity what they really care about is making money is making returns and so when i spoke to al piso they said well some of the best investors aren't the best people but they have the best returns and that kind of an attitude just is an acceptable so what you're seeing is actually a lot of women venture capitalists leaving these male dominated firms and starting their own funds and i do think that they'll slowly start to change the norms of behavior i interview some of these women in in this book where you know they're pitching for an investment from lp's and the lp's will say well wait how many kids do you have oh i have three oh are you going to have the kids and the fund and that particular investor was wondering if she should take their money at all but decided that yes they have a weirdness about her being a working mom but maybe if she takes the money and she you know knocks it out of the park she can prove them wrong and pave the way for more women bloomberg host emily chang joining me talking about her new book bro topi breaking up the boys club of silicon valley i want to go back to something though because one of the things that i hear from my friends on the right goes right back to the heart of something that you said though about vc all they care about is getting maximum return we mean we still i mean you're on bloomberg right we talk about money a lot i go on fox business we talk about money money you know are we are we saying we should change you know i talk about capitalism two point.

emily chang bloomberg al billion dollars