35 Burst results for "British Parliament"

Vote for New UK Prime Minister Goes to 4th Round

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:26 min | 2 months ago

Vote for New UK Prime Minister Goes to 4th Round

"Michael gove, who's the smartest member of the British Parliament, is out there pitching her. And he went on one of the Brit stations yesterday on LBC with Andrew marr and made this pitch about kimmi bad not cut number one. Michael goat. To be fair, she has Mormons through the experience and Tony Blair or David Cameron has when they became prime minister. And she's been in a runner party of course. Jeez. Oh, absolutely. And also, she's the same age as Rishi and she's been in government in three very different roles. All of which she's accomplished successfully. I know all of the candidates. I've either worked with them because they've been junior ministers and departments that I've been running all these supported me in previous leadership elections. Our new hesitation saying that of all of the people who worked with me in a department that I ran, cami was undoubtedly the outstanding minister. She has an intellectual grasp second to none. She has a capacity to communicate with confidence, but also with empathy. And also, she's brave. It's a rare junior minister who tells their Secretary of State where to get off because their secretary state is getting something wrong. Can we do that to me repeatedly? There were a number of occasions where I told her that I disagreed. She took it in very good part. But it's that confidence based on an understanding from first principles of what you want to achieve that you need in a

Kimmi Michael Goat Michael Gove Andrew Marr British Parliament LBC David Cameron Tony Blair Rishi Cami
"british parliament" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

02:09 min | 3 months ago

"british parliament" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Booth And I'm filling in for my good friend, Dan bongino. It's an honor to be with you guys today. And look, if you've got a pen and paper, I want you to take down this number if you get it, your phone out, take down this number, when you're taking your calls later today, 844-484-3872 again, it's 844-484-3872. And so what we've been talking about today is just looking back on fourth and 4th of July and looking back at the foundations of our nation. We've got to get to the back to the basics as a country, right? Like if your foundation is rotten, if your core is rotten, the rest of its run. So we got to get back to the basics of the country. We've got to fix our foundation. And I was talking about before the break, the stamp act. I did this podcast interview with historian doctor Brian mcclanahan on the foundations of her nation, the American Revolution. I think part of our obligation too as a country is to look back on history to understand it. Because if you don't understand what makes our nation unique what makes us special, then why fight for it, right? So we've got that duty, so I did this interview and it was really meaningful to me and one of the discussions we had was on the stamp act and the importance that that played in a really starke or starting a revolution. And what happened with this is what it really indicated was just the heavy hand of the British government coming in because really for over a 150 years you had the colonies were used to self governance, which is so important as Americans. And it was this first internal tax that was levy directly on the colonies by the British Parliament. And so you look at this small tax, help spark a revolution. Over the role of government in their life, that was unacceptable to them. It was tyrannical. You look at what we accept now as a country. I mean, look at what happened in the wake of roe versus wade, the overturning of it. He had politicians like AOC and senator Elizabeth Warren, calling for the federal government to just open abortion clinics on federal lands. Listen to her. Open abortion

Dan bongino Brian mcclanahan booth British government British Parliament senator Elizabeth Warren wade AOC federal government
"british parliament" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:32 min | 6 months ago

"british parliament" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"I But anyway I hope I get to see a lot of people Marcus dare Spiegel Thanks mister president There is a presidential election coming up in 2024 And as you know there are white yes That's true And there are widespread concerns in Europe that figure like your predecessor maybe even your predecessor himself might get elected president Again so are there any steps anything you're trying to do and NATO is trying to do here these days to prevent what you're trying to do becoming undone to just somehow Thank you No that's not how I think it is I've been dealing with foreign policy for longer than anybody is involved in this process right now I have no concerns about the impact I made a commitment when I ran this time I wasn't going to run again and I mean that sincerely I had no intention of running for president again And until I saw those folks coming out of the fields and Virginia carrying torches and carrying Nazi banners and literally singing the same vile rhyme that they used in Germany in the early 20s or 30s I should say And then the gentleman you mentioned was asked what he thought and a young woman was killing the protester And he asked was asked what he thought he said they're very good people on both sides And that's when I decided I wasn't going to be quiet any longer And when I ran this time and I think the American press whether they look at me favorably or unfavorable acknowledges I made a determination Nothing is worth no election is worth my not doing exactly what I think is the right thing Not a joke I'm too long in the tooth to fool with this any longer And so we're a long way off in elections a long way off My focus of any election is on making sure that we retain the house in the United States Senate So that I have the room to continue to do the things that I've been able to do In terms of growing the economy and deal in a rational way with American foreign policy and lead the world to be the leader of the free world So but it's not illogical question for someone to ask I say to people at home imagine if we sat and watched the doors of the bundestag broken down and police officers killed and hundreds of people storming in or imagine if we saw that happening in the British Parliament or whatever How would we feel And one of the things that I take some solace from is I don't think you'll find any European leader who thinks that I am not up to the job And I mean that sincerely it's not like wow it's just that the point is that the first G 7 meeting I attended like the one I did today Wasn't Great Britain And I sat down and I said America's back And one of the.

Marcus NATO Europe Virginia Germany Senate America British Parliament Britain
"british parliament" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:38 min | 7 months ago

"british parliament" Discussed on WTOP

"A flag Drake coffin I know 13 One of those so she said Mitch 13 of them it was a clear reference to the botched withdrawal from Afghanistan last August and there were a few of those highly partisan moments throughout the speech There were and that one was particularly noteworthy especially when you consider as he was referring to his son Beau Biden as well as just a very very heart wrenching situation involving the veterans there So I'm sure that will get at least a moment of attention One of the more traditional if you will moments where you actually had both sides kind of going at each other although the U.S. Congress doesn't do it quite like the British Parliament but you did hear some booing early in the speech when the president was starting to talk about his economic plans and referred to former president Trump's tax cuts and that brought some booze and some hisses from the Republican side Most of the speech I thought was about what we expected after Ukraine It was basically a laundry list of things that the president would like to do However there was a lot of shortness on specifics related to how that's going to get done You'll notice we never heard the words build back better You heard a lot of the elements of that including trying to get a national plan for family leave raising the minimum wage lowering the price of prescription drugs The president trying to frame everything to show that people would actually be able to save money under these programs Republicans of course very skeptical of that He also said that his top priority is actually getting inflation under control Again however somewhat short on specifics there I'm sure Republicans will be chipping away at that because he really didn't go into any specific plans other than to say well we want to get away from supply chains overseas These are a lot of things that will take a lot of time I also thought it was interesting that he went back to some of the big things that happened last year The American rescue plan of course with COVID And as well as giving some more details related to the infrastructure plan giving some props to Republicans for helping to get that past noting that it's going to fix 65,000 miles of highway and 1500 bridges across the country So again trying to tout some of the things that he's done over the past year also citing the fact that more than 6 million jobs have been created and that economic growth is going higher However Republicans as you know have been really ripping into the president in connection with those rising prices in the supermarket and at the gas pump Capitol.

Beau Biden British Parliament Mitch U.S. Congress Afghanistan Trump Ukraine
Windsor Police Arrest Protesters Who Remained at US-Canada Bridge

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:23 min | 8 months ago

Windsor Police Arrest Protesters Who Remained at US-Canada Bridge

"So a good rule for governance is that the more decentralized the form of government, the less centralized it is, generally the more free the people are. Why? Well, because in order for the central kind of authority to be successful, is they must be right 100% of the time. Where if they're wrong, then you're wrong for everybody. This is what Louis Brandeis called the laboratories of democracy. Now there's been plenty of instances in the past where president suspended writs of habeas corpus, like Abraham Lincoln did. Now the justification was that we were at war against a power, a Civil War. Now, Canada, we got our Canadian history here, was actually founded by the British Parliament, so that totally proves my point. That it wasn't the states that came together and created a federal project, it was a foreign power that came and created the federal project. And so Canadians and their history and their culture, they don't really know how to deal with this sort of encroachment on their freedoms and liberties. Well, Windsor police on Sunday started arresting protesters, blocking the ambassador bridge. I'm reading from the post millennial. Up to 30 protesters had been arrested, most of whom were charged with criminal mischief. Police also seized 5 vehicles from protesters and 7 vehicles were towed Saturday. Police started detaining protesters after a judge ordered them to leave the ambassador bridge some protesters moved away on their own as police approached. Sunday morning. So the emergencies act is an act of parliament to authorize the taking of special temporary measures to ensure safety and security during national emergencies. So the British Parliament created Canada and then Canada has remained subservient. To the power ever since. So what's going on in Ottawa remains to be seen? But the push by Trudeau to get rid of these protesters crush them and early is very clear.

Laboratories Of Democracy Louis Brandeis Windsor Police British Parliament Abraham Lincoln Canada Ottawa Trudeau
William Federer Shares the Story of Yale's 8th President Timothy Dwight

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:14 min | 8 months ago

William Federer Shares the Story of Yale's 8th President Timothy Dwight

"Tell us if you would the story of Timothy Dwight. Right. So the setting is we have a revolution and then France has a revolution. And our revolution was preceded by a great awakening revival. France's revolution was preceded by Voltaire, who mocked Christianity and had a very skeptical viewpoint and undermined morals. And so as a result, the French Revolution became very bloody. And so Timothy Dwight was the president of Yale during this time, and he wrote comments on the difference between our revolution and the French Revolution. In my post on Timothy, why did I go through a little history? Yale, it was founded in 1701. There were ten congregational ministers who sort of felt like Harvard was getting to religious and stodgy. They actually used a term called old lights versus the new lights. And the old life were the religiously strict orthodox, the guys that had their positions and they looked down upon emotional preachers like George whitfield and so forth. The university was originally called the Connecticut collegiate school at killingworth milford, but then they moved to 1716 to New Haven, Connecticut. So the college group, as a result of reverend Jeremiah drummer and he defended the colonial charters against overreaching British Parliament. So the Chargers were given, then you'd have different kings that would want to take away the old charter and consolidated and he would defend them. He secured 700 books for the college's library and solicited donations from many individuals, including the English playwright, Richard Steele, the scientist, Sir Isaac Newton, and he also got contributions from a merchant named elihu

Timothy Dwight Yale France Voltaire George Whitfield Connecticut Collegiate School Killingworth Milford Reverend Jeremiah Drummer Timothy Harvard New Haven British Parliament Connecticut Chargers Richard Steele Sir Isaac Newton
UK counterterror officers lead probe in lawmaker's slaying

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

UK counterterror officers lead probe in lawmaker's slaying

"A long serving member of the British parliament was stabbed to death David Amos was meeting with constituents at a church when he was stabbed I think everybody was deeply shocked and saddened heart stricken prime minister Boris Johnson says part of the reason for the shock is that Amos was so well liked above all he was one of the kindest nicest most gentle people in politics but he also had an outstanding record of passing laws to help the most vulnerable a twenty five year old man was arrested at the scene chief constable Ben Julian Harrington says counter terrorism officers are leading this case it will be for investigators to determine whether or not this is a terrorist incident but as always I will keep an open mind Amos was knighted by Queen Elizabeth in twenty fifteen for his service becoming Sir David I'm at Donahue

David Amos British Parliament Boris Johnson Amos Constable Ben Julian Harringto Queen Elizabeth Sir David Donahue
Trump Is Blaming Biden and ‘the Woke Generals’ for Afghanistan

Mike Gallagher Podcast

02:19 min | 1 year ago

Trump Is Blaming Biden and ‘the Woke Generals’ for Afghanistan

"At some point. The blame trump routine is going to wear thin with all americans. Even democrats have to be rolling their eyes at biden's disastrous response. That this is somehow trump's vol speaking of trump. He spent a long time with sean hannity last night on fox news pointed out some really important things to remember about this debacle in afghanistan well biden in the woke generals. They're just woke. I mean you look at what they're talking about. I was thinking even at the end of my time. I was seeing letters being sent out about equality and all of these different things. The soldiers they wanna fight they wanna be prepared to fight soldiers but the woke generals and has gotten to a level where that nobody can even believe they were looking to get out but they forgot one thing. They forgot to take the people with them and the merchandise were the meeting. They forgot to take the greatest military equipment anywhere in the world with them. And it's hard to believe actually because the child would have understood you. Get the military outlast. A childhood of understood that. How could they have done this to our country pretty Pretty profound sounds pretty fired up as he should be. He also of course observed what the world must be thinking and what. The world is thinking of this failure by the united states of america. And you know who. We look. So bad in front of his russia and china and kim jong un north korea and the european union that laughing at us at a horrible meeting with the g. seven the other day they went out and they were going wild. You've you so what happened in parliament. British parliament where statements are made about our country and about our president. Nobody's ever spoken about our country or president. The way they did in parliament It is so embarrassing but the embarrassments the least of it. There's great danger right now. He's right it's not just the embarrassment. Shame the humiliation that. The united states is experiencing it's the concern and the fear and the great danger.

Biden Sean Hannity Fox News Afghanistan Parliament Kim Jong North Korea United States European Union Russia China
"british parliament" Discussed on Moving2Live

Moving2Live

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"british parliament" Discussed on Moving2Live

"Beach bums right. With with a decent other qualification. We take people swimming daily with vivid. Some equipment is not like is it skills but he's quite easy to get trucks. I came back to the uk job sports development and start to do some work with extracting condition company. Not just looked at while. I was in australia. I've really got into trading ended and up became like a proper bro. Guy doing like four sets bench week. Never trading legs Occasionally doing like i was. I like go into that horrible. Awful uneducated gyms in but i enjoyed the gym environ- so i came by software community geysers sport on a one. I got a place on. An internship offered me a job. And i started working in the university system to begin with. Stay with them for five years. Just like look at the performance teams unit and and Not so thing which was great so sandwich there. Because i mean not sell people now that when asked about it i've probably worked with over thirty different sports over the years and a lot of that was in university and what was amazing about that. Was i looked going from beaten. Netball football to golf to whiteboard him. Because the athletes coaches and the mindset was just amazing melting pot opportunity to get really good at reading people and really good adjusting. How you're going to coach so you call a speech and netball is like a replay. You have to be a completely different approach. And i love that communication challenge at the same time for my education and conditioning association. Accreditation i needed to the case of in guy was working within sports development. At the time was amputee. Marathon runner corbetta. Why had he just gone to fifty seven for martha and said it's still shift. And if people know about martha. Time double-leg bilateral hit the same thing as bilateral amputees through the nasal ruins on straight. Like pylons start with them and that's about read jacko's point of ice was the first athlete that coach once one specifically and awesome guy guy. He can't squat. Cartlidge was our assessment process. But like how do you even begins raw trading program. Has he got full. Hamstring mosquito or not like what i was crazy by love complexity and not something that kind of come to really embrace over the years about the problem sober nature which is properly got my brain taking and i like to be a little bit original and at an always like being told what to do in parliament sport was an amazing opportunity going to be a bit of a non-conformist into to go on with trip myron path because it was no research that will tell you how to get the will again pizza to run a two hour. Forty two meyer thing. Which is why he ended up doing. No one can tell you what you do is right or wrong so i kind of the autonomy of as difficult as that makes it because you you have to take risks and really yourself in how you're gonna write. Programs and part of the export is a relatively small world. You saw delivering performance gains for some people will one person and other people find out about some working with some swimmers and some wa that's skies in a so a scale from there. It became a specialism of mine. Really i guess in stop them working with the british parliament swimming team and went to the rio twenty sixteen games to do the holding. Count that into the village itself. Still working as a consultant with Power sport now. And.

netball corbetta martha Cartlidge swimming australia uk jacko football golf myron meyer british parliament
"british parliament" Discussed on A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

04:56 min | 1 year ago

"british parliament" Discussed on A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

"Robert clive up traditional essentially through conspiracy manages to beacon your daughters army of one third of the army refuses to fight on the day of the Essentially defeat says young ruler and takes over bengal and takes over the due to us by seventeen sixty four of tax collection of the battle. Now they have in their hand and tire a treasury of bingo later on in eighteenth century went live with the ambition the british parliament for his corrupt practices. He would essentially go on to say when i walked through the treasury of motion about of bengal and i give myself only twenty three million sterling bounds. And i thought that was a very small sum. So you can imagine the level of plunder which you know of was undertaken when the last independent rulers of ingles. What did this cross of the richest strategy in the richest province of one of the richest countries in the world. Do for the british this stop relying on civil coming in from the new world remember. Money is usually silver or gold base. Silver largely allowed of that civil is being funneled from mines in the new world including in mexico by the seventeen seventies. This silver has started drying up the mind not producing as much and it is in your favor of the european powers to stop this. Outward flow of species are golden silver from their own treasuries and to find a market read. They can essentially be sufficient so gaining the bengal. Province is in a way a godsend because now they have this money. They can extract that money from the indian people they can use it for their own trade and then expenses of the british government. The extend your company has by. This point started working as a state in an office itself. A government bauer in an office itself even though it is only join. Stocks trading company essentially means that the more or less sufficient. So what else are. They treating other than gordon. They also trading in indigo the die bauge. Only in the nineteenth century would become something that could be mass produced commercially produce chemically produced before that it came from a blonde and.

Robert clive bengal treasury of motion british parliament army mexico british government bauge gordon
"british parliament" Discussed on Armstrong & Getty On Demand

Armstrong & Getty On Demand

05:42 min | 1 year ago

"british parliament" Discussed on Armstrong & Getty On Demand

"Assault just to clarify. What was said there in michelle's introduction to the story we apologize mistake story of course is about bill cosby the detail. Now bill clinton serving time for sexual assault. Ironically it could have been so story behind the story of the making a mistake. There is bill. How bill cosby get out. Why did he go. What happened there. Long story very very short of the judge ruled that the previous district attorney had struck a bargain with cosby that he would not prosecute him criminally if he would consent to testify in the civil case. Okay that guy leaves office. New guy comes in says. Nah i'm gonna use all those statements you made in the civil case against you in the criminal case and the soups ruled not far from unanimously. But the soups in pennsylvania ruled that now that was that was an unholy overturning of an agreement and government persecution in essence. This seems like it deserves. The abbot still treatment. Yeah but still. It's bill cosby. He's rate sixty women. At least let's jail. Yeah probably unfair. But still i have drank all my coffee. Apparently i have grown grown accustomed to a leisurely lifestyle during our week and a half off and The the rigors of working causing me to need to go turn to stimulants to be able to keep my energy up same here. I was doing a good job of cutting down on my caffeine over vacation. I'm hammering it down hammered and speaking of great britain. Oh boy got got an update on a story out of afghanistan boy. The way we're leaving there it's making me think there's a story going on. That's not being reported anyway. More on that in our three this from great britain lobsters feelings loom large as british parliament debates animal welfare bill. They're glorified cockroaches. That happen to be delicious. Let's be serious. How does a lobster feel when it's dropped into a boiling pot. The british parliament wants to know hot. At imagine is an octopus ever sad. Do squid learn lessons. Do bees feel joy. Do earthworms have anxiety. All of the members of the house of lords are current though some days just digging through the earth. I'm processing the dirt through me and i'm thinking what's the point. Are the other worms looking at me. Just hit measuring up. I just don't know what to think. I can't no legs. Why no legs. Wow all of these questions are being debated in the house of lords. Currently as they work on this new animal. Where foot welfare bill. Can you imagine they're actually trying to debate with her. Earthworms get depressed. These questions arise because prime minister. Boris johnson bo joe. I didn't know this is trying to make good on a campaign. Promise promise that. He made that. He was going to come up with a law. That animals are sentient beings and deserve to be treated better. I didn't know bo joe. Was this kind of guided you. I didn't know this was part of his politics..

bill cosby british parliament cosby bill clinton michelle britain pennsylvania house of lords afghanistan bo joe Boris johnson
Jamie Bristow Talks About  Developing Agency In Urgent Times

Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

06:12 min | 1 year ago

Jamie Bristow Talks About Developing Agency In Urgent Times

"Our guest today is jamie bristowe jamie. Welcome to the podcast. Glad to have you here. I need to be here so we're gonna talk about a few different things today. One will be the mindfulness initiative and want to hear more about that and then in particular one of the documents that your group has recently published. But i'd like to start by just helping the audience get a little bit more understanding about you and your background with mindfulness. Okay So i've been the director of the mindfulness initiative sort of work backwards if that's okay and so i've been the director of the mindfulness initiative which is like a policy institute think tank working with politicians primarily in the uk but also around the world for getting on for six years And i've been working in the mindfulness field. I guess for a few years more than that. I was the business. Development director had space Back in the days when has faced with like seven people in five desks north in london rather than the big Sort of global brand. That has become today and previous to that. I was trying to find my way into sharing. I learnt myself huge impact. It had them how to my life. I was lucky enough to Learn to meditate. When i was a student at university so i was a fresher. Eighteen years old and didn't think much of it was just like another experience like join only different societies to try. Try out different. Things ultimate frisbee or amateur dramatics. Meditation was just like one of those things along for like. Oh wow i can. I can close my eyes radically alter my subjective experience just by applying myself that's cool And then kind of forgot about it because there were so many other exciting things to and dive into well. I knock him dipped in and out of it but it wasn't until i had my first like graduate graduated job. I was a young advertising executive. Just really going to be graded advertising and I was working on like a nissan misano. Nissan is he saying this in the states at the time like descending. suv's essentially and I was really stressful. Like i'm struggling to concentrate. The lifestyle was cheering me up to an extent and so i really at that point started to really invest in it rather than being in thing. I did now again. Became a regular practice. And i as it's been charted in the academic literature people often start for self-regulation benefit. You know for me. It was it. Was the attention thing like i needed to i. I as a kid i was. Add at the end of the spectrum so i Got myself regulation benefit. I could concentrate but then it then you know develops center from self regulation to self expiration and then like wow. There's much more to me. And to and to life. I guess than i thought that was and then moving on from that to self transcendence of because if the final of the three raises the phases. The one one paper has charted. And sure i started practicing for reasons other than myself I'm that she had the advertising world wasn't wasn't right for reasons. The myself is So i left. That world went into climate. Change campaigning And through that like realize. What a piece of mindfulness was for me in making that journey from sending. Suv's to selling responsiveness to climate climate crisis And and so yet. That's that's why. I find my way into doing what i'm doing now. Really the kind of social implications of widespread contemporary give a practices. Jimmy thank you so much for that background. And it's it's fascinating to hear different ways. Each person may find some value in this that we might be brought to it for a particular reason. Focus and then. It's oh my there's more stuff here to hearing about your time in head space. Andy putty comas. One of the first interviews. I did another pug guests many years ago before it got really really big. And so with that you've had this practice that's been part of your life that has been beneficial transformative to you and then along came in some fashion. The mindfulness initiative. How did that get started. While i was working head space at the time and i was invited by chris. Colin who's leading teacher at oxford. Mindfulness center and i'm teaching politicians in the british parliament From he and mark williams from about two thousand and his spring two thousand and thirteen a year or so later. Those who who. Who had been on a mindfulness course started to become interested in the science behind what they've found and what the policy implications might be. Because often you know when you find that it's really helping you know about is. How do i get this. You know and you reach for the most obvious thing you bring into your school or you tell you family about it but politicians that like the policy lever is like you can. How do we get this into

Jamie Bristowe Jamie Misano Nissan UK London Andy Putty Comas Mindfulness Center Jimmy British Parliament Mark Williams Colin Oxford Chris
EU officials formally sign post-Brexit trade deal with UK

Morning Edition

00:10 sec | 1 year ago

EU officials formally sign post-Brexit trade deal with UK

"Union have formally signed the post Brexit trade agreement reached with Britain. The deal is still subject to approval from the EU legislature in the British parliament. Cold War spy

Eu Legislature Britain British Parliament
EU ambassadors approve post-Brexit trade deal

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

EU ambassadors approve post-Brexit trade deal

"Brexit trade deal clinched. On christmas eve has now been provisionally approved by european governments teri schultz reports. This will allow the agreement to take effect on january first ambassadors from the twenty seven remaining members of the european union have given their formal backing to trade and customs agreement worked out between the eu and uk last week this agreement will prevent tariffs and quotas being imposed on uk goods entering the e eu single market when the brexit transition period officially ends december. Thirty first although parliament's on both sides also need to approve the agreement. The european parliament refused to call a special session to consider the more than twelve hundred pages of court on such a short time line. That will only happen next month but will not prevent what's being called the provisional application of the term starting friday the british parliament will vote on the deal wednesday and expected to approve it

Brexit Teri Schultz EU UK British Parliament European Parliament
U.K. and EU reach Brexit deal that should avert New Year chaos

Todd Schnitt

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

U.K. and EU reach Brexit deal that should avert New Year chaos

"Well. The UK and the European Union have reached a trade deal worth over £600 billion a year, just a week before the UK is set to leave the EU Prime Minister Boris Johnson says the relationship between his nation and the you won't change because of Brexit. We will be your friend, your ally. Your supporter and indeed never let it be for gotten your number one market. Because, well, they we have left the EU. This country will remain culturally emotionally historically. Strategically. Geologically. Attached. To Europe. The British Parliament will vote on the deal December

European Union UK Boris Johnson British Parliament Europe
"british parliament" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

Newsradio 600 KOGO

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"british parliament" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

"It's the latest when you need it on demand from Fox News and Amazon, Alexa Well the UK and the European Union have reached a trade deal worth over £600 billion a year. Just a week before the UK is set to leave the EU Prime Minister Boris Johnson says the relationship between his nation and the you won't change because of Brexit. We will be your friend. Your ally, your supporter and indeed never let it be for gotten your number one market. Because, well, they we have left the EU. This country will remain culturally emotionally historically. Strategically geologically. Attached. To Europe. The British Parliament will vote on the deal December 30th. And despite a surgeon coronavirus cases across the country, Americans are still traveling for the holidays. Nearly 85 million people are expected to travel over the next week and a half, according to Triple A. The vast majority are avoiding crowded airports and packed planes to drive to their destinations. That's despite public health officials urging folks to stay home is States report record numbers of hospitalizations due to the coronavirus. A lot of folks we spoke to acknowledge they're taking Risk by traveling but safe for them. Being reunited with family is worth it Boxes Garrett tending. Plus, the MBA is forbidding players and staffers from trying to cut the line for the Corona virus vaccine. In a league wide memo Thursday, the MBA touted the safety and effectiveness of the visor and modern a Corona virus vaccines that have been approved for use in the United States, but urged players and staffers alike to wait their turn in accordance with public health regulations regarding who gets vaccinated first. MBA is allowing exceptions for team physicians and health related personnel, as well as older staff members or those with conditions that delivery higher risk for complication upon contracting the coronavirus. The memo comes in the wake of NBA Commissioner Adam Silver, recently telling reporters on conference call at the MBA would not jump the line when it came to the vaccine boxes..

MBA European Union UK Boris Johnson Fox News British Parliament Prime Minister Alexa Europe Brexit United States Adam Silver NBA Amazon Commissioner
"british parliament" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"british parliament" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"The European Union have reached a trade deal worth over £600 billion a year, just a week before the UK is set to leave the EU Prime Minister Boris Johnson says the relationship between his nation and the you won't change because of Brexit. We will be your friend, your ally. Your supporter and indeed never let it be for gotten your number one market. Because, well, they we have left the EU. This country will remain culturally emotionally historically. Strategically geologically. Attached. To Europe. The British Parliament will vote on the deal December 30th. And despite a surge in Corona virus cases across the country, Americans are still traveling for the holidays. Nearly 85 million people are expected to travel over the next week and a half, according to Triple A. The vast majority are avoiding crowded airports and packed planes to drive to their destinations. That's despite public health officials urging folks to stay home is States report record numbers of hospitalizations due to the coronavirus. A lot of folks we spoke to acknowledge they're taking Risk by traveling but safe for them. Being reunited with family is worth it Boxes. Garrett Tenney Plus the MBA is forbidding players and staffers from trying to cut the line for the Corona virus vaccine. In a league wide memo Thursday, the MBA touted the safety and effectiveness of the visor and modern a Corona virus vaccines that have been approved for use in the United States, but urged players and staffers would like to wait their turn in accordance with public health regulations regarding who gets vaccinated first. MBA is allowing exceptions for team physicians and health related personnel, as well as older staff members or those with conditions that delivery higher risk for complication upon contracting the coronavirus. The memo comes in the wake of NBA Commissioner Adam Silver, recently telling reporters on conference call at the MBA would not jump the line when it came to the vaccine boxes. Metropolitano..

MBA European Union Boris Johnson British Parliament Prime Minister Garrett Tenney Europe Brexit UK Adam Silver NBA United States Commissioner
"british parliament" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"british parliament" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Supporter and indeed never let it be for gotten your number one market because although we have left the EU, this country will remain culturally emotionally, historically, strategically, geologically attached to Europe. Well, we'll see if the EU reciprocates with that philosophy. What are some of the pitfalls Matthew and any lingering questions? So there will be many lingering questions. The British parliament first of all is going to have to vote on this thing, and that's supposed to happen on December 30th even if it does pass, though the toxic politics Around Brexit are just not going to disappear. There were already expressions of disappointment today In Scotland, for example, the First Minister Nicolas Sturgeon, said that this is a bad deal for the fishing industry. In Scotland. She said that the U. K government broke its promises here and that we're going to learn more about how that is going to play out in this deal, she said, also menacingly for British politics that Scotland has the right to choose its own future. As an independent country, another quick example from Ireland. This is a country that stood to lose a lot if there was a no deal Brexit scenario Ireland's part of the EU. It also shares land border with Northern Ireland, which is part of the UK, the Irish prime minister. Today. Michael Martin called this new trade deal the least bad version of Brexit possible so damning with some faint praise there. It was Matthew Bell. Thank you very much. And American isthmus. Same to you, Marco. Thanks..

EU Scotland Matthew Bell Ireland British parliament Michael Martin Northern Ireland prime minister Nicolas Sturgeon Europe Marco U. K UK
Historic Brexit Deal Sets Trade Relationship for U.K., EU

WSJ What's News

06:15 min | 1 year ago

Historic Brexit Deal Sets Trade Relationship for U.K., EU

"Just ahead of a year end deadline the uk and the european union have reached an agreement on a brexit trade deal that will guide their future relationship british prime minister. Boris johnson says the deal ends years of economic uncertainty. Very pleased to tell you the psalter name That we have completed the biggest trade deal yet worth six hundred sixty billion pounds. Yeah a comprehensive canada style. Free trade deal between the uk and the eu a deal that will protect jobs across this country allow goods. You can goods and components to be sold without tariffs and without quotas in the eu market. Deal which will if anything allow our companies and our exporters to do even more business with all european friends. The deal comes after months of negotiations following the uk exit from the european union in january. Joining me now to talk more about it is wall street journal. Uk and brexit. Editor stephen fiddler. Hi steven thanks so much for being here more booger so stephen. This deal follows months of talks. It's a big agreement. Tell us more about the key terms of the deal which covers a really broad range of issues here covers everything from trade to security to terrorism sharing of information on crime databases. It includes traffic Regulations you know who can drive on. Who's roads it includes fishing and who can fish in waters and the british waters and and how much fish they can take out of it. I mean there's a vast agreement of more than a thousand pages. The main thing it does is avoid. The imposition of time on trade between the two sides for the first time since one thousand nine hundred seventy three came down really in the last days to fight about fishing which is just a tiny proportion of both economists about zero point. Three percent of of both economies in terms of gdp a hugely important places like the uk but also in france and the netherlands denmark and spain and in the end it came down to a sort of a haggle over but the species. That could be caught from the waters of the of the uk species by species over the next five and a half years so it got down into kind of incredibly detailed negotiation in the haggling over various things that are actually in the end. Very small points economically the question was how much does the u k agree to follow standards and regulations set out by the eu in order to ensure that the uk could get tariff-free access to the market a full hundred and forty million people and in the end. That was a compromise on that that you didn't the uk to become a major competitor on its doorstep with free access to the eu market. And be able to undercut it and things. I m environmental standards on on things like subsidies for companies on things like labor standards and labor rules so the uk basically you had to accept in general a lot of those standards as the price. It paid to get tariff-free access to the eu. But in general the uk is now sort of a much freer to settle agreements with other countries including wanted hopes. I think with the united states that's free trade agreements because in the u. It's basically locked into and it has been locked into the us trade arrangements for decades so now that a deal has been reached. What will be playing out over the next few weeks. Well it has to be ratified. That's the first thing so that the british parliament will has been recalled. I think for december thirtieth to ratify. The agreement will do that on on one day. European leaders also will have to approve it. That's a fairly foregone conclusion. I think that both sides get approval from both sides. It also technically needs the approval of the european parliament. So that's the eu legislature. That will happen some point in the new year so in january one the agreement will go into place provisionally and then it will be ratified presumably at a later date by the european parliament. This is a basis for the future relationship of the eu and the uk. They're right next door to each other hugely important to each other in lots of ways and it's wrong to think of this as being kind of static thing that's that's now setting concrete foil. You know the rest of time. It's the start of a relationship that will change. According to how each side sees their own best interests so it sounds like this isn't quite it for brexit. Although a lot of reporting has referred to this as sort of a capstone deal here what other loose ends need to be tied up. Well it is a capstone really in in the sense that it's as i said the main of the major framework for their relationship. There are things that need to be tied up. And these are sort of unilateral in a way so the eu has to make rulings on the ability of you've to shed data with the uk. It hasn't done yet. That's a unilateral designation. It will make and we're expecting that to come. There's also some eu declarations to come on allowing financial services firms for the uk to do certain operations inside the eu after january. The first so there's technical things will follow. It's not going to be in terms of financial services anywhere like the relationship. That was there before that allowed london. Essentially to become the capital of a you finance and do some huge percentage of old finance business in the eu. Certainly all wholesale finance business that has gone away. There's already been drift of capital adrift of personnel. From the city of london to other places in the eu and that drift is is likely to continue. That's u k and brexit editor. Stephen fiddler stephen. Thank you so much for joining me. Today you're welcome

EU UK Stephen Fiddler Boris Johnson Wall Street Journal Eu Legislature Steven European Parliament Stephen Denmark The Netherlands Canada British Parliament Spain France United States London Stephen Fiddler Stephen
So long, and were keeping all the fish: Brexit

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:20 min | 1 year ago

So long, and were keeping all the fish: Brexit

"There should have been something of a resolution at last to the brexit drama. This morning ursula von der line the president of the european commission and boris johnson. Britain's prime minister and said yesterday as an extended deadline to work out the fine print on britain's divorce papers yesterday came and despite the exhaust soon after almost one year of negotiations. And despite the fact that deadlines have been missed over and over. We both think that it is responsible at this point. In time to go the extra mile mr johnson used similar language to ms vonda. Lions having repeatedly warned that no deal was a very likely outcome. Where there's life there's hope we're going to keep talking to see what we can do. The uk certainly would be a will key away from the talks. I think people would expect us to to go the extra mile. Neither side wants the regulatory and logistical chaos of a no deal scenario but neither side seems willing to make much in the way of concessions and now an immovable deadline looms december thirty first. We are very much convinced. The end of the year. When the transition period finishes john peet is brexit editor. So the risk of nato is still high but the mood between the sides is probably better after the extension of the deadline than it was last week and what are. The main areas of disagreement still the main areas of disagreement being the same almost all year. There is a quarrel about fisheries giving european votes access to british waters. And there's a quarrel about what's called a level playing field which the rules for competition to make sure britain does not undercut european companies insatiable environmental labor and state. Subsidy rules the eu. On britain to stick to most of the rules it follows now. Britain wants the right to diverge from these rules and some way of settling that bigger argument fisheries will be needed. If there's going to be a trade deal but as you say these have been the points of disagreement. Better part of the year i mean What room for compromise left. Well they all talking. As i understand it about possible dispute mechanisms for settling quarrels about measures that be taken by britain or indeed by the eu. After the first january that deemed to be anti competitive. And i think that's the focus where you might find some way of agreeing what the europeans want is a dispute mechanism that would allow them to retaliate. If they deem britain to be behaving in an uncompetitive way. Retaliate by imposing tariffs or withdrawing trade preferences. The british could do the same to the eu. And i think in that area there is still scope for agreement and all this is about rules and regulations but what the personalities involved here. How does that play into. what's happening. The european union negotiator is michelle bonnier. he's french and he obviously has relationship with french president. Boris johnson has been trying several times to go round michelle bonnier and negotiate with others but the europeans are very strict on saying. This is the job of the european commission. Michelle baez negotiator. His bosses are london. I on the president of the european commission. I think boris johnson gets on reasonably with all of these people but none of them quite trust him. And i think that's one of the reasons why they want to have a very clear sort of legal framework that includes dispute settlement mechanisms and the right to retaliate. Because they never quite trust. Boris johnson not to go off and do something that will damage them. And how much do you think that issue of trust has has helped things up so far in yet still i. Trust has been very important in this negotiation. And i think the behavior of boris johnson has not made it easy a. He refused to consider extending the deadline for the negotiations earlier in the year when the europeans wanted him to and he then suggested a couple of times that he was going to rewrite the withdrawal treaty. Which is the agreement reached last year under which britain formerly left the european union. Even though that's an international treaty that would be a breach of international law. And i think if you put those things together. There is every reason why the europeans feel. They shouldn't trust will rely on the british government. Under boris johnson. Not to babe in a way that they think might be bad for the european union its members so the us official negotiator is michel barnier but that the national leaders are playing something of a roll here to national league is obviously critical. I mean Michelle bonnier as the negotiator. Us on the line. As the president of the european commission are operating under a mandate as they call it which they've been given by national leaders for these trade talks the mandate is quite a tough one. The toughest person in this mandate of toughest of bits of the mandate have been insisted on by the french president last week. Emmanuel macron said. I've consistent. So now i don't want to have my cake and eat it but i do want the pieces cut. He could it. Because i'm not giving my peace away. Michelle demander busy discussion janardan pam. I'd meanwhile angela merkel the other key european leader the chancellor germany. she's regarded as a bit more of a soft cup than emmanuel macron. She's very keen that there should be a deal beneath them. Dusty dusty. alice gibney super communists. I say funds and she's also quite strict and she has recently said. I think we should do everything together. Result goes saying and the threat to both sides. All along has been the chance that this should end without a deal or are both sides ready for that. I think no deal would be highly disruptive for both the and the uk. The impact would be worse but britain because it is more. Reliant on trade across the channel and largest sheriff's exports go to the european union. If there is no deal that will be intensive customs checks and problems at ports and trading across between britain and the uk and then also be tariffs which are quite low. But they're high for certain sectors ten percent for cars forty percent for sheep metex bullets about the same for beef exports and that would certainly cost people and be very disruptive of a very big trade relationship. The europeans think it will be worse for britain but britain also thinks that it would be disruptive for the eu particularly for ireland. Most of his trade goes through the united kingdom and say both sides want to avoid new deal and so does that mean that. This may go right down to the wire that there may be negotiations. Happening on new year's eve at some point people will have to say look. If we can't strike an agreement we are just going to turn deal. I mean what. The negotiators come up with has to be approved by national parliaments by the british parliament by the european parliament. That's the surprises. That sometimes takes weeks or months. You can tell escape it. But i think if we get to the thirty first of december they haven't reached an agreement that it will mean. No deal really have settled before christmas. Have any chance of ratification for january-august john. Thank you very much for your time. Once more. thank you.

Boris Johnson Britain EU Michelle Bonnier European Commission Ursula Von Der Ms Vonda John Peet Mr Johnson Michelle Baez United Kingdom Lions Nato Emmanuel Macron Michelle Demander Janardan Pam Michel Barnier
"british parliament" Discussed on LIFE: Love,Insight, Fertility, Experience

LIFE: Love,Insight, Fertility, Experience

05:27 min | 1 year ago

"british parliament" Discussed on LIFE: Love,Insight, Fertility, Experience

"Because you know everybody else had these children are going to be. You know so upset about all of this it will make them very unhappy will make them disturbed and actually they just really didn't care of them so although the tune in our in our study one was a bit unhappy about it the rest of the rest either the majority. I'd say we're just not very interested. You know they would say things like well. You know it's just there's so many other more interesting things being in my life. This isn't many an issue for me. And then there was some a smaller group who actually felt very positively about it and would say things like well. I like it. You know this is something special about me you know. It's a good story to tell my friends and so on so you know there were all these an predictions about the bad things happen again. It turned out not to be the case. So i think that's the advantage of doing longitudinal research. So you know you can her the children up from very young before they know anything about their conception and also allows you to look at things like well. When did parents begin to talk to their children. How much difference does that make. So that's why going back to see the families every few years has been a very Illuminating approach i think in terms of addressing the concerns about surrogacy so the research has a has fed into legislation on surrogacy and You know you're in new york. And i know you involved in the change in legislation. That happens in new york state. And i think my research did contribute to that fed into debates on the actions but also in the uk similar things happening so in the united kingdom but actually we've had legislation on surrogacy since nineteen eighty five. The the idea that point was surrogacy. Surrogacy is not allowed to be commercial in the united kingdom so though sarah gates can claim expenses. They're not allowed to be paid such so. The idea was surrogacy would disappear because if surrogate could be paid. It was thought well we wouldn't want to do it. Not turned out not to be the case so at the moment the commission is working with the united kingdom government to route to again have another review lawn surrogacy and it seems very likely that surrogacy legislation will go before new legislation will go before the british parliament and twenty twenty two and the aim is to make more straightforward easier for people to have surrogacy..

united kingdom sarah gates new york united kingdom government british parliament
"british parliament" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:37 min | 2 years ago

"british parliament" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Hello. You're listening to the BBC World Service and I'm severe Smith Gala. Or at least that's who I always thought I was my dad always thought he was a Smith Gala two and then in his late sixties, something changed forever. When something came up on the science, I just assumed it was a cousin. And to be honest, I didn't really think much more of it. That had taken a consumer D n a test kit just like over 26 million other people on the planet. But he ended up finding out a lot more than he bargained for. This isn't just a documentary about skeletons in the closet. This is about personal, cultural and even ethnic background, suddenly surfacing identities that we have always had, but not necessarily known about. And if these DNA tests are supposed to give us all the answers, what exactly are our questions about ourselves in the first place? Find out now in DNA and me after the BBC news Hello. I'm Chris Barrow with the BBC News. The US president elect Joe Biden is toe asked members of the new coronavirus task force led by scientists and public health officials. How to turn election campaign proposals into action as they try to fight the pandemic in the world's worst hit nation. His David Willis to 12 member Corona Virus Task Force comprised of scientists and health officials, one that will be ready. The Biden campaign says to go into action Once Joe Biden is sworn in on the 20th of January, it's probably the issue that will dominate the early days of his presidency because the virus has already claimed. 238,000 American lives plus and infected close to 10 million people here now, Mr Biden is also poised to an actor Siri's of executive actions that would Undo many of Donald Trump's foreign policy measures. Resident front has still not conceded and a key part of the federal bureaucracy. The General Services Administration has not yet recognized Mr Biden as the president elect. Resident Il Ham, Aaliyah has told the BBC Azeri forces will stop fighting immediately the moment Armenia withdrawals from occupied territories surrounding the disputed enclave of Nagorno Karabakh. Mr Liev said he did not see a possibility for peace with the current prime minister of Armenia, Nicole Passion, yon the opportunities to compromise his shrinking because we're getting those territories back by force. So is they're losing time. And if they behave reasonably, we can work on some forms off cell governance. We're not against. But frankly speaking with this prime minister off Armenian, I don't think that the any possibility for peace He insisted that Armenian civilians would be able to remain in Laguna. Cara back on dismissed fears of ethnic cleansing. The upper house of the British Parliament is voting today on a controversial bill that would override parts of the withdrawal agreement signed between Britain and the U. He used chief negotiator is in London for further talks on a trade deal. Disagreements remain over fishing rights and rules on fair competition, Chris Mason reports. Sticking points a cz they were but one thing has changed The election of Joe Biden, the president elect has been openly critical of the internal market bill, fearing its objective, ensuring free trade within the UK could impose a hard border between Northern Ireland and the Republic, and this would be a deal breaker. For any U. S. U K trade arrangement, The Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab said the UK was unconditionally committed to not having AH hard border on the island of island. This is the latest world news from the BBC. Police in Austria have raided 60 properties used by suspected Islamists. The early morning raids took place simultaneously in four regions. 30 people were arrested. Prosecutors say the operation targeted members and supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood and the Palestinian groups Hamas. They say the raids come a year after investigations were launched against 70 suspects. They're not connected to the recent terror attack in Vienna. The Russian military says a soldier has killed three people at an airbase near the southern city of Oran age. At least one other soldier was injured. Reports say the assailant used a firearm he'd seized from an officer. More than 100. Security personnel are searching for the man who escaped the scene of the shooting. One of the world's most famous radio telescopes at Parks Observatory in New South Wales. Australia has been officially renamed marry Yang as part of this year's celebrations of Aboriginal culture. Parks relayed the television pictures of the moon landing from Sydney. His film Ursa Parks Observatory has three telescopes all have Bean renamed in respect of the astronomical knowledge of Australia's original inhabitants who stores of creation are told by the Stars. The largest, which has discovered hundreds of new Galaxies and rapidly spinning neutron stars, called pulsars is to be known as Mari Yang or Sky World. The others have Aboriginal names, meaning smart I and smart dish. They were chosen by were a jury elders who say it's one of their proudest moments. The southeastern shores of Florida.

Joe Biden BBC president prime minister UK Smith Gala Armenia Mari Yang Ursa Parks Observatory Australia Chris Barrow Mr Liev BBC Azeri General Services Administratio US Parks Aaliyah Muslim Brotherhood British Parliament
"british parliament" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"british parliament" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Radio. I'm David Westin turned out Omar Crumpton for Bloomberg. First word News David Wisconsin elections officials say all votes are in and have been counted. The state's Elections Commission administrator declined to confirm on official tallies that showed Democrat Joe Biden with a lead of more than 20,000 votes. President Trump's campaign manager Bill Stepien, says the president planning with a lead of more than 20,000 votes, President Trump's campaign manager Bill Stepien says the president plans to quote Immediately request to recount in Wisconsin If the battleground state is declared victory for Mr Biden. All eyes are on Pennsylvania and election officials there say they're working hard to count every single ballot. State says Nearly half of the mailed in ballots have been counted and they're still coming in Pennsylvania will accept ballots postmarked by Election Day until 5 P.m. on Friday. Ballots from military and overseas voters could be received until November. 10th the US postmaster, General Lewis to Joy may have to testify under oath about the US Postal Service is a parent failures to adhere to court orders. The orders stem from a lawsuit over changes that disrupted the delivery mail in ballots during the election. A federal judge said today. He was shocked to hear about the failures of the USPS. Follow through on the orders, including not completing a mandatory sweep of mail and processing facilities to look for undelivered ballads by three PM on Election day. The British Parliament has voted to back Boris Johnson knew Corona virus lock down that after the prime minister warned England faces quote the risk of immortality on a grievous scale. If lawmakers failed to approve the plan, the U. K reported 492 virus related deaths today. The new regulations take effect Thursday. Enforcing the closing of pubs, gyms and nonessential shops and restricting household mixing global news. 24 hours a day on air and on Bloomberg. Quick take powered by more than 2700 journalists and analysts in over 120 countries. I'm more Crumpton, This is Bluebeard. Okay, Mark. Thank you so very much. There's some breaking news..

Bill Stepien President Trump Bloomberg Joe Biden president US Pennsylvania Omar Crumpton David Westin David Wisconsin Elections Commission USPS Wisconsin British Parliament Boris Johnson administrator Mark General Lewis
Politician, Eleanor Rathbone

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:59 min | 2 years ago

Politician, Eleanor Rathbone

"Today we're talking about one of the first female members of the British Parliament who used her position to push for gender equal legislation. Please welcome Eleanor Rathbone Eleanor was born in London on May. Twelfth Eighteen, seventy two. From a young age, she grew up in the world of politics. Her Father William was a liberal member of parliament. And often entertained other politicians and intellectuals. In eighteen ninety, three at the age of twenty one. Eleanor. Left home to study at Somerville College Oxford. There, she studied classics and was allegedly nicknamed the philosopher by her peers. When Eleanor realized that her college refused to give degrees to female students, she took matters into her own hands. He joined a group of women called the steamboat ladies who sailed to Dublin. To get honorary degrees from Trinity College. After graduating eleanor worked alongside her father investigating the working conditions of Industrial Liverpool. After his death eleanor continued her work in the city she volunteered for the Liverpool central relief, society where she dedicated her time to helping families in poverty, improve and change their living conditions in the eighteen nineties. Eleanor became a supporter of the women's rights movement, which she saw as integral to widespread social reform. Eighteen ninety five, she was appointed secretary at the Liverpool Women's suffrage society as well as the women's Industrial Council. Eleanor didn't agree with radical tactics to promote women's suffrage and instead pushed a more moderate approach in nineteen. Oh six, the Liverpool City Council Open. It's elective positions. Two women in nineteen o nine eleanor ran and was elected as an independent candidate a position she held until nineteen, thirty five. In nineteen thirteen, she co founded the Liverpool Women Citizens Organization to promote the involvement of women in politics. When World War One broke out eleanor organized association to help wives and other dependents. She continued that work when soldiers returned home, she saw mothers were struggling to provide for families and advocated for the installment of a family wage system. This method would pay family allowances directly to mothers, helping them to support their children and simultaneously fighting against the notion that men had to be the breadwinners. In nineteen eighteen at the end of World War, one British women over the age of thirty. Got The right to vote that same year eleanor established the nineteen eighteen club the following year eleanor became president of the National Union of Women's suffrage societies. And renamed it the National Union of Societies for equal citizenship in Nineteen, twenty, two eleanor ran for British parliament. She lost that year but was elected in nineteen twenty nine as an independent member for the combined English universities. She was one of the first women to hold a position in parliament. There Eleanor continued her lifelong activism in her first speech. She criticized British colonial ISM, and it's anti-feminism. She specifically called out the inhumane practice of female genital mutilation in Kenya. As. The Great Depression loomed she campaigned for the People's rights to cheaper milk and better benefits for dependents of the unemployed. Eleanor was also one of the first politicians to warn of the danger of fascist uprisings across Europe. She spoke candidly about her disappointment in British neutrality concerning politics in Germany Spain Italy and Czechoslovakia. She joined a nonsectarian anti-nazi council to support human rights and set up a parliamentary committee that took up individual refugee cases throughout the war at one point eleanor allegedly tried to charter a ship to cross the blockade of Spain Rescue Republicans from the country. Later, in the early nineteen forties, eleanor devoted resources to get an Jewish people out of Poland. In nineteen forty-five eleanor finally saw her fight for family allowances put into law by the Labor Party with the Family Allowance Act. However it was initially passed on the stipulation the allowance be paid to fathers rather than the mother she fought for. Eleanor's rage was short-lived. The bill was contested by many women in parliament and was amended within the year to be paid to mothers. Eleanor died suddenly of a heart attack on January second nineteen forty-six. Forty years later, a blue plaque is dedicated to her by the Greater London Council at her former residents. It calls her the pioneer of family allowances. She was also honored along with fifty eight other women's suffrage supporters on the plinth of the statue commemorating fellow suffragettes leader millicent falls it in London twenty? Eighteen.

Eleanor Rathbone Eleanor Liverpool Women British Parliament Liverpool Women Citizens Organ Liverpool City Council Open Liverpool National Union Of Women London Somerville College Oxford Trinity College Greater London Council National Union Of Societies William Europe Kenya Dublin Poland Millicent Spain
Boris Johnson will delay decision on quitting Brexit trade talks

Monocle 24: The Globalist

09:04 min | 2 years ago

Boris Johnson will delay decision on quitting Brexit trade talks

"The brexit transition period is due to expire on the thirty first of December at which point the UK will leave the single market without a deal unless an agreement with the EU is reached in the next few weeks British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said he wanted the broad outlines of the deal to be in place by the time the European Council Summit begins, today. The McCaffrey is your news political editor. He joins me on the line from Brussels could money cheat today it's the deadline. So why aren't we walking away? In this process is brexit process. We're very very used to deadlines coming and going out we gene and two large degree. At today he's GonNa come and go again and what we're expecting is no deal at the end of today when. Leaders meet in Brussels who were also not expecting Britain at top walk away either in fact we're expecting. Probably weeks of negotiations. Why is that I? Think because progress has been made though it is interesting last night the Boris Johnson spoke to US London line the EU Commission, Presidents and chose Michelle the EU council president in a joint to call and he. Exposure of his disappointment that the had not being a substantial or not progress. But clearly think that there is still an opportunity to get a deal. Hence why these talks will continue. We have to remember at the end of all of this book Britain and the e You have repeatedly said, they do wolves future trade deal I. Think both of them are willing to give it another shot of you like a bit more time So what are the underlying issues that holding up this process? Will listen to you though kind of three key areas in all of this at first of all is the so-called level playing fields or state AIDS, which is essentially the e you wanting you to adhere to the same rules and regulations to a large degree that and they already do as a former member of the European Union and things like environmental protections, food standards, for example, so that Britain can't undercut those in a more competitive way and join to that is this issue of state AIDS. The idea that the state can subsidize heavily industries to keep them afloat if you like, and again the EU is king the Britain essentially really can do that because it could convey. Could gain a competitive edge. Undercut the E. U., two degree now Britain would point out and rightly so some would say that actually if there is any part of the two sides who are used to subsidizing their industries, it's more likely to be countries like France and Italy than it needs to be the UK or indeed Germany for example, who just failed out Lufthansa to the tune of ten billion euros I mean the UK hasn't yet bailed out any of Big Airlines then disease you have governance How to settle speech future future disputes in essence the EU, has conceded that it's no longer going to be the European Court of Justice and they're trying to work out to kind of independent tradition if you like. And then finally, there's this kind of issue of fishing which economically is not important either to the EU or the UK in the sense it doesn't really make much of any countries economies to large degree, but it is politically symbolic. Ephraim. Brexit. As it will is what Brexit was all of out retaining sheesh water and also some European countries. It's incredibly symbolic importance at French fishermen, for example, or at pretty significant force in France and Emmanuel macron is staring down election in the not too distant future. So that is an issue. That actually is always the most difficult of issues because as as a Britain wants to gain back control of its waters, the EU still wants to be allowed to fish in those waters and it suggesting that if it cannot will. Then Britain is not going to be able to sell its fish to the rest of Europe and that is by far the largest markets. So shortly, collapse the whole deal on fishing. Think not though there are genuine concerns that it could be at the key issue. In the trade talks over the next couple of weeks, not least of all, because as become this to the issue in from both sides that for Britain. It's very symbolic as I say what Brexit is, they are absolutely determined. That they can have you know European fishermen essentially in the seas for years and years to come. Katrina to the fish they just think that is fundamentally unacceptable. It is not in essence taking back control. For the EU are equally determined. That if Britain wants to gain access to it single market by selling fish and eighty I, think it's eighty percent of British Fisher exploited in sixty percents. In, total those to the rest of the EU then. You're. Not, GONNA be able to sell your fish and you can have all your efficient chips he wants, but they'll have to be British people are going to eat them and not the EU, and they would also point that actually half of the so-called Bush's boats that fish in fresh waters at the moment are actually forward. So in practical terms, would it make that much difference I think the compromise, the them at may well come, and with this idea of quotas every year that potentially will start where we all now and year after year decrease. On a negotiated faces a bit like Norway has dumb but for Emmanuel macron fishing is a key key factor in all of this. Simply because you know French, fishermen are a potent political force but for the countries like Germany. In essence fishing's not very important and they would be very, very disappointed when push on for the deal to collapse on that single issue. So I mean what happens next and is a no deal Nella a probability rather than A. So. When you talk to people here and is being a whole range of MVP's and official yesterday, they were putting it at a probability of sixty percents. Gene essentially, that will be no deal, which is point stalk in many ways given the fact that we are getting into the game and we really all because time is to Michelle Volley ticking in this process I think what will happen next though is that they will conclude. Leaders at tomorrow that enough progress has been made and the talk should continue. I expect the British will accept that and talks will continue for the next couple of weeks. up until. Either the end of this month or the start of next. But then a deal is going to have to be done or essentially both sides have to accept the will be no deal because ultimately if there is to be a deal, it is a massive. Weighty Hefty document that has to be translated into all the official languages of the EU. EU Paul, we'll have to vote on the British parliament, some national parliaments to and so that decision will have to be pretty soon at the start of the next month because ultimately, they'll only have up until the end of to send the. It's because Boris Johnson his always all. And that he will not extend beyond December thirty. First, we've heard of course that before I think this time that really is a hard deadline and so at the Mo- wind, you'd have to conclude or less things substantially change that you know no deal. Is a real. Possibility, but probability, how is the British parliament reacting to this brinkmanship? Well, there's this. Thing is when we kind of what? It's not weird actually, it's probably not surprising the tool. But, it's not really consuming European on British national politics. At the moment clearly, we're in the middle of a pandemic. Clearly everyone's focusing on not just the fact that there is a second surge affecting almost every corner of Europe and deed every corner of the British isles. And Other increasing restrictions, talks about lockdown. So not not anyone's really talking about Brexit I think. Boris. Johnson's going to take enough majority that no deal is not good to trouble him like it. It was last year when there was a possibility that the government collapse on the issue I don't think that's GonNa happen this time round for the genuine concerns in Britain about what this will mean. Already, the government is already having to spend millions and millions of pounds to get a border posts. Customs checks to employ people essentially to work on that border from the first of January and no matter what the trade will be there will be extra checks a respectable. What happens

European Union Britain Boris Johnson Brussels Brexit British Parliament Eu Commission Europe Michelle Volley France Germany UK European Council Summit Aids Mccaffrey Political Editor Ephraim European Court Of Justice
A Conversation With Erin Vilardi,  Founder And CEO Of Vote Run Lead

The Electorette Podcast

05:00 min | 2 years ago

A Conversation With Erin Vilardi, Founder And CEO Of Vote Run Lead

"Into the podcast thanks for having me. So I saw talk where you showing the ranking of presentation by women at the highest levels rate, and there was a ranking of countries by countries and the US came in rather slow. And I just have one quick clarifying question for that was that at the government level or all executive leadership that I think is the inter-parliamentary Union I you which keeps the records around parliaments. So that's the most. Equitable body across various governments and so that's actually what they're comparing. So our Congress to say like the British Parliament, the UK parliament I don't know what year you talk but where are we now in comparison to that year and how we rank with other countries? So. It changes frequently. As elections happened across the globe, but I can actually pull that up and tell you that it's not good. We are tied at seventy six according to the inter-parliamentary union with Afghanistan, and that is from March twenty nineteen. So it looks like and now we are eighty three. So actually we've gone down we have our ranking has lowered in the last couple of years, which often means because even though we had quite a wave of women, right the two thousand eighteen election is often called the wave of women. Especially when it comes to Congress, we didn't see that large of a dramatic increase in moved to about twenty eight percent and you know that was fantastic because it actually ushered in A. Wave of women of color it ushered in a wave of young women, but it wasn't that kind of exponential growth or getting us anywhere near you know parody or reflective, which would be the majority we should be closer to fifty one, hundred, fifty, two percent to be fully reflective of women's representation in this country. So and you see other countries making different kinds of progress ahead of us as we remain pretty stuck pro because I think one of the points he made in that talk that we were at twenty percent and we've been at twenty percent in in terms of representation for twenty years. Try. So that is statistically around the state legislatures and same thing twenty eighteen we saw state legislative wave happen very much mirrored what we saw at the congressional level. So predominantly, democratic women rising through the ranks for the state legislatures I think there we are also. So the Congress has something like twenty four percent and I think actually the state houses around twenty eight percent. And, a fantastic resource is actually something called the Center for American, women and politics tracks all of these numbers really closely as either people retire or things change. They're doing a really great job of keeping those numbers up to date but again, it's pretty stagnant, right? It's not enough to make significant change you end up having to have women who are taking really really deep risks. An order for policy change to occur rather than the change where you see a more equitable government or more equitable legislature and allowed you mentioned the center of American women and politics because I interviewed them at least once or twice and I remember Kelly Dittmar from there, you know saying something that really stuck with me was before the two thousand, eighteen midterms before the election happened and their historic number of women running for office and everyone was really excited about the fact we had so many women running for office right and then you pointed out the fact that like all of these women. Won't win right so we have you know this is a multilayered issue we have you know getting them to run for office, we having them winning their elections, and then you know there's something that you mentioned in your talk that really stuck with me. You said something about term limits right? We forget that the fact that these women once they actually when they actually have to stay in office and then you know sometimes they aren't reelected. So we have all these these multilayered issues that keep women out of office in keep these percentages low well, and you also have pretty weak party infrastructure. There's. A great article outright now, I will find it and share it with your audience about you know really questioning. Is there a real? Paul, within the Republican Party to actually elect women now I think some Republican. Women will tell you. Yes including some younger republican congressman who are doing things outside of the party leadership but there isn't the same kind of concerted effort that you see on the left. But let's also remember that the Democrats effort towards recruiting women is pretty new and they still do things that actually for example, they after the win of Alexandra Customer Cortez. Long term incumbent, the D. triple, which is the Democratic congressional campaign arm said any vendors, any people who do business any consultants such sort of Konami around political campaigns you can't do business with these insurgent candidates like an see in the future also be blacklisted from doing business with the triple endorse candidates, and that was basically a slap in the face to nontraditional candidates, which primarily are winning overwhelmingly women of Color. So there's While we do have one party sort of doing better than the other around recruiting and activating uplifting as part of the leadership pipeline. It's really a reckoning we have to have with ourselves as a country with all of our political parties to do

Congress United States A. Wave Republican Party British Parliament Executive Konami Alexandra Customer Cortez Afghanistan Congressman Kelly Dittmar UK Center For American Paul
"british parliament" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

06:33 min | 2 years ago

"british parliament" Discussed on 600 WREC

"The person to lead on this issue and comment on the people who have not. We are talking with Conrad Black in Canada. He is a member of the British Parliament. He was a member of the House of Lords. Author most recent updated book, a paperback version of president like No other Donald J. Trump in the restoring of America. You have owned prestigious Media outlets, newspapers in Canada and in Israel and in the United States. So you addressing the media moments ago and you said You expressed incredulity like we all feel here in the United States cannot possibly understand how Thinking people can in an unthinking way, end up supporting a candidate like Joe Biden, who Put the lid on his campaign at nine o'clock every day does not go anywhere to draw. Crowds can't draw crowds. President Trump has has engaged more people with covert 19 the past three days and Joe Biden has, and he was ostensibly healthy out one explanation for this. Conrad is the media is, of course not reporting anywhere near what you want. I know about about Joe Biden to the majority of their consumers and the people consuming mainstream media in America today simply are Uninformed. They simply do not know. Because mainstream media today is devoted totally To the destruction of President Trump. I'm afraid but except for the News corporation, a glass Fox News Wall Street Journal in the New York Post. That is true. What you said, is exactly true. And this, of course, ah! I think an unprecedented state of affairs and will be the subject of a lot of analysis by historians and media specialists in the future. I'm not my own. Impression has bean. The reason for this was that when Donald Trump around 20 announced 2050 and carried on from there. He made it clear that unlike other candidates in the past Hey, was running against the entire system in his ranking, install factions. Both parties was running really against the bushes as much as the Clinton and Obama and he's been true to that he's been turning that he's been true to that. But once once Elected. He I think made conciliatory moves to bring the Republican Party and congressional delegation especially was just sat on its hands for six months waiting to see if we can impeach her out. I mean, Paul Ryan, unusual speaker in the first For six months or so. Mitch McConnell wouldn't lift a finger to help him. But once they saw that he was for reals, I think he's made an effort to bring them in under the tent, not Ryan personally, but the most of a Republican congressman Sanderson, and they've responded to that. I think he's clearly at the head of that. Artie officially now never Trumpers, or, you know, cowering in the camp of the Democrats firing missiles backwards over their backs, like right, throwing the flowers. But, um ah, Surtees key part of what he attacked the whole system and specifically included this attack on the national political media. I think they, You know, I don't want to take liberties and mind greed, large, varied groups, But as a group, I think they felt that he was threatening them as he was threatening the whole political establishment. But he was going to say In effect, they had no hitting. The Emperor had no clothes. The Washington Press corps is accustomed to elevating promoting political leaders as it wishes. Andi Andi. He ran with a social media understands sort of Broadcast journalism and you're involved in the leader of and on DH. He countered their influence on guy for a long howl. I know I'm not an expert in social media, but he may still be kept me. He obviously has a direct line scores of millions of people. Through through Twitter and so on. And so he e think they feel that he is threatening their influence in the political life of the country, and I'm liking now. Add to that. Most of them tend to be left dish and snobbish on da Left. Snobs don't much care for Donald Trump, because, ah, he is not a man of the left, although he's certainly not a reactionary either, is a man of the people, not the left. But of course not the same thing and Andi hey, is informal and straight fucking and politically incorrect and that tends to instate stupid playing levels of snobbery. Andi. He is the victim of that. But he's also the beneficiary of it, because, as all polls indicate the media uniquely low people in the country and incidentally young greatest, but I will if I pay, I think, but that whole State of affairs is worrisome because we have to have a free press and the functioning democracy and we can't have anyone government. Certainly one else tampering with it. But we have a very inferior press not only in the United States, but it's a problem throughout the advanced Western On DA and when the public disdains the press. I believe that it's a potentially dangerous situation. We have to have a free press that is respected, but it only be respected and bitter inside respect. And as you said a minute ago. The media in this election campaign has been absolutely scandalous. They're full of mallet, and they are liars, and one hesitates to use such a planetary phrases. No, I cannot take issue with the president when he said that they are enemies of the people. To the extent they deliberately misinform the public. That's what our enemies Conrad Black is our guest. A brief obscene profit time out, and we will return right after Thiss.

Donald J. Trump Conrad Black Joe Biden Andi Andi United States president Canada America House of Lords British Parliament da Left Republican Party Paul Ryan Mitch McConnell Washington Press corps Thiss
Boris Johnson faces Brexit revolt in parliament.

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:41 min | 2 years ago

Boris Johnson faces Brexit revolt in parliament.

"I'm Anthony Davis. The European Union on Monday ramped up pressure on UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson to step back from breaking the brexit divorce treaty. Delaying a key decision on London's euro clearing justice. He faces a rebellion in the British parliament. The European Union says Johnson's plan would wreck trade talks and propelled the United Kingdom toward a messy brexit while former British leaders have warned that breaking the law is a step too far that will tarnish the country's image. The House of Commons will vote on moving the internal market bill which the EU has demanded London scrap by the end of the month two, its next amendment stage after a debate that Johnson will introduce. As Johnson prepared to try to persuade lawmakers that he's planned to explicitly break international law was worth supporting a derivatives industry source said the European Commission had delayed a decision on euro clearing. Johnson who has a majority of eighty in the lower house of parliament faces a growing revolt. All of Britain's living former prime ministers have expressed concern about his plan as have many senior figures in his Conservative Party. The leader of the opposition Labor party kissed Obama who is self isolating due to the corona virus said, he would oppose a bill that broke international law. Johnson's plan to explicitly break INS National Law has plunged brexit back into crisis less than four months before Britain is finally due to

Boris Johnson European Union Prime Minister Anthony Davis United Kingdom Britain House Of Commons Ins National Law London Labor Party Conservative Party Barack Obama European Commission
The Encryption Debate Rages On

Cyber Security Sauna

04:07 min | 2 years ago

The Encryption Debate Rages On

"So etiquette you've talked about encryption before. Got Fascinated. Encryption in the nineties already, I've been most interested in societal aspects of cryptography lately since I've seen quite concerted attacks against the freedom of businesses and individuals on using encryption, you're doing a horrible job tooting your own horn. You're not mentioning the UK parliament or anything like that at all. I was. Invited by the British parliament actually, they had a giant comet A. When they were deliberating the investigatory powers bill, I can today's so they invited me to to give evidence on encryption and I was happy to. Explain how what they were. Planning to do was horrible. Davor. Nicely listening to are they paid no attention to why opinions? I was also participating in the European Union Commission Panel on. On dual-use aspects of encryption. And similarly to European Commission. noted. That the guy from Finland appeared on, they pay no attention to what I was telling. So I have good track record of. Being listened to, but look necessarily followed or that's all we can. Anyone of, US, can ask for. But. You sound like the right person to briefly summarize what the Christian debate is all about. Technology. And from the mathematics point of view, we have gotten to a point where good quality encryption. is now available and good enough quality would in this context me in that if I choose to protect. Some piece of information and communication with quality. cryptography means. It. Is Too costly for the adversary to try to break. That encryption in. reasonable. Amount of time. So everybody on this planet currently has access to technology and know-how on good quality encryption at this is unprecedented in our times, and of course, this medics. Punch off authorities unhappy because quite many of those intelligence gathering mechanisms and. The law enforcement investigatory methods have being built around the notion that the authorities would be given access to people's. Communication. Day. Regardless of how it was protected. In case, there is a legitimate need to obtain that access If there's a good quality could Covic protections, there's nobody but the actual personal interest that they all started these are now. Tracking, or trying to interrogate. So nobody else would be positioned to decrypt the material sold that makes of course, the authorities have begun happy, and that discussion has been going on for centuries. and. Only now, a small people to sit. And individuals are in a position to utilize encryption without having to ask for permission. Yeah. So like before when when regular citizens tried to encrypt their information so that it wasn't available for law enforcement lawyer I was just like all you sweet summer child and just cracked it anyway but they can't do that anymore implementation. They were either week because the computing power was not that abundant in the past. All they were artificially weak. So they were basically I. The back door, all day were deliberately written. To be faulty so that the authorities would be in a position to crack the conversation open.

European Commission. United States British Parliament European Union Commission UK Finland
The U.K. is offering around 3 million Hong Kong residents a path to British citizenship after a new national security law

All Things Considered

00:26 sec | 2 years ago

The U.K. is offering around 3 million Hong Kong residents a path to British citizenship after a new national security law

"Was referring to Britain's recent decision to offer a path to citizenship for up to nearly three million Hong Kongers after Beijing implemented a national security law, which is shrinking freedoms in the former British colony. The Chinese government has grown more assertive UK has repeatedly pushed back in recent months today. Pompeo also met with China Hawks in the British parliament and what was seen as an attempt to pressure Prime Minister Boris Johnson today can even harder line against China's ruling Communist Party.

China British Parliament Boris Johnson Communist Party Pompeo Prime Minister Beijing Hong Kongers Chinese Government Britain UK
Pompeo Visits U.K. To Discuss Joint Efforts To Counter China

All Things Considered

02:35 min | 2 years ago

Pompeo Visits U.K. To Discuss Joint Efforts To Counter China

"London London Now Now that that is is where where Secretary Secretary of of State State Mike Mike Pompeo Pompeo was was today, today, talking talking with with British British counterparts counterparts about about joint joint efforts efforts to to counter counter China. China. The The secretary secretary congratulated congratulated the United Kingdom for moving earlier this month to ban Huawei, the controversial Chinese telecom giant from the development of Britain's five G network, NPR's Frank Langfitt reports. Compound kicked off today's joint press conference by giving Britain a public pat on the back for supporting a harder line against Beijing. I want to take this opportunity Tio congratulate the British government for its principal responses to these challenges. You made a sovereign decision to ban WOL away from future five G networks. You generously opened your doors to Congress who speak nothing more playing just for some freedom. We support those sovereign choices we think well done. Pompon was referring to Britain's recent decision to offer a path to citizenship for up to nearly three million Hong Kongers after Beijing implemented a national security law, which is shrinking freedoms in the former British colony. The Chinese government has grown more assertive UK has repeatedly pushed back in recent months today. Pompeo also met with China Hawks in the British parliament and what was seen as an attempt to pressure Prime Minister Boris Johnson today can even harder line against China's ruling Communist Party. When a reporter asked British Foreign Secretary Dominic Rob, with pressure from the Trump administration has influenced the UK China policy robbed, denied any questions mean Mike and I always have constructive discussions and actually majority times on views overlap when we work together very well. Today's press conference was designed to affirm an Anglo American stance towards the world's second largest economy. Pompeii went much further, saying countries across the globe should join together to call out China for its moves in the South China Sea along the Sino Indian border. You can't go make claims for maritime reaches that you have no lawful claim to You can't threaten countries and bully them in the camellias. We want. We want to see every nation who understands freedom and democracy to understand this threat that the Chinese Communist Party is posing to them and to work both themselves and collectively. To restore what is rightfully ours. China's criticized the U. S and U K for engaging in what it calls a Cold War mentality. But this isn't just about geopolitics. With more than 140,000 Americans dead from covert 19 in the economy and recession. President Trump is trying to portray Joe Biden, the presumptive Democratic nominee, is soft on China and hopes his increasingly hard line will help him win a second term come November.

China Mike Mike Pompeo Pompeo Secretary Chinese Communist Party South China Sea Britain Beijing British Government United Kingdom British Parliament Huawei London London President Trump Chinese Government Joe Biden Frank Langfitt NPR Boris Johnson Trump Administration Pompon
"british parliament" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"british parliament" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"The first European to visit the lake heavy northern region that would later become Wisconsin this week in eighteen fifty nine the famous tower clock known as Big Ben located at the top of the three hundred twenty foot high St Stephen's tower brings out over the house of parliament in Westminster London after fire destroyed much of the palace of Westminster the headquarters of the British parliament in October eighteen thirty four the standout feature of the design for the new palace was a large clock atop the tower this week in nineteen eleven ray Haroon drives his single seater Marmon wasp to victory in the inaugural Indianapolis five hundred now one of the world's most famous motor racing competitions the two hundred lap two and a half mile race has since become Memorial Day weekend tradition jumping way ahead this week in two thousand five W. mark felt's family ends thirty years of speculation identifying felt the former FBI assistant director Deep Throat secret source to help unravel the Watergate scandal tape show that Nixon himself has speculated it felt was the secret informant as early as nineteen seventy three what happened thanks for listening to this week in history on I heart radio here's what some people at the big networks and big newspapers don't understand that your smart and that you want to be talked with not S. W. I. S. and radio one of the reasons we exist is to find out exactly what you say news talk eleven thirty W. I. S. and where your.

Wisconsin Westminster London British parliament ray Haroon Indianapolis Nixon palace of Westminster FBI assistant director
"british parliament" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

05:09 min | 2 years ago

"british parliament" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Strange happenings of the British parliament media reports say that a mischievous fox slipped into the building Thursday or ran up the staircase and relieve himself nextel publications nor W. CBM Baltimore the wind speeds relaxing here into the overnight and some light snow who's coming into the forecast our temperatures down to an even freeze overnight tonight here in the city and where we had some thirty and forty mile an hour winds across the area Friday sunshine Saturday not as breezy high forty five and thirty two Saturday night mostly sunny Sunday up to fifty and then more wet weather early next week with temperatures in the forties and fifties Monday Tuesday I meteorologist Scott Lori more from the weather channel for talk radio six eighty W. CBM broadcasting from the W. C. B. M. safe retirement solutions studios call rob Veroli four one zero two six six eleven twenty save for retirement solutions dot com hi this is Brian good or John of advanced remote control join me for what's bugging you on Saturdays at five PM on talk radio six eighty W. C. via the views and opinions you hear on talk radio six eighty W. C. B. M. at W. C. M. dot com are not necessarily those of the owners management employers and advertisers of W. CVM but they should be this is George nori with coast to coast AM on talk radio six eight W. C. via George Cole the wildcard line at eight one eight five zero one four one zero nine the first time caller line is eight one eight five zero one four seven two one to talk tool free from east of the Rockies call eight hundred eight two five five zero three three from west of the Rockies toll free call eight hundred six one eight eight two five five to reach George via Skype use Skype name George nine seven three one three seven Georgia text message anytime at eight one eight two nine eight six five two one this is coast to coast AM with George Noory well next month we go back on the daylight saving time already referred clicking along I think it's like March eighth something like that before you go to bed on the Sunday turn your clock up ahead one hour interesting how fast things go we're gonna come back in a moment to take more beer open line calls in just a moment here's some news for you the twenty twenty presidential races in full gear and if you're tired with the constant media spin check out newsmax TV the new cable news channel and everybody seems to be talking about the th the ratings are up two hundred percent it just be Bloomberg TV and other major cable channels in the ratings newsmax TV you'll like it every day see people like Mike Huckabee Pat Buchanan Herman Cain Machel Malcolm Alan Dershowitz and a lot more and on weekends it's got some great documentaries that you can't get anywhere else so tune in to newsmax TV it's carried on every major cable system direct TV channel three forty nine dish to sixteen Xfinity eleven fifteen spectrum file six fifteen U. verse twelve twenty optimal model to **** Suddenlink while one more just check your channel guide if newsmax TV is not on your cable guide call your cable company tell them you want newsmax TV everyone else gets it you should too real people real stories and I copy torture of twenty four hours a day in Los crossed my floor with that literally popping in saliva yeah a lifelong three different common knowledge and they could do nothing someone had mentioned to me about across president Reagan take it I ordered it in one week one week my coffee in fact the carnivore be one that would come into our store Kate coffee I told them what I'm doing well what are you doing shopping I said I hear your for that job eight six six eight three six eight seven three five eight six eight three six seven three five or visit carnivore dot com that C. H. R. and I..

fox British parliament
"british parliament" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"british parliament" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Is are laid out against the king the declaration says quote to prove the us this meaning the absolute despotism of George the third the tyranny of Georgia third as stated in the declaration to prove this tyranny let fax be submitted to a candid world right the Americans are making are they they have in this essentially written an indictment against George the third and indirectly to the British parliament as well and it lays out the declaration lays out all of the crimes committed by George the third in the British parliament right and so by laying out those facts they are laying them out to people everywhere to determine whether the charges are in fact true or not true this is why it says we are submitting it to a candid world right we're appealing to the minds to the reasons of people everywhere all right let's now turn to the second paragraph which is one at least what often considered to be the second paragraph is really just one long sentence and.

George Georgia British parliament
"british parliament" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:57 min | 3 years ago

"british parliament" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Highland Sacramento it's ten o'clock today on the New Yorker radio hour the most powerful woman in Washington on the subject it is riveting the country if the Senate decides that they have better things to do that day that the public will recognize that they have abandoned their oaths of office and so what are the options they could to say they are quit so they put speaker of the house Nancy Pelosi ways the politics of impeachment with staff writer Jane Mayer he's impeached forever if we go down that path impeach for ever should we go down that path that's later this hour and just ahead I'll speak with Ronan Farrow about his book catching kill he looked in detail at how Harvey Weinstein and other powerful man accused of crimes try to protect themselves through the use of spies and their allies in the media that's on the New Yorker radio our live from NPR news in Washington I'm Barbara Klein Britain's lawmakers have foiled prime minister bars Johnson's plans to win approval today of his brexit withdrawal agreement and peers Franklin fifth reports from London Johnson's opponents easily passed an amendment that would hold their endorsement of his deal until all the related legislation is passed lawmakers fear the traditional brexit legislation might not make it through parliament by the October thirty first deadline in the UK would inadvertently crash out of the with no deal with you because economic and political damage Johnson is required by law to send a letter to Brussels tonight because he's failed to pass his deal today but Johnson says he won't and plans to try to bring his withdrawal deal up for a vote next week meanwhile lawmakers say they will try to have a British court forced Johnson to request to delay Frank like that NPR news London the commander of Kurdish led forces in northeast Syria is calling the US Turkey cease fire agreement a quote really terrible deal and pears Daniel Estrin reports from dough hook Iraq near the Syrian border general Muslim Kobani Abdi told NPR the U. S. troop withdrawal will make it difficult for the US to help his forces fight ISIS he said his forces will abide by a U. S. Turkish brokered pause in the fighting for five days but he said his forces would withdraw only from one area facing the heaviest fighting not from the entire Turkish border area Turkey's president says if the troops do not leave the whole area Turkey will resume its offensive president trump has said Kurds were happy with the ceasefire deal but the Kurdish commander said it will have quote catastrophic consequences he's referring to Turkish plans to resettle millions of Syrian refugees in the area Kurds in Syria fear the refugees will be hostile to Kurds and forced them to flee general of the said quote I would like to tell trump that he promised to protect the Kurds he said the.