18 Burst results for "British Raj"

"british raj" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

01:30 min | 3 weeks ago

"british raj" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"44 years straight. This is Atlanta Hawks basketball look at 63 seconds to play in the second quarter of the heart's trailing the Jazz 42 30 to 1 other game in the second quarter right now in Dallas, the Mavericks leading Dolan steamed 45 42 look at down ships has 15 points Portland in Philadelphia in the first quarter, Trailblazers leave that 1 24 2 22. Well, it's an eight point lead right now. For the Jazz. They will have the ball out of their time out. The Hawks come back with Solomon Hill, Kevin Herder. Damn British Raj on Rondo and John Collins. Cam. Is that a whole lot better tonight? Still not shooting at that great, not three of nine, but he's been a lot more active. So now it'll be Mitchell to bring it up. Mitchell goes back door with a pastor Bogdanovich, who lays it in. They drew that up nicely out of the time out. And it's a 10 point game now 40 to 32 Hawks trailing 50 seconds to go in the second quarter. On the left side, It's Kevin Herder Kevin Dribbles towards the lane out to John Collins, straightaway three by Johnny College is good. On. Collins gets the three. That's his 31st of the year. 40 to 35 hawks down by seven Now the jazz coming back Mitchell Mitchell up top to Bogdanovich down the lane. Bogdanovich lays it up. No good. Go bear the rebound. Had it knocked away Then it saved though they get it out the angles angles throws it outside. Mitchell. Long, three. Good. Donovan Mitchell, with.

Mitchell Mitchell Bogdanovich John Collins Hawks Donovan Mitchell Kevin Herder Kevin Dribbles Atlanta Hawks Kevin Herder Dolan Solomon Hill Mavericks Portland Rondo Dallas Johnny College Philadelphia
India locks down its 1.3 billion people for 21 days

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:42 min | 1 year ago

India locks down its 1.3 billion people for 21 days

"I'm Anthony Davis. India has begun the world's largest lockdown today as Prime Minister Narendra Modi announced in a TV address. Wanting one point three eight billion citizens to stay inside will risk inviting the pandemic into their homes. And pledging two billion dollars to bolster the country's beleaguered healthcare system the move puts nearly one fifth of the world's population under lockdown. The announcement set off panic in many neighborhoods as people rushed to markets to stock up on supplies at many places. Police tried to disperse crowds outside stores. Indian health officials have reported four hundred sixty nine active cases of Kovic nineteen and ten deaths. Officials have repeatedly insisted there is no evidence yet of localized spread but if conducted relatively scant testing for the disease in a country where tens of millions live in dense urban areas with irregular access to clean water experts said local spreading is inevitable but since the World Health Organization declared the corona virus a global pandemic triggering. India's government to invoke a British Raj era epidemic act giving it sweeping powers to contain the disease the cases have been growing rapidly and according to Modi have the potential to spread like wildfire in recent days. India had gradually expanded stay at home. Orders banned international and domestic flights and suspended passenger service on its extensive rail system until the thirty first of March. It was not clear what the

Prime Minister Narendra Modi India World Health Organization Anthony Davis Kovic
"british raj" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

09:25 min | 1 year ago

"british raj" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"But then unfortunately something really bad happened on April thirteenth. Nineteen nineteen in th- czar which was located in the state of Punjab in India. British soldiers fired on an unarmed gathering of men women and children who had come into the city to partake in a traditional Sikh festival. There was a peaceful nationalist demonstration. Going on that day but many of the people who who were around who are involved in the shooting. They weren't even really part of the demonstration. Exactly they were completely kind of innocent of whatever was going on so a lot of lives were lost and we don't know exactly how many a lot of sources you look at and I think the official number reported by the British Raj was three hundred seventy nine but some people say that could have been as many as a thousand or more well and then the accounts of it in the British press were Especially disturbing you know. They were treating it as though it had been a riot and the people who were killed had gotten themselves into trouble essentially and people just had a very unfortunate reaction to to the whole thing that went down. Yeah it was weird. It was a big cover up For obvious reasons. They didn't want people to know that this had gone down the way had because there was basically no reason for these people being killed so they had to spin it they had to spin it and But then there were marines. Of course of what had really happened throughout India and took were caught wind of this and he was pretty disgusted by the entire situation. It kind of changed his outlook and it definitely changed the way he felt about being British night so he wrote a letter to Lord Chelmsford. Who was the viceroy of India time and renounced his knighthood and if you read his letter it's interesting because it is so formal so polite it's very written and very precise English but I don't know he's clearly very deeply disturbed by what's happened and can't reconcile being a night with supporting the definitely. We have a little excerpt from the letter just to give you an idea of how insensitive was by the situation. He says the very least I can do for my country to take all consequences upon myself in giving voice to the protest of millions of my countrymen surprised into dumb anguish of tear the time has come when badges of honour make our shame glaring in their incongruous context of humiliation. And I for my part wish to stand. Shorn of all special distinctions by the side of those of my countrymen who for their so called insignificance are liable to suffer degradation not fit for human beings so this was the end of this quote. Total cooperation with the British in it changed people's opinions of him to He wasn't the same guy anymore and I mean we can talk about that. Maybe I in a literary sense with the eighth. 'cause I people have suggested that this is part of the reason why gates opinion of Takur soured according to on a gentleman car to Gore's resigning his knighthood just didn't match up correctly with the idea. Yates had of him as this serene mystic from the East who certainly wouldn't get involved in politics certainly wouldn't do anything as bold as renounced his knighthood It it just didn't match up with Yates's to Gore and of course I mean we can assume there's some other reasons in here. Yates really didn't like to Gore's translations as we mentioned earlier He was probably bound to be disappointed in this creation. He had imagined for himself because to Gore did right so much more than just romantic poetry. He wrote essays and plays and prose. I mean we have to assume it. It did play a role. Yeah I mean I think it did but I think at the same time there had to be more to it. I mean they knew each other so he must have known that there was more Gore than just romantic literature and poetry that he wrote He did a lot of political writing a lot of speaking. He was kind of a voice for for the way he had publicly promoted him. Though Yep I guess so. That's true but I guess it was bound to happen since two other things anyway so there was bound to be some kind of falling out between them at some point but it changed. It changed what Yates Thought of to Gore. At least in the you know outwardly and it changed I think what to Gore thought of his own views. A little bit too definitely. He didn't really. He didn't really change his views about the east and west needing each other. He still thought that he still thought he wanted to see Kind of a universal land where where people are cultures would come together and there weren't all these barriers between them but at the same time he I think he was very conflicted about the situation that happened especially because he had English friends and so it made the situation kind of difficult for them and he tried to express these feelings through his work. After the fact yeah and after this he kept on traveling so he was still out and about in the world very much so He said who visited more than thirty countries on five continents Lecturing and having these extended conversations with people like Einstein on truth and beauty. They have this like amazing debate and music. I mean stuff that you wouldn't even you know think of Einstein talking about but I mean to Gore is is all over the world. He meets Mussolini and it takes them a little while before he starts hearing reports about the fascism that's going on in Italy from some `exiles and Denounces Mussalini. But yeah even then you know. His his tenancy are still Very polite and proper Interesting to read them. Up never loses his smooth talking But so he the going around the world. It's partially to speak because he's asked and to to speak on behalf of the Independence Movement But it's also to earn money for his school he still stumping for his cause which is education and he's still out there trying to keep the school this eccentric school that he started going And later this school in Shaun Tan becomes a university called Vista Bharati University in Nineteen Twenty One And so he has some success with that but it sort of peters out as he Yeah you were talking about it. The support it. What it's like today kind of more of a place where you can learn about him than a university. I think it's more to study his Philosophies and so forth necessarily but it does still exist. Yes you can still visited today. Actually I think that India's recently nominated to be a world hair UNESCO World Heritage site. You've been there. I've been there. I went there when I was fourteen although I can't remember too much unfortunately but I do remember it being very screen and And liking it lot. That's a rule of the PODCAST. You always have to mention the post. It makes everybody think we're we're going all over the world seeing all this stuff. Oh dear not really guys But I don't know even with all of this Traveling around the world and promoting in school and promoting his writings. He kinda kept his distance from the more confrontational side of the nationalist movement. He didn't get super involved in not even after this renouncing his knighthood and all that no. He's still kept his distance He was still part of it through his writings through his talks that he gave And he was still friends with Gandhi. Of course even though he didn't necessarily support a reaction that he did but but he didn't get too too involved and unfortunately he passed away about seven years before indy actually achieved independence in nineteen forty seven. But on the bright side maybe India's national anthem. Jonah Gone Anna is based on one of his song poems and another of his songs. Marshawn are. Bangala is Bangladesh's national anthem. Yeah so that's pretty impressive. Yes Sir I think so. He still gets to be a part of it. It's not easy to forget him at all. Still a big part of the national culture. Every time they sing the national anthem or here. It's about think of him and And Music Art actually an interesting fact about his art. He didn't take painting until he was about seventy years old. Which I think is amazing. So he takes the painting at age seventy yet somehow. He managed to create about two thousand paintings and drawings for he died around. Each eighty was busy though. That's incredible thank you so much for joining us today for this Saturday. Classic if you have heard any kind of email address maybe facebook url during the course of the episode that might be obsolete it might be doubly obsolete.

Gore India British Raj Yates official Punjab Einstein Shaun Tan Lord Chelmsford Takur And Jonah Italy Vista Bharati University Mussolini UNESCO World Heritage Marshawn Bangala Gandhi Bangladesh
"british raj" Discussed on The Joys Of Binge Reading: The Best in Mystery, Romance and Historicals

The Joys Of Binge Reading: The Best in Mystery, Romance and Historicals

09:09 min | 1 year ago

"british raj" Discussed on The Joys Of Binge Reading: The Best in Mystery, Romance and Historicals

"Fox and blog as well as details about how to subscribe to the broadcast so you don't Miss Future besides sides but now he is Harriet hello via Harriet and welcome to the charge. Thank you so much for inviting. She May Jenny great pleasure to be here. I've loved the neurology books and I just wanted to ask you was there once upon a time moment. When you decided sided you really hit to write fiction or somehow you life wouldn't be quite complete and if so was the any sort of special catalysts forage yes. I think there was a catalyst but I'll stop from the beginning. I grew up on femme in Wiltshire which was then a very quiet partially England and they went many other children around play with so I had quite a Sonatrach childhood is Mike. Sisters both went away to school when I was still quite young. Men Five wasn't out if I wasn't outside side playing on the farm or in the garden I would be usually found inside with my nose in a book and I think the course I loved reading. Eventually I came to feeling would like to try my hand at writing and I think a lot of people do when they start off. They write short stories because they seem a manageable length. Although sort stories are actually a great deal harder than most people think to write successfully but I was very pleased that I managed to get a few published in magazines which was which was lovely but I never really aspired to anything a longer than a short story and then I was in my forties when when I entered a national story competition and the idea of it was six well known writers would write the first half of the story and people people entering the competition would ride the second half and you had to choose who store you would like to pick an. I chose the story started by John Harris who I imagine most people had all she wrote the book shock ally which was a very popular novels about twenty years ago probably had to pay yes and anyway I it was lucky enough to get to the finals which was very exciting and people said very nice things about my story and I met on Harris the final judging and somebody said to her what advice would you give to aspiring writers and she said just drop the word aspiring and get on right and I think that gave me the confidence to think. Maybe I should just do that. Maybe I should take a lead by allow myself to take my writing more seriously rather than just thinking of it as a will little hobby I have maybe I could make more of it so I think that was my catch list really yes. Oh that's great It's amazing to me that it's twenty years ago. Shock allow was published time goes. Yes just had its twentieth anniversary. It's exciting when you meet someone like that makes the idea of being writer a lot more real doctors it does yes. She was very charming and very approachable and I think she gave the three of us who got to the finals a Qalat of confidence which was which was really kind of as she met us at her home retool said with with lovely because you felt very welcomed rather than just make current a television studio and it knows it was really quite lacking a pivotal moment in my writing career. Tell me do you know did either of the Abitur. Finalists continue to be published authors like yourself. As far as I know they didn't in fact Bagley one of them became very ill about years afterwards and died but the other one no. I don't think she did well. That's a feed your cat so you must recent work. We'll get where you're not talking about. Some of you really work a little later on chat. You've been come known in recent years. So this historical crime the series that you've been working on the spokes seat in nineteen eighty. It's along so they start yet crime series and they feature Celanese Three Lankans. We'd call him today. Police Office is married to a British woman. Tell me how that the concept that it came about well as I'd want. I did actually start writing historical novels. I think we'll probably talk about later but I was very keen to try mystery country Sirius. I've always enjoyed the mysteries on an I knew the kind of mystery books I wanted to write. I didn't want to write anything with a lot of violence so sexwale swearing on the page and I wanted a detective who would be middle of the road. He would need to have some issues but I didn't think I could write the kind of detective who is now calling with a broken marriage in that kind of thing I mean. Some people do that kind of very very well with elements of horror in them. Sometimes I think but it wouldn't be for me so I knew the type of person I wanted my detective to be and I anew the type of mystery I wanted the thing that was lacking was I didn't know what setting I want you to unsettling. It's very important to me. I don't really enjoy book since they have a very strong said the setting and it was when I went to Sri Lanka on a extended holiday that I fell in love with country so much that I thought you know. This is the place site. I want to set my series the place I want to write about and when I got home exhibit the what's let's with just spilling out. I think the first book in the series in about three months because I was so excited about it or couldn't wait to write about the country and the characters shake really as I as I went along to concrete form as I went along. So how long did you actually spend Sudoku Day on that holiday well for my for my taste not nearly enough to I could have I could've spent months there really but I spent about the three weeks that and also read a lot. I read a lot about the country both novels and things people in the past written about it early travellers there I read everything I could find fares and does a very strong seats as you say and particularly I think I was impressed by the feeling feeling of love his garden and the such a strong sense appreciation of the natural world and gardening gardening and garden plants on site. I got the feeling that you probably also loved your garden. Would that be riots. Yes I do I do. I think that's one of the things that greatly appeal to me about career. Lanka at the plant life is is wonderful and so diverse and also the animals and Birdlife is renowned for its its birdlife a huge numbers species of birds and I think because it's a small island it's not terribly built up and the population per square grandma mile is a lot smaller than India's. You're not aware the teeming millions as you are in India in fact. Some people said that Sri Lanka is India with the crowd crowds in the debt that I think that's probably true description. It's also known as the Pearl of the Indian Ocean and it the wildlife series is in the plant life is just so beautiful that I think that was one of the things that greatly appealed and yes. I am a McCain Gardner obviously in a very different sort of environment tune in the UK. We haven't got the lushness that you get in somewhere like Sri Lanka but I do very much enjoy plants and I very much like playing around with the different shapes and colors and so on so I think that's why gave inspector to silver that quality ideas and because it Satan the colonial take time when Sunanda was still a British colony it gives a real flavour off the classic Golden Age Mystery Because you've got the instructor of of social show status and yes but I gather that in passage from new ALA which is the most recent one that you've written a Saujana cruise liner that seems to be even more of a golden age seating because they were stuck in one place and they can't get off the bar right. Sorry it's a bit like only Orient Express isn't it. Yes yes will disown the Nano with ruled stuck on votes then then when non narrows down and I it's. It's very tempting conceit truly that did I think it it does work. I think I've wanted to try some of the traditional golden age themes really at that passage from Nola was also inspired by wonderful exhibition addition adopt Victorian out that museum in London which was about the Golden Days of cruising the twenties and thirties and it was absolutely fascinating going into tool fashions.

Sri Lanka India John Harris Harriet Indian Ocean Fox Nola Orient Express Wiltshire McCain Gardner England Police Office Lanka Bagley Abitur writer Sonatrach Mike Sunanda Saujana
"british raj" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

04:52 min | 2 years ago

"british raj" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"And for whatever reason I was last to get my one on one with him which took place in a bar upstairs. There was made out in British Raj gear to. I don't even know what they were thinking. But anyway, it was like a British Raj bar, and he was he was blotto. And as I take out my tape recorder, and I put it on the table, you know, to make my intentions clear, and he made his intentions clear by running his hand up inside of my started with the knee, and then all the way up high and thank God, he passed out drunk in my lap before you get any third farther, his impact on culture. Mickey came along. You know, he came into the league for years earlier than sandy. So he came into the league in nineteen fifty one on a gust of postwar optimism and he had that innocent beautiful, mid western smile. He I think he was an incarnation of postwar optimism. And he he spoke to the sense of our clout, you know, we could re we could defeat Hitler. We could remake Europe, and we could hit from both sides of the plate with equal power. That book. Yeah. Pretty well. It was both puts her bestsellers before we go on back to the book on neighbors. You were born where and how did you get to Washington? I was born in the Bronx about a mile north of Yankee Stadium. And I came to Washington nineteen seventy nine with a husband who had a clerkship at the supreme court, which which Justice that would have been John Paul Stevens. Who in fact, bequeath me, and I wore at Yankee Stadium this year when I threw out the first pitch as part of the promotion, the Babe Ruth book, he gave me a a an authentic Yankee satin jacket that George Steinbrenner the third had given to him on the Yankees. Yes. But I didn't know about you. But here is some video have. Have. Well, we shown the video of you throwing out the first pitch already. But here's the video of John Paul Stevens talking about babies, as I know many many times, I wasn't fact witness of call your shop. Homerun by Babe Ruth. I remember sitting behind third base in watching. Neighbor, Ruth, respond to guy Bush's jazzing resin from the sidelines and pointing to center field and following up with it. Favorite famous crawl chat over the centerfield scoreboard. What's the call? So this isn't a nineteen thirty two Olympics of chef boy, I'm tired nine hundred thirty two World Series and Babe Ruth gets into this back and forth with Charlie root the pitcher for the Chicago Cubs, and it becomes a legend that you know, he standing at home plate and the cubs in their dugout her yelling at him. The Anki yelling back at the cubs. And he raises one finger for one strike for two strikes. And he's any points out to the allegedly. This is the mess that he points out to the bleachers and the grandstands pointing and allegedly saying I'm I'm gonna hit the next one. Now, he never talked about it at the time because reporters didn't ask any questions time, you Larry merchant who was a great tabloid writer for the New York Post when I was growing up said about. This incident if reporters had actually gone to lock in those days and asked questions, we know if he called the shot, but because they didn't it was just the press and Babe Ruth was really candy guy. There's only one guy the press box who mentioned in said it was a call shot. It only became fact in quotations days later and roots reaction was well, it's in the newspapers you read the newspapers, don't you? Here's the rest of John Paul Stevens talking about that very incident. A young man. He may have been a Bank, not judging maybe not as young man. Zene? He said he didn't want to embarrass me in front of the whole crowd. But his grandfather had been in the bleachers. And the homerun hit landed in the left field bleachers. Just right next. Door's grandfather had been sitting. And he saved the ball. Hit a family souvenir. Thought came to me. And the thought was this Babe Ruth hit two home runs..

Babe Ruth John Paul Stevens Mickey Yankee Stadium British Raj Yankees Chicago Cubs George Steinbrenner Europe Larry merchant Bronx Washington New York Post Hitler Bush Justice writer Charlie
"british raj" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

07:31 min | 2 years ago

"british raj" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Sixty eight AM the answer. All right, everybody Dennis Prager here. Speaking with the British historian, Andrew Roberts. And thoroughly thoroughly enjoy live. I lived his book was said it was over. And it's a very big book. How many words is your book? At four hundred and sixty thousand it is it's that big. Yeah. But that includes that includes the. Boats as footnotes and the bibliography in the index. You didn't have to read the entire four hundred and sixty thousand so I just read a four hundred thousand word book. That's such a credit to you. I think getting. Related emails. Let's see schools saying that they from people who completely sold. But Sunday go along I want. It's funny. I understand that. Because the end is briefly described. I wanna talk to you about that in a moment. But all right. So we did Stalin. There was another the other thing that I really really grateful to be able to talk to you. Most people don't have access to authors. And I I never take it for granted. He. It came through to me that he fought for the British empire pretty much as much as he fought for Britain. Absolutely, right. Yes. He was his secular religion, really all the way through his life from the name of that. He went out as a young and into the North West Frontier of India to protect the British Raj. British rule in India all the way through to the last words that he said as prime minister all about his Italy in the civilizing mission and the positive aspect of the British empire. Which I have to say, I have no vested interest here. I'm I'm not a Brit. But. You're pretty serious anglophile left. You've got it bad. Boy. I have never been called the anglophile in my life. That is so far. If I tell you this if I were anglophile it would have been killed in my year in Leeds. I think it was knocked out of the. I I really I bumped sure I suffer from that. I do. However, I am not so much an anglophile as a civilization of file. And I believe that the Brits have made a major contribution to the toughest thing in the world. And that is making good civilization. And I I don't know if one thinks in terms of good and bad rather than imperialist, non imperialist or colonialist, not colonialist. Why is there an argument against his notion that there was a civilizing power in the British empire in India? Well, that's right. I mean when you look at what the British did that doubling the life expectancy upbringing eight times more of the land under cultivation getting rid of horrific practices, like not saying we days onto their husbands that husband's funeral. 'cause the everything we did. With regard to railways and every Gatien and bringing universities in for the first time, internal peace protecting to allow at free-trade largest trade area and do that. A the way in which since the nineteen sixties. The not monks history, Mark. So eat for though since it's been left to manage to turn the British empire into something. Unique key evil seems to be an extraordinary extraordinary things me good. Oh. I I I said I think in terms of good and evil and the neck good of the Brits in India is so obvious to me. That one has to have a broken moral, compass there wouldn't be an NBA without Britain. It would be a bunch of competing non-related states. He certainly wouldn't have won with them the Westminster democratic system in parliament and the floor in the way that it has the Indian legal system is that comes from the common Laura's that Britain. And then and you'll say wouldn't have had it as a unit tree country as you say. You never have had them the Punjab, for example in the same country as as Bengal. Just exactly yeah. He was sort of the Garibaldi of India. Yes. Exactly. You can understand why church believes that this is worth fighting four and yes ending way in which and he saw he saw the full sole actually the terrible massacres that took place between Sikhs and those limbs induce up on the North West Frontier in nineteen forty seven and nineteen forty eight. And he warned that this was going to happen and the labor government nickname fan and the results something like three quarters of a million people were killed. He had if I can if I read you correctly. He was not an admire Gandhi. No, no. I sort of notorious remarks and and famous quotable things those directed against Gandhi. Who of course today especially in India is considered something like a secular Saint, but he wasn't I I the more. I know about Gandhi the more I agree with Churchill. We'll just the day. I didn't know if you noticed in the Gambia in a university in the Gambia Gandhi statue was taken down because it's racist remarks that he had made about black Africans. Everything needs to be seen this question of race. And and in terms of its put me historical perspective, absolutely nothing. If you can't put it in the proper context exactly what I spoke about last hour. I get a lot of my wisdom from the bible and Noah is described as a righteous man in his generations. You can only judge people in their generations precisely. It means nothing otherwise you might as well split. Oliver Cromwell would think about United States like medicine. Makes no sense. Luckily, he probably thinks what I think of it. I'll be back. Vital segment coming up. It's too bad. It's like it's sort of like.

British Raj India anglophile Britain Gandhi Dennis Prager Andrew Roberts Oliver Cromwell Gambia Stalin NBA United States prime minister Noah Leeds Gatien Mark Punjab labor government Laura
"british raj" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

12:55 min | 2 years ago

"british raj" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Me in the studio to talk about his latest work. Stop and search is playwright Gabriel by the mercy. We also welcome back critic Maryann Johanson before we hear from Kevin nightly. Can I ask you both in light of injury Selbe playing an animal, and this is our Facebook question to the your favorite actor in an animal role. Marianna I'll come to you. I it's really tough because with the rise of animated cartoons. There's so many good choices are. But I think I'm gonna go with Eddie Murphy as donkey in Shrek interesting because I think we got for you those on Facebook as well, any any particular reason, why the donkey spoke to you this is so lively and repressive, he's just a fun character and Eddie Murphy's brilliant. Excellent. Gabriel was about we'll give that interests Elbert voiced shit. Come in the remake of the jungle book, I have to say much as I enjoyed that. The original George Saunders is the voice of the British Raj. Majestic collusive malevolent. I thought that was irreplaceable. You were almost doing an all do. For a voiceover yourself there. And we thoroughly enjoyed it. One of the baboons. Keira Knightley first then star of many historical trauma, and her new movie collect is about the iconic French author Sidney Gabrielle Colette the film set at the turn of the twentieth. Century tells the story of a woman from a simple rural background who is a wonderful writer, but has to hide that in a voice and talent Colette. Mary's a charismatic and dominant Peruvian writer who's known as Willie played by Dominic west and Willie takes the credit for her first four novels. The film is about Colette claiming her voice and stepping out from behind the shutters of a man, his ecliptic give you a sense of the film. We need. Another writer with what not even making a thousand this month. I've got three hundred from the echo four twenty-five Malaysia's bump novel and just to fifty from the music reviews. He doesn't even cover the outgoing spent so much money mortgage. Mathilde restaurants, always pick up the Bill will no matter how many people join us. It's expected on and the races and the casino du monk repes-. No. I'm just saying we could economize you. You could write what those stores you told me of San Severo last year my school story. Yes. That could be well his next novel. Karen, nightly spoke to the BBC's Edith Bowman and told her what attracted her to the role of Colette. I'd heard of her because my mom had been. He's a writer had been hugely influenced by I'd actually only read two of her novels. Yes. Cherie in the last two Cherie, which if you haven't read you should totally read 'cause they're peaceful novels, but I need nothing about her life up taking nothing about this first marriage. So I just got description for oh, it's really interesting when you get a period film, and you think well, this feels so modern, you know, it's talking about gender, politics and such. Politics, and everything that is still very relevant today. And we're still trying to figure out, but it was set one hundred years ago. Plus, there's a celebrity couple aspect to it 'cause Colette and Willie were very much the pinnacle of Parisian society, which at that point was culturally, the center of the world, and they were this celebrity couple that I mean ended up selling soap and selling. I mean, everything that you sort of imagine from a celebrity couple today with Instagram selling wherever they compare. Violent couple of. Kind of is. Sort of left that because it's something that you totally think is such a modern phenomenon. Yeah. And actually isn't a tool I think people would assume that he kind of took everything from heart and go everything from her. She very much to Kalat from him as well. I think she was very clever woman. I don't know if she would've been what she became without him. Eventually, it was a relationship that didn't work and she gets out. But actually, you know at the beginning she is helped by she was edited by him. He gave her a kind of entrance into a society that was sort of beyond imagination. Yeah. We've all had relationships that haven't worked. But there's been moments where they've been amazing. And I think as far as my playing with Dominic west who plays Willie to understand why they were together to understand why they were amazing when they were amazing. And then you have to be on her side to say need to get out of this relationships, a complex beasts they and that's what I loved about. This film was it dealt with the complexity that it wasn't simply one just taking from the other that there was some give and take. But essentially she needed to get out, and she did and one person that encouraged to do that with her mother. I almost feel that there's another film. There is another film, and that we were desperate to get more of that relationship into the film, and it sort of you feel like with collects life. If you do you read any biography about correct, you could make a whole crowd like series about and particularly because the mother was not what you imagine a mother of that period to be she always felt that her daughter was genius. She always knew her husband was using her. And she was the first one. So you need to divorce him. And that's not what you imagine. A woman of. Over one hundred years ago and say she absolutely adored had gender non conforming lover. She loved Missy. And she wanted her to go off with her anything. Wow. That's a really this is an interesting woman. What do you form a decision on? What makes you say? Yes to do. What makes you see? Yes. The next product. It's pre- instant in fact, as if I have to think about it, then it's no. But ultimately on the story. I know exactly when I found out. I just never know what I'm looking for quite tricky. It's a physical reactions reaction. Yes. Like, an absolute. Yes. Karen, nightly and colitis probably on a big screen somewhere near you. My guests on today's our playwright Gabriel Fatima and film critic, Mary and Johansen. Well, we heard care not talking about collects mother Marianne. Let's talk about mothers on film. Sally. Is this an unusual thing to see? Well, especially the fact that both the present and cure nightly focused in on this mother role. Well, it's really unusual. There are plenty of films about mothers and mothers and daughters. But there are almost none that I can think of that are about mothers of artistic or creative daughters movies about artists. We hardly ever see particularly their childhood where presumably their environment growing up and the influence of their parent. Particularly the mother must. Have a huge influence on creating a creative child. The something we hardly ever see depicted onscreen, and it's actually in the big interactions with Colette and her mother in the film are much later in her life when it's really about her encouraging her in her relationship, which is important too. But it's it's less about the work, except in the sense of she should go out and do the work and claim her name for herself. I mean, the the thing that we tend to see a lot of is dysfunctional relationships. I always thinking of Carrie Fisher and her mother of postcards from the edge. And that was fraud. Wasn't it? Yeah. That makes better viewing on some level. It's a lot more dramatic, and we want drop how sure way Gabriel tell me about the importance of mothers in the creation of an artist. What was yours like among was lovely. She was an Irish woman and she loved watching American films and so much of my childhood in the sixties and early seventies was spent on Saturday afternoons watching could a wide range of American films that will come on television. And. Remember that? There was a difference between us I kinda felt manipulated by films in complained fissiparous. And she said, you're not getting it. And so after world I can have stopped and tried to get hurt take on these films. And actually, she wasn't following the standard Hollywood kind of identify with the hero overcome obstacle and become this kind of successful American model person. She was looking at edges of the films of lightened shade moments of feeding and she would speak with me afterwards is the light was going down. We've never turn the light on afterwards. Once we turn the television off, and they're in the dog, it was acclaimed of breathing between us the breathing engagement of storytelling and of analysis was between. My mother remain. I suppose really made me the kind of storyteller the. Yeah. Definite. And the poet. You're listening to the answer on the BBC World Service. If you asked me he was the most talked about young actor of the last eighteen months, there's only one name Timothy Shalimar. He's the twenty two year old New Yorker who starred in last year's call me by your name and can currently be seen in the incredibly powerful film. Beautiful. Boy, it tells the real life story of a family struggling to help that addict son and the sons agonizing journey through addiction and sobriety an addiction. Again, you get the idea. Beautiful boy is based on two books. The first beautiful boy a father's journey through. His sons addiction was written by the journalist, David Sheff and the second tweak growing up on methamphetamines was written by his son. Nick chef Steve Carell plays the father Timothy plays. Nick, the BBC's Antonio quick asked the actor how he approached the role was human in my experience with him in real life is full of light. It has an incredible sense of humor. And it's joyous as well as a lot of other stuff. But I felt there's a stereotype a misconception about addiction and drugs so much what the movie gets at that. It's other or that he can't affect you can't affect your family when the reality is is very human disease. It doesn't discriminate more time. I spent visiting rehabs more time, I spent visiting meetings more, I realized oh, this is everywhere. And I don't mean that in a stark way either. But sometimes you go to meetings or any other programs people have years of sobriety. And they're not gonna fairs that are presented in pop culture. But rather he's uplifting moments where people are filled with gratitude that they're saving their lives. There are some scenes when you're re very very high. Indeed. Well, I think it's the job any actor. I mean for playing substance use you I don't know what the part of like acting school or something. And I know they're sequences movie worm higher methamphetamine or high on heroin, and those are obviously two different highs. And I was fortunate enough to. Have people to talk to you there you've gone through this. A drug adviser onset to make sure everything looked right. You know, some of the best scenes of the scenes when you're pretending not to be high. And I wondered because some of that is very subtle. And how you gauge that. I mean, do you watch yourself back? What's happening? I mean, I'm really grateful that those scenes work for you. But I think it's less me going to the monitor recalculating what I'm doing which is I've seen actors be able to do that. But that's really not my MO, basically, like the trial out of stuff. I just like to see how things play out if things feel unnatural maybe the energy that have a room or maybe there's too much energy maybe to performance, and it's good to recalculate or sometimes literally look at the monitor. But generally, I like to know give whatever the honest take is in that moment. And if trust your director like you can try stuff knowing you can be bad. And if it's bad it won't won't make it to the movie, I can do research and do research. Kim. You think that you have this under control? I understand how scared you are interesting. Why do things it doesn't make me any different or a I'm attract craziness, and you're just embarrassed. Because I was like this amazing thing like your special Chretien or something. And you don't like Quiambao now war, you, Nick. Here. This is who I am. We're all Joaquin Phoenix quota like elaborates matters interested in wearing different scarves. It's less. Like, ooh. How can I make myself on recognizable to people and make choices? They're smart and rather like present reality of the human condition. And I think it's more learned from me as an actor. Like, I watched like when I did homeland when I was sixteen I believe in which were performing I was literally at the time still projecting and being very big. And I feel like it's a hard thing to do. We you're coming in as a day player in a movie even beautiful egg to be one of the lead. So you get a little bit of wiggle room to be yourself to be bad. Call me by your name oversee was absolutely huge hit. What happens then do truckloads of scripts arrive dwelled is your voice to what happens. Well, I think the best thing for me was going to work on Henry the fifth right away. And it's called the king and David Michaud directed it. And I started that basically a week after the Oscars last year. And was basically in England almost immediately and you'll playing the king. Yeah. I'm playing Henry the fifth the prints, I guess at first and with an English accent with an English accent Timothy Chaumet talking about beautiful boy and his working methods takes off seriously doesn't he in the studio with me today?.

Sidney Gabrielle Colette Gabriel Fatima Willie writer Eddie Murphy Facebook BBC Dominic west Karen Keira Knightley Nick George Saunders Mary British Raj Maryann Johanson Marianna Selbe San Severo Cherie Instagram
"british raj" Discussed on Interesting Humans

Interesting Humans

05:03 min | 2 years ago

"british raj" Discussed on Interesting Humans

"Couple of weeks. It'll be the one hundred sixtieth anniversary of his birth and two years ago in November. Google featured him as one of the doodles because you know, he he really had a huge contribution. But he he wasn't. He didn't just work within radio technology. He will so moved into botany and biology, and he's also credited as the father of Indian science fiction, I had a Costa week lunches Wikipedia, and he has more sections in so many different fields. They think anyone that I've ever seen before. Yeah. I mean, he really is. You know, the the classic definition of of a polymath which appealed to me because I you know, I think whilst I don't have any of his his genius. I certainly have short attention span. So I like to go between different fields. And the final reason I thought it'd be a nice choices. We actually have a slight connection one not related in any way. But he's from a town, which is more than they unleash. It was India when he was living there is still under the days of the British Raj. Which is also my ancestoral hometown. And again, my family left with before the British partition that so I I didn't realize until I started reading about him that we were actually from the same hometown urgently to give you a bit of backdrop the part of India that he's from his cooled Bengal, which is in the east of India. And in the second half of the nineteenth century and early twentieth. Century Bengal, underwent the Bengals renaissance. And if you look pedia on the renaissance, you'll have Italian English German polish, you only region outside Europe is Ben goal, and it was a period where science literature, social Justice and things that will really flourish. And it took in there into the twentieth century, so one of the permanent freedom fighters in India's independence movement said that Bengals thinks today India things tomorrow and JC boasts was. Was one of the real pillars in in the scientific progress there and another one another who is also called boasts. It was his contemporary. And he's the reason that the Higgs boson is so named Bozon. And that's where the name who's on comes from. But anyway, that's a different boats not related, so he he actually came to London to study medicine originally. And it's unclear why he changed. It says the smell of the dissection room didn't agree with it. This -sarily studying two straight medicine. Yeah. He means. So again medicines loss was everything else has gained completes he decided to change tack. And then went to Cambridge to to study physics. This set him down the path of of radio. And so if you ask most people who invented radio, I think most people in the western say Marconi and in truth, it was it was no there was no one person. But but in the nineteenth century the presence of electricity electromagnetic waves had been theorized by James clerk Maxwell, I think, and then the next sort of keep us and would have been hooked who demonstrated that the distance of of radio waves, but the only way they would generate today, then they had very large wavelength. So the recording equipment and any kind of experimental equipment was enormous. And so both then came along to the building on this work and create. Wanted the entire setup. So the generates and the receiver for microwave radiation. And so he he he was able to generate wavelengths between two few centimeters to offer ends meter. And so then to do a lot of experiments with the behavior of radio waves, and he did a demonstration in Calcutta several years before Marconi where he transmitted and microwaves through the left tenant governor of Bengal, really. And through all and decimated some gunpowder and sort of showmanship and his supervisor in Cambridge Lord Rayleigh of many, economists things in physics fame, then communicated boasts work to the Royal Society in London, but both had no interest in painting any of his works. So like. No, no. I mean, so he he went to America. And did a demonstration apparently a friend over that. She persuaded him to pay his cO hero, which is the name of the the receiver. And he did. But then just let it lapse. And he said he wasn't interested in commercial application. He just wanted to do it for research purposes. And it's happening to let anybody use it. So he was kind of an original open source kind of guy whereas Kony two years later did create a Payton, and he was interested from the beginning and commercial telegraphy and.

British Raj Bengals Marconi Century Bengal Google London Indian science Costa James clerk Maxwell Bengal Wikipedia Europe Calcutta Cambridge Cambridge Lord Rayleigh Payton Kony supervisor
"british raj" Discussed on Stance

Stance

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"british raj" Discussed on Stance

"Brand new we'd twenty eighteen one hundred years in some women fest. Granted the right to vote in Britain an effort that was powered by the Suffragettes a few years ago. I was surprised to learn about British Indian that was at the heart and forefront of the suffer jets movement that most people have never heard of Suffiad, delete. Sing I called up bowed Kosta and eat the almond who's written a book about her who was Safai Dileep Singh. Safai if you made her up would be utterly unbelievable. She was the daughter of maharaja she was daughter to Queen Victoria. She was a British Asian to me. She's reminiscent over Kardashian. Initi- has this great coming out at Buckingham Palace. She's a paparazzi Princess. She loves scandalizing society by doing these things like riding a bicycle in public and women only racy women. That kind of thing smoking, very expensive cigarettes from this very ridiculous holder. This you sort of that becomes who she is. But then something wakes up in her. It's a social conscience and it happens because she goes back to India. And that is when she gets woke, and what was it about that trip more than anything? She his cry of the nationalist Indian, nationalist who have been begging the British Raj. Give us some say in future. They have this sang of Oslo. Also, give us a voice give us our voice just presses buttons in her. So when she's on the the voyage back, it will never be enough for her to be this paparazzi Princess, and when she comes back to England she hears that same thing of ours ours, but in English, give us a voice, give us a voice coming out of the mouth of the Suffragettes. And she thinks right. I now understand this. This is something I will fight for can you talk to me about her contribution to the suffrage movement, and essentially helping getting women the right to vote Safai was against the way, we put it. Today's that she was a propaganda grenade because of their connections to the Royal family because of this exotic image that she hadn't because people knew who she was. So Emily Pankhurst assume as Safai expresses an interest in being suffragette kind of deploys like a weapon, so the Suffragettes at the time with drive through the streets with press cards newspapers same votes for women the right in your face kind of publications, and they would drive these cars to the places where they were bound to have face to face conflict with men so jury lane, for example, where people out of the filters quite drunk, and there would be a massive standoff in it. We get into the newspapers because they wanted publicity Safai not only went on these press cart drips, she drove the cards. She then gives money she gives her time. But she also gets involved in the violent militant struggle to. They arrested their restaurant on a number occasions. But they keep letting her go because. The embarrassment of having Queen Victoria's goddaughter. This Indian Princess in prison. It's just too awful here in Britain. But it's also it's seismic for India. Because this this little chitter girl who standing up against the might of the Raj. The message that would send to India in the north of India Pajaro, which is where her father was maharaja, which just be too much of a risk..

Safai Dileep Singh Britain India Queen Victoria British Raj Kardashian Kosta Buckingham Palace India Pajaro England Emily Pankhurst Initi Oslo Safai twenty eighteen one hundred ye
"british raj" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

03:19 min | 2 years ago

"british raj" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"It was a time when people were beginning to to experiment with psychedelics and some some spiritual practice, but not so much, but the whole campus was just kind of turned upside down, and then the politics of it meant that the police came onto campus, and it was it was getting impossible. So I left just before I had done all the work for my PHD, except my dissertation, and I decided to take some time off, and I traveled overland with my partner, then and I traveled overland from London to Delhi both through that that is like going backward in time. It was then before everything was so, you know, kind of globalized. And and it was amazing because at that time going through, you know, the former Yugoslavia Iran and Afghanistan and Pakistan into India. Every place was completely peaceful and people everywhere took us into their homes, and we took a bus from from London to Delhi longest buzzer on in the world. It was to two months. Again, it costs four hundred dollars and. But it then we stopped in lots of places, and and got to know people all along the way and also got to. Have some experience of their spiritual and religious practices all along the way. And that was really opening for me. You know, I had never really experienced much of anything besides Christianity. And Judaism before that. And then I got to India and I expected to stay for two weeks. Maybe an India. We were kind of, you know, searching for meaning. Yeah. And we were looking for it everywhere. And India was one of those places, but I got to India, and I. The first week. I was there. I heard about a course that a Burmese Buddhist teacher was was offering for westerners for the first time. It was the very first time. Right. A very western. Yeah. And it was in bug guy where the Buddha was enlightened. And and I did that course with many other people who are still might close friends. And if you're right that you I read somewhere that you you heard about that or at least in part because you you ran into Sharon salzberg on the streets. We had been at the same school. We already knew her. No, we didn't know each other there. So, but we heard of each other. And so she was a undergraduate in American studies, and I was a teaching fellow. But we had heard I guess that each other might be in India. So yeah. So we met there were very few westerners than I mean, there'd been the British Raj..

India Sharon salzberg London Delhi Iran partner Afghanistan Pakistan teaching fellow four hundred dollars two months two weeks
"british raj" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"british raj" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"And then the politics of it meant that the police came onto campus, and it was getting impossible. So I left just before I had done all the work for my PHD, except my dissertation, and I decided to take some time off and I traveled overland from London to Delhi. That is like going backward in time. It was then before everything was so, you know, kind of globalized, and it was amazing because at the time going through, you know, the former Yugoslavia Iran and Afghanistan and Pakistan into India. Every place was completely peaceful and people everywhere took us into their homes, and we took a bus from from London to Delhi so long as buzzer on in the world. It was two months. Yeah. And it costs four hundred dollars. And but then we stopped in lots of blazes and got to know people all along the way and also got to have some experience of their spiritual and religious practices along the way. And that was really opening for me. And I expected to stay for two weeks. Maybe an India. We were kind of searching for meaning. Yeah. The first week. I was there. I heard about a course that a Burmese Buddhist teacher was offering for westerners for the first time. It was the very first time. Right. Yeah. Mary westerners. Yeah. And I did that course, with many other people who are still might close friends, and there were very few westerners than I mean, there'd been the British Raj. And then there was a been gap. And then the us, you know, I think you did say this of it. What you discovered how would you talk about what you discovered in that experience of a serious introduction to contemplation to meditation. I, you know, it's hard to talk about I know, but. With the most basic thing that I could look inside myself and learn about the nature of the mind and the nature of the world. I was literature Sudan, I had read, you know, a thousand books probably, and I was always looking outside for more ideas, and, you know, more critical, understanding and more content. We didn't call it content. Yeah, we call literature. Right. And so just looking within was really stunning. And then that first course was from five in the morning till ten at night and. Little by little, you know, I started getting really quiet and still, of course, all kinds of things came up. But I really began to see that. I was not my mind. I was not my body. I was things, but I was also awareness. I began to see the basic nature of the impermanent of thoughts as they arise in follow. A and I started taking them less seriously. It was really wonderful. I felt much less dependent on finding things outside and it gave me a kind of radical self confidence. Like, I belonged here on the planet. And you know, and that I would be able to understand the basics of how it's all unfolding. I I would say that it also gave. Me kind of faith in the unfolding. I liked it you use the word sane faith. That's what it felt like it felt like I had a faith in actually the way things are and that that was okay..

London Delhi India Mary westerners Iran Afghanistan Sudan Pakistan four hundred dollars two months two weeks
"british raj" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"british raj" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"Of maybe a minority treaties within the British Raj to keep bigger entity would tolerance in some sort of a constitution and different electors. The older forms of self government were replaced with a notion that the new name of the game now is nation state. And this is where I think the protections as they were really Madge ind- in the nineteen twenties and thirties, and how they were executed. After all were one were radically different, but I want to get back to what I think is another one of the main arguments for the for the as he put the policy people on. And I guess people without agenda, the conflict resolution types will claim, which is that is not about the colonial legacy or those natives such stomach manage themselves. But simple, cultural, distaste, we don't wanna live together. We don't like each other, which is brings me back to my first question. And again, this is absolutely not my view, but I think it is the prevailing view of people who think that conflict needs to be resolved by separating people. So. What I very much appreciate it as where you point out that there are other partitions that are not based on that. So you talk about Germany, Korea and Vietnam. The examples of partitions that show that it's not inevitably based on ethnic nationalism, upset on historical, political, economic forces. So can you explain that thesis? Well, the. That's absolutely Kate. I mean, I think that differences are also culturally constructed. I mean, whether you look at at seller global cases, like I'm the Irish geisha or Israel Palestine case, or if you look at the Indian subcontinent, the differences were something that was cooked slowly through culture. I mean, this is why you will see, when does we will read a collection. You'll see that which is our listeners, all of our listeners. You will see that. Surprisingly, a lot of our authors are dealing with poets would intellectuals with novel. I mean, because before you exercise the politics start, you need someone to help you to imagine you know that the different take elated and if you'd like sort of create a wall in the head before there's a wall on the ground. If one would like to do it, he's looking because he knows I wrote my entire PHD about that basically. And I think that this is where you see that the German. For instance, the partition was seen as so foreign. So Ilian something that was forced post from imposed from the outside was of course humilating that you could, you know, scarred it. Are we able to live together what's alternatives to partition for conflict resolution since you are critical of it as stories? Oh, always fear prophesyzing and there's.

Madge ind British Raj Germany Israel Vietnam Korea
"british raj" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

B&H Photography Podcast

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"british raj" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

"Thank you very much pleasure talking with you. Thank you, Vincent for Sasha's. One of Nikon. Sixteen founding Nikon, embassador and as a recipient of the Computerworld Smithsonian award in media, arts and entertainment, as well as the Schellenberg final award, his list of photography wards in publications long, and he's authored from off to Kansas, almost every black and white technique known to mankind and welcome to us two point. Oh, a cinematic approach to digital still photography with Photoshop. He's based in Los Angeles, and he divides his time between commercial and final photography assignments. Here's Vincent. There's the word, amateur is Latin on Tori means to know for the love of her. And when I was a kid, I had this book called Daphne nations and like a definition is bacteria rear of a cafeteria bigamist a large Italian fog, right? So when my father passed away, I found the book in a library book. I'm sure I'm sure the definition for stolen library. The statue of limitations, but so I'm looking through this and you know, and my favorite Daffy nation was the definition or definition of expert x. the grammatical term for has been spurt need up under pressure. Okay. So. You have expert or amateur of these two, what would I rather be? I wanna be an amateur. I wanna be in a state Amatori. I wanna do it for the love of it. Because thinking about all of the the experts, you know there has been drips under pressure on ticketing about something, and it's like there's like I look at the separate the world into like us and from us, you can learn how to shoot like a pro. We can learn how to shoot front of. Okay. Rather rather be in the trauma. Like Corey. So I really worked very hard to be a working professional because one of the things I went to ACT American conservatory theater and they have this concept called share the revolt which is working actress, teach actors how to work. Okay. So all of the instructors that we got where people that were in the field. And so we got a lot of cool stuff about how to do things. And I wanna share the reform. I lead such a blessed life. I, it's truly not lost on me. The great gig I have and the places I get to go because the camera allows me to do that. Okay. Well, all of these lessons and discoveries and things that I have the opportunity to do because the course of my human events allows me to do this. How do I make people who come in contact with their life easier? So you know, six, seven times a year like to teach classes because I think it's important to share the results. And one of the things that I love about teaching a class is when you start making a living as photographer, you don't necessarily pull out of your entire tool set because you you use the things that work right. But when I teach a class, I get asked questions. I haven't thought of that year's and that leads to, wow, that's really cool. Let's solve this problem then let's and then that winds up inhabiting my work like I shoot landscapes and I shoot people. And the reason why I'm always making a point to do both is I believe you should treat your portrait's like landscapes in your landscapes portraits that they have to cross pollinate that you can't just be this one thing because you get into a groove, the group becomes a rut. The Rupp becomes a whole, the whole becomes a grave. And then you're wondering. Nobody hires you and your bitter. And I, I don't wanna be that I, I wanna be an eighteen year old spirit looking for the zipper in the old guy Fatman suit, you know, going. I know I know what I mean. You're someplace. What's what's coming up? What do you wanna plug people projects in the works in different stages. I'm sure, but the book concept project quickly is called turning last page colon. And so it's Cuba turning last page, nineteen sixty two Burma turning last page of the nineteenth century and India's turning last page of the British Raj. And the goal of those three projects that I'm working on. His one is to build a school in Burma because there's a place in Burma where there is no school in the kids are illiterate and it's like..

Burma Nikon Vincent Los Angeles Photoshop Kansas Amatori Sasha British Raj Corey Rupp India Cuba eighteen year
"british raj" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

Great Big History Podcast

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"british raj" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

"But their argument because that argument is unjust that argument is you live in poverty but i get rich is a tough one to argue so their argument was we are making you better we are getting you ready to enter the league of nations we are what would have been set in the nineteenth century civilising you and so the entire argument was based on ethical morality that europe is better and that it's our job like the white man's burden from kipling to make you better and to be fair india is probably the best or the british raj of what we call india south asia is probably the best example of the application of that idea unlike the congo unlike many places in south africa in central africa where that was the argument and they may no pretense of educating anybody of creating a middle class in india they did following the c point mutiny in eighteen fifty six that was a determination there india was too big to rule on on your own it was way too big to occupy british army and so they were going to have to create a indian middle class a pro in a pro british british educated englishspeaking indian middle class and gandhi is part of that.

europe india south asia congo british army kipling africa gandhi
"british raj" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

Great Big History Podcast

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"british raj" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

"Hulo back my name is dr christopher generic this is great big history podcast thank you for coming by today we talk about decolonization and the british raj and india and the making a pakistan bangladesh sri lanka south asia the british raj was huge it stretched from southern afghanistan from the desert of iran all the way to the jungles of burma a held some three hundred million people and one of the oldest civilizations on earth the indus river valley and the ganges river valley civilizations go back for five thousand years which brings us to gandhi there were independence movements of course before gandhi before the second world war but gandhi was the man who was able to take the british constitution and our use it to argue for indian independence he was a british train lawyer and he used the british constitution and the european alignment those ideas we talked about of lock of freedom and self determination to argue for independence his methodology of this was nonviolence now that's a misnomer because it's not just you don't you protest and you don't commit violence is that you allow violence to be done onto you that you gain a moral victory the british argument for holding on to india was a moral one even though it was an economic situation the idea was india the subcontinent south asia was a colony and britain was extracting the resources at of low price manufacturing those resources into high value goods and then making the profit.

british raj afghanistan burma indus river valley gandhi india asia dr christopher pakistan iran ganges river valley britain five thousand years
"british raj" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

Great Big History Podcast

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"british raj" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

"Following the sea point mutiny and eighteen 56 the british put their stamp on it they're gonna make it little britain to grow it british our little brown brothers as the story went as the saying went in the eighteen 80s and so you have the british raj are aga where queen victoria was literally the emperor's of india whether the indians wanted her not she was and then what happened while the first world war happened and then the second world war happen and indians started to say hey we wanted an independent india and in the muslim said we want an independent muslim kingdom an gandhi comes along and and charms the world end and boom in nineteen forty seven lord mountbatten goes and quote unquote gives india back to the indians and it immediately falls apart a merely brings up into india which is the hindu stand where the hindus a living but it also breaks into pakistan it breaks in the sri lanka and bhutan and nepal even though bhutan nepal really were kind of in the pending kingdoms at the time they were still more or less on the rule of the raj and so was a part of afghanistan and so all these pieces kind of broke apart into the into their different pieces they were once ruled by one central government more or less for all intents and purposes and now they are doing their own thing and it broken tolis parts and then later on pakistan breaks into bangladesh and pakistan.

britain aga queen victoria world war india sri lanka bangladesh pakistan brown bhutan nepal afghanistan
"british raj" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"british raj" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Seven at the age of fifty three from tuberculosis but they had a really what you did she cheater netting she died in nineteen sixty seven shots only via fifty three years old well and um here's the deal they um she was crazy about him and they were together for when thi year lau ever together for twenty years and he um they met when they're both mary to other people and if you've been over to london they had some ten thousand documents on display at the victoria and albert museum um and but they've been cataloguing these things they've been cataloguing they wrote letters all the time because that's what people do i know letters letter and their fair started nineteen thirty six and um it went on and they have the victorian albert museum bought these from the vivien leigh a stayed and um also so um like the archive included a lovely note from queen elizabeth to vivian saying really apologies for being rude to her and thanking her for the perfectly lovely flowers really yeah also letters from ilya kazaam the director of 1950 when streetcar named desire and she performed that in the west and and you know just so there's kind of a whole bunch you letters but there are two hundred letters from lawrence many of them twenty pages long expressing his love to her his advice on which he should do about her career 'cause they're both married to other people wearing when they met how long and they were dairy before they wanted ears and they're wait wait when they were married to other people they were they were together for twenty years but they were married to other people when they met and they were terrified that their involvement would kill their hollywood careers oh my darlene little love i do long for you so lawrence livia rights or my heart's blood is unbearable without you and um every air her original name is vivian hurt lee and she was born in india at the height of the british raj you know they added yet the.

the deal victorian albert museum vivien leigh queen elizabeth ilya kazaam director lawrence lee india albert museum vivian twenty years fifty three years
"british raj" Discussed on talkRADIO

talkRADIO

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"british raj" Discussed on talkRADIO

"Chance to see a little after their initial these films at vaujour's house klay idea fantastic really well eat the india and britain have a long relationship then another hip gave the three hundred years and you know it is everyone is interested in it so i think with my so is hanford could find that there was a big old is getting older audience because there's men razor of air breaking in the roger still very relevant isn't there might be something completely different view of event two days of the british raj in india but still that relationship between india and britain is important and even more fair now these breaks it took sukur where india sort of massive market potentially for let me ask you grondona i think nairobi what you in kenya which was a british columbia but did you have you wear a family you have family in india will you heard stories about what happened to them for example drink politician oh yes khalili earned my family i work putting kenya that might that my aunt that in a thousands of years came from either precompetition india what is now pakistan and in inner exactly this month ram this day actually in seven years ago my grandmother and fine children were in the house that they cow in jaylen and they were wrong thing going on and everyone's there you go to leave the might uemoa's i wear mike and ago and she used to sleep on the roof at the house of the children and when anybody came to could harm than they used to boil water in tribe threatened again anything else at one day an indian army chart clean and said right you go to lead right now the literally because they were wearing a nickel on this truck and then they were on a train for three days they couldn't get off the train either because it will writing going on and also they couldn't you know that they will lower disease and color everywhere so they were stuck on the train they have no food no water and fat you might by mother's milk guida and how younger child died of starvation and then they ended up in the refugee camp as i talk about in the film and so yes to partition directly but it like me and clearing up hitting glen um emily who is the way i was a little girl.

vaujour india britain kenya columbia the house mike guida hanford pakistan three hundred years seven years three days two days one day milk