36 Burst results for "British Parliament"

Fresh update on "british parliament" discussed on Mark Levin

Mark Levin

00:31 min | 53 min ago

Fresh update on "british parliament" discussed on Mark Levin

"New scrutiny over the content it promotes. In its news section documents roster Journal reviewed show that the new algorithm started to promote divisive content in the news feeds. So when employees started to make changes to that The Wall Street Journal reports that Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg resisted some of those reforms because it would reduce user engagement. This is what Zuckerberg told Congress last March when asked about Facebook pushing divisive content the way that we view this is that we are trying to help people, um, have meaningful social interactions. Now the head of public policy for Instagram says social media isn't inherently good or bad for people. Many find it helpful one day and problematic the neck but but stands behind the company's policies. Edward Lawrence with Fox Business. Britain's parliament bans China's Ambassador China's ambassador to the UK had been invited to meet with lawmakers in the British parliament. But Parliament speakers have stepped in to block the visit. The speaker of the lower chamber, the House of Commons, said it would be inappropriate because China has recently imposed sanctions on five British lawmakers. China's London Embassy condemned the ban as despicable and cowardly. In London. Simonneau in Fox News poll finds most Americans don't believe their personal information is secure online, and they aren't satisfied with the federal government's efforts to protect their digital privacy. The poll by the Associated Press N O R C Center for public affairs, research and marry talk Shows. About half of Americans believe their private tax conversations, lax security, and they're even less confident about the security of their social media activity or physical location. Nearly three quarters of Americans say they support establishing national standards for how companies can collect process and share personal.

Edward Lawrence Facebook London House Of Commons Instagram Congress Mark Zuckerberg Simonneau Zuckerberg Five Last March Fox News British Associated Press N O R C Cente UK Fox Business London Embassy Public Affairs Nearly Three Quarters Parliament
Trump Is Blaming Biden and ‘the Woke Generals’ for Afghanistan

Mike Gallagher Podcast

02:19 min | 2 weeks ago

Trump Is Blaming Biden and ‘the Woke Generals’ for Afghanistan

"At some point. The blame trump routine is going to wear thin with all americans. Even democrats have to be rolling their eyes at biden's disastrous response. That this is somehow trump's vol speaking of trump. He spent a long time with sean hannity last night on fox news pointed out some really important things to remember about this debacle in afghanistan well biden in the woke generals. They're just woke. I mean you look at what they're talking about. I was thinking even at the end of my time. I was seeing letters being sent out about equality and all of these different things. The soldiers they wanna fight they wanna be prepared to fight soldiers but the woke generals and has gotten to a level where that nobody can even believe they were looking to get out but they forgot one thing. They forgot to take the people with them and the merchandise were the meeting. They forgot to take the greatest military equipment anywhere in the world with them. And it's hard to believe actually because the child would have understood you. Get the military outlast. A childhood of understood that. How could they have done this to our country pretty Pretty profound sounds pretty fired up as he should be. He also of course observed what the world must be thinking and what. The world is thinking of this failure by the united states of america. And you know who. We look. So bad in front of his russia and china and kim jong un north korea and the european union that laughing at us at a horrible meeting with the g. seven the other day they went out and they were going wild. You've you so what happened in parliament. British parliament where statements are made about our country and about our president. Nobody's ever spoken about our country or president. The way they did in parliament It is so embarrassing but the embarrassments the least of it. There's great danger right now. He's right it's not just the embarrassment. Shame the humiliation that. The united states is experiencing it's the concern and the fear and the great danger.

Biden Sean Hannity Fox News Afghanistan Parliament Kim Jong North Korea United States European Union Russia China
Jamie Bristow Talks About  Developing Agency In Urgent Times

Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

06:12 min | 7 months ago

Jamie Bristow Talks About Developing Agency In Urgent Times

"Our guest today is jamie bristowe jamie. Welcome to the podcast. Glad to have you here. I need to be here so we're gonna talk about a few different things today. One will be the mindfulness initiative and want to hear more about that and then in particular one of the documents that your group has recently published. But i'd like to start by just helping the audience get a little bit more understanding about you and your background with mindfulness. Okay So i've been the director of the mindfulness initiative sort of work backwards if that's okay and so i've been the director of the mindfulness initiative which is like a policy institute think tank working with politicians primarily in the uk but also around the world for getting on for six years And i've been working in the mindfulness field. I guess for a few years more than that. I was the business. Development director had space Back in the days when has faced with like seven people in five desks north in london rather than the big Sort of global brand. That has become today and previous to that. I was trying to find my way into sharing. I learnt myself huge impact. It had them how to my life. I was lucky enough to Learn to meditate. When i was a student at university so i was a fresher. Eighteen years old and didn't think much of it was just like another experience like join only different societies to try. Try out different. Things ultimate frisbee or amateur dramatics. Meditation was just like one of those things along for like. Oh wow i can. I can close my eyes radically alter my subjective experience just by applying myself that's cool And then kind of forgot about it because there were so many other exciting things to and dive into well. I knock him dipped in and out of it but it wasn't until i had my first like graduate graduated job. I was a young advertising executive. Just really going to be graded advertising and I was working on like a nissan misano. Nissan is he saying this in the states at the time like descending. suv's essentially and I was really stressful. Like i'm struggling to concentrate. The lifestyle was cheering me up to an extent and so i really at that point started to really invest in it rather than being in thing. I did now again. Became a regular practice. And i as it's been charted in the academic literature people often start for self-regulation benefit. You know for me. It was it. Was the attention thing like i needed to i. I as a kid i was. Add at the end of the spectrum so i Got myself regulation benefit. I could concentrate but then it then you know develops center from self regulation to self expiration and then like wow. There's much more to me. And to and to life. I guess than i thought that was and then moving on from that to self transcendence of because if the final of the three raises the phases. The one one paper has charted. And sure i started practicing for reasons other than myself I'm that she had the advertising world wasn't wasn't right for reasons. The myself is So i left. That world went into climate. Change campaigning And through that like realize. What a piece of mindfulness was for me in making that journey from sending. Suv's to selling responsiveness to climate climate crisis And and so yet. That's that's why. I find my way into doing what i'm doing now. Really the kind of social implications of widespread contemporary give a practices. Jimmy thank you so much for that background. And it's it's fascinating to hear different ways. Each person may find some value in this that we might be brought to it for a particular reason. Focus and then. It's oh my there's more stuff here to hearing about your time in head space. Andy putty comas. One of the first interviews. I did another pug guests many years ago before it got really really big. And so with that you've had this practice that's been part of your life that has been beneficial transformative to you and then along came in some fashion. The mindfulness initiative. How did that get started. While i was working head space at the time and i was invited by chris. Colin who's leading teacher at oxford. Mindfulness center and i'm teaching politicians in the british parliament From he and mark williams from about two thousand and his spring two thousand and thirteen a year or so later. Those who who. Who had been on a mindfulness course started to become interested in the science behind what they've found and what the policy implications might be. Because often you know when you find that it's really helping you know about is. How do i get this. You know and you reach for the most obvious thing you bring into your school or you tell you family about it but politicians that like the policy lever is like you can. How do we get this into

Jamie Bristowe Jamie Misano Nissan UK London Andy Putty Comas Mindfulness Center Jimmy British Parliament Mark Williams Colin Oxford Chris
EU officials formally sign post-Brexit trade deal with UK

Morning Edition

00:10 sec | 9 months ago

EU officials formally sign post-Brexit trade deal with UK

"Union have formally signed the post Brexit trade agreement reached with Britain. The deal is still subject to approval from the EU legislature in the British parliament. Cold War spy

Eu Legislature Britain British Parliament
EU ambassadors approve post-Brexit trade deal

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

00:49 sec | 9 months ago

EU ambassadors approve post-Brexit trade deal

"Brexit trade deal clinched. On christmas eve has now been provisionally approved by european governments teri schultz reports. This will allow the agreement to take effect on january first ambassadors from the twenty seven remaining members of the european union have given their formal backing to trade and customs agreement worked out between the eu and uk last week this agreement will prevent tariffs and quotas being imposed on uk goods entering the e eu single market when the brexit transition period officially ends december. Thirty first although parliament's on both sides also need to approve the agreement. The european parliament refused to call a special session to consider the more than twelve hundred pages of court on such a short time line. That will only happen next month but will not prevent what's being called the provisional application of the term starting friday the british parliament will vote on the deal wednesday and expected to approve it

Brexit Teri Schultz EU UK British Parliament European Parliament
U.K. and EU reach Brexit deal that should avert New Year chaos

Todd Schnitt

00:42 sec | 9 months ago

U.K. and EU reach Brexit deal that should avert New Year chaos

"Well. The UK and the European Union have reached a trade deal worth over £600 billion a year, just a week before the UK is set to leave the EU Prime Minister Boris Johnson says the relationship between his nation and the you won't change because of Brexit. We will be your friend, your ally. Your supporter and indeed never let it be for gotten your number one market. Because, well, they we have left the EU. This country will remain culturally emotionally historically. Strategically. Geologically. Attached. To Europe. The British Parliament will vote on the deal December

European Union UK Boris Johnson British Parliament Europe
Historic Brexit Deal Sets Trade Relationship for U.K., EU

WSJ What's News

06:15 min | 9 months ago

Historic Brexit Deal Sets Trade Relationship for U.K., EU

"Just ahead of a year end deadline the uk and the european union have reached an agreement on a brexit trade deal that will guide their future relationship british prime minister. Boris johnson says the deal ends years of economic uncertainty. Very pleased to tell you the psalter name That we have completed the biggest trade deal yet worth six hundred sixty billion pounds. Yeah a comprehensive canada style. Free trade deal between the uk and the eu a deal that will protect jobs across this country allow goods. You can goods and components to be sold without tariffs and without quotas in the eu market. Deal which will if anything allow our companies and our exporters to do even more business with all european friends. The deal comes after months of negotiations following the uk exit from the european union in january. Joining me now to talk more about it is wall street journal. Uk and brexit. Editor stephen fiddler. Hi steven thanks so much for being here more booger so stephen. This deal follows months of talks. It's a big agreement. Tell us more about the key terms of the deal which covers a really broad range of issues here covers everything from trade to security to terrorism sharing of information on crime databases. It includes traffic Regulations you know who can drive on. Who's roads it includes fishing and who can fish in waters and the british waters and and how much fish they can take out of it. I mean there's a vast agreement of more than a thousand pages. The main thing it does is avoid. The imposition of time on trade between the two sides for the first time since one thousand nine hundred seventy three came down really in the last days to fight about fishing which is just a tiny proportion of both economists about zero point. Three percent of of both economies in terms of gdp a hugely important places like the uk but also in france and the netherlands denmark and spain and in the end it came down to a sort of a haggle over but the species. That could be caught from the waters of the of the uk species by species over the next five and a half years so it got down into kind of incredibly detailed negotiation in the haggling over various things that are actually in the end. Very small points economically the question was how much does the u k agree to follow standards and regulations set out by the eu in order to ensure that the uk could get tariff-free access to the market a full hundred and forty million people and in the end. That was a compromise on that that you didn't the uk to become a major competitor on its doorstep with free access to the eu market. And be able to undercut it and things. I m environmental standards on on things like subsidies for companies on things like labor standards and labor rules so the uk basically you had to accept in general a lot of those standards as the price. It paid to get tariff-free access to the eu. But in general the uk is now sort of a much freer to settle agreements with other countries including wanted hopes. I think with the united states that's free trade agreements because in the u. It's basically locked into and it has been locked into the us trade arrangements for decades so now that a deal has been reached. What will be playing out over the next few weeks. Well it has to be ratified. That's the first thing so that the british parliament will has been recalled. I think for december thirtieth to ratify. The agreement will do that on on one day. European leaders also will have to approve it. That's a fairly foregone conclusion. I think that both sides get approval from both sides. It also technically needs the approval of the european parliament. So that's the eu legislature. That will happen some point in the new year so in january one the agreement will go into place provisionally and then it will be ratified presumably at a later date by the european parliament. This is a basis for the future relationship of the eu and the uk. They're right next door to each other hugely important to each other in lots of ways and it's wrong to think of this as being kind of static thing that's that's now setting concrete foil. You know the rest of time. It's the start of a relationship that will change. According to how each side sees their own best interests so it sounds like this isn't quite it for brexit. Although a lot of reporting has referred to this as sort of a capstone deal here what other loose ends need to be tied up. Well it is a capstone really in in the sense that it's as i said the main of the major framework for their relationship. There are things that need to be tied up. And these are sort of unilateral in a way so the eu has to make rulings on the ability of you've to shed data with the uk. It hasn't done yet. That's a unilateral designation. It will make and we're expecting that to come. There's also some eu declarations to come on allowing financial services firms for the uk to do certain operations inside the eu after january. The first so there's technical things will follow. It's not going to be in terms of financial services anywhere like the relationship. That was there before that allowed london. Essentially to become the capital of a you finance and do some huge percentage of old finance business in the eu. Certainly all wholesale finance business that has gone away. There's already been drift of capital adrift of personnel. From the city of london to other places in the eu and that drift is is likely to continue. That's u k and brexit editor. Stephen fiddler stephen. Thank you so much for joining me. Today you're welcome

EU UK Stephen Fiddler Boris Johnson Wall Street Journal Eu Legislature Steven European Parliament Stephen Denmark The Netherlands Canada British Parliament Spain France United States London Stephen Fiddler Stephen
So long, and were keeping all the fish: Brexit

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:20 min | 9 months ago

So long, and were keeping all the fish: Brexit

"There should have been something of a resolution at last to the brexit drama. This morning ursula von der line the president of the european commission and boris johnson. Britain's prime minister and said yesterday as an extended deadline to work out the fine print on britain's divorce papers yesterday came and despite the exhaust soon after almost one year of negotiations. And despite the fact that deadlines have been missed over and over. We both think that it is responsible at this point. In time to go the extra mile mr johnson used similar language to ms vonda. Lions having repeatedly warned that no deal was a very likely outcome. Where there's life there's hope we're going to keep talking to see what we can do. The uk certainly would be a will key away from the talks. I think people would expect us to to go the extra mile. Neither side wants the regulatory and logistical chaos of a no deal scenario but neither side seems willing to make much in the way of concessions and now an immovable deadline looms december thirty first. We are very much convinced. The end of the year. When the transition period finishes john peet is brexit editor. So the risk of nato is still high but the mood between the sides is probably better after the extension of the deadline than it was last week and what are. The main areas of disagreement still the main areas of disagreement being the same almost all year. There is a quarrel about fisheries giving european votes access to british waters. And there's a quarrel about what's called a level playing field which the rules for competition to make sure britain does not undercut european companies insatiable environmental labor and state. Subsidy rules the eu. On britain to stick to most of the rules it follows now. Britain wants the right to diverge from these rules and some way of settling that bigger argument fisheries will be needed. If there's going to be a trade deal but as you say these have been the points of disagreement. Better part of the year i mean What room for compromise left. Well they all talking. As i understand it about possible dispute mechanisms for settling quarrels about measures that be taken by britain or indeed by the eu. After the first january that deemed to be anti competitive. And i think that's the focus where you might find some way of agreeing what the europeans want is a dispute mechanism that would allow them to retaliate. If they deem britain to be behaving in an uncompetitive way. Retaliate by imposing tariffs or withdrawing trade preferences. The british could do the same to the eu. And i think in that area there is still scope for agreement and all this is about rules and regulations but what the personalities involved here. How does that play into. what's happening. The european union negotiator is michelle bonnier. he's french and he obviously has relationship with french president. Boris johnson has been trying several times to go round michelle bonnier and negotiate with others but the europeans are very strict on saying. This is the job of the european commission. Michelle baez negotiator. His bosses are london. I on the president of the european commission. I think boris johnson gets on reasonably with all of these people but none of them quite trust him. And i think that's one of the reasons why they want to have a very clear sort of legal framework that includes dispute settlement mechanisms and the right to retaliate. Because they never quite trust. Boris johnson not to go off and do something that will damage them. And how much do you think that issue of trust has has helped things up so far in yet still i. Trust has been very important in this negotiation. And i think the behavior of boris johnson has not made it easy a. He refused to consider extending the deadline for the negotiations earlier in the year when the europeans wanted him to and he then suggested a couple of times that he was going to rewrite the withdrawal treaty. Which is the agreement reached last year under which britain formerly left the european union. Even though that's an international treaty that would be a breach of international law. And i think if you put those things together. There is every reason why the europeans feel. They shouldn't trust will rely on the british government. Under boris johnson. Not to babe in a way that they think might be bad for the european union its members so the us official negotiator is michel barnier but that the national leaders are playing something of a roll here to national league is obviously critical. I mean Michelle bonnier as the negotiator. Us on the line. As the president of the european commission are operating under a mandate as they call it which they've been given by national leaders for these trade talks the mandate is quite a tough one. The toughest person in this mandate of toughest of bits of the mandate have been insisted on by the french president last week. Emmanuel macron said. I've consistent. So now i don't want to have my cake and eat it but i do want the pieces cut. He could it. Because i'm not giving my peace away. Michelle demander busy discussion janardan pam. I'd meanwhile angela merkel the other key european leader the chancellor germany. she's regarded as a bit more of a soft cup than emmanuel macron. She's very keen that there should be a deal beneath them. Dusty dusty. alice gibney super communists. I say funds and she's also quite strict and she has recently said. I think we should do everything together. Result goes saying and the threat to both sides. All along has been the chance that this should end without a deal or are both sides ready for that. I think no deal would be highly disruptive for both the and the uk. The impact would be worse but britain because it is more. Reliant on trade across the channel and largest sheriff's exports go to the european union. If there is no deal that will be intensive customs checks and problems at ports and trading across between britain and the uk and then also be tariffs which are quite low. But they're high for certain sectors ten percent for cars forty percent for sheep metex bullets about the same for beef exports and that would certainly cost people and be very disruptive of a very big trade relationship. The europeans think it will be worse for britain but britain also thinks that it would be disruptive for the eu particularly for ireland. Most of his trade goes through the united kingdom and say both sides want to avoid new deal and so does that mean that. This may go right down to the wire that there may be negotiations. Happening on new year's eve at some point people will have to say look. If we can't strike an agreement we are just going to turn deal. I mean what. The negotiators come up with has to be approved by national parliaments by the british parliament by the european parliament. That's the surprises. That sometimes takes weeks or months. You can tell escape it. But i think if we get to the thirty first of december they haven't reached an agreement that it will mean. No deal really have settled before christmas. Have any chance of ratification for january-august john. Thank you very much for your time. Once more. thank you.

Boris Johnson Britain EU Michelle Bonnier European Commission Ursula Von Der Ms Vonda John Peet Mr Johnson Michelle Baez United Kingdom Lions Nato Emmanuel Macron Michelle Demander Janardan Pam Michel Barnier
Politician, Eleanor Rathbone

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:59 min | 11 months ago

Politician, Eleanor Rathbone

"Today we're talking about one of the first female members of the British Parliament who used her position to push for gender equal legislation. Please welcome Eleanor Rathbone Eleanor was born in London on May. Twelfth Eighteen, seventy two. From a young age, she grew up in the world of politics. Her Father William was a liberal member of parliament. And often entertained other politicians and intellectuals. In eighteen ninety, three at the age of twenty one. Eleanor. Left home to study at Somerville College Oxford. There, she studied classics and was allegedly nicknamed the philosopher by her peers. When Eleanor realized that her college refused to give degrees to female students, she took matters into her own hands. He joined a group of women called the steamboat ladies who sailed to Dublin. To get honorary degrees from Trinity College. After graduating eleanor worked alongside her father investigating the working conditions of Industrial Liverpool. After his death eleanor continued her work in the city she volunteered for the Liverpool central relief, society where she dedicated her time to helping families in poverty, improve and change their living conditions in the eighteen nineties. Eleanor became a supporter of the women's rights movement, which she saw as integral to widespread social reform. Eighteen ninety five, she was appointed secretary at the Liverpool Women's suffrage society as well as the women's Industrial Council. Eleanor didn't agree with radical tactics to promote women's suffrage and instead pushed a more moderate approach in nineteen. Oh six, the Liverpool City Council Open. It's elective positions. Two women in nineteen o nine eleanor ran and was elected as an independent candidate a position she held until nineteen, thirty five. In nineteen thirteen, she co founded the Liverpool Women Citizens Organization to promote the involvement of women in politics. When World War One broke out eleanor organized association to help wives and other dependents. She continued that work when soldiers returned home, she saw mothers were struggling to provide for families and advocated for the installment of a family wage system. This method would pay family allowances directly to mothers, helping them to support their children and simultaneously fighting against the notion that men had to be the breadwinners. In nineteen eighteen at the end of World War, one British women over the age of thirty. Got The right to vote that same year eleanor established the nineteen eighteen club the following year eleanor became president of the National Union of Women's suffrage societies. And renamed it the National Union of Societies for equal citizenship in Nineteen, twenty, two eleanor ran for British parliament. She lost that year but was elected in nineteen twenty nine as an independent member for the combined English universities. She was one of the first women to hold a position in parliament. There Eleanor continued her lifelong activism in her first speech. She criticized British colonial ISM, and it's anti-feminism. She specifically called out the inhumane practice of female genital mutilation in Kenya. As. The Great Depression loomed she campaigned for the People's rights to cheaper milk and better benefits for dependents of the unemployed. Eleanor was also one of the first politicians to warn of the danger of fascist uprisings across Europe. She spoke candidly about her disappointment in British neutrality concerning politics in Germany Spain Italy and Czechoslovakia. She joined a nonsectarian anti-nazi council to support human rights and set up a parliamentary committee that took up individual refugee cases throughout the war at one point eleanor allegedly tried to charter a ship to cross the blockade of Spain Rescue Republicans from the country. Later, in the early nineteen forties, eleanor devoted resources to get an Jewish people out of Poland. In nineteen forty-five eleanor finally saw her fight for family allowances put into law by the Labor Party with the Family Allowance Act. However it was initially passed on the stipulation the allowance be paid to fathers rather than the mother she fought for. Eleanor's rage was short-lived. The bill was contested by many women in parliament and was amended within the year to be paid to mothers. Eleanor died suddenly of a heart attack on January second nineteen forty-six. Forty years later, a blue plaque is dedicated to her by the Greater London Council at her former residents. It calls her the pioneer of family allowances. She was also honored along with fifty eight other women's suffrage supporters on the plinth of the statue commemorating fellow suffragettes leader millicent falls it in London twenty? Eighteen.

Eleanor Rathbone Eleanor Liverpool Women British Parliament Liverpool Women Citizens Organ Liverpool City Council Open Liverpool National Union Of Women London Somerville College Oxford Trinity College Greater London Council National Union Of Societies William Europe Kenya Dublin Poland Millicent Spain
Boris Johnson will delay decision on quitting Brexit trade talks

Monocle 24: The Globalist

09:04 min | 1 year ago

Boris Johnson will delay decision on quitting Brexit trade talks

"The brexit transition period is due to expire on the thirty first of December at which point the UK will leave the single market without a deal unless an agreement with the EU is reached in the next few weeks British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said he wanted the broad outlines of the deal to be in place by the time the European Council Summit begins, today. The McCaffrey is your news political editor. He joins me on the line from Brussels could money cheat today it's the deadline. So why aren't we walking away? In this process is brexit process. We're very very used to deadlines coming and going out we gene and two large degree. At today he's GonNa come and go again and what we're expecting is no deal at the end of today when. Leaders meet in Brussels who were also not expecting Britain at top walk away either in fact we're expecting. Probably weeks of negotiations. Why is that I? Think because progress has been made though it is interesting last night the Boris Johnson spoke to US London line the EU Commission, Presidents and chose Michelle the EU council president in a joint to call and he. Exposure of his disappointment that the had not being a substantial or not progress. But clearly think that there is still an opportunity to get a deal. Hence why these talks will continue. We have to remember at the end of all of this book Britain and the e You have repeatedly said, they do wolves future trade deal I. Think both of them are willing to give it another shot of you like a bit more time So what are the underlying issues that holding up this process? Will listen to you though kind of three key areas in all of this at first of all is the so-called level playing fields or state AIDS, which is essentially the e you wanting you to adhere to the same rules and regulations to a large degree that and they already do as a former member of the European Union and things like environmental protections, food standards, for example, so that Britain can't undercut those in a more competitive way and join to that is this issue of state AIDS. The idea that the state can subsidize heavily industries to keep them afloat if you like, and again the EU is king the Britain essentially really can do that because it could convey. Could gain a competitive edge. Undercut the E. U., two degree now Britain would point out and rightly so some would say that actually if there is any part of the two sides who are used to subsidizing their industries, it's more likely to be countries like France and Italy than it needs to be the UK or indeed Germany for example, who just failed out Lufthansa to the tune of ten billion euros I mean the UK hasn't yet bailed out any of Big Airlines then disease you have governance How to settle speech future future disputes in essence the EU, has conceded that it's no longer going to be the European Court of Justice and they're trying to work out to kind of independent tradition if you like. And then finally, there's this kind of issue of fishing which economically is not important either to the EU or the UK in the sense it doesn't really make much of any countries economies to large degree, but it is politically symbolic. Ephraim. Brexit. As it will is what Brexit was all of out retaining sheesh water and also some European countries. It's incredibly symbolic importance at French fishermen, for example, or at pretty significant force in France and Emmanuel macron is staring down election in the not too distant future. So that is an issue. That actually is always the most difficult of issues because as as a Britain wants to gain back control of its waters, the EU still wants to be allowed to fish in those waters and it suggesting that if it cannot will. Then Britain is not going to be able to sell its fish to the rest of Europe and that is by far the largest markets. So shortly, collapse the whole deal on fishing. Think not though there are genuine concerns that it could be at the key issue. In the trade talks over the next couple of weeks, not least of all, because as become this to the issue in from both sides that for Britain. It's very symbolic as I say what Brexit is, they are absolutely determined. That they can have you know European fishermen essentially in the seas for years and years to come. Katrina to the fish they just think that is fundamentally unacceptable. It is not in essence taking back control. For the EU are equally determined. That if Britain wants to gain access to it single market by selling fish and eighty I, think it's eighty percent of British Fisher exploited in sixty percents. In, total those to the rest of the EU then. You're. Not, GONNA be able to sell your fish and you can have all your efficient chips he wants, but they'll have to be British people are going to eat them and not the EU, and they would also point that actually half of the so-called Bush's boats that fish in fresh waters at the moment are actually forward. So in practical terms, would it make that much difference I think the compromise, the them at may well come, and with this idea of quotas every year that potentially will start where we all now and year after year decrease. On a negotiated faces a bit like Norway has dumb but for Emmanuel macron fishing is a key key factor in all of this. Simply because you know French, fishermen are a potent political force but for the countries like Germany. In essence fishing's not very important and they would be very, very disappointed when push on for the deal to collapse on that single issue. So I mean what happens next and is a no deal Nella a probability rather than A. So. When you talk to people here and is being a whole range of MVP's and official yesterday, they were putting it at a probability of sixty percents. Gene essentially, that will be no deal, which is point stalk in many ways given the fact that we are getting into the game and we really all because time is to Michelle Volley ticking in this process I think what will happen next though is that they will conclude. Leaders at tomorrow that enough progress has been made and the talk should continue. I expect the British will accept that and talks will continue for the next couple of weeks. up until. Either the end of this month or the start of next. But then a deal is going to have to be done or essentially both sides have to accept the will be no deal because ultimately if there is to be a deal, it is a massive. Weighty Hefty document that has to be translated into all the official languages of the EU. EU Paul, we'll have to vote on the British parliament, some national parliaments to and so that decision will have to be pretty soon at the start of the next month because ultimately, they'll only have up until the end of to send the. It's because Boris Johnson his always all. And that he will not extend beyond December thirty. First, we've heard of course that before I think this time that really is a hard deadline and so at the Mo- wind, you'd have to conclude or less things substantially change that you know no deal. Is a real. Possibility, but probability, how is the British parliament reacting to this brinkmanship? Well, there's this. Thing is when we kind of what? It's not weird actually, it's probably not surprising the tool. But, it's not really consuming European on British national politics. At the moment clearly, we're in the middle of a pandemic. Clearly everyone's focusing on not just the fact that there is a second surge affecting almost every corner of Europe and deed every corner of the British isles. And Other increasing restrictions, talks about lockdown. So not not anyone's really talking about Brexit I think. Boris. Johnson's going to take enough majority that no deal is not good to trouble him like it. It was last year when there was a possibility that the government collapse on the issue I don't think that's GonNa happen this time round for the genuine concerns in Britain about what this will mean. Already, the government is already having to spend millions and millions of pounds to get a border posts. Customs checks to employ people essentially to work on that border from the first of January and no matter what the trade will be there will be extra checks a respectable. What happens

European Union Britain Boris Johnson Brussels Brexit British Parliament Eu Commission Europe Michelle Volley France Germany UK European Council Summit Aids Mccaffrey Political Editor Ephraim European Court Of Justice
A Conversation With Erin Vilardi,  Founder And CEO Of Vote Run Lead

The Electorette Podcast

05:00 min | 1 year ago

A Conversation With Erin Vilardi, Founder And CEO Of Vote Run Lead

"Into the podcast thanks for having me. So I saw talk where you showing the ranking of presentation by women at the highest levels rate, and there was a ranking of countries by countries and the US came in rather slow. And I just have one quick clarifying question for that was that at the government level or all executive leadership that I think is the inter-parliamentary Union I you which keeps the records around parliaments. So that's the most. Equitable body across various governments and so that's actually what they're comparing. So our Congress to say like the British Parliament, the UK parliament I don't know what year you talk but where are we now in comparison to that year and how we rank with other countries? So. It changes frequently. As elections happened across the globe, but I can actually pull that up and tell you that it's not good. We are tied at seventy six according to the inter-parliamentary union with Afghanistan, and that is from March twenty nineteen. So it looks like and now we are eighty three. So actually we've gone down we have our ranking has lowered in the last couple of years, which often means because even though we had quite a wave of women, right the two thousand eighteen election is often called the wave of women. Especially when it comes to Congress, we didn't see that large of a dramatic increase in moved to about twenty eight percent and you know that was fantastic because it actually ushered in A. Wave of women of color it ushered in a wave of young women, but it wasn't that kind of exponential growth or getting us anywhere near you know parody or reflective, which would be the majority we should be closer to fifty one, hundred, fifty, two percent to be fully reflective of women's representation in this country. So and you see other countries making different kinds of progress ahead of us as we remain pretty stuck pro because I think one of the points he made in that talk that we were at twenty percent and we've been at twenty percent in in terms of representation for twenty years. Try. So that is statistically around the state legislatures and same thing twenty eighteen we saw state legislative wave happen very much mirrored what we saw at the congressional level. So predominantly, democratic women rising through the ranks for the state legislatures I think there we are also. So the Congress has something like twenty four percent and I think actually the state houses around twenty eight percent. And, a fantastic resource is actually something called the Center for American, women and politics tracks all of these numbers really closely as either people retire or things change. They're doing a really great job of keeping those numbers up to date but again, it's pretty stagnant, right? It's not enough to make significant change you end up having to have women who are taking really really deep risks. An order for policy change to occur rather than the change where you see a more equitable government or more equitable legislature and allowed you mentioned the center of American women and politics because I interviewed them at least once or twice and I remember Kelly Dittmar from there, you know saying something that really stuck with me was before the two thousand, eighteen midterms before the election happened and their historic number of women running for office and everyone was really excited about the fact we had so many women running for office right and then you pointed out the fact that like all of these women. Won't win right so we have you know this is a multilayered issue we have you know getting them to run for office, we having them winning their elections, and then you know there's something that you mentioned in your talk that really stuck with me. You said something about term limits right? We forget that the fact that these women once they actually when they actually have to stay in office and then you know sometimes they aren't reelected. So we have all these these multilayered issues that keep women out of office in keep these percentages low well, and you also have pretty weak party infrastructure. There's. A great article outright now, I will find it and share it with your audience about you know really questioning. Is there a real? Paul, within the Republican Party to actually elect women now I think some Republican. Women will tell you. Yes including some younger republican congressman who are doing things outside of the party leadership but there isn't the same kind of concerted effort that you see on the left. But let's also remember that the Democrats effort towards recruiting women is pretty new and they still do things that actually for example, they after the win of Alexandra Customer Cortez. Long term incumbent, the D. triple, which is the Democratic congressional campaign arm said any vendors, any people who do business any consultants such sort of Konami around political campaigns you can't do business with these insurgent candidates like an see in the future also be blacklisted from doing business with the triple endorse candidates, and that was basically a slap in the face to nontraditional candidates, which primarily are winning overwhelmingly women of Color. So there's While we do have one party sort of doing better than the other around recruiting and activating uplifting as part of the leadership pipeline. It's really a reckoning we have to have with ourselves as a country with all of our political parties to do

Congress United States A. Wave Republican Party British Parliament Executive Konami Alexandra Customer Cortez Afghanistan Congressman Kelly Dittmar UK Center For American Paul
Boris Johnson faces Brexit revolt in parliament.

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:41 min | 1 year ago

Boris Johnson faces Brexit revolt in parliament.

"I'm Anthony Davis. The European Union on Monday ramped up pressure on UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson to step back from breaking the brexit divorce treaty. Delaying a key decision on London's euro clearing justice. He faces a rebellion in the British parliament. The European Union says Johnson's plan would wreck trade talks and propelled the United Kingdom toward a messy brexit while former British leaders have warned that breaking the law is a step too far that will tarnish the country's image. The House of Commons will vote on moving the internal market bill which the EU has demanded London scrap by the end of the month two, its next amendment stage after a debate that Johnson will introduce. As Johnson prepared to try to persuade lawmakers that he's planned to explicitly break international law was worth supporting a derivatives industry source said the European Commission had delayed a decision on euro clearing. Johnson who has a majority of eighty in the lower house of parliament faces a growing revolt. All of Britain's living former prime ministers have expressed concern about his plan as have many senior figures in his Conservative Party. The leader of the opposition Labor party kissed Obama who is self isolating due to the corona virus said, he would oppose a bill that broke international law. Johnson's plan to explicitly break INS National Law has plunged brexit back into crisis less than four months before Britain is finally due to

Boris Johnson European Union Prime Minister Anthony Davis United Kingdom Britain House Of Commons Ins National Law London Labor Party Conservative Party Barack Obama European Commission
The Encryption Debate Rages On

Cyber Security Sauna

04:07 min | 1 year ago

The Encryption Debate Rages On

"So etiquette you've talked about encryption before. Got Fascinated. Encryption in the nineties already, I've been most interested in societal aspects of cryptography lately since I've seen quite concerted attacks against the freedom of businesses and individuals on using encryption, you're doing a horrible job tooting your own horn. You're not mentioning the UK parliament or anything like that at all. I was. Invited by the British parliament actually, they had a giant comet A. When they were deliberating the investigatory powers bill, I can today's so they invited me to to give evidence on encryption and I was happy to. Explain how what they were. Planning to do was horrible. Davor. Nicely listening to are they paid no attention to why opinions? I was also participating in the European Union Commission Panel on. On dual-use aspects of encryption. And similarly to European Commission. noted. That the guy from Finland appeared on, they pay no attention to what I was telling. So I have good track record of. Being listened to, but look necessarily followed or that's all we can. Anyone of, US, can ask for. But. You sound like the right person to briefly summarize what the Christian debate is all about. Technology. And from the mathematics point of view, we have gotten to a point where good quality encryption. is now available and good enough quality would in this context me in that if I choose to protect. Some piece of information and communication with quality. cryptography means. It. Is Too costly for the adversary to try to break. That encryption in. reasonable. Amount of time. So everybody on this planet currently has access to technology and know-how on good quality encryption at this is unprecedented in our times, and of course, this medics. Punch off authorities unhappy because quite many of those intelligence gathering mechanisms and. The law enforcement investigatory methods have being built around the notion that the authorities would be given access to people's. Communication. Day. Regardless of how it was protected. In case, there is a legitimate need to obtain that access If there's a good quality could Covic protections, there's nobody but the actual personal interest that they all started these are now. Tracking, or trying to interrogate. So nobody else would be positioned to decrypt the material sold that makes of course, the authorities have begun happy, and that discussion has been going on for centuries. and. Only now, a small people to sit. And individuals are in a position to utilize encryption without having to ask for permission. Yeah. So like before when when regular citizens tried to encrypt their information so that it wasn't available for law enforcement lawyer I was just like all you sweet summer child and just cracked it anyway but they can't do that anymore implementation. They were either week because the computing power was not that abundant in the past. All they were artificially weak. So they were basically I. The back door, all day were deliberately written. To be faulty so that the authorities would be in a position to crack the conversation open.

European Commission. United States British Parliament European Union Commission UK Finland
The U.K. is offering around 3 million Hong Kong residents a path to British citizenship after a new national security law

All Things Considered

00:26 sec | 1 year ago

The U.K. is offering around 3 million Hong Kong residents a path to British citizenship after a new national security law

"Was referring to Britain's recent decision to offer a path to citizenship for up to nearly three million Hong Kongers after Beijing implemented a national security law, which is shrinking freedoms in the former British colony. The Chinese government has grown more assertive UK has repeatedly pushed back in recent months today. Pompeo also met with China Hawks in the British parliament and what was seen as an attempt to pressure Prime Minister Boris Johnson today can even harder line against China's ruling Communist Party.

China British Parliament Boris Johnson Communist Party Pompeo Prime Minister Beijing Hong Kongers Chinese Government Britain UK
Pompeo Visits U.K. To Discuss Joint Efforts To Counter China

All Things Considered

02:35 min | 1 year ago

Pompeo Visits U.K. To Discuss Joint Efforts To Counter China

"London London Now Now that that is is where where Secretary Secretary of of State State Mike Mike Pompeo Pompeo was was today, today, talking talking with with British British counterparts counterparts about about joint joint efforts efforts to to counter counter China. China. The The secretary secretary congratulated congratulated the United Kingdom for moving earlier this month to ban Huawei, the controversial Chinese telecom giant from the development of Britain's five G network, NPR's Frank Langfitt reports. Compound kicked off today's joint press conference by giving Britain a public pat on the back for supporting a harder line against Beijing. I want to take this opportunity Tio congratulate the British government for its principal responses to these challenges. You made a sovereign decision to ban WOL away from future five G networks. You generously opened your doors to Congress who speak nothing more playing just for some freedom. We support those sovereign choices we think well done. Pompon was referring to Britain's recent decision to offer a path to citizenship for up to nearly three million Hong Kongers after Beijing implemented a national security law, which is shrinking freedoms in the former British colony. The Chinese government has grown more assertive UK has repeatedly pushed back in recent months today. Pompeo also met with China Hawks in the British parliament and what was seen as an attempt to pressure Prime Minister Boris Johnson today can even harder line against China's ruling Communist Party. When a reporter asked British Foreign Secretary Dominic Rob, with pressure from the Trump administration has influenced the UK China policy robbed, denied any questions mean Mike and I always have constructive discussions and actually majority times on views overlap when we work together very well. Today's press conference was designed to affirm an Anglo American stance towards the world's second largest economy. Pompeii went much further, saying countries across the globe should join together to call out China for its moves in the South China Sea along the Sino Indian border. You can't go make claims for maritime reaches that you have no lawful claim to You can't threaten countries and bully them in the camellias. We want. We want to see every nation who understands freedom and democracy to understand this threat that the Chinese Communist Party is posing to them and to work both themselves and collectively. To restore what is rightfully ours. China's criticized the U. S and U K for engaging in what it calls a Cold War mentality. But this isn't just about geopolitics. With more than 140,000 Americans dead from covert 19 in the economy and recession. President Trump is trying to portray Joe Biden, the presumptive Democratic nominee, is soft on China and hopes his increasingly hard line will help him win a second term come November.

China Mike Mike Pompeo Pompeo Secretary Chinese Communist Party South China Sea Britain Beijing British Government United Kingdom British Parliament Huawei London London President Trump Chinese Government Joe Biden Frank Langfitt NPR Boris Johnson Trump Administration Pompon
Worries beset famous London Shakespeare theater

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Worries beset famous London Shakespeare theater

"Disney all of Britain's springs theaters the have been entertainment shot since March and shopping center when the adjacent government imposed to a the nationwide theme park look is starting done a to phase slow the three spread opening of Wednesday the virus well the complex something used which used receive to be called government downtown subsidy Disney is going the to globe allow gets some ninety third five party percent shops of its revenue and restaurants from ticket to sales open but the fear its website to says the blue says from even the pandemic with enhanced has been safety financially measures devastating an inherent and risk could be of even exposure terminal to cope with nineteen the British parliament's exists culture committee in any has public told the government place the globe and is it part says of by our visiting national identity Disney springs and for you such voluntarily a national treasure assume to all succumb risks to cope related with nineteen to exposure would be a tragedy the website Charles says all visitors hello this month and workers London will have to wear a mask and undergo a temperature check last week universal Orlando opened about a half dozen shops and eateries hi Jackie Quinn

Disney Britain Charles Orlando Jackie Quinn British Parliament Workers London
Worries beset famous London Shakespeare theater

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Worries beset famous London Shakespeare theater

"Disney all of Britain's springs theaters the have been entertainment shot since March and shopping center when the adjacent government imposed to a the nationwide theme park look is starting done a to phase slow the three spread opening of Wednesday the virus well the complex something used which used receive to be called government downtown subsidy Disney is going the to globe allow gets some ninety third five party percent shops of its revenue and restaurants from ticket to sales open but the fear its website to says the blue says from even the pandemic with enhanced has been safety financially measures devastating an inherent and risk could be of even exposure terminal to cope with nineteen the British parliament's exists culture committee in any has public told the government place the globe and is it part says of by our visiting national identity Disney springs and for you such voluntarily a national treasure assume to all succumb risks to cope related with nineteen to exposure would be a tragedy the website Charles says all visitors hello this month and workers London will have to wear a mask and undergo a temperature check last week universal Orlando opened about a half dozen shops and eateries hi Jackie Quinn

Disney Britain Charles Orlando Jackie Quinn British Parliament Workers London
Worries beset famous London Shakespeare theater

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Worries beset famous London Shakespeare theater

"Disney all of Britain's springs theaters the have been entertainment shot since March and shopping center when the adjacent government imposed to a the nationwide theme park look is starting done a to phase slow the three spread opening of Wednesday the virus well the complex something used which used receive to be called government downtown subsidy Disney is going the to globe allow gets some ninety third five party percent shops of its revenue and restaurants from ticket to sales open but the fear its website to says the blue says from even the pandemic with enhanced has been safety financially measures devastating an inherent and risk could be of even exposure terminal to cope with nineteen the British parliament's exists culture committee in any has public told the government place the globe and is it part says of by our visiting national identity Disney springs and for you such voluntarily a national treasure assume to all succumb risks to cope related with nineteen to exposure would be a tragedy the website Charles says all visitors hello this month and workers London will have to wear a mask and undergo a temperature check last week universal Orlando opened about a half dozen shops and eateries hi Jackie Quinn

Disney Britain Charles Orlando Jackie Quinn British Parliament Workers London
Worries beset famous London Shakespeare theater

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Worries beset famous London Shakespeare theater

"All of Britain's theaters have been shot since March when the government imposed a nationwide look done to slow the spread of the virus well something used receive government subsidy the globe gets ninety five percent of its revenue from ticket sales the fear to says the blue from the pandemic has been financially devastating and could be even terminal the British parliament's culture committee has told the government the globe is part of our national identity and for such a national treasure to succumb to cope with nineteen would be a tragedy Charles hello this month London

Britain Charles London
"british parliament" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"british parliament" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Is are laid out against the king the declaration says quote to prove the us this meaning the absolute despotism of George the third the tyranny of Georgia third as stated in the declaration to prove this tyranny let fax be submitted to a candid world right the Americans are making are they they have in this essentially written an indictment against George the third and indirectly to the British parliament as well and it lays out the declaration lays out all of the crimes committed by George the third in the British parliament right and so by laying out those facts they are laying them out to people everywhere to determine whether the charges are in fact true or not true this is why it says we are submitting it to a candid world right we're appealing to the minds to the reasons of people everywhere all right let's now turn to the second paragraph which is one at least what often considered to be the second paragraph is really just one long sentence and.

George Georgia British parliament
"british parliament" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"british parliament" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Hello. This is the globalist coming to you live from the Dory. House in London. I'm Georgina Godwin coming up. French president Emmanuel Macron is in east Africa. But is the soft power neo-colonialism or push to assert global thority? Whilst his troubles continue at home pandemonium in the British parliament as some Theresa May's own cabinet ministers. Joined the vote against her version of Brexit. We asked what's next and who's in charge. Plus, we still see the independence acting as talent scouts for the risk averse mainstream industry. The international Booker prize announces a shortlist of thirteen an unusually they mostly come from small independent publishes. What does this mean for the industry, and we'll be at nyp him the world world's largest international property fair in Cannes with business papers to that's the head right here on the globalist live from London. French president Emmanuel Macron is currently undertaking three day trip to if you pick Kenya and Djibouti in a bid to build stronger ties with east Africa. Amongst is objectives unveiled this week has been pledged to invest two point five billion euros in startups and small businesses, but it's not all soft power the trip arrives at a time. When FRANZ is also deepening its military commitments across the continent and domestically. The French president is still recovering from a bruising few months in Paris facing down mass protests from the yellow vests movement. So what is Michael really hoping to show to the.

Emmanuel Macron east Africa London Georgina Godwin Theresa May nyp Booker FRANZ Brexit Cannes Michael Paris Kenya Djibouti three day
"british parliament" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"british parliament" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"So Jason we are speaking shortly after the vote on Tuesday night, your time and negotiations were happening overnight. But it seemed like the writing was on the wall hereafter two groups of lawmakers that may need it on her side said they'd vote against the plan. She did manage to secure concessions from the European Union. Tell us more about what happened heading into the final hours before this vote. Will it's roads. Theresa May did some last minute shuttle diplomacy or to Strasbourg to see the head of the European Commission in an attempt to ring a couple of concessions that would get some of these revolu makers in our own party. And then some refer opponents in the Democratic Unionist Party on board to try and get this deal over the line and short it wasn't enough her the opponents, and to her Brexit plan that particular concerns are on whether whether or not the UK can unilaterally exit sort of the us economical orbit. In the event that they can't reach a broader trade deal. The fact is that the legal assurances she brought back were insufficient for these guys. And so it became clear during the day that they were going to vote against the hammer really fell actually fell. I guess whenever the attorney general the UK sort of the most senior lawyer published his own legal advice. It said pretty much what what the Brexit tears the very hard line. Brexit guys had thought on the long this wasn't going to work. So by middle of the afternoon. It was pretty clear she was going to lose this vote tonight. Of course, marks another huge blow for Theresa May a second defeat after lawmakers voted down her plan in January. What else did we hear from may following the vote on Tuesday was heard the clip she didn't? I mean, she'd sort of lost their voices quite different here. Whatever she said. But what happens next is there'll be a vote Wednesday on whether or not the UK should leave the European without any sort of withdrawal agreement a toll, and this is a no deal exit that most people most economists policymakers think the would be very damaging for the UK economy. It is something that is in favor amongst very small group of hardcore Brexit tears, so it looks like parliament will vote against that. What happens after that? Then is there will be yet another vote on Thursday where parliament will be asked whether or not it wants to extend the article fifty process. This is the part in this is this sort of the formal name for the negotiations between London and Brussels whether it wants to extend that forbid try and figure out some way through all this. So what she warned parliament was that, you know, every possible lock in here is kind of still on the table that could be not la- told it could be no Brexit atoll. There could be some other deal on people really try and make their minds up now about what it is. They actually want as we've been reporting this is likely to lead to a delay in that March twenty ninth date, which was when the United Kingdom was set to depart from the European Union. Yes, that's right. The question now is quite long that extension will be at does seem very likely. We will get an extension with the votes in the next couple of days. It's really up to the Europeans beside how long an extension to offer all twenty-seven Member States of the European Union to first of all agree and extension, and then they can basically offer the UK a certain period of time. Now, the thinking for a longtime walls that they would only really offer a very short extension. Maybe a few months to take us into the summer. The reason for that is there are some European parliament elections in the summer, and they sort of figured that. You can't have a departing Member State electing you MP..

Brexit United Kingdom European Union Theresa May Democratic Unionist Party European Commission Jason Brexit atoll Strasbourg Member States attorney London Brussels
"british parliament" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

05:47 min | 2 years ago

"british parliament" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Speaking in the British parliament announcing that there will be no votes on Brexit Brexit until Wednesday, February twenty seven she said people have got to hold their nerve right now, they're holding their nerve and Venezuelan joined by Senator Tom cotton. Good morning Senator cotton. How are you? Good morning, you to be honest with you. Are you optimistic that today's marches in Venezuela will finally forced Madero out? I hope so Hugh it really comes down to a handful of senior security officials around the d'oro as we heard last week. And the Armed Services Committee when I was questioning Admiral baller, the commander of our southern command nNcholas Maduro is dependent on the. For his personal security unit bed at night on the Cuban and Russian intelligence services. But at the leaders of the Venezuelan military and intelligence and security services end up turning on Madero, and recognizing that the only way they can save their own skin is to tell their troops to put down their arms do not fire or otherwise our press. They're on people and have move forward with a new fair and free election than Maduro stays will be over. Now. I want to ask you about. I hope that happens the green new deal because so many in my business are attempting to disappear with it. They're actually complicit with Alessandria Calcio Cortez trying to get rid of her seven page white paper on it that she posted. Do you believe your colleagues knew what they were endorsing when they endorsed her her crazy get rid of the cows and the airplanes white paper. I mean, Hewitt's it's pretty remarkable that when these Democrats put out the green new deal last week that you had many. Democrats running for president leap onto a proposal. That was going to confiscate every privately owned vehicle on America within a decade and ban air travel. So we could all drive a ride around on high-speed light rail supposedly powered by unicorn tears. Don't forget the cow the cows there. They're all well, we can we can all become vegans. It's cals are gone as well as flatulence is a mortal threat to the world. Look, this is a classic example of a of a gap being when you say what you really mean? I understand that Democrats have proposed this immediately tried to retract that white paper that went along with their resolution, and too many people in the media have been complicit and the stolen like or nineteen Eighty-four technique of disappearing. It sending it down the memory hole. But this is where their heart lies. They believed that Americans driving around in trucks on farms or commuting from the suburbs where they can have a decent home into the city to get. To work fundamental threat to the world, and they have to have the power in the control of those Americans lives to implement a radical vision for humanity. Let me then switch to another radical vision. Boycott divest sanction, Israel, Marco Rubio, introduced a antibeach s resolution. I'm sure you voted for it. But I think it's beginning to dawn on people. This isn't just a nutty idea. The left it's spreading abroad. Hewitt is I've been spreading around the world. Unfortunately, you know, the Senate path that with a pretty healthy vote. But unfortunately, it really divided the democratic caucus. This is what you see over the last twenty five to thirty years, regrettably since the Oslo accords support for Israel has steadily increased among Republicans and independents yet it stagnated or even declined among Democrats. This is not just an issue of radical liberals in congress. But this is where a lot of the hearts of the Democratic Party lies. I frankly, whether it's here in the United States, or if you look abroad, there's a connection between these two issues were discussing throughout history. If you look hard enough at an anti-capitalist, and what they say, you often find an anti Semite that is absolutely true. Now, I want to switch very quickly to the quote deal that was agreed to by the seventeen a cap on on beds, a cut in the number of beds is actually what used to call the get out of jail free card. It is it's a. It's almost incredible for me to say that they would would you vote for this. Well, it's premature I know that the senior leaders on that commerce committee say they have an agreement in principle. I don't think the committee has signed off on any final report. I know there hasn't been legislative tech shared with the other senators, so I'll see what it says in the coming days. But as you say capping the beds that I can use to detain illegal alien is simply a backdoor way to have open borders. It's been a democratic priority for a long time immigration is an area where the fine print really matters. The devil is very much in the details. All have to go through the proposal and a fine tooth comb. But I would certainly hope that we wouldn't be decreasing in any way the net number of beds available to ice to detain dangerous illegal aliens. So Senator cotton between the green new deal between BBS and refused to the sport antibeach ES legislation between. Attempt to cap. The of beds has the Democratic Party gone off the cliff. Presume they were on the cliff to begin with. True it does. But I mean, it does seem like it's an avalanche of of tumbleweeds over the side. I think you did a glass to two weeks or so what we've seen is not so much the Democratic Party going over the cliff, but the Democratic Party showing its true colors that they truly do want the power to radically remake every American's lives by banning vehicles and banning air travel and even banning Cal at the same time, they're willing to engage.

Democratic Party Senator Madero Senator Tom cotton Hewitt Israel Maduro British parliament Venezuela Brexit Brexit Alessandria Calcio Cortez Hugh Armed Services Committee flatulence Marco Rubio Senate
"british parliament" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

04:26 min | 2 years ago

"british parliament" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"But I really think at this point these seem to be the two possibilities that we are looking at which is either no deal or Theresa May's deal. It is also possible on Valentine's Day that this amendment comes back that was voted down at the end of January. Which calls for an extension to this process. The way the originally worded amendment was written was that. If there was no deal by February twenty six the UK government would have to go to the EU and request an extension until the end of twenty nineteen. Now, the thing to remember with that is all of the other EU twenty-seven members would have to agree to an extension. If the British parliament adopted the deal, it is very likely that the EU would agree to a technical extension of several weeks once the UK passes this deal. It still has to pass implementing legislation and the European parliament also has to ratify the deal, which would be a given. But you need time for this. But if there is agreement on the deal, it's not really a problem to extend the couple of weeks to essentially allow the paperwork to flow through what I think the EU is not prepared to do is to have another six months, twelve months of wrangling in London without any clarity about the future direction that they're moving in. In other words, they want to verify that Britain is all in before they allow an extension. Sure, if you need time to ratify if there was going to be a second referendum, if there was going to be an election. If there was some extenuating circumstance that required more time. I think there would be a lot of openness to an extension if we are going to have an extended period of uncertainty with no discernible outcome. There is not a lot of sympathy within Europe to doing that. Okay. So if there's a prospect for a revote swinging, the kind of numbers that it would take to swing one thing that has to happen as happened with the tarp the tarp vote that you reference is really interesting analog here because there was essentially nothing different in the second vote than in the first accept the impending doom of the financial crash, and one thing you have to believe is that the doom is real. Because it is actually embarrassing to turn around and vote for something that you just voted against literally without change or even time separating them. And that's an embarrassing thing for a politician to have to do, and you have to really believe that you're on the bus that is about to careen off the cliff. And so one of the things that I question about Brexit is whether a lot of British politicians really believe that the situation is that bad. And so now, let's talk about what happens in March. If there's no deal all of a sudden, it's the twenty ninth, right? Yes. March twenty ninth Britain's out of the EU. There's no deal. What happens when we wake up on March twenty ninth without a deal. I think it actually would be pretty bad. I the the main thing that happens is the UK is definitively out of the EU. There is no transition period. Everything that applied currently no longer applies. So on the economic side, the UK would go back to trading with the EU on WTO rules, so all of the preferential trading arrangements customs arrangements that were put in place would no longer cease to exist. So you would have incredibly high customs on some products, you would have to have checks at all of the borders of the border in Northern Ireland. If you think about the trucks that are going from Dover in England to Calais in France, all of those goods would have to be checked, which means if you are shipping food if you are shipping medicine, if you're shipping any sort of perishable good leaving aside everything else in the supply chain all of that is going to be delayed. There's people looking at open skies arrangements in terms of whether or not air. Airplanes are going to be able to land in the UK the rights of UK citizens living in the EU EU nationals living in the UK are no longer going to be protected. There was an announcement that came out from the British government a couple of weeks ago saying that payments that are given by the national health service to Brits who are living in retired in Europe would no longer necessarily apply. So everything would would essentially grind to halt..

EU UK Europe Britain Theresa May British parliament European parliament British government Dover Calais London Brexit France Northern Ireland England twelve months six months
"british parliament" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

05:07 min | 2 years ago

"british parliament" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"You are listening to the daily on monocle twenty four with me Andrew moolah for many years the lost three in particular British politicians pundits newspapers of eurosceptic stripe, pem subject today. Continental counterparts to no end of robust abuse routinely, traducing them as bungling bureaucrats corrupt troughs troughs coffers, in fact, and or outright, Nazis, those same British politicians pundits newspapers had spent much of today. Clutching? The polls and retreating to their fainting couches in response to a couple of E U Penn. Panza drums returning the serve European Council. President Donald tusk spoke of a special place in hell for those who promoted Brexit without even a sketch of a plan of how to carry it out safely. This was followed by gave whole Stadt the EU pollens chief Brexit negotiate a suggesting that Lucifer would be unlikely to welcome Brexit's cheerleaders as they would even manage to divide. Hell I'm joined now by Kara Walker political analyst and former BBC. Political correspondent Carol is is this just to us convulsion saying what they have long thought. Well, look, these comments are hardly likely to help the atmosphere ahead of the next crucial round of talks in this. And I think what you sense here is a certain amount of frustration on the e u side frustration that this whole Brexit process is still dominating the whole of European Union business frustration that a deal. They thought was all signed sealed and delivered was then comprehensively rejected by the British parliament and frustration that they're simply not clear what the way through is going to be at to be said that these remarks have provoked absolute fury, right across Britain, the leader of the house, and your leads them said the remarks were totally unacceptable and the tusk should apologize. Saaji javid. Who's the home secretary said he was out of order. All in foster who leads the Democratic Unionist Party accused him of being deliberately provocative, and I think jokester the time when the prime minister desperately needs some at least some positive positive language from the European Union. These comments seemed designed to make her talk even harder just as she heads to Brussels to have talks with these characters have been so rude about semi of her colleagues. It doesn't bode well, those responses you saw it though are all absolutely shameless though on die because the hope start and two of said today is not a fraction of what has been said about them over the last few years, not merely by allies of the people those people you quoted, but by those people you quoted. Well, certainly that has been a huge amount of criticism of the fact that those who campaign for Brexit did not have a clear plan did not have clear arrangements have north through thought through all the practical difficulties and the huge issues over questions such as the border between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland which would have to be resolved. Of course, they would also say those Brexit is that when they were campaigning for Brexit. The government of the day undetected Cameron and Georgia's Boone refused to put in place any plans for what that might be. And indeed the there are now very few of those leading Brexit campaigners who are in government any longer to see the process through. So I think they would say that there are reasons why they have been unable to. Shape, the course of events, but of course, the referendum walls abiding ary choice. It was in or out. It was never going to be the moment when you decided what the next cools of events was going to be and since we had that referendum vote in two thousand sixteen. You've had a Prime Minister Theresa may who spent her whole time trying to keep them bold. Both sides of this argument trying to compromise endlessly, which is part of the reason why we've now ended up with the mass the confusion with time running out that we're seeing at the moment when we go back to that original remark by Donald tusk that started today's flap. Did you get the sensitive walls? Just a spontaneous outburst. Or is this some sort of strategy because it has to be noted that Bailey had he said it then it appeared on his official Twitter feed, which does suggest a certain. Amount of coordination as far as the messaging went. Well, there was no sense. We'll so ever that. This was a remark that don't to didn't intend to make festival. He's a very experienced..

President Donald tusk Brexit European Union E U Penn prime minister Democratic Unionist Party Kara Walker Andrew Bailey Panza Brussels Republic of Ireland European Council political analyst BBC Carol secretary Northern Ireland Britain
"british parliament" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"british parliament" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"I'm Val are the British parliament has agreed to remove the so-called Irish backed off from its Brexit deal. However, it is unlikely the EU will accept that. We'll have more details as they unfold. Meanwhile, things are heating up with Venezuela. US national security adviser John Bolton warning. There'll be serious consequences for anyone who attempts to harm. Interim president one Guido in a tweet Bolton denounced threats to glider made by Venezuela's chief prosecutor also the State Department says Americans should not travel to Venezuela yesterday. The US froze assets of nNcholas Maduro and state run oil company paid a visa accused of funneling billions to Madero leaving the people of Venezuela in dire. Straight. So the former commander of US. Southern command, Admiral James Stavridis believes Madero eventually will not be able to remain in power. He tells the Salem radio network quite optimistic. I think there's a two and three chance that the Maduro regime goes down right now at least twenty one other governments in the region and around the world recognized Cuando as Venezuela's president also at townhall dot com longtime political consultant Roger stone appearing in court on charges, the special counsels Russia probe et cetera court here in Washington. Roger stone pleaded not guilty to charges including lying to congress and obstruction. He was arraigned this morning after being arrested in a raid last week. Prosecutors say stone lied about his talks with the Trump campaign involving WikiLeaks and the hacked e mails released that hurt the Clinton campaign in two thousand sixteen saga megani. Reporting the largest utility in the US filing for bankruptcy is it faces billions of dollars in damages from wildfires in California Pacific Gas. Electric filed for chapter eleven reorganization. Even though investigators determined last week the utilities equipment was not to blame for the two thousand seventeen fire that killed twenty two in northern California. Moore townhall dot com. When it comes to your pain. Many of you might be skeptical black. I was about ordering relieffactor Pat Boone again for this wonderful.

Venezuela US Roger stone Madero John Bolton British parliament nNcholas Maduro EU Admiral James Stavridis Pat Boone Val Interim president commander California State Department Cuando congress California Pacific Gas president prosecutor
"british parliament" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

MSNBC Morning Joe

03:13 min | 2 years ago

"british parliament" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

"If you want to listen to gridlock, you've just listen to it from the British parliament, two tribes, not listening to each other just yelling at each other a country divided people's trust in government ebbing away on for this government in the UK, a complete humiliation. We expected the Theresa May's deal patiently negotiated over two years for Britain to leave the European Union would be defeated. But this was unprecedented. The less time government lost like this was in one thousand nine hundred twenty four by one hundred sixty six votes. This was by two hundred thirty eight complete on utter humiliation on any other country at any other time, maybe an any company chief executive with losses like that would be well the door by by midnight last night that will not happen for Theresa May. Yes. In about ten minutes time, she will begin to face questions than there will be six hours of debate. Then there will be a vote of milk confidence in the government, which she will win because her party doesn't want to see the opposition take power. It's a crazy situation. But the question then is what next I'm nobody knows. She must go with a plan b by Monday. So she'll be scrambling around the opposition party saying, well, what do you want? Then she'll go to Europe and say, can you give us any compromises? I mean, guys, it is a complete mess. It almost makes what's happening in Washington. Look pleasant. It is a complete mess in one of the problems is Bill speaks of two tribes. But in fact, it's not even quite that simple. Because there are members of the labour who obviously support Brexit. There are conservatives that support Brexit to cross-currents are pretty pretty difficult to depend down. Aren't they Bill yet? Yeah. Absolutely, right. The this is the problem. There are splits right across society through politics. Three families on the labor party on the conservative party are split on your remember the Tories have been split on Europe for about forty years. And this whole Brexit day. Buckler really is as a result of first of all David Cameron trying to neutralize his Euro-sceptic wing by calling this referendum which was won narrowly fifty two forty eight two and a half years ago. And then Theresa May trying to neutralise her eurosceptic wing by saying, okay? You voted for that? I'm going to give you a hard Brexit. Well, that hard breaks it was defeated last night. But no, what is it a self? Brexit is it no Brexit. What we do know is that on March twenty nine hundred just over seventy days time by law deal or not Britain will leave the. European Union after forty five years of membership. Unless there is a delay on the delay. Can only happen if they come up with a plan b that the European Union says, okay, we'll give you a bit more time to work this..

Theresa May European Union Brexit chief executive Bill Europe Britain British parliament UK Washington Buckler David Cameron forty five years seventy days forty years ten minutes six hours two years milk
"british parliament" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"british parliament" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"A stunning defeat by the British parliament of Prime Minister, Theresa May's Brexit plan to leave the European Union. Correspondent Nic Robertson is in London. I spent a sense all along Theresa May place her decisions and our thinking very close to her chest. There's been a sense of the government would have taken a loss of of fifty or sixty votes to be enough for the prime minister to continue. But the question today is whether maze government can survive the big defeat, and whether she will try to renegotiate Brexit. The US economy is taking a larger than expected hit from the partial government shutdown, and that's based on the White House. Estimates of the impact. Correspondent Steve Kastenbaum reports. The head of one of the nation's biggest banks worries the shutdown could cause severe damage to the overall economy in a phone call with investors chase CEO Jamie diamond said the banker in seven point one billion dollars in the. Fourth quarter. It was a sixty seven percent increase over 2017 but short of expectations. So J P Morgan stock fell a little diamond also said the partial government shutdown was bad for business saying that it was slowing growth. He claimed that if it lasted the entire first quarter of the year, it could bring GDP down to zero the president's nominee for attorney general William Barr says he wouldn't automatically recuse himself from oversight of the Muller Russia probe if a Justice department panel makes that recommendation, you would not like it. If I made some pledge to the president that I was going to exercise my responsibilities in a particular way. And I'm not gonna make a pledge to anyone on this committee that I'm an exercise it in a particular way or surrender at a federal judge has denied a request from federal employees union to require the government to pay workers required on the job during the government shutdown now in its twenty fifth day on Wall Street, the Dow was up ninety s and p up nineteen. I'm mike. Boss. Look at the road. Here's taints out from the one zero one five seven twenty AM traffic.

Theresa May Prime Minister Nic Robertson William Barr European Union president London Jamie diamond US Steve Kastenbaum White House CEO J P Morgan Muller Russia Justice department attorney one billion dollars sixty seven percent twenty fifth
"british parliament" Discussed on Risky Business

Risky Business

04:18 min | 3 years ago

"british parliament" Discussed on Risky Business

"We spoke with Alex Thomas about this weird process by which you know, three which the UK parliament wound up with a whole bunch of Facebook internal documents there on the internet now. Do you have the British parliament has dumped the dogs for everyone to raid, which yes people reminding through at finding what's choice examples of Facebook Kana being jerks and writing them up and the just it really doesn't look good for Facebook. This particular particular stash dogs Facebook being saying, oh, well, it's taken out of context and Bubba mobile. Many of these like internal memos where they like. Yeah. Gee, if people found out about this Shaw freak out. Oh, well, it's worth the PR is stuff. Like that. I mean, it just just to show that they knew what they were doing right. Yeah. Exactly. Why particular funny? But as where the VP of product management is talking about how one of the features they have been trying to sell to advertise and things is primarily being taken up by gaming companies. And he says, quote, I'm not proud of the fact that we're county extolling game companies that make slot machine is a positive example of those willing to pay fees bracket, I'm fine with it. Just not proud of it. Dan. That's the thing. Good old main while having some more drama with Google, plus which is just a hilarious apparently exposed Dada from fifty three point five million uses to which I saw able on Twitter saying, wow, Google, plus fifty fifty million users. But yeah, exposed a bunch of data on fifty two and a half million users that already planned to pull the plug on Google, plus, but apparently those plans have been accelerated they like they electron a sprint it into the paddock to put a bullet in its head. Yeah. This is apparently another instance of the same sort of thing they have lost. I'm where there was some particular APR that didn't correctly enforce the restrictions on. You know, seeing information about the about people's go about other people that were related through the using question. They appear to the end of this through internal auditing. Am I guess in that respect they didn't have to tell everybody that headed by saying that there's no evidence that was actually used? But yeah, the fact that I've exposed that many user accounts. I guess the thing they felt that out in front, and yeah, I guess the fact that it's going to get a bullet soon, there's probably gonna make everybody happy. Now earlier this year the city of Atlanta suffered a pretty serious ransomware attack. Some rainy ins have been have been indicted over this doesn't look like there was any sort of state state level involvement. But yeah, they found some people apparently there's no specifics of how these two individuals. We're actually kinda talk some identified by the investigation, they were using a set of Maui. This malware that there were a bunch of people using at the time there, isn't it isn't really clear with the two people were also responsible some of the other ones. Yes. So we're not really sure about that. Yeah. We don't really clear also whether or not there will ever actually face those charges I still in Iran and not like to get extradited. But maybe. Go on holiday to make. That's right. Get in the van, and we chat guy got Vande last week that guy totally going to this guy in China who was using we chat like we pay a we chat to collect his his ransomware ransoms, and you know, you and I suggested last week that he might be arrested, and he was arrested. He got in the van and the van has taken him to undisclosed location. So that's that's a nice follow up for everyone. The FBI. Meanwhile, is investigating comments on the website around net neutrality. Tell us about this one. Those of you who are Americans will probably remember the kind of knit neutrality debate and drama that happened early on the year. There was a bunch of lobbying around the comments system for that kind of crashed during the low to people's comments initially, and then lots of fake comments being submitted by various groups for and against there's been a bunch of investigations into that process to see where the people have been people who've whose identities have been used to submit comments, fraudulently going after the people, you know, the campaigns are doing that for those frauds, the state level investigations have been largely obstructed in terms of getting out of the they said, we're.

Facebook Google Alex Thomas FBI UK Bubba VP Shaw Twitter Dan Maui Atlanta Vande Iran Dada China
"british parliament" Discussed on Ross Patterson Revolution!

Ross Patterson Revolution!

04:22 min | 3 years ago

"british parliament" Discussed on Ross Patterson Revolution!

"And my family which i think everybody should just be worried about their friends and family my my biggest goal with as far as foreign affairs in politics go is that we're not going to get blown up i don't wanna live under the fear of fucking bomb or a missile kid come and just nuke our country and we would be in a world war so that being first and foremost at the top of my list of how i live my life and i value my friends and family i'm happy the fucking putin meeting took place mapping the kim meeting took place those are really the only countries worried about china i guess china would be the only other one where it's like greats why don't you go i hope he meets with the fucking prime minister of china next i hope there's dialogue about that too great so that way it lessens the chances of us blowing up one another in the future that's really all i give shit about if you're asking me about spies and treason and all this other bullshit i don't care i know for a fact responding on them i i know we have spies over there and i'm sure they have spies here i know they do britain fuck they got wiped over there what wink white russia wipe their own spas and the cousin it's called they wipe their own spies over there three or four of them died british parliament was like oh my god it's crazy they gave nerve guests to their own agents no that's the way it should be if you're a spy and you go to another country you get caught your country's gotta kill you you know that when you sign up and that's kinda deal sure so if you think that for one second just because juice avert two point oh hacked into the dnc that's that was a big deal or kind of change the election it didn't like the dnc when they got hacked it was exposed forgiving the questions to hillary instead of bernie sanders anyway if you're going to be pissed off about anything they threw bernie under the bus for chrissakes like nobody influenced what's his dick komi to come out what three weeks before the election and sam reopening the investigation with hillary clinton now that happens if russia did that congratulations we got some family or something made him do it if the ballots were rigged and votes were fake in the election that went for one candidate and not the other greats i would say fuck it now i don't give a shit i don't give a shit i'm done with her emails to like stop wasting our fucking time with the shit because there was a guy one of the fbi guys who is investigating on the the muller team they had him out because they found a bunch of text messages saying we're going to get trump and he was a big hillary supporter and all that shit and they did this whole grandstanding thing in congress with republicans grilled him and vice versa and i don't care that's a waste of time away aware of taxpayers you found the text messages he also was just like you know it's two thousand sixteen he was talking to like a colleague he'd thought privately or something privately and it was just kind of girlfriend don't worry we'll get them and it's like at that time you know people were saying all kinds of fucking shit but know i actually don't believe that it you know he did anything wrong i mean i don't know he had his opinions but everyone does in everyone's bias so basically is just like we're all biased we all have our things but it doesn't interfere with our work if we if we're in a certain position and my my biggest thing is this right so you had the text messages wasn't bias absolutely but he was outed already out there why hold a whole goddamn days worth hearing he wanted to the tax payers he wanted to but soda the republican senators i mean it's just like i don't eat both of them can get fucked like all of that whole daycare which did you hear like grants like can you look at your wife in is with your and then like some ladies like oh congressman oh please you're going it's like it was.

three weeks one second
"british parliament" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"british parliament" Discussed on Amanpour

"Solve this with our military iraq and afghanistan we'd have we on there we had huge deployments those troops and couldn't fix those countries then what do i need in place for military intervention to potential succeed i need some domestic support international support and that week after that attack didn't materialize internationally the british parliament voted against joining us go miracle called him and said she couldn't support military action publicly unless investigation was done at home the republicans are saying it'd be unconscionable act without congressional authorization and that's unsatisfying as it is i also think it is true that obama's weighing not just whether there's a case for intervention but if i interviewed like this can work and it'll be for the history books end the studies will be done on that but it's not talk about the trade will yeah which everybody thought president trump was just using rhetoric was negotiating tactic but actual sums numbers now being flung around actual allies and competitors off ending retaliation and he says things like you know i didn't even know when i talked to a prime minister trudeau i just made it up i said we had a deficit i didn't know he says that you know all these things it's fascinating to read what you wrote about the meeting with president xi of china when you're with president obama and this is what he said about trump we prefer to have a good relationship with the united states but every action will have a reaction and if an immature leader throws the world into chaos then the world will know whom to blame i thought that was the one of the most interesting comments by leader in your whole book is totally haunting and this is a november two thousand sixteen election and obama was warning about i think trump is serious about this straight and g looks kind of sat back photos hands he'd take a measure this and what he was saying exactly what's happened which is trump goes down this.

iraq british parliament obama trump trudeau china united states afghanistan president prime minister g
"british parliament" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Arts Review

Monocle 24: The Monocle Arts Review

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"british parliament" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Arts Review

"But it's time now for our weekend read when we hear from an author about their latest work this week it's jo swinson who was the youngest member of the house of commons when she was elected to the british parliament the age of twenty five years now deputy leader of the liberal democrats she was a minister for women and a qualities on the uk's coalition government when she lost her seat as did pretty much all times in the twenty fifteen general election she was reelected two years later but uring her time out of parliament wrote the book called equal power and how you can make it happen and she explained more to georgina covering gender inequality is all about power and having spent three years as minister for women and feeling like i really got to understand those power structures much better i also came to the conclusion that it was a problem that we only be sold if people up in the country in the ruined individual lives were able to take action because government has a role to play but panel solve this on its own and so what i really want people to understand is the power that they have to tackle this issue and there's inspiring stories in the book from everybody from a seventeen year old school girl who got her alevel music syllabus changed include women composers to people who have made changes in their workplaces and by taking on major corporates so everybody really does have some power to make a difference because i suppose that is the danger in terms of things like alevel syllabuses we just accept the status quo exactly the problem of gender inequality it's so deeply ingrained it's everywhere and i've concluded the way to challenge it is for lots of people to be challenging it and lots of different places there's no one single silver bullet that will do it and therefore you need people to be when they get annoyed about something when they're concerned by particular injustice to be challenging that and to have the power to do so and i think particularly in this world of social media actually that is easier now than it ever was before to get momentum behind a particular issue or campaign and i think what shows in terms of the.

jo swinson british parliament uk twenty five years seventeen year three years two years
"british parliament" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"british parliament" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Several banks adopted the prefix i think about hof the banks the lodge utility companies certain parts of the national health service the royal mail now recognize it and in two thousand fifteen the british parliament even voted to allow mp's to use the title none of them has yet done so mix even entered the oxford english dictionary that same year twenty fifteen if mix sounds a bit foreign ta's shame mitts this gender neutral language is relatively new show only started using themselves in twenty ten but it makes a huge difference to people's lives he suddenly got people going on my god this explains how i've always felt a soon as awareness is raise them people suddenly have woods and have the language to describe how they've always felt a never known what to do about that mix may seem like it's on the road towards acceptance yet the struggle to insert these two letters into the culture has been a bureaucratic and emotional nightmare two letters mean a lot of red tape shays being through the bank thing many times as is usually the case with things in the uk it's also the letter the kind of letter the one with the stamp you put in the post says you'll have rung up you'll bank and they will ask you for the title you will say to them it's mix and they will say what now and you'll save books and they will say yeah we don't have that in the system and then you will say well that's my title and they'll say yeah we'll we can't do that and then you will say okay i'll write you a letter and basically at this point battle commences say very polite woods and then you'll say less polite woods and then they will either say oh that's very interesting and we will take that into consideration and they won't all they will actually do something about it for awhile shake got so frustrated with this routine that they contemplated more radical solution so i signed up for the church of universal whatever.

british parliament mp shays uk
"british parliament" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"british parliament" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Portion of them we're not imprisoned at the time didn't take their seats in westminster though when parliament convened instead they formed the first doyle which was basically a parliament for the irish republic ayman valera who had been a leader in the easter rising had been spared execution because he was an american citizen meaning that he wasn't guilty of treason he was elected president of the deal and he made markevic who is still in prison his minister of labour she was finally released from prison in march of nineteen nineteen she and the other she of the other members of the movement who were imprisoned were basically released out of the fear of the ongoing flu pandemic officials were worried that if they contracted influenza and died in prison they would all become martyrs by this point guerrilla warfare had been underway for months and what became known as the irish war of independence or the anglo irish war as mr of labor constants kept strict security procedures instituted a labor court to resolve disputes and basically tried to mediate between faint and the labor party her department of labor worked out of a building that claim to be an apartment leasing office and also contained several pianos so people working there could pretend to be giving pino lessons if there was a police raid just make it super clear what was going on rather than joining the rest of the members of parliament and the regular british parliament they had founded their own parliament which they were having to operate in secret because it wasn't actually legal for them to be doing it and at some points various members of that parliament were doing so from prison i find this whole thing fascinating so carlson's was arrested again in october of nineteen nineteen during all of this by that point the doyle and most of the organizations that she was involved with had all been outlawed after her release she managed to run the department of labor while in hiding for several months before being arrested once again in september of nineteen twenty when the car that she was riding in was pulled over by police this time while in prison she learned to speak irish this is that moment i've had several but it's that moment when i was looking over this earlier where i'm like she was born or.

doyle ayman valera president influenza carlson department of labor pino
"british parliament" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:31 min | 4 years ago

"british parliament" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"No boy a lot behind that song right now we're looking at a week in the news the tax bill tillerson michael flynn the president's re tweets matt lauer plus plus plus north korea's missile that royal engagement you can join us what do you make of the weeks new load of sexual misconduct revelations and what about that busted sting on the washington post is the royal engagement the only good news this week a couple of calls and want to come to you on the president jacques delors and water for pennsylvania delors you're on thanks for calling hi tom last evening i watch your session of the british parliament um and they will rebuking trump's we tweet so the videos and i were literally leaders need to take a lesson from the british members of the earth the members of the british parliament as to what it means to have possessed intestinal fortitude whenever trump tweets reach tweets antimuslim videos or rhetoric that target grows bigger on the backs and on the chests of any americans serving overseas and that includes state department ngos or the military as well as their family members who are serving with him overseas and i have a question for someone on your panel no beat how does this when he tweets out these antimuslim comments how does that play in places like saudi arabia indonesia doors we we've got it.

president north korea washington post british parliament michael flynn matt lauer jacques delors pennsylvania trump saudi arabia indonesia
"british parliament" Discussed on World News Tonight with David Muir

World News Tonight with David Muir

02:24 min | 4 years ago

"british parliament" Discussed on World News Tonight with David Muir

"Tonight president trump turning up the heat on his own party to replace obamacare ten they get the votes plus what president trump is now saying about russia's meddling in the us election buried alive the deadly landslide swallowing an entire village destroying more than forty homes government hack the cyber strike on the british parliament leading to an email shut down or russian hackers now selling the passwords of government officials breaking news armed standoff suspects taking over a home after shooting at police residents told to stay safe behind locked doors nowhere to run with customers trapped in a store coming face to face with a massive tornado and nine one one less than the four year old girl saving her mother reaching out for help in the nick of time do your kids know what to do in an emergency from ed see this is abc news tonight good evening thanks for joining us on this saturday i'm tom yomise and we begin tonight with the giant battle over health care the president putting pressure on his own party this as a growing number of republican senators say they have strong reservations is the bill now on life support and president trump appears to have changed course on the issue of russian meddling in the november election say now widen president obama do more to stop it abc's david right starts to soften the white house tonight the white house is gearing up for another round in the fight to repeal obama care approach trump pack threatening a million dollar ad by against a moderate republican senator who dared to announce overnight he won't back the bill as it stands nevada's dean however says he's concerned about the impact the bill would have on low income residents of his state it's very difficult to get me to yes the republicans need almost every single vote they have to pass the bill but five republicans have said no and four others have expressed concern after golfing today trump tweeted i cannot imagine that these very fine republican senators would allow the american people to suffer a broken care any longer i wanna see and bill with horror.

obamacare trump russia british parliament tom yomise president obama david senator nevada us shut down abc abc million dollar four year