27 Burst results for "British Museum"

Is This Ancient Biblical Forgery Actually Real?

Kottke Ride Home

05:48 min | 6 months ago

Is This Ancient Biblical Forgery Actually Real?

"So close to a century and a half ago. A man named moses wilhelm shapira found fifteen manuscript fragments in a cave near the dead sea. They were written in an ancient hebrew script and contained. What shapiro claimed was the original book of deuteronomy blitz despite interest from the british museum to the tune of a million pounds. The manuscripts were found to be forged. Shapiro was disgraced and the documents disappeared but now a scholar named don dershowitz is questioning. If those documents might have been real all along so while the british museum was examining the manuscript fragments for authenticity themselves. Back in the nineteen th century. A few of the fragments were also on display to the public already attracting tons of visitors. The news of the possibly oldest ever discovered biblical manuscript had made headlines around the world. While awaiting the museum's official decree of authenticity. Someone else decided to take matters into their own hands. Charles simone clermont. Is you know who the times describes as a swashbuckling french archaeologist and longtime nemesis of shapiro's end quote examined the fragments for a few minutes and immediately went to the press to say that they were fake. The risk he played on his cursory examination paid off when the british museum experts agreed. Shapiro was humiliated by this and ended up. Tragically dying by suicide a few months later. The documents were sold at auction for a fraction of what they were originally expected to sell for. And most people soon forgot about the whole thing now. Dershowitz from the university of potsdam germany has published a new paper and companion book making the case that the manuscript was real all along quoting the new york times but dershowitz makes an even more dramatic claim the text which he is reconstructed from nineteenth century transcriptions and drawings is not a reworking of deuteronomy. He argues but a precursor to its dating to the period of the first temple before the babylonian exile that would make it the oldest biblical manuscript by far and an unprecedented window into the origins and evolution of the bible and biblical religion dershowitz. His research closely guarded until now has yet to get broad. Scrutiny scholars previewed his findings at a closed-door seminar at harvard in two thousand nineteen are divided. A taste of fierce debates likely to come but of dershowitz is correct. Some experts say it will be the most consequential bible related discovery since the dead sea scrolls in nineteen forty seven and quotes the times. Sagely points out that it's much tougher to prove something authentic than it is to prove. It's fake but there's an additional hurdle to be jumped. In this case the physical fragments themselves may no longer exist so back in eighteen eighty three there was a mad rush at the time to find biblical artifacts that would prove or disprove various points of contention emerging in biblical scholarship moseley around the documentary hypothesis. The idea that the first five books of the bible or the pentateuch were actually written by various authors. Not just one traditionally thought to be moses. It was in this climate of aggressive archaeology that shapiro. I established himself as an antiquities dealer in jerusalem and during which time he and clermont no became enemies. After camacho correctly denounced a collection of pottery. That shapira had sold to the german government. It's also important to note that shapiro was a convert to christianity having been raised jewish in russia so he was viewed with some skepticism from the other biblical scholars and archaeologists and also faced intense antisemitism after the deuteronomy manuscript was denounced. Fast forward to now. Dershowitz says one of the main reasons he thinks the fragments could have been real is because their contents differs quite a bit from the deuteronomy in the bible and many of those differences lineup with discoveries that were only made when the dead sea scrolls were found in nineteen forty seven sixty four years. After chapitoulas discovery of the fragments dershowitz also investigated. Some of shapiro's personal notes archived at the berlin state library and found three. Handwritten pages of shapiro trying to decipher the fragments. Filled with question marks and transcription errors. Dershowitz said quote if he forged them or was part of a conspiracy. It makes no sense that he'd be sitting there trying to guess what the text is and making mistakes while he did it end quote while some scholars of the evolution of biblical text or undershoots side cautiously believing the deuteronomy fragments may be genuine. Most pig refers people who study inscriptions are the ones that usually authenticate documents. Most of them aren't convinced they say the original fragments bear the hallmarks of modern forgery. That they agree with the notes made by the experts who examined them at the time and since no one has the fragments to examine physically now. It's a closed case and as for the content being impressions christopher rolston leading pig refer at george washington university said quote. Forgers are pretty clever with regard to content and they've been very clever for twenty five hundred years and quotes despite dershowitz his published paper and companion book. The jury is still out and who knows if it will ever truly be born ounce. It would have some pretty huge complications. If it does due to some of its key differences for example. It's missing all of the laws of the deuteronomy were familiar with in the bible. Ones upon which traditions and entire libraries have been founded. It would also bolster the theory that are tons more stories and traditions out there than just the ones that have been preserved in the hebrew bible.

Shapiro Dershowitz Moses Wilhelm Shapira Don Dershowitz Charles Simone Clermont University Of Potsdam British Museum German Government Sagely Chapitoulas The New York Times Berlin State Library Moseley Shapira Camacho Germany Harvard Clermont
interview With Mo O'Connell And Mary Tynan

The Plastic Podcasts

05:16 min | 8 months ago

interview With Mo O'Connell And Mary Tynan

"I'm doug danny and you're listening to the plastic podcasts tales of the irish diaspora way going in reverse order here today. The plastic podcasts. Not so much plastic as elastic with two women artists who returned to and from britain. Maureen o'connell or mo is an award-winning writer actor and director based in dublin. At her film spa weekend is currently garnering laurels at festivals around the globe. Meanwhile actor writer director. Mary tynan speaks to us from galway. She has founded notes from xanadu which she describes as probably the world's first online art center and hosts everything from music to talks to theater and stitch and bitch sessions. I'm in the middle of the curiously named storm kristoff when we talk so my first question is a wild and windswept how you doing doing great state all right I suppose for the benefit of both business. If you'd like to say hello with your names. And that way they can tell who's speaking turn or names maritime. And i'm doug just in case there was any confusion so but if we can go back to The the the first thing would be that you both left ireland in order to go to england and specifically london So if i can ask her festival. Mary you You you were born in england but raised in galway essentially. Yes s one in west london very west london he from apple and let while in essex's while and then moved to in front of us john and i basically went back on al twenties and spent most of my adult life. That north london westbound east london every avalanche from southeast asia whenever south river. What about you and wake up in in the for vici- back to dublin and went to radha in two thousand nine and and then detroit there. Federated is in twelve in the state of years in london turn years maybe and they came back to ireland in two thousand fifteen the end of twenty fifteen and then start doing research for a nine hundred sixty short film. I want to make twenty sixteen seventeen Rebellion so and then so you can across to be paul colson. Rawda first of all. Yes a mary. What brought you across the back across london. This dispose opportunities really I i came over at a time when i was just before the boom started. Not there wasn't really any any work here and I just i left london anyway. I'd always kind of wanted to live. Erin i'm in times of doing things like acting and stuff like that. I'm just i just general Opportunity i just like. I did really really love land. Always i just felt like it was as those targeted program is and at its best. A cities like a gigantic playground. And bam. what. I like about london. It was just you could wacko sorts of places. You could visit those places. You could gross the british museum. You could go sit by the river. Everything you could think of was that and Yeah i just thought it was. It was a better place on. Especially since i've mostly been single also. It's at a place for single parents live. But did you still have one foot in galway Well i had family goalie. Yeah i had like. I'm at my parents sam wealth. My mom died while ago but nutria times walked without minister and now that children is also i did have thought but miam- neither of my parents originally from goal i so i can go away the such. I wouldn't have had my cousins or anything like that. Yeah mobile humor. And this is the first three years three. Get note that well. Because i had so intense and we were told me off to work and stuff because it was intense. You'd be too tired. i kind of had to work. I worked in irish for in second year at help pay bills and things like this was a nice relief from radha as in is right Being this crazy irish far people killing each other like all the time. Just an honest is very funny. Irish pub and then go back and throughout the next scrapes that exploit rates contrast and but i. I don't want an acting that. Mary saying but i do think that difficult being an actor because you take a job that is at lopate so that you can remain free to audition if you get

London Doug Danny Maureen O'connell Mary Tynan Galway Kristoff Dublin Paul Colson Rawda England Ireland Radha South River MO West London Britain North London Doug Federated Confusion
Africa and museums: shaping the future; rethinking the past

The Art Newspaper Weekly

04:40 min | 10 months ago

Africa and museums: shaping the future; rethinking the past

"I just on your lawson. The founding director of the paloma in togo and andrew santo. Who's just written a book with twenty eight interviews with museum leaders across the world. I also speak to. Dan hicks about his book. The british museum's about the bronzes and for our work the week christopher repeal of the national gallery in london talks about san mateo painting of copernicus. That's coming to the national for an exhibition next year before that a reminder that you can sign up for the art newspapers free daily newsletter for all the latest stories goes to the art newspaper dot com and the link is at the top right of the page. And while you're there you can also sign up for a range of other newsletters including the book club and the art market. I now a new book by the writer and cultural strategy advisor andhra santo features twenty eight conversations with directors of museums and other institutions oldham during the covid nineteen pandemic the future of the museum. Twenty eight dialogues. Include voices from across the world attempting to define museums and the challenges and opportunities ahead of them now and in the coming days among them. Direct is of african museums including sonia lawson the director of the paladin loma in togo in west africa. Andress and sonia join me to discuss the role of museums today and look at how sonya's togalese institution reflects a new coq drew dynamism on the african continent andress. I wanted to begin by asking you. This book was written on zoom. Just as we are now essentially so you talked to twenty eight museum or cultural institution directors about what they were doing. It happened to be done in the covy deer as it were but was it. Germinating is an idea for a much longer period this spring. I wrote an article in art. Net news actually wrote it over easter weekend. So i remember did very well I guess that was early april. I can't remember the exact dates and it was an article about reopening museums. And it just hit a nerve. It really got a lot of people talking at the time. And i heard from dozens and dozens of museum directors and just became part of illogic conversation. And that's when we really realized that this is the moment because it gave us an editorial frame because it it really was a moment that made us ask what is the future about. Still trying to figure it out. I think there's no doubt in all of our minds that this is one of those years in the calendar that will be a turning point. A historical marker where new phase is beginning persona. I think this phase is the one that started in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine just ended. Now we have a new face. So what does that mean for museums. Once i figured out that this would be a book not just of conversations with museum. Directors conversations about the future not necessarily revisiting. Why museums have been great in the past of which many reasons to talk about that too but to really have a forward-looking and that is what led to choices like this extraordinary new institution in togo. Which i think is such a taste of where museums or cultural institutions or cultural centers are headed All around the world so so in a way this moment. This covert moment crystallized. How such a book could come about and how we would choose directors to be in it before we speak specifically about sons institution. I wanted to ask you about a phrase that you use in the to the book where you talk about how. The paradigm smashing experimentation in museums and cultural institutions is happening in effectively in the global south so in africa in asia in latin america. Can you expand on that a bit now. Because what do you think lies behind that. Well first of all i. That's not to say it's not happening elsewhere. And i think the book provides lots of examples of how people are thinking you in original ways about museums all around the world. But i think that there are perhaps two main reasons. Why so many of these truly interesting. And i would say inspiring. Examples of new practices are often happening in the global. South one is that many of these institutions are brand new. So it's you can speak to this. They have an opportunity to really design for the now and for the future. They're not dealing with a legacy infrastructure. They're not trying to retrofit something. That was already there and tried to adapt it to the future.

Togo Andrew Santo Sonia Lawson Dan Hicks National Gallery San Mateo Andress Oldham Sonya West Africa Sonia London Latin America Asia Africa
A New Museum to Bring the Benin Bronzes Home

Dan Proft

00:46 sec | 11 months ago

A New Museum to Bring the Benin Bronzes Home

"Written and Nigeria launching a joint archaeological project investigating a site that's hugely important to the former kingdom of beneath the New Museum of West African Art will occupy a site in what's now Benin city in southern Nigeria. In what the British museum calls the most extensive archaeological excavation there ever it on Nigerian associates will excavate the site of the new museum before it goes up in 18 97. British forces raised the whole city to the ground to avenge the killing of colleagues and huge numbers of artifact were looted. These excavations are part of a reconsideration of how in the era of Empire museums around Europe acquired treasures from other

New Museum Of West African Art Nigeria Benin City British Forces Europe
Why Is There a Parthenon in Nashville?

BrainStuff

03:04 min | 1 year ago

Why Is There a Parthenon in Nashville?

"At first, no one expected the building to last. The Tennessee Centennial Exposition, which was something like a world's fair or Walt Disney world's epcot was held in Nashville in eighteen, ninety seven. It featured a full scale replica of the famous Parthenon from Greece the Plaster Parthenon. This plaster Parthenon which fit in with Nashville's ambition to be the Athens of the South housed an art exhibition over six months one point eight million people visited the exposition small when compared with the twenty, seven million, who turned out for the Chicago world's fair of Eighteen, ninety three, but huge for Nashville which, at the time had a population of one hundred thousand as a nineteen twenty one newspaper put it the general effect of the cream, colored staff structure with the brilliant colors, and the freeze and Gables, so overshadowed all the other buildings that when the exposition was over, the people demanded its preservation, and it became shrine to the residents and visitors of Nashville. But this shrine was not built for the long term by nineteen eighteen. The building had disintegrated so badly that it had to be closed for safety reasons, however, thanks to popular demand. The city decided to rebuild it. Isn't concrete structure in nineteen twenty. The Nashville Parthenon reopened to the public in nineteen thirty one. As with the Greek Parthenon, the columns on the Nashville structure are not completely straight, but have a slight convex curvature called emphasis. The corrects for an optical illusion that makes straight lines appear concave at a distance. The structure is also full friezes carvings, and includes a replica of the famous elgin marbles now known as the Parthenon Marbles. These marble structures were part of the original Parthenon, but were removed by the British earl of. And sold to the British Museum in Eighteen Sixteen, the entire transaction remains a point of dispute between Britain and Greece. And while the original Parthenon is in a ruin, the national version features the complete structure. A builders made educated guesses to fill in the parts. At the time of its reopening in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, one, the only thing missing from this replica Parthenon was a statue of the Greek Goddess Fina. But after twenty years of small contributions from the public via a donation box at the site plus some private funding, there was enough money to commission a forty two foot. That's thirteen meter statue, the same size as the original. Tennessee sculptor Alan require to eight years to finish the mass of work, which was unveiled in nineteen ninety, and features a spear that was crafted with McDonald's flagpole is the sturdy core for twelve years. The statue stood in plain white gypsum cement, but in two thousand and two it was gilded in real gold, although some people have complained that the gilding makes Gaudy, it's actually more historically accurate. Nashville Parthenon still serves as the city's art. Museum and it's permanent. Collection is home to sixty three paintings of nineteenth and twentieth century American artists donated by Nashville businessman and collector James.

Nashville Parthenon Greek Parthenon Nashville Plaster Parthenon Parthenon Marbles British Museum Tennessee Walt Disney Epcot Athens Chicago Greek Goddess Fina Greece James Mcdonald Alan Britain
Australia to shut state border as Melbourne infections surge

BBC World Service

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

Australia to shut state border as Melbourne infections surge

"And New South Wales, two of the country's most populous are shutting their joint border to contain a resurgence of Corona virus infections in Victoria. It's the first border closures since the Spanish flu pandemic a century ago. Officials in the Victorian capital Melbourne have placed nine public housing estates with 3000 residents in lock down. This man's mother is one of them. There is no consideration for a ll the people people that like our mother, who's about 75 years. Of H in a dark ation is medication. Of course on we kind of have access to her. Yes, we understand 19 but not this right. This restrictions on just look down could be better than this. British museums galleries

South Wales Melbourne Victoria
Is Shangri-La A Real Place?

BrainStuff

04:54 min | 1 year ago

Is Shangri-La A Real Place?

"James Hilton was simply dreaming of a place that humans have yearned for since they I learned to yearn a heaven of sorts a Paradise Utopia Xanadu the garden of Eden Shambala Hilton a popular writer in the first half of the twentieth century named his Happy Place Shangrila and he made at wondrous in spiritual talking it high into the mountains in northwest Tibet. It was setting of his nineteen thirty three adventure. Novel lost horizon which instantly became a worldwide bestseller. It was also made into a major Hollywood film. The legendary Frank CAPRA directed and Ronald Colman Jane Wyatt starred in Nineteen thirty seven from the moment lost horizon hit bookstore shelves Shangri la became synonymous with utopia back. Then it was an ideal a place to escape to during a time when the real world had just been through a global war in the Great Depression since then the simple idea of the place has sparked countless trips. Tibet journeys of faith and perseverance of hope and distant. Promise of supposed enlightenment and sometimes disappointment. It's kind of an amazing phenomenon considering that the place doesn't exist and it never has except for ten years or so when what's now called Camp David. The presidential retreat was founded under the name Shangrila by then President Franklin Roosevelt in nineteen forty two. Or at least that was the only time it's existed until recently but let's start at the beginning. Hilton reportedly did most of the research for his novel in the British Museum Library not far from his home in the northeastern part of London. He never actually visited Tibet. Instead he took inspiration for Shangri la from another utopian dream a place known for centuries as Shala we spoke with Ed Birnbaum who lectures on comparative religion mythology and wrote the way to Shambala in nineteen eighty. He said there was one. Sort of very very garbled version of the Shambala myth that Hilton Red and one of the Catholic explorers writings. But it wasn't an all clear. It was the sort of universal theme and at that time. Tibet was pretty much unexplored. So if you're going to look for hidden utopia that was an ideal place to do it. Shala is a Tibetan Buddhist legend about a Utopian Paradise far in the Northern Mountains of Asia. It said to be a spiritual place where people of all religions and backgrounds live together in harmony and also said to be the place from which when Warren Evil Engulf the rest of the world. A leader will emerge to defeat the forces of chaos and usher in a new age of peace and happiness. Shambala grows out of the Buddhist Teaching College Chakra or the wheel of time which states that the center of the universe. Mount Meru sometimes called Mount Subaru. Set to be well. North of Tibet. Birnbaum said people sort of looked at Tibet as this mysterious Utopian kind of place and the Tibetans themselves looked even farther north for that. Utopia Shambala if Hilton who died in nineteen fifty. Four was indeed modeling Shangri la after the Buddhist teachings of Shambala. It might paint him to learn what's happened to his imaginary wonderland because it's become real but not an particularly Buddhist way in two thousand one the Chinese government which is controlled. Tibet since late nineteen fifties changed the name of Zhongdian County to Shangri la for simple purpose to cash in on tourist dollars. Many areas and China had been vying for the right to change their names. Shangri la and took nearly a decade to decide on a winner. Zhongdian one out in. What the Guardian in two thousand six called one of the most day. She's rebranding exercises in history. Today the larger area Shangrila boasts say Shangrila resort a Hilton Garden Inn Shangrila and airport with daily flights to Beijing Shanghai and Lhasa. The capital of China's Tibet Autonomous Region in the heart of what Westerners now as Tibet visitors can tour the largest Betton Buddhist monastery in Yunan province. And when they're done they can cough down. Abreu at the Shangri la beer bar tagline beer made in heaven Tibet and the newly named Shangri la a draw for reasons other than tourist traps. Of course Tibet is known. After all is the roof of the world it shares the highest peak in the World Mount Everest with neighboring Nepal. Though that's a long way from Shangri La. The area's natural beauty is breathtaking. Which makes it a destination for outdoor levers. That's especially popular with Chinese tourists. It's harder for Westerners to secure visas to get there. But is this the Shangri La that James Hilton envisioned? Is What modern travelers expect. That it seems is probably up to the pilgrim. Birnbaum said there are different ways of going to Shambala to me what I found most interesting was the symbolism of it sort of reflects an inner journey

Tibet Eden Shambala Hilton Shangri La Ed Birnbaum Shangrila Hilton Red Hilton Garden Inn Shangrila Shala China Frank Capra Buddhist Teaching College Chak President Franklin Roosevelt Hollywood Mount Meru Ronald Colman Jane Wyatt Writer Zhongdian County
"british museum" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

13:28 min | 1 year ago

"british museum" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm Ian Elsner. Museum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums each episode. He's never longer than fifteen minutes. So let's get started. There's a way to look at history that focuses on the events themselves. And then there's a way to look a history that focuses on the fallout in the Fourth Century. Bc. E So Lucas. Who's one of Alexander the great successors and Chandra Gupta who is the first Moyen Emperor in northern India met for the first time by the banks of the River Indus and there they had some kind of military encounter? What kind of military encounter? Well we don't really know what we do know is that following the encounter. Greek ambassador megacity was sent to the Indian Interior for the first time and he wrote an ethnographic cool the indicate and it described India for Greek Odeon based on personal observation. But also that you need this. Lots of strange storytelling as well. And this particular tax reform the foundation of Western knowledge of India for generations. And you can just imagine that. Soldiers and British soldiers in the nineteenth century took translations of this particular taxed with them to north west of India when they were exploring. So it's a very long life and it's particularly that that continues to resonate. This is Dr Shushma John. Sorry Tabor Foundation Curator of South Asia at the British Museum. I'm talk to central Michigan. Sorry on the Table Foundation Creator South Asia at the British Museum. And when I'm not at work I welcome my podcast which is very much a passion project and this is called the Wander House will get to the wonder house in a minute because it's an excellent podcast but I a doctorate at University College London. Jane sorry studied this ancient encounter of which only Greek descriptions survive. That moment of meeting in connection has been completely transformed it was transformed cleaner period by British and Indian scholars have precious scholars saying. Oh you know so. Give Woman's warned. He defeated this Indian general whereas the Indian scholars right the the complete opposite that take gender. Gupta defeated this incoming European and he became a great leader and ruler. So actually I think because of this uncertainty. I think it tells us a lot about the time we live in right now. And how may have been transformed in the past so that Doesn't it doesn't bother me in the sense that we will never have this Tonic truth because you know we're never going to get that what we can study is the fallout. How people interpret these historic events and how that reflects on the moment. They're living in now and of course what better way to see in the form of a building how people interpret historic events than a museum itself. This is why the whole idea of decolonizing museums and collections is so important. Because I think up. Till now we've all been complicit in telling partial stories under the guise of trying to be neutral and as we know that neutrality is quite problematic and it tells very very partial truth or partial version of a story. Museums are great way to see what historic events meant to the museum. Builders and I can think of no clearer example than the British Museum. We have reading credible exhibitions on. Say you know when you're thinking of ancient South Asia? They're often on Buddhism or Hinduism organism. So they have a very close religious fakers but will they don't tend to address very rarely that I've ever seen anyway is today's collections. Arrive here. What was the clinical interest in that material? How has it been interrupted? How's it been presented at also? Why why Nice particular ways? How how has that changed over the last century or so it? It's too easy to present a cycle neutral view the ancient Pau of ancient religions. But I I don't think that's particularly ethical. I think if you're going to be doing that you need to be telling that full story in episode thirty nine of this show. We examined Hand Sloan and the origins of the British Museum. Funded in large part by his marriage into the enslaving plan Takeuchi of Jamaica and aided by Britain's rising colonial power global reach. Sloan assembled an encyclopedic collection of specimens and objects from all around the world that became the basis for the world's first public museum the British Museum. A place where anyone could freely enter to see the glory of the British Empire the empire and fuses pretty much every aspect of life life in the UK. Whether we're all aware of it will not in a weather. It's the names of the streets. We walked down the the museums that were founded the collections. They hold the structures. We still all inhabit when you look around at the museum's mice museums I'd say UK. They hold the contents of empire objects collected around the world by client officials by soldiers by Salas people. Working Abroad Uber. Count disentangle the two. When you are telling a story you need to be honest. And tell the whole story or at least as much of it as you can possibly share. Because otherwise you're telling a very very partial one. That often overlooks the violence of an object's collection and the situation and circumstances it was created taken purchased and brought him to the UK to be held in a museum today. Sorry is the first curator of Indian descent of the South Asia collection at the British Museum. In the past Tracy Tell Dighton. Do you think about it very much. I think he's signing when I look at my couture practice and how I approach my role. The collections who. I want to work with and how I realized that actually there is a difference between what I do. And what's other people in a whole range of institutions? Bring Two zero and at first. I was really uncomfortable about that. I thought my goodness unit is it. Just because of who I am and what I am. What about you know? My academic side Olifants might use skills knowledge but actually. I think it's my ability to do my job. Is it somehow rich? I bring a slight different perspectives. We'll say in how I do it. The South Asia collection at the British Museum is so enormous that it can capture the sweep of history of South Asia from the Paleolithic period. To the present day. The gallery opened in two thousand seventeen before that it was last refurbished in nineteen ninety. Two it just happens to be the largest gathering the museum so hey no pressure looking say. Try Not to fail on your first go. It was it was really tricky. We started by thinking about who actually comes to the museum and seventy percent of our audience comes from outside the U. K. And if those people a huge proportion than not very well versed in the history cultures religions of South Asia. So how'd you present your collections in a way that shares this really incredible to the world with people who'd About it and so. We decided to have a chronic thematic kind of approach. We started with the Paleolithic. She's about one and a half million years ago and ended at the present day and the encyclopedic collections at the museum permits us to be able to do something like that. As part of that isolated wet on the ancient to medieval sections. Which is the collections? I cover along with the bulk of the anthropological collections. And also the textiles it. It's got a mammoth collection. The Dakota but as Powell fat I was very keen to introduce moments were slightly unexpected stories and people what presented so for example in the main oil. You walk down. One of the first sculptures you encounter is the modern line capital which takes about the first century day and it was actually excavated and request to the museum by South Asian Collector Pokharel Energy on. I put a portrait of him on that label as well as little bit attacks expanding it because I wanted people to be confronted by South Asians in South Asia Gallery. It's not enough to display their culture of their collections in their history. I think it has to be a shared enterprise and an in another section for example in the Janus in western India the Medieval section I included fate graphs of the Jane Temple from less. Which is where I'm from in the UK who wanted to show you know the sculptures on display. They are just as much positive. British culture as it was back then in the medieval period. It's not just a alien religion in Asian culture. It's our shed culture now. I think it's really important to connect the dots so you do. Share this broad sweep of history and culture but then you want to intersperse it with these other reading important moments linking in a WHO and what you might see around you as you get your everyday life in the UK linking it with with the pastas. Well I asked John. Sorry if she's noticed changes in who visits the gallery and how much time they spend there since the update very interesting. Hughes how they engaged with different displays how it can sort of tweak them to make more engaging annoy definitely notice that there are more South Asians in the gallery space the South Asia section. Anyway this is a really tricky one because I hope that a museum is for everybody. The reality is that as you say. A lot of people don't feel that the museum is for them and it's it's terrible because obviously the museum is for everybody but once again when you have very neutral displays and people aren't addressed people aren't consulted people you want working with members of the community. I think understand why they might feel somehow excluded from these spaces and we've all had moments have been chatting to people may assume that museum is not for them it somehow seen as a very different other ring space. A when you see the workforce inside the museum also predominantly white and. There are very few members of your black and minority ethnic stuff in the museum's once again. What sort of message are you trying to share with everybody else? You're saying hey come come to a museum but you can't work How how'd you change that? And I think it's not just one not tweets. I think it's a fundamental reimagining of what exactly a museum is exactly. This museum is full. I'm not sure that we have these answers. But what I think is really really important. Is that we start having these conversations. Are We start experimenting? And this is one of the reasons why John. Sorry started the wonder House podcast. The podcast which is completely independent of the British Museum is away again. Sorry to share the most innovative contemporary approaches to decolonization and so I got in touch with some people whose work I really respect and I asked them if they were willing to talk about their work what they learn what they what they thought didn't work quite so well and share their stories and experiments with decolonizing where they love about. The wonder house is being able to listen in on these conversations. That might not be happening in museums themselves but are happening at coffee houses and pubs nearby and the show explores the scale to you here. John Sorry who works at one of the largest institutions in the world in conversations with people who might be their museums only curators. I worry that the decolonizing museums incredible energy that it has right now. It's quite easy for that. To evaporate every single a movement has its moment and unless we embed this kind of knowledge and approaches it's it's going to evaporate and that that's one of the things that worries me. Most I not just the collections but also you know the the simple fact that many of us who work in museums you often one of the one or two Black Amano. She ethic people in an entire institution. That's not easy. Sorry studies the ancient world. But now she is at the forefront of modern museum interpretation printing not just the event but also how the event ripped through history remember the story about Salukis and Chandra Gupta from the beginning of the episode. The Indian interpretation of that moment has worn out. And actually if you read historical novels modern comics if you watch Indian films and in TV series. That's exactly the vision of John. Goto that we have now and you know what it's evolving over time you know days of being shaped and reshaped day by day at the moment and I think that's.

British Museum South Asia Dr Shushma John India Chandra Gupta UK Tabor Foundation Curator of So Table Foundation Creator South River Indus Ian Elsner South Asia Gallery megacity foundation of Western Asian culture Michigan South Asian Collector Pokharel Alexander Wander House
Bored?  Games!

Your Brain on Facts

09:20 min | 1 year ago

Bored? Games!

"A lot of playing board games these days and that's pretty fitting human making board games for a long time like a long longtime seven thousand years or more for a bit of historical context. We stopped hunter-gathering and settled down to be farmers about ten thousand years ago rather than try to cram seven thousand years in six occupied continents worth of history into a half hour podcast. I'll hit some of the high points. Especially the less well-known once the earliest gaming pieces ever found are forty nine. Small carved painted stones found a five thousand year old burial mound in southeast Turkey. Similar pieces have been found in Syria and Iraq and seemed to point devoid games originating in the Fertile Crescent. You remember the Fertile Crescent from the first week of world history class. It's the same region discovered alcohol invented papyrus and made calendars all of which you need. If you're hosting game night other early dice games were created by painting a single side of a flat. Stick these sticks would be tossed at once and that would be your role Mesopotamia. Dice were made from a variety of materials including carved knuckle bones would painted stones and turtle shells. No wonder folks used to say roll them bones dice from the Roman era. Looks like the six sided die. We use today though. Some of them had their corners. Cut off to be able to reach a higher number not unlike dungeons and dragons dice. Imagine excavating a distant Roman out host and finding a D twenty serious cricket board games became popular among the Pharaohs of Ancient Egypt. And that shouldn't surprise. That board games were a bigger part of life for upper class people since they have both money for entertainment and time to play. Even before the first dynasty Egypt loved a game called Senate. It's even seen on. The walls of tombs and copies of the game are buried with noble people. Ancient Egyptians were strong believers in the concept of fate. And that your luck in the game of Senate meant that you were under the protection of the major gods of the Pantheon raw toe to toe Cyrus. The significance of the game is clear. The game play not as clear. Historians have made educated guesses as to the rules more on that later and Board Game. Companies have used those guesses as a jumping off place to make modern versions. Four Games also became tied into religious beliefs. One such game was Mahan played around three thousand. B C e Mahan was a protective God depicted as a snake with coils around the Sun God raw during his journey through the night the game and the God became intertwined. Tim Kendall and ancient Egyptian historian believes that it's not possible to know for sure with the information we have available whether the game was inspired by an existing deity or the Deity was inspired by the game. Many people think backgammon is the longest plate of all the board games with evidence that it existed around two thousand B C but there is an extant game. That is a little bit older. Relatively speaking the royal game of for the game gets its name from being found in the royal tombs of in Iraq. There was also a set found in Pharaoh. Tutankhamun tune the game. Play is simple but very familiar. You're trying to get all of your pieces around the board first thumping off your opponent's pieces along the way again. Proving there's nothing new under the Sun. The royal game of herb was played with four sided or tetrahedral dice. A D Four for the tabletop games out there. Even though the game's over four thousand years old amazingly we found a copy of the rules Irving Finkel the British museum deciphered cuneiform tablet and discovered. It was the rules for the Royal Game of Earth. He then saw a photograph of a nearly identical board game being played in modern India. That makes the Royal Game of Earth. The longest played game in history and there is a great video of Irving Finkel. Who has ever so pleasantly mad teaching youtuber or Tom Scott how to play Lincoln the show notes and a little clip right here. Because I just couldn't help myself. All sorts of evidence has come to live so that we know how this game was played and we can play it now with a great deal of excitement. Sometimes it brings out violence. Come Times it brings out savagery. I have to say that this so we've decided to bring in a member of the public. I can't remember the name on Tom. Scott I make videos about science technology in the world. Who's never paid this game before? I have never played this game before. I'm Gandhi swift overview of the walls. Hope he masses and I'm getting to play of course play gently at first because I don't say hi to hang I'm to wipe the floor with it wouldn't do it for me even discovered these rules and I'll throw in his mind. Game listing whitlow. Marta is similar to that question of modern. There were some minor differences s today. Each player has fifteen checkers and uses six sided dice to be the first to bear off. All of one's checkers. I confess that I am reading that. From a website verbatim. I know less about that. Yemen do cricket. Backgammon had a renewed surge of popularity in the nineteen sixties which is held longtime for a comeback. Thanks in part to the charisma of Prince Alexis. Obolensky the father of modern backgammon cigarette liquor and car. Companies began to sponsor tournaments and Hugh Hefner held backgammon parties at the Playboy Mansion. At the same time that the Romans were playing Latin backgammon. The Chinese were play. We she or you may have heard of it. Go Que- she may even predate the game of twelve markings and the royal game of Earth. According to legend which has a pesky habit of morphing into history quay g was created by the ancient Chinese. Emperor Yell to teach his son on Ju discipline. Concentration and balance the popularity of wage e grew throughout Eastern Asia especially in Japan. Which is where the name go comes from another ancient game which is still out there and a favourite of nearly every household in my family is the African game of Mangala in our modern parlance. Munkala refers to a specific game. But the name actually belongs to an entire genre of games a genre eight hundred traditional games strong. This family of Board Games is played around. The world is referred to as Sewing Games S. O. W. I N. G. Devotes the way that you pick up and drop the stones playing pieces like you were sowing seeds in the ground. The word Mukalla comes from the Arabic Nicola to move most one college games share a common structure where each player has gained pieces in divots on the board and moves them to capture their opponent's pieces leading them to also be called count and capture games. The boards can be wooden clay even just little holes in the dirt playing pieces of everything from seeds. Stones shells anything near at hand that fits in the holes. The earliest evidence of the game are fragments of pottery. Board found in Eritrea dated to the sixth century CE. Though if the games were played with seeds on wooden boards or pebbles in divots in the dirt the game could be even older. The absence of evidence is not evidence of absence after all that particular logical fallacy is called argument from ignorance at ignorant him. And it's not a good look now. We go to the land of ice and snow of the Midnight Sun. Where the hot springs flow Scandinavians played chess. Like game called. Nevin tough at least as early as four hundred see. I'm sure my clever listeners haven't forgotten that. Viking refers to the raids undertaken by a small portion of the population themselves called Viking US meaning kings table noth- Atoll was a war strategy game. The kings objective was to escape to the edge of the board while the opponents laurel objective was to capture him. The attacking force had the natural advantage at the start of each game. Perhaps mimicking a cultural mindset of a small group being victorious against a larger force like say a few boats full of Viking attacks against the army of an English King Scandinavians spread the game to Ireland Britain and Wales through. Let's call it. Unexpected cultural exchange archaeologists have also discovered that it was popular as far to the east as Ukraine.

Backgammon Tom Scott Iraq Mahan Senate Fertile Crescent Irving Finkel Turkey Pharaohs Of Ancient Egypt Syria Tim Kendall Egypt Prince Alexis India Hugh Hefner Eastern Asia Midnight Sun United States Eritrea
Odd Jobs: Who's telling the truth?

Pants On Fire

08:43 min | 1 year ago

Odd Jobs: Who's telling the truth?

"Deborah and Lisa will each have a minute and change to tell their stories before the timer goes off we flipped a coin and Sort of blocked everyone's view and picked it up before any of US could see it and he swore where it was headed up. Lisa has elected to go second Debra. Are you ready to go. I bring it on our topic. This week is odd odd jobs. So listen carefully teagan and Bennett Deborah. Your timer will begin now. Did you ever wonder about how people woke themselves up. Before the mass production of alarm clocks well and during the industrial revolution. It was the job of a knocker upper to rise in the very very early morning and go around town waking people up at the time that they wanted to get up. Some knocker upper woke up as many as eighty or ninety clients a day so these knocker uppers throughout history were very clever. They came came up with very inventive ways around problems. That would naturally come up in their jobs for example when the practice I came him about knocker uppers would knock loudly on people's front doors. That's where they got the name from but they soon realized that neighbors could also hear these loud knocks Knox and get a free wakeup call out of it so knocker operas fashion sticks with metal wires wrapped around the end and woke up clients individually by tapping being at their windows. If you lived on the second floor not a problem. You're not per upper. Would just get a longer stick and if you lived on the third floor. Well I'm not sure but there was at least one other method knocker uppers used to wake up people a key shooter. That's right people would actually pay for the privilege. Fledge of having someone wake them up by shooting. Dry Peas out of tune at their houses presumably. Those who did always remembered to lead their windows closed in time. Well done debra okay. Now it's leases. Turn to tell us about an odd job Bob of his own Lisa. You're ready do I tell the truth or you tell the story again and we'll find out yes okay and it should be about like odd jobs. There's something I have a feeling you'll figure it out. Okay I got it. The timer will begin now. Okay Bennett antiquing. Juno those guards outside of Buckingham in Palestine England like the ones with the head coach and the tall funding hats and they stand completely motionless and silent. Even if you shout right in their face and you're not They're called the Queen's guard and they're not just there as the show for towards they're actually trained soldiers at least east they usually but during the economic recession of nineteen sixty one. A labor dispute with the Queen's guard ended with Queen Elizabeth Firing all but twelve of the soldiers and replacing them with some random dude off the street. Who would accept the queen's low wages not cool queen none of these substitutes actually knew what they were doing? They're only there to make it look. The Queen had adequate protection. Now this fake security force was secretly referred to as the Queen's toy soldiers the twelve original guards who remained were given the task of training the toy soldiers but it quickly proved to be a wild goose jays which is bad some of the new recruits. Were too old to actually do any other work and nearly all of them found it too hard to stand still. Oh for that long amount of time on one hot July morning that year one of the guards tired from standing decided to sit down on the ground legs folded while still L. on active duty. A few of the toy soldiers followed his lead thinking they were supposed to be sitting down and eventually the entire force commanders included. We're sitting sending parental style on the ground in front of the palaces east entrance they remain that way until the changing of the guard that afternoon. Original photograph of this strange occurrence is currently early on display in London's British Museum which is in London and time. Thank you Lisa nicely done. Okay Bennett and Teagan. It is decision time now. We're going to decide WHO's story works is at Lisa's tale of the queen's toy soldiers and air sats protection when the Buckingham Palace guards were fired over labor dispute or is it. Deborah's tale will the knocker industrial revolution. Who would go around in the early hours of the morning shooting peas windows and waking people up so what do you think do you think the second one? But I'm not trusting lease after he would do anything to Cheat Mall Wong on. Maybe I would the one thing I would do would not. I would be good so take then. I don't really know but we story is very very believable. Evil what makes Lisa story believable because there are our status stand there usually true but in my story there are people who are asleep and there are many people as a matter of fact all people who sleep. Sorry Lisa just now Bennett. Give give me three reasons. Why divorce story is going to be the true one? No I wasn't saying that I was. I think what it was actually Debra. Do you think that I have the true story or the fake story. Actually you know what I think that you have the fake story. You think I have the fake story. Why do you think either fake story because nobody sleeps well? It would be a hard job and I've never really heard any history of felt that ever. I think I'm going to have to go with Lisa before you do that. I have one more question for debt. You said it was during the something Ramdas Revolution. That's at a time when lots of machines and factories were being produced so what time line is approximately. Where in the years is that go late? Eighteen hundreds fours in the late eighteen. I I don't believe that. Ah such thing as third. I think we're just like for like so many people just like three floors that when you sleep on or maybe they were in like an apartment building where there are no Davos. Don't try and make sure seem more real do do you think what do you think. I think that Lisa's story was true. Give me three reason. It just sounded realistic. Hosted the way that Lisa meted robots make everything sound realists. Have you heard this is. He's very dumb. Okay hold on Alexis. My ex-girlfriend we don't talk anymore. Yeah all right guys. We're here to pick apart. Lisa's dating history story. Come on very traumatized you just go with Lisa's. Even though I do not believe if I disagree. Let's go with Lisa's we lease. This is true. I believe that this is true. Yes and you believe that I I told you a lie. I told you fake story okay. Well we'll the real honest truth teller today. Please come forward and tell us which one of you it is as I am. The True Story Taint knocker uppers. Who would wake people up before the invention engine of the alarm clock but sometimes sometimes you lose? That's just basically lost loss during the running shoes one. Oh he's hard to live with your member all the time. He is winner four times times in two square to square. Oh my goodness national dimension that typical second child they all agreed that I won. No did win because you trick them. Yes we all lost because we believed

Lisa Bennett Deborah Debra Teagan Queen Elizabeth Firing United States Buckingham London Buckingham Palace Davos BOB Knox British Museum England
"british museum" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"british museum" Discussed on Little Atoms

"British museum that countries have lost to be returned and on rich i'm not again reflects powell high rockies now and it kind of i think in some ways a cultural arrogance if i did but we shouldn't come after these objects now the festive and you can so we will keep me this reflects the history of race signs in a way this idea that britain on western powers claim the mantle of superiority of kind of the height of civilization that somehow history is over they have one and they all the peak of civilization humans will never get any better than this than the greeks achieved the romans achieved philip which has achieved this is the pinnacle and somehow they have the right then decide what happens to the rest of the world now rubs took about the concept of racing so let's establish what you mean by race science before we do it's difficult pigs by others giving i did and invented the institution of the week when the book came out of his office question and i talked about but they said forty three sides and i felt it science it's kind of woven in to the bedrock bedrock of modern western science it's i did that race is real and there is a racial hierarchy so from the bus of modern western science in lightened meant it was taken us in assumption there was no tiny agenda hierarchy with women below men as the intellectual and physical in fear is meant but also the different kinds of people represented perhaps different breeds of human and that we could be slotted in underneath the white european i thought i did although very much bill tone and elaborated frayed to don in subsequent centuries then in the twentieth century pulled away from quite significantly after the sec multiple hasn't completely left behind i think and you could still see tinges of it in genetics particularly in population and genetics and medicine running by the way through the science of humans of biology in behavior in psychology there is still this idea that human variation could be mopped in some way through population groups it's rather than through individual variation and this is somehow meaningful not just in superficial wayside skin color but somehow more deeply meaningful lazy itself as a as a scientific obviously has as you said a relatively recent history dan late in the period of time when in fact nights just before that but you know what we as a scientist reclassifying everything yeah so that way of looking at nature was to make big bill estimate and inter inter hierarchies so this is a guy you're hunting friedrich blooming bugs are never come across in because he's so he was a kind of not trust explorer and he is the source of our current and we still use caucasian so caucasian on the surface should being people from the cook says what he did was he was comparing the skulls of different races racial groups and he thought the people's in the cooks is the most beautiful oval and he defined caucasian then you know this kind of breach of the most speech for people on us as everyone from western europe tunnels in india which is obviously not just within the cooks much broader areas and not but that kind of again speaks three arbitrariness of race that even within the classifications of people came up with and everyone had very different classifications that the terminology they used their ideas they used sometimes just particular to that some people would customized by color some people would pick out particular population groups and it was quite random and this again would cut rounded caucasian obviously if it means nothing to you that would mean i am doing face of us like to look at if we were discussing the straight people would say actually you are indian or brown and you will white european they would call you caucasian but not make caucasian and no way the blue about meant it included me and this is an idea that has been played around was so much throughout history so for example in the history of this historic don't include in the book but that's fascinating to read it.

British museum
"british museum" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"british museum" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"So if you're like, the British Museum has always been about Gulliver's travels, you set off to look at what's happening in China or Mexico, and you come back if he learned a bit about Mexico and a bit about China, but above all, you realize how odd your way of doing things, and that you can't do it in different ways. So the point of looking at the other cultures is to see how you can be different. And the words would you choose to be different? So there have been out of facts on display for more than two hundred and fifty years their on continually. Yes. But I'm assuming that the way. That the narrative is framed has changed. Yes. Absolute. Okay. So can you give us one example of this artifact that's been there for two to one hundred fifty years, and is is no display differently. Yes. And there's a there's one very obvious artifact when it's put together in the middle of aging century, one of the arguments, very strongly put forward is that all human beings are doing the same things just slide two different ways as a very humane humanistic enlightenment idea, and one of the things that they know is that everybody lets everybody plays music, every society, we know dances, sings whatever. So the one of the collectors asks ship's captains to bring back musical instruments around the world one of the audiences. A drum is bought in Virginia in the United States and before the United States. It's still a British colony in the seventeenth thirties and is put on show as an. American Indian as they call it drum and looked at and everything's how interesting day her drums, just like our drums, then later on much later when they start examining the would the discovered it's not an American drummer tall is actually a drum that comes from west Africa. And how did a drum mid west African wood? Carved, very elaborately carved in west Africa would get Virginia in the seventeenth thirties with his only one way, it's actually part of the slave trade. So from what is the illustration of music as worldwide phenomenon we have a document of the slavery. Now, we don't have many documents of the slave trade from the African side because the people who wrote the records were the whites. So it turns into a very important document because we know that drums were used on the ships to make the slaves dumps to keep them from despair to keep them fit insofar as it could be fit transported that and we also know that then used in the plantations often to call people to revolt so in that drum you have a story of exploitation transport bridge. You also. Have a story of resistance. And then further examination reveal that it's not any ill drum is actually from an African Royal orchestra..

west Africa Virginia Gulliver China Mexico African Royal orchestra United States British Museum one hundred fifty years fifty years
"british museum" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

04:33 min | 3 years ago

"british museum" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"So he's actually establish that. Did you already mentioned? I believe I said the British Museum. Okay. London's Bloomsbury. So he spent about three years finding the right objects and among them is this really amazing. Again, another self plug really amazing head of the emperor Augustus. I don't know if you've ever seen it. It's this beautiful bronze thing had sculpture oxidized, so it's kind of green and then it has. These amazing is which staff are intensely made out of glass and shows I used to have a picture of a hanging. My Lou interesting in my last house that is interesting a little bit too much information. So the head is immaculately preserved because around two thousand years ago, it was captured by a Cush light army. If you're wondering whether from it's an area that's now in modern Sudan. So the Kushtia army captured the statue which had been sent out for kind of imperial reasons chopped off his head, buried the head face down under the steps to the temple so that everyone going into the temple stamped on Augustus head in this kind of. Symbolic act of defiance and rage against the Roman empire machine. I'm there lay until nineteen ten when it was excavated an an example of really extraordinary benevolence rather than just taking it as they did with the organ marbles. The British Museum actually bought it for that connection where now resides so in his office, having it installed low down close to the ground kind of in the manner of it's sort of long internment. Fascinating. Also impressive about that. Was that old managed to begin an end that review with both items somehow itself. Impressed that skillful, thanks org. You're with the briefing or more call twenty four. Let's head to the Balkans though to wrap up the day's program, more weird and wonderful stories in the frame here. Let's hear from Monaco's man in the region guide loan good often into you guy. What have you got for us? I gather there's a big anniversary around. Yeah, there is two hundred and forty a big anniversary. It's one we all mall because when the two hundred and fortieth Tom. Absolutely. So yes. I mean, it's it's It's a a slam slam. at all anniversary, no way to hundred and fortieth, but it's a big one for Slovenia because it's the two hundred fortieth anniversary today of the first successful ascent of mount three glove, which is Slovenia's highest peak rooms to about three thousand meters. And this is such an important place in Slovenian psyche, Tom, because if you look at the Slovenian flag now it's red white and blue trickier, which looks like pretty much every other red white and blue trick lab, including embarrassingly Slovakia, the one distinguishing because everybody gets Slovakia Slovenia mixed up. So it really doesn't help. But there is one distinguishing feature on the Slovenian tricolor and that is a graphic representation of Trig love. And they say, Tom that you cannot be properly Slovenian unless you have made an ascent of Trig laugh. Okay. Have you have you ever given a bash go? I know I have no. I've talked into the lake which you can see from trick, but not not just. This is something that's something to look forward to perhaps. Let let's say you do tackle this autumn. You might miss out on well, another sort of traditional, a traditional sort of happening, which is a photo by the I'll just tower. That's right, Allie. Yes, tower is the if you won't get you take a selfie from the top of mantra glove and say, look, I am truly Slovene than the alleyoop tower is the place to take this photograph. Now a has to be said, the Elliot's tar looks like a six year olds, representation of what a space rocket looks like. Or maybe if you've seen walls in Gromit the the, the grand day out, it's it's that kind of space, rocket sort of thing. And there's a lovely picture on the the STI news agency website of somebody in a climbing helmet, peeking out a bid grinning face peeking out of this. This whole that's cut in the side of the Slovenian space rocket on top of this mountain. And it does look extremely precarious. I have to say, which is why I'm in no rush to climate, but that is being helicoptered off to be repaired again to be taking off. Generations of paint, stripping it back to the metal repairing that crucially also repairing the lightning conductor, which has got damaged somehow quite possibly by lightening, and hopefully in a matter of weeks, we'll be back there for keen Slovenes to once again, do selfies with..

Tom British Museum Slovenia Trig Cush light army London Sudan Augustus Kushtia army alleyoop tower Slovakia Lou Bloomsbury Monaco Slovenes Allie Elliot three thousand meters
Photographer says Bill Murray assaulted him at a restaurant

24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 3 years ago

Photographer says Bill Murray assaulted him at a restaurant

"Actor Bill Murray is being accused. Of slamming a, photographer against the door and pouring a glass of water. Over him and the photographer is singer Carly Simon's brother Peter Simon says he. Was taking photos of abandoned a Massachusetts restaurant on an assignment for the Martha's Vineyard times, he says Murray accosted him swore at him and threatened him Simon says the band invited him and he wasn't there to. Take pictures of Murray a police report says Murray told them Simon was taking pictures of him the report says Murray was visibly upset and said that Simon Was harassing him nobody has been

Bill Murray Iraq Carly Simon Brian Tampa Bay British Museum Facebook Tampa United States London Alex Stevenson Stevens Megan Crane Apple Florida Massachusetts Forty Four Year
"british museum" Discussed on In Our Time

In Our Time

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"british museum" Discussed on In Our Time

"This is the bbc this podcast is supported by advertising outside the uk this is the bbc firms for learning this episode who've been our time there's a reading list to go with it on our website and you can get news about our programs if you follow us on twitter at bbc in our time i enjoyed the programs hulo in five twenty bc darius the great started building on the site persepolis the ceremonial city of the persians and for almost two centuries this was the richest place on earth it's extravaganza mark of the ruler's power as kim kings over land stretching one terms from libya to pakistan from egypt up to the russian steps this is accumulated empire and it was then the largest in the world when inactive revenge vandalism alexandra mastodon sector city in three thirty bc it said he removed two hundred wagons of gold and silver some of the tributes and taxes from across the empire with meeting discuss the rise and fall of persepolis are loyal journal professor of ancient history abuna ministy best to salvage curtis curator a middle eastern coins the british museum and then jalen electra in greek and near eastern history at king's college london loyd will jones darius the great was head of what's known as the ketamine empire what worries origins oh the persians originate from so that people version is iran that we could change modern day iran we thinking of the iranian plateau the the essential border still of iran but of course as you said the empire was so much bigger the original persians came in in nomadic formation they were nomadic tribes from the steps of your asia in the second millennium bc they went into different parts of iran taking on different traditions in the north of iran then with the meads people probably hit of those and in the south south west of iran this is where our persians settle the indo european speakers so the languages are.

bbc uk twitter kim kings libya professor british museum jalen electra jones pakistan egypt king ketamine iran two centuries
"british museum" Discussed on ID10T with Chris Hardwick

ID10T with Chris Hardwick

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"british museum" Discussed on ID10T with Chris Hardwick

"Talk on here i don't know hit straighter you know but i kept my wife is not yeah like for instance you know we're going to the magic castle tonight that's what my wife likes to imagine costs imagine castle yeah magicians come out i've been told about this i've been told i have to guy it's great is it yes magic trick chris i do like a good magic trick yeah well you know my friends rather comedians magicians or juggling it's just all the weird basically circus performers like any kind of circus performer is kind of who that that's kind of where our hearts are how often do you go to the magic costs we don't get to go that often and it's just like right down the street and we will belong to it for a couple of years and we just we just never we just don't ever have the time to go well you know i'm sure you when your home i'll have right yeah you never do that thing in urine a million in edible things to walking from replace i should be in the british museum every day bridget day and i'm i'm not saying you're quite right you know you just drive by and you're like but alex great i'm gonna go there please looks great yeah but boy bed at seven o'clock sounds great pajau early pajamas sound really awesome are you a late night person your morning person pass and that's why i'm most i'm most suited to theater in that way because when the alarm goes of five am when i'm sure you're saying oh yeah i'm not great without caffeine in an ideal world i would i'd like to go to work at five pm and finish about one that's my most productive i'm come home wind down a little bit what about e morning you're right up with the the lark so yeah i i wake up i'm up early which is hard when i go to stand up kostanic shows go until twelve twelve thirty at night and then i'm just wrecked for the next day and it takes me an entire day to rest up enough to be able to do two shows that night i just can't.

british museum caffeine bridget alex
"british museum" Discussed on Dear Hank and John

Dear Hank and John

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"british museum" Discussed on Dear Hank and John

"Glad that we know this much about this eight thousand year old man and i'm sure that he would be absolutely delighted to find himself dried and sunburnt in the british museum can dead bodies get sunburned hank they can get damaged by the sun but a sunburn is a pretty specific set of things that happen and it is it is not just the damage that is done in fact basically what happens is your cells get damaged by the sun and then your body has reaction and inflames that area to to do the repair work and a lot of times that is actually the thing that is causing the discomfort is the inflammation of the repair rather than the damage itself but the damage itself also can cause a lot of problems and depending on how severe it is so yeah it's the the cells can get damaged and they can get damaged whether or not they are alive and actually like interestingly cells continue to do some metabolising stuff after the what we would consider the death so they individual cells will continue to be alive you've enough for the person is dead and so you can you could still get some of that inflammation if you could get some of that even some like melanin production so you would get a very maybe even tiny amount of tanning that would happen after the body died but only for a very short amount of time well i'm glad that i know that i feel that my life has been enriched to almost as much as if i had learned how to tweet nothing.

british museum sunburn eight thousand year
"british museum" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Arts Review

Monocle 24: The Monocle Arts Review

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"british museum" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Arts Review

"Think it was more kind of elemental all of them you you wanted strong female characters but no she didn't start set of lecturing saw that was there were no protests during the meeting and then amongst the others unit the mermaid and mrs hancock imaging hermis go ahead said please voters because actually it's just such original tale the author used to work at the british museum answered of constructed this perfect eighteenth century of her garden world with his courtesan at the head of it and then you're waiting for me to appear right this freak show the mermaid brilliantly done an young you know sort of young this i'm bishen and selfconfidence i thought was reassuring that there were young people just very sure of what they wanted to say i wonder if you even know what it is exactly that you're looking for and if book has to be of its time does it have to be politically relevant so for instance home fire comey wonderful on the soap police basically yes is that important it was into that terrific and i thought it was a story that was so relevant could almost have been journalism except that it told it from the inside and therefore had an ambiguous in suit human complexity to it which gave it a sort of bigger resonant so it's both sort of buying on topical ni and then has his wide resin so i think you could read that in fifty years time we'll stand so i think that's the test we've talked about various books on the shortlist haven't discussed the idiot elif batch amon it's charming book i think it's really about the poignant appeal of learning she's learning about bush's learning about life and that was a book that i lent out to a few students who came back exactly how they've unit she just caught that time of life and the sense of what books can give you and that which you might never have again you know so i think that just captured a moment and she's beautiful writer i'm funny that's nothing was good too.

british museum bush writer others mrs hancock fifty years
"british museum" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"british museum" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"The case case couple of years ago vr romanian man and his mother was trying to protect him and she burned the artworks in how often thinking that they wouldn't be found but of course the the the little burn krispy brits along with their bake him was found you know so enp it is the thing is that all theft from a gallery is not just a criminal act against the gallery it's a criminal act against civilization because artists of course for the people an the most famous case where people say is the artworks stolen or not is of course the algamal bows you know an endemic his hair in the the british museum in london as its lead legal own up at the greek authorities claim that uh the ottoman empire which gave you the british the chance to take and look after it didn't have the right to authorize it so are we involved in our highest ladies are unhappy more legal that becomes an era battle between nations as opposed to get battle between men in masks is bags with who had swag written on them i mean if he do have all these amazing pieces of out you say you can't display them so people do people just set on them and put keep them in there keep them in their ovens than that by or other saad incredibly sent one one can only hope that there are some sort of incredibly autistic he's sensitive bodies out there who quietly have the beautiful an you know the beach will manage shea totoni sort of all nev in that back in they just occasionally gone have looked it and have a guilty sense of pleasure of what they've go the thing is i mean i lightly i dare in that the guilty cents a pleasure but most art collectors you know they they they want to have the token trophy is like going into the party with with the blown disco with the tulips legs and then you know the biggest cleavage just to show off so they're not going to hide it in the cell of with a goal balls they want to be able to showed off so it's useless to them is the same ways when you still banksie off the street first of all it becomes worthless because banks he is only worth something when it's on the streets but that i remember lovely story of a a.

theft british museum saad london
"british museum" Discussed on The Economist Radio

The Economist Radio

01:30 min | 4 years ago

"british museum" Discussed on The Economist Radio

"To what extent does this still resonate in modern is ready politics well we're going to hear a lot about it over the next few weeks out there's going to be a celebration of uh israel's relationship with the united kingdom apart from prime minister netanyahu at going to london to attend miss dinner uh the knesset the israeli parliament is going to hold a special session in jerusalem now there are other events planned across the country uh the declaration itself the original letter uh might be lent to israel by the british museum to put on display uh so again we're going to see a celebration of what has historically been one of israel's most important foreign relationships other comes at a slightly ironic time because the israeli government over the past few years has taken a very hard turn towards rightwing populists on uh the settler movement is increasingly powerful and prime minister netanyahu's government uh we've seen restrictions on liberal ngos we've seen increasing attacks on how to free press and the courts and other institutions that are seen as bastions of liberalism in israel and all of this has drawn a lot of criticism from israel's traditional allies particularly uh countries in the west and in europe uh and also from jewish communities abroad who are incensed at netanyahu's alliance with both president trump in the us and with farright parties in europe so all of that likely to be papered over uh in the next couple of weeks uh but there's a there's a very underlying tension in the relationship now one of the things that you mentioned in your piece is that in times of.

israel united kingdom prime minister netanyahu jerusalem british museum israeli government us europe london president
"british museum" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

02:04 min | 4 years ago

"british museum" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"And it it led to this amazing version of the artifact that you can go see today i think it's usually at the louvre museum in germany but i believe it is currently on loan at the british museum in fact i believe it was the british museum tweeting about the acquisition that uh or acquisition the the loan that made me think about doing this episode so and the lion man he he stands like a human in this twofooted by pete will posture backstraight with human arm straight down to the side human torso maybe lioness kinds of legs but this proud menacing head of a big cat and you've got a wonder so this is thirty five to forty thousand years ago the long before recorded history nobody was writing down what they were thinking there apparently was no written language so what did this figure mean to the stoneage people who made it yeah i mean for for the most part we can only we can only guess we can certainly look to more to increasingly more complex ideals who came afterwards be look at it and you think was this a is this a deity is this they punishing creature is this a i have seen the the term mom master of animals thrown around the area in interpreting sex similar alleged figures from cave paintings and and other uh ancient remains yeah there is a sort of intuitive since in which you could see an ancient person seeing an apex predator like a lion or any any kind of big cat as some sort of god of the wilderness uh that would have power over other animals because it is at the top of the food chain but it's a serious question to imagine why people would make this artifact because making an artifacts like this would have been a an extreme sacrifice uh these would have been people i think very likely living not always very far from the edge of starvation uh in an artifacts like this took resources it took time it took energy at wore down your sharp flint tools in the carving process in fact there was a in in recent years there is an experiment by a guy named wolf hein.

louvre museum british museum food chain wolf hein germany forty thousand years
"british museum" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:30 min | 4 years ago

"british museum" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"I feel like a t set west have been destroyed at other things as well it gave no details but it makes it sound like fortunately no one was harmed in this accidental discharge of a firearm but there was some dramatic incident and in spite of this chequered background stevenson wound up working at the british museum he married he had two children and then he changed courses to join the clergy after he was traumatized by the death of his brother he became a priest after the death of his wife so where we come around to these monumental volumes of translated works of history he turned out to really have a knack for translating and editing historical documents he did a lot of work for the historical mees gets commission he put together a bunch of different gigantic collections of historical documents for various different clubs and historical societies these ranged from four to eight volumes in length some of them were these gargantuan editions of old religious and secular histories and this was his his thing and apparently he was also extremely personable and generous as well so this is the guy that did the translation of the thing that we are about to read yeah worthy of a a little minibiography there for sure uh and back to the story in stevenson's translation william begins his account by saying that it doesn't seem right to skip over the story of the green children but at the same time he had some doubts about the matter.

british museum stevenson william
"british museum" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

02:06 min | 4 years ago

"british museum" Discussed on FoodStuff

"That's some serious stuff chester was so thirsty oh my goodness okay uh if you want to hear more from from jonathan strickland by the way you can catch him on the podcast tech stuff and also on the facebook live show called game changers on how stuff works facebook page secret fund seattle history board games be flavored games and videogames all kinds of things yep yep check not i think he jonathan anyway uh so these sorts of recipes pop up in upper class cookbooks from all over europe the british museum cookbook reports they were often decorated with edible gold and silver leaf to make them that much more extra showy yes uh end these cold dishes might have been especially popular due to the theory of using food to balance schumer's that that whole concept of cool versus hot and wet verses dry that's going on in our bodies it in the universe around us i'm so so cold dishes made with gelatin were recommended especially for people with hot and moist temperaments um like youth and adolescence or during torrid southern summers one of these days we're going to do to episode on humorous i feel like they keep propping up yeah am not entirely sure all it i am interested in hot than moist temperaments that's a great descript her i i think i've done a few people like that oh have you i think we all do anyway to please the friday non meat eating catholic crowd chefs got the idea to boil some you'll zip in the stock of a fish like cod and also swim bladders to make catholic approved fish chillies soon that sounds very appetizing who yeah uh meanwhile in the late 1500s a fellow sometimes called europe's first celebrity chef wrote about his technique of using egg whites to help clarify stock for gelatin that was a mystery martina dick coma who was a tally and if you could not tell and we'll talk more about that works also in our side section blow.

chester jonathan strickland europe schumer facebook seattle british museum
"british museum" Discussed on Mysterious Universe

Mysterious Universe

01:51 min | 4 years ago

"british museum" Discussed on Mysterious Universe

"Then a bubble grows on you off the seiko offered on this baby spot as god in agent they had probably head of this contraceptive recipe anna this has been blocked about endlessly but they have a recipe on papyrus will use feces of crocodile all smashed up with them and to do on an the shape this into a supposed to tori vaginal suppository in that is supposedly great contraceptive method and they had an awesome aphrodisiacs too so when the british museum is a this old egyptian papyrus to the germans we'll call that clinton chosen what's turkey could thicket to get that all is considering whether to tag this to edit that out oldest living in the show on what is lieutenant sanurip the british museum got this all the virus it's called the ingredient of a potion that allows you to get pregnant or allows it's like an aphrodisiac facilitates facilitates pregnancy so let me read it out for you take it dandruff from the scalp of a dead man who was recently murdered three step too at the blood of a ticket from a black dog a drop of blood from the ring finger of your left hand and plenty of semen it's too much effort everyday he's gotta that kinda f it's like you find a dead man the dead man i get but nato than you think craig i've got the first ingredient for the potion and eager to find a we'll see murdered and no he he fell off a bridge it's harden damn it going to find another dead man that was recently murdered but here's the thing i want to just finish on this before we go to plus some cultures never made the connection between six and babies right so which culture is that all the idiots over really tomlin's.

british museum clinton craig tomlin
"british museum" Discussed on Rick Steves Britain & Ireland Audio Tours

Rick Steves Britain & Ireland Audio Tours

06:51 min | 6 years ago

"british museum" Discussed on Rick Steves Britain & Ireland Audio Tours

"The peppermint sculptures these statues were originally nestled nicely in the triangular peppermint above the columns at the parthenon's main or east entrance. They depict the legendary moment when the city of athens was born. The greek gods are lounging around gathered at an olympian banquet. Suddenly there's a stir of activity. He the cup pair of the gods has something amazing. she's the tallest surviving statute near the centre frightened. She runs to tell the others address whipping behind her startled meter just to the left turns toward he. What's the big news. It's the miraculous birth of athena. According to legend. Zeus had his head split open allowing athena. That got us of wisdom to rise from his brain fully grown and fully-armed inaugurating the golden age of athens. Unfortunately that key scene is missing. It's the empty space in the middle at the peak of the triangle. The only one who hasn't lost his head is laid back dyonisis. He's a cool guy further left. He just raises another glass of wine to his lips over on the right aphrodite. The goddess of love leans back into her mother's lap too busy admiring her own beautiful bare shoulder to even notice the hubbub. A chess set horse's head screams. These people are nuts. Let me out of here to this. Exciting scene came with a message. Justice wise athena rose above lesser gods. Who were scared. Drunk or vein. So her city athens rise above her lesser rivals this is amazing workmanship compared dyonisis with his natural relaxed reclining pose to all those stiff egyptian statues. We saw standing eternally attention. Appreciate the folds of the clothes and the female figures especially aphrodite. He's clinging rumpled robe. Some sculptors would. I build a nude model of their figure. Put real close on it instead. Steady how the cloth hung down before actually sculpting and marble others found inspiration at the tavern on wet. Toga night wonder behind. The statues originally sat forty feet above the ground the backs of the statues which were never intended to be seen are almost as detailed as the fronts even without their heads these statues with their detailed anatomy and expressive poses speak volumes. The met appease are the square panels on the walls to either side. Start on the right wall with three panels of men. Fighting centaurs lisa. Why do you think the elgin. Marbles are so treasured. Well it's been said that. The british of the nineteenth century the most powerful nation on earth saw themselves as the successors of those empires of old. Maybe these rocks made them stop and wonder will. Our great civilization also turned to rubble. The med appease the battle of lake paths and centaurs the met appease once decorated the gaps between the cross beams above the parthenon's columns. Here's the scene. The humans have invited. Some centaurs barbarian half man half horse creatures to a wedding. Feast all goes well until the british centaurs. The original party animals get too drunk and try to carry off the women. A brawl breaks out the panel in the middle number thirty one shows a centaur grabbing a man by the throat while the men pulls his hair remember. The greeks prided themselves on creating order out of chaos within just a few generations. They went from nomadic barbarism to the pinnacle of early western civilization. These meta ps tell the symbolic story of this struggle between the forces of human civilization and animal like barbarism now cross to the opposite wall and see how it all turned out in panel number. Twenty eight the centaurs start to the upper hand as one rears back in prepares to trample a helpless man. The leopard skin draped over the centaurs arm roars at taunt the humans lose face actually literally to the left in number twenty seven. The humans finally rally and drive off the centaurs. A centaur tries to run but the men grabs him by the neck and raises his right hand in sword now missing to run him through notice. How the full in the man's cloak set off his smooth skin emphasizing. His graceful figure. The centaurs have been defeated and humanity triumphs in fact these reliefs represent a turning point for global humanity around the year five hundred e c when this art was made bold. New ideas were exploding simultaneously. All around the world socrates in greece confucius in china buddha in india these thinkers and others were independently discovering a non material unseen order in nature. They talked of a rational mind or soul and saw humans as separate from nature and different from the other animals. In the greek golden age civilization finally triumphed over barbarism. Rational thought over animal urges and order over chaos. And you've now conquered the british museum. We hope you've enjoyed. We've seen the legacy of three great civilizations egyptian art that seems built for eternity the fierce lions of assyrian civilization and that beautiful balance of golden age greece. If you have time and energy there's much much more to the british museum and if you're doing more sightseeing in london. We also have audio tours for westminster. The city saint paul's and the british library remember. This tour was excerpted from the rick. Steves london guidebook co-authored with jeanne openshaw for more details on eating sleeping and seeing london referred to this year's edition of that guidebook for more free audio tours and podcasts and for information about our tv shows bus tours and travel gear visit our website. At rick steves dot com. Thanks to jeanne openshaw. The co author of this tour. This tour was produced by cedar house. Audio productions thanks for joining me tears and goodbye for now..

jeanne openshaw london forty feet india Zeus china egyptian westminster cedar house thirty one Twenty eight Steves greek greece year five hundred e c earth nineteenth century this year assyrian twenty seven
"british museum" Discussed on Rick Steves Britain & Ireland Audio Tours

Rick Steves Britain & Ireland Audio Tours

06:17 min | 6 years ago

"british museum" Discussed on Rick Steves Britain & Ireland Audio Tours

"Two winged bulls. From course bad the palace of sargon. These marble bowls guarded the entrance to the city of shar aquin. Which means sorry guns phil. This was a new capital near niniveh and the modern city of mozell it boasted vast palaces built by sargon the second around seven hundred bc. The thirty ton bulls were cut from a single block tipped on their sides then dragged to their place by. Pow's in modern times when the british transport those statues here. They had to cut him in half. You can see the horizontal cracks through the bulls. Chests sargon gained his reputation as fierce general by subduing the israelites after a three year. Siege of jerusalem. The bible tells us that when the israelite king refused to pay the annual tribute sargon invaded and ethnically cleansed the area. He deported many as relates to assyria thus inspiring legends of the lost ten tribes. These winged bulls also celebrate another of sargon. The seconds triumphs over the rebellious babylonians. The south in seven ten. Be sargon marched victorious through the streets of babylon the predecessor to the capital. We now call modern baghdad. Sneak between these bowls in veer right into room ten there. You'll find more relief panels showing preparations for a big hunt. Took a royal lion hunts from the palace of asher bonnie paul lion hunting was as serious sport of cans on the right wall are horses on the left. You'll find hunting dogs and next to them. Lions resting peacefully in a garden. They're unaware that. Shortly they'll be rousted stampeded and slaughtered lions lived in mesopotamia up until modern times. And it was the king's duty to keep the lion population down to protect farmers and herdsmen. This duty became a sport with stage. Tons and zoo-bred lions and lion. Hunting was a political statement enabling that kings of men to prove their power by taking on the king of beasts. Continue ahead into the larger lion hunt room reading the panels like a comic strip. Start on the right and stroll counterclockwise. They released the lions from their cages. Then soldiers on horseback. Heard them into an enclosed arena. The king eager to show his stuff has them cornered. Let slaughter begin. The chariot carries king usher bonnie. Paul the great grandson of sargon. The second by the way don't confuse asher. Bunny paul with esher naser paul. The second he ruled two hundred years earlier. The king leaves half a dozen deadlines his wake then moves on. Meanwhile spearman hold off more lions attacking from the rear at about the middle of the long wall. The panel show lions fleeing from the hunters cornered by hounds shot through with arrows and weighed down by fatigue. They began to fall. The lead line carries on even while vomiting blood. This low point syrian cruelty is perhaps the high point of their artistic achievement. It's a curious coincidence. That civilizations often produced their greatest art in their declining years On the wall opposite vomiting line is a panel known as the dying lantis. The lioness roars in pain and frustration. She tries to run but her body is too heavy her muscular hind legs once the source of her power are now paralyzed like these brave lions serious. Once great warrior nation was eventually slann. Usher bonnie paul. The last of a serious great kings reigned for fifty years but shortly after his death a syria was conquered and in six twelve bbc their capital. It was sacked and looted by their neighbors to the south babylon. They left us these lion hunt panels with their mood of tragedy and proud struggle in a hopeless cause. They are some of the most beautiful of human creations. Our next stop is ancient greece in room. Thirteen if your legs feel like the dying lioness and you need a break. There's a cafe just ahead the directions that follow are a bit tricky so you might want to just get out your map and find room thirteen in the greek section to get to the greek collection exit. The lion hunt room at the far end. You'll spill out back in the nimrod gallery from their turn right and make your way back to the huge winged lions. The ones we saw at the start of the assyrian exhibit exit assyria between the winged lions and make a u turn to the right. That'll take you into room eleven. You'll walk past. Glass cases of small figurines these prehistoric greek barbie and ken dolls date from the socratic period. That's from about twenty five hundred. Bc continue into room twelve. The hungry can go straight to the gallery cafe from here. Turn right into room thirteen. It's filled with greek vases. In.

fifty years niniveh mozell half a dozen Paul ten tribes shar aquin Thirteen Two winged bulls mesopotamia six twelve bbc Usher bonnie paul thirty ton bulls south babylon Bunny paul bonnie paul israelites babylonians two hundred years earlier about twenty five hundred
"british museum" Discussed on Rick Steves Britain & Ireland Audio Tours

Rick Steves Britain & Ireland Audio Tours

06:53 min | 6 years ago

"british museum" Discussed on Rick Steves Britain & Ireland Audio Tours

"A syria to human headed winged lions long before saddam hussein iraq was home to other palace building iron fisted rulers like the assyrians these lions guarded in syrian palace. In what is now iraq back in eight sixty bc with the strength of a lion the wings of an eagle the brain of a man and the beard of z. Top they protected the assyrian king from evil spirits and scared the heck out of foreign ambassadors and left wing newspaper reporters. Metaphorically speaking a syria was the lion king of beasts severely middle eastern civilizations. The assyrian from their home in what is now northern iraq dominated the middle east for three centuries from nine hundred to six hundred bc. Lisa what has five legs and flies I dunno rick what take a close look at the big wing clients. These quinta beds appear complete both from the front and from the side so they could guard both directions at once carved into the stone between the bearded lions loins. You can see one of civilizations most impressive achievements writing this wedge shaped script called. Cuneiform is the world's first written language invented five thousand years ago by the sumerians of southern iraq. They passed it down to their less civilized descendants. The assyrians now walk between the lions glance at the large reconstructed wooden gates from an assyrian palace. And turn right into the long narrow red gallery room. Seven it's lined with brown relief panels the nimrod gallery palace of esher. Nezar poll the second. This gallery is a mini version of the throne. Room of king escher nezar pulled the seconds palace nimrod entering you see the king on his throne at the far end shaded by a parasol flanked by winged lions and surrounded by these relief panels which were originally painted in bright colors and finished with shiny varnish. Find the king himself in the first panel on your right. He's the one with the braided beard. Earing and fez like crown. He's flanked by his supernatural. Horror headed henchman. They sprinkled incense on their king. Pine cones the bulging forearms hint at esher nezar paul's reputation as mercilus warrior. Who used torture and humiliation as part of his distinct management style under his reign in the early ninth century bc the assyrians dominated the mideast from their capital at niniveh in present day northern iraq. Asher nezar paul. The second proved his power by building a brand new palace. Decorated by these panels in nearby nimrod. The cuneiform inscription running through the center of the panel is. Ezra pulse resume. It reads the king. Who has enslaved all mankind the mighty warrior who steps on the necks of his enemies. Tramples all foes shatters the enemy the weapon of the gods the mighty king the king of assyria king of the world be a mba raged vice president of marketing their relief panels in this gallery. Chronicle the bloody career. King ashra nazar paul the second president of torture a dozen paces farther down on the left wall. You'll find an upper panel last attack on an enemy town and all around good guy attack on an enemy town and other relief panels many nations conquered by the assyrians consisted of little more than a single walled city. Here the assyrians attack with crude tank. Actually a siege engine that shields them as they advanced to the city walls to smash down the gate with a battering ram. The king stands a safe distance away behind the juggernaut and looking braver than actually is shoot. Taros the assyrian army was both fierce and efficient equipped with high-tech siege engines like this one with chariots and with mounted cavalry in the next panel. To the right. You'll find a scene called enemy escape. Soldiers flee the slings and arrows of assyrians by swimming across the euphrates river. They use inflated animal bladders as life preservers their friends in the castle. Downstream applaud their ingenuity. The assyrians were ruthless. They intimidated enemies with a policy of brutality. One conqueror boasted after subduing a nation. I tied their heads to trunks all around the city in the panel below the enemy escape. You'll see one called review of prisoners. The assyrian economy depended on booty here. A conquered nation is paraded before the assyrian king whose shaded by his parasol asher nezar. Paul the second sneers and tells the captured chief drop and give me fifty push-ups above the prisoners heads. We see images of rich spoils of war. Elephant tusks metal pots. And so on. The assyrians depopulated conquered lands by making slaves of the locals mass deportations and ethnic cleansing. Then they repopulated those lands with the syrian settlers on the opposite wall. A few steps further along is an artist's rendering of what the nimrod palace would have looked like the thirty thousand square foot palace was built atop a fifty acre artificial mound. An inscription of the time tells us the new palace was inaugurated with a ten day banquet. Where the king picked up the tab for sixty nine thousand five hundred seventy four of his closest friends as you browse the rest of the panels in this gallery consider that despite their ruthless reputation the assyrians have left a legacy as builders rather than destroyers once they'd conquered a place the assyrians proved to be steady and capable administrators. The built public works in a vast system of roads served by an express postal service for their combination of military might and efficient rule. The assyrians have been called the romans of the east when you're ready to move on exit the nimrod gallery at the far end as you exit. Hang a u turn left rounding the corner. You'll see two huge winged bulls guarding the entrance to room..

Paul fifty acre five thousand years ago niniveh Asher nezar paul early ninth century southern iraq fifty push-ups sixty nine five legs esher nezar paul ten day first panel northern iraq Lisa euphrates river eight sixty bc two huge winged bulls thirty thousand square foot pa both directions