35 Burst results for "British Medical Journal"

Study: Vaccine Blood Clots Risk Is Lower Than Clot Risk From COVID-19

Atlanta's Morning News

00:19 sec | 9 months ago

Study: Vaccine Blood Clots Risk Is Lower Than Clot Risk From COVID-19

"Those who have been vaccinated. A study in the British medical Journal finds about 12,000 of every 10 million covid patients are hospitalized or die from blood clots That's far higher than those who received the Pfizer AstraZeneca shot. Previous studies have shown a slightly higher risk of blood clots among those who received the vaccine. Fans returned to East Lake Golf Club for the

British Medical Journal Pfizer Astrazeneca East Lake Golf Club
"british medical journal" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

The Last American Vagabond

05:42 min | 10 months ago

"british medical journal" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

"I want to reiterate a point. Now this is like i said yesterday. Thank you for those of you. That are patient enough to go through information more than once. I want this to be done in a way. Now for a specific reason to go over this again or specifically this since it was blocked the other day and this again to start the show and i want you guys to this is. This'll be a clip. That should be something that we put out there by itself. And i want people to understand how important this is because the reason. I'm reiterating these things again. Today is because both of them are no longer there. Both of them are gone. And this is such a vow. I've been using these two documents. Three of ms one for the british medical journal. That says the same thing just detour gone and the reason. I want to reiterate this again today. So i haven't had done so in together in a while and in the context of how they're very very strongly revising history in real time right. Now they're deleting stuff all over the place and that needs to show us that they're hiding something. There's no reason that you delete data history records if you're not trying to hide something it's crazy so let's start with this one again and i want to show you can see the website is we are re and by the way it goes to this link because this is the one they redirects to. Now let me try to do this. I guess not hugely important. Let me try to do one. Hopefully you can get a blip of it. When i just grab it from my links. But you'll notice that when you go to this where it was it right there. Hopefully this pops up. you'll be able to see it. You get a quick blip of the real thing there there it is see hopefully guys caught that up and then it goes over here and says well we've revamped their website and and as i as i've extensively done by myself and showing you on the show literally nothing else can find is even remotely changed..

british medical journal
"british medical journal" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

The Last American Vagabond

04:23 min | 10 months ago

"british medical journal" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

"Everyone's lives will. Here's the british medical journal one of the most respected scientific publications on in existence. Telling you that those benefits that keep screaming our hypothetical meaning. They have not been proven july thirteenth. Yes this is an opinion. But guess who's writing it. peter doshi. I was just talking about the other day. And i made sure i confirm this because i wasn't sure if anything changed since then but he is currently a senior editor at the british medical journal. Right so we have a senior editor of one of the most respected science publications on the internet writing. And telling you that these are hypothetical benefits. Children's should not be injected. Isn't that exactly what we've been saying. Have been censored for yes and no. I'm not calling for him to be censored but this is not some fringe. Anti-science fake news conspiracy theorist i hope we all recognize how reductive and stupid that continual narratives. The truth is out there guys. It's funny you say that for x. files it's true though. This is all out right now. The truth is right in front of you. it's just about year willingness to look at it which you all know. This is just a funny one that i think is kind of a forty and slip or whatever mistake but i did download this taking to listen to this. It's kind of funny because we've had a lot of these throughout this process where they basically say what we think you know. Least we think we know is the truth. Didn't grab it here doesn't shops. That is good morning shops morning morning. Which the evidence that you've looked to make this decision. Yeah we know. The w vaccinated food people are mighty be to get to carry. Grown vars are much more likely to get or carry the corona virus. You know. he could've mistake he could meant to say much less likely. But it's an odd slip. Maybe it's because he very How're you wanna think about. Listen again this decision. We know that w vaccinated fully vaccinates people are multiple mighty to get to carry the chrome vars. Much more likely to get and carry. I you know take it think about it however you want. I find that to be a mistake to make with the way. He said that so who knows who knows why. Set it mistake regardless. It's pretty.

british medical journal peter doshi
"british medical journal" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

The Last American Vagabond

01:44 min | 11 months ago

"british medical journal" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

"I don't talk about this much. But i you know. I'm not here asking for funding and donations. Because you all know what this is about not to say. That's even wrong because clearly people in this position we don't exist without funding. It's not like the mainstream media right. They all despaired skipper tips than europe show was just like how exactly do expect people to make this work but we shifted into the support only model. We don't have any advertisers. we don't have anything. It's only you out there supporting us if you stop donations boarding us. This channel no longer exists honestly. I'd probably get a job and keep doing it anyway. Because i care about it but the point is this is all i do and this is all we will do the last american vagabond because you allow that to be the case. You are the last american back on your part of this because you are all part of our funding you are our support and this is how keeps going this now as always t shirts and things you can buy the links in the show notes truth holding but the real point is just about sharing the content but taking this link sharing with your friends talking to them about it better yet shared video take the source material and show them that. Especially those that are completely resistant. Because they're going to say. Oh t lab is a not a reputable source or whatever that of the person said you know. Despite the fact that we're pointing to the british medical journal lancet and you know the people that they are supposed to listen to. It's all there for them to wa- to drop the seed water at every now and again right. Thank you for being here guys. I just couldn't do this without you. I love you all as always question everything. Come to your own. Conclusions stay vigilant..

europe british medical journal
"british medical journal" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

The Last American Vagabond

01:44 min | 11 months ago

"british medical journal" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

"I don't talk about this much. But i you know. I'm not here asking for funding and donations. Because you all know what this is about not to say. That's even wrong because clearly people in this position we don't exist without funding. It's not like the mainstream media right. They all despaired skipper tips than europe show was just like how exactly do expect people to make this work but we shifted into the support only model. We don't have any advertisers. we don't have anything. It's only you out there supporting us if you stop donations boarding us. This channel no longer exists honestly. I'd probably get a job and keep doing it anyway. Because i care about it but the point is this is all i do and this is all we will do the last american vagabond because you allow that to be the case. You are the last american back on your part of this because you are all part of our funding you are our support and this is how keeps going this now as always t shirts and things you can buy the links in the show notes truth holding but the real point is just about sharing the content but taking this link sharing with your friends talking to them about it better yet shared video take the source material and show them that. Especially those that are completely resistant. Because they're going to say. Oh t lab is a not a reputable source or whatever that of the person said you know. Despite the fact that we're pointing to the british medical journal lancet and you know the people that they are supposed to listen to. It's all there for them to wa- to drop the seed water at every now and again right. Thank you for being here guys. I just couldn't do this without you. I love you all as always question everything. Come to your own. Conclusions stay vigilant..

europe british medical journal
"british medical journal" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

The Last American Vagabond

04:02 min | 11 months ago

"british medical journal" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

"It's an obvious reality that when you do this creates the justification for these things to find a way around it that is what new these things in an expedited fashion. So what they're telling you it's just like they're you know. The the mammo population grew after the dinosaurs disappeared. Well now that you're doing this in the same way in the same kind of you know analogy way. You're creating the just the reason for these things to to thrive. I mean it's very interesting to me now again. This doesn't prove that these things are being cost today but it shows you clearly just like with the you know lively discussion or whatever else that these people are are ignoring the reality whether or not they think it's true because they're told to because that's the that is the direction right so loudly confirmed debunked crazy conspiracy theory until they go. Okay now you can talk about and they go. oh now it seems real legitimate. Nothing changed in no. I'm not even saying that's the there are more of that topic. Then just elaborate theory. That's a clear couched point. It's meant to hide the bigger picture. But it shows you how clear they are actually had this over here for this. This popped up wasn't gonna get into it today. Just scientists are demolishing the conspiracy theory of the origins. This just came out like we just talked about this or the british medical journal is a how ridiculous it is that they all claimed it was fake despite the evidence because of a narrative because they were afraid for their jobs and now they just keep going fake news. Because we don't care about the birds. It's just it's crazy. How obvious this is right. They are actively doing this. And this is what we're seeing today. Now it's as a musician is also making once or non-existent genetic variants of pathogens more prevalent presumably because vaccine primed. Antibodies can't as easily resize an attack shaped shifter's that look different from vaccine strains this is not specific about chickens or merrick's this is this is general..

british medical journal merrick
Russia's Sputnik V Covid vaccine appears effective, study finds

Morning Edition

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

Russia's Sputnik V Covid vaccine appears effective, study finds

"Published report today suggests a Russian made Cove in 19 vaccine is more than 90% effective at preventing disease. NPR's Joe Palka has more Russian vaccine is called a Sputnik the although it was originally approved by Russian regulators in August last year on Lee, Now are the results appearing in a peer reviewed journal. Nearly 20,000 volunteers participated in the vaccine study. Three quarters of the volunteers received the vaccine one quarter of placebo in the study. Vaccine efficacy was 91.6%. Sputnik V is what's known as a viral vector vaccine, a different kind of Xing from the ones made by Pfizer and Moderna, but similar to ones made by AstraZeneca and Johnson and Johnson. It's given as two doses spaced 21 days apart. Results appear in the British medical journal, The Lancet, Joe Palka, NPR

Joe Palka NPR LEE Moderna Pfizer Johnson Astrazeneca British Medical Journal The Lancet
Klobuchar worried about data security for Amazon Halo

The Internet of Things Podcast - Stacey On IoT

01:44 min | 1 year ago

Klobuchar worried about data security for Amazon Halo

"Talk about iot device. Privacy's specifically the senate or rather. Amy klobuchar is really wondering after reading review of amazon's tracker what the department of health and human services plans to do to ensure privacy of people's health data so club. Hr read the amazon review. Said how it takes so much personal information like naked pictures of my body which it does you can delete them it's optional. You can delete the photos from the device. Those photos amazon gives you the option of sending them to the cloud so they don't automatically go there so that's all really important but kluber chart points out in the letter that seventy nine percent of health apps do share people's data and people may not be aware of that that was a study from the british medical journal in twenty nineteen. And so she's asking the department of health and human services for questions basically. She's saying. Hey are you paying attention to this. What are what actions do y'all take to safeguard users private health information. Do you have the authority at actually do any of this. And what else do we need to give the department of health and human services like what regulatory powers we need to give so they can strengthen privacy and security protections for this kind of data and she's asking for all of the information that h h has to make sure devices like halo aren't like willy nilly grabbing your data and share in it in ways like the might be uncomfortable were even detrimental to one's health and i say thank you.

Amazon Department Of Health And Human Amy Klobuchar Senate British Medical Journal
"british medical journal" Discussed on Emma & Tom's PGCE Podcast

Emma & Tom's PGCE Podcast

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"british medical journal" Discussed on Emma & Tom's PGCE Podcast

"You can't go away from the sort of medical overtones of that that kind of phrase and of course this of idea of going for research informs that can sometimes be a little bit caricature. People not always necessarily completely convinced that it's it's great. You know that they think the prop stats means. We get to exclude. The common sense of you know long experience in the classroom and all that kind of thing which clearly we don't so just so i bring you to articles from the british medical journal. Which kind of illustrate the point this being made here because because because the medical profession has had a lot longer being evidence based and research informed and all that kind of thing that we have so they have had time frankly to completely satirize it and heavily defended so perhaps there is a connection. Here we can. Just take a cautionary moment as we as we listen to attempt to precis these two academic papers so that we don't go sort of too far into a kind of crazy world where where we only do things if they are informed by research based evidence. So here we go. This is the first articles was published in two thousand and two thousand three yet my set at the wrong one in front of the first one was published in two thousand and three and it's entitled parachute to use to prevent death and major trauma related to gravitational challenge systematic review of randomized control trials. And what they say and their introduction is this the parachute is used in recreational voluntary sector military settings to reduce the risk of orthopedic head and soft tissue injury after gravitational challenge typically in the context of jumping from an aircraft the perception that parachutes were successful. Intervention is based largely on anecdotal evidence observational data found their uses associated with morbidity and mortality due to both of the intervention and other complications in addition natural history studies of free fall indicate that failure to take or deploy a parachute does not inevitably result in an adverse outcome we therefore undertook a systematic literature review of randomized controlled trials of parachutes. So off. they go and they sort of describe their methods of literature search all very seriously and then their results a single sentence he says our strategy did not find any randomized control trials of the parachute. So if they go in there discussion then they say well. It's often said that doctors are interfering monsters obsessed with disease and power who will not be satisfied until they control every aspect of our lives. It might be argued that the pressure exerted on individuals to use parachutes is yet another example of a natural life. Enhancing experience being turned into a situation of fear and dependency. The widespread use of the parachute may just be another example of doctors obsession with.

british medical journal
"british medical journal" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

The Last American Vagabond

05:06 min | 1 year ago

"british medical journal" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

"Pcr testing and contact tracing in general in the general population make little sense and create an additional case. Democ on top of the pandemic. Like it's incredible word of point where these respectable as we're told you know the ones that they would use if it was otherwise saying something else outlets of the i mean it's whether whether talking about swiss policy research or the british medical journal. They're the ones saying it's a case democ but you can tweet about a case stemming and they'll call you fake news. Conspiracy theorist people have lost it. We're literally we're in a really alarming state right now where we're staring science and actual remember how this began remember how it was. Oh the fringe anti-science weirdos with their one doctor like whether it's tar because it's right there the crazy corner over there. We are so far past that now with mountains of experts and medical professionals and doctor you name it on and on and on entire countries are coming out and saying this. Pcr shouldn't be used or this whole thing isn't really there or on and on and on and still they want to pretend like it's a fringe conspiracy theory. I feel really bad for the mainstream media to be honest because it probably feels really stupid to sit there and act like what they can clearly see isn't happening or just too dumb to know. Probably both but it says mass. Vaccinations will also make rather little sense. Especially because at the time experimental vaccines might become available and remember. They are experimental. Despite what the mainstream talking heads try to bleed at you because they were told to their masters it very much isn't experimental vaccine and it says because at the time it becomes available many people will have already been exposed to the wild virus. But it's not about anything other than giving you this thing that they're trying to test. That's my take based on the facts. But saying the following chart compares the very different mortality profiles of covid nineteen in the nineteen eighteen flu. Note that even in the night in the eighty five plus age group covert nineteen. Legality doesn't reach the value of the nineteen eighteen flu as the chart uses two different skills left versus right and covert scales. Four times smaller surrealism. The left we're talking about The top says to two thousand five hundred deaths per one hundred thousand on the right. Is the six hundred permanent so the bull dark.

british medical journal flu
Tobacco sales during lockdown

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:57 min | 1 year ago

Tobacco sales during lockdown

"During lockdown We sorta changed or spend money always being by mobike. Be buying jigsaw. Buying craft kits. Thinks like that and by motorola does seem that. We've been on mass buying more tobacco. If you look at the results from philip morris japan tobacco imperial brands altria group all of which have reported in the last month. They've essentially said our industry. Globally is doing far better than expected. Now of course long-term tobacco is a declining industry but it seems that the stress the anxiety. The bordon maybe even the freedom of being locked into your home has cool. Smokers either to restart smoking or to smoke more because the outlook for the industry the sales and revenue and profits. They've been reporting it being better than expected now. This is a slightly new story. Because else countries such as south africa where sales were banned entirely because of course covert isn't a disease that attacks the lungs and the chest and so smoking makes it far worse. There's also issues about some some places. Sales of tobacco products were considered essential. And therefore you could still buy them in. The shops and other countries cells of tobacco wouldn't considered non essential. And you couldn't buy them in. The shops followed by the way considered tobacco and essential purchase. So there's some confusion there's also been a pantry loading stopped loading what we saw toilet roll but also say we nuances this story again. Because of high taxes and high prices for tobacco most western countries smuggling tobacco is a massive issue. And of course what we know. We know the borders closed so again. The closure of the borders stopped a lot of that tobacco smuggling which again boosted big tobacco prophets. So so this is a really new story that straightway you'd think well covert attacks suggest attacks. The lungs people would stop smoking. Actually that's not been the case and actually people have drunk more wind. We've seen that in the uk people returning to alcohol to relieve their anxiety. It seems people have been turning to tobacco as well now. That story misses out. I think quite a key point and this is something. I'm noticing around the media. Nobody wants to report this. But if you refer to the british medical journal don't have the exact figures in front of me but it's something like this. Twenty percent of the british population smoke deaths from covid. Anchors is not point four one percent it would appear that there's something in nicotine That actually prevents prevents the virus entering the lungs. I know they should. Nobody wants to talk about. This correlation is not causality. okay speakers two things correllated does not mean one causes the other they have given you a financial answer georgie. You'd expect nothing else of me. Yeah well

Mobike Altria Group Philip Morris Motorola Japan South Africa Confusion British Medical Journal UK
Trump's Treatments & Nobel Prizes

The Naked Scientists

04:59 min | 1 year ago

Trump's Treatments & Nobel Prizes

"With me this week are one of the world's leading Patio Anthropologists. He's at the University of voters rand in South Africa, and that's Lee Burger. We'll have the British medical, Journal excecutive editor, Theo blooms. Hello to both of you great to have you with us. Hi Chris in between us we'll be talking to a range of guests who are going to be joining us over the next hour. LE- I think. It's actually this year thirteen years almost to the day since we first met in Johannesburg thirteen unlucky for some. But definitely, not for you I gather that you've discovered not one not two not three but now four new species of ancient human ancestor. It's only three new species. So we'll work on that though with these new discoveries I'm. In the middle of discovery right now and Cova kind of pushed us into a strange space and figure out something to do when we get back once lockdown levels and covid actually lowered here in South Africa and I'd already dispersed my my laboratories in there was site that we had discovered early on in the exploration activities back in two, thousand, thirteen and It was a difficult site. It was going to be a site that was hard to work. It was going to be a site that had every reason it was dangerous that I didn't do it and. I decided to take a chance on day one we hit an extraordinary discovery that that we're in the middle of right now, and so this is really the third big discovery that we've had. It's full of hominids and we're very fortunate to be able to work under these conditions. So this is a cave signed is this where Homo Naledi the smaller ancestors were burying their dead. Inside this I two hundred meters away from where we discovered Homo Naledi. It's different cage system. It was right in front of us. It's an entirely different kind of creature from Homo, Naledi. It's big tooth and it's extraordinary and how old is this? I have no idea this this whole discoveries three and a half weeks old when he heard about it here on the naked scientists first theo over to you for second what does it been like running a Medical Journal juryman covert? We've heard from what it's like trying to fill work as you make extraordinary discover new Ford what's it been like at the J.? Busy is is the one word that comes to mind I mean we. Probably most medical journals have seen attend to one hundred fold increase in submissions of papers with people very anxious to get out the latest findings about covert and we've had to sort of scale up to handle those, and of course, we've been trying to get results out very quickly if they're important the public needs to know as soon as possible. So we we're working round the clock and a lot of my colleagues working. At home with small children and nevertheless trying to do more than they ever did before. Too busy time. Is a mixed bag in terms of the quality of what you've received received some stuff that you think my goodness. That's amazing and if you also receive some stuff that makes you my goodness, I can't believe someone actually sent that to journal did their toddler ride this Yes we we we pretty much always get a range of quality I think what's happening now though is that Everyone thinks every single funding about covert is really really important and they want to get it out as fast as possible maybe when it's not quite ready. Of course, the the most recent high profile person who has succumbed to the new current Avars is Donald Trump and his doctors interesting. They've put him on a whole raft of different treatments including an antibody therapy might by the American company general also a number of other drugs and supplements. It has been unclear though how ill he actually has been summer saying he's actually been downplaying his symptoms. It's been a very interesting journey. I learned a lot about cove. I learned it by really going to school. This is the real school. This isn't the let's read the book school and I, get it and I understand it and it's A very interesting thing going to be letting US know about it. Charlotte some as intensive care consultant, she's at Adam Rex Hospital in Cambridge. She also advises the UK governmental managing the condition. CHARLOTTE, what what was your reaction to the cocktail of treatments that the president of the United States was or appears to have been given? After that it was quite surprised. They pass when the best dogs verity that I would have weeks four had I been? Lacking off the him I think most. Is probably the gentleman therapy, but he had ten of two antibodies. I'm the ADS to neutralize the virus I'm actually the company that makes these had any the I h of miss a few days before they were given the president and it was any based on two hundred and seventy five patients on trials ongoing. So we actually know whether this therapy what's not so I was slightly surprised that a very experimental therapy. Promising is greed given to the president of the United

Donald Trump Homo Naledi Theo South Africa University Of Voters President Trump United States Johannesburg Chris Lee Burger Editor Cova Medical Journal Charlotte UK Adam Rex Hospital Consultant Cambridge
Why is the seemingly simple science of masks so complicated?

Coronacast

04:55 min | 1 year ago

Why is the seemingly simple science of masks so complicated?

"The advice on masks has changed a lot over the course of this pandemic. Hey at the beginning, we were getting some mixed messages about where the mosques were effective at all whether perhaps they could do more harm than good and then over time and we have talked about it a lot on this show already and you acquire vocal quite early on. In the pace that mosques are fictive and that they should be made mandatory in the heavy made mandatory in Victoria. The lightest that we know about what types of face coverings provide the most protection against carbon. So let's just do a little bit of the history going back to the can remind ourselves in the beginning World Health Organization and expert groups such as ours in the study were down on what's called Aerosol Spray. They thought it was just about droplets nearby and you pick it up off of surfaces. Out of date research, it's important but not all aerosol spread we're just talking way. I'm talking if you were in the room with me and Snort well-ventilated room, you could catch it from me over a period of an hour or so even though you're socially distanced happens in restaurants, choir practices and so on. And that's made people realize around the world that mask wearing is really important and some countries of the world they already knew that. So we've drifted towards mask-wearing. What we know that works is at least a two layered cotton mask when the inner layer is quite closely woven in the outer layer is going to be the waterproofing or a surgical, an approved surgical mask or an in one thousand five masks that doesn't have one of those one way valves on the front because they'll just spray the virus sites to people just remember that you're protecting others by wearing a facemask others so. That's the story facemasks. Now, there's a couple of pieces of research which are out in the last few days, which are quite interesting on face masks because one of the negative findings on face masks are only from one of the proponents of face massacres, Rhino McIntyre, from the Kirby Institute in Sydney she and others did a randomized trial in Vietnam with the people who were homemade masks, we're more likely to transmit viruses. This is a few years ago before covet. They even had worries at the beginning. This was actually about the way these masks were being maintained and turned over and so on the. Reanalysis in the British Medical Journal and shown in fact, it was the way they were looking after these cloth masks and the masks that were just hand washed in warm water in a basin and heart to dry they continue to transmit the virus. But if you went into a hospital laundry or you wash them properly and sixty degrees in a proper cycle, then they were actually. Okay. So it's the way that these were maintained and the second one was face shields. Face shows were allowed in Victoria allowed anymore by themselves because they continue to spread the virus and a study of healthcare workers in India has shown that the addition of a face shield to face masks significantly reduces the chances of healthcare workers being infected. So facials do work as an extra device, but not instead of masks healthcare workers in do generally use face shield Sunday it's part of the PPI, and so they're pretty well sorted, but they're still being a problem in Australia with healthcare worker infection. Either because they've not been wearing p. not being provided and in many cases, we still don't know how many health care workers caught the infection sonoma's I'm going to reveal something to the audience about you and your e mailing habits is that you love to either get up very late at night early in the morning and look three research journals. It's a continuous variable by the way. Yes. And then it just like like randomly with research articles that we should talk about. So let's just rip through a whole bunch of them right now you're why should you sleep? You know exactly if you're not skin asleep, why should I be at asleep? So first of all, what's the chances that a baby could catch covid from? It's Mother's breast milk, I? Mean this is a very live topic and with meeks findings mean baby there are some reports of babies, newborn babies, catching SARS COV to, and this is a very small study looking at breast milk and really no convincing. Evidence that the breast milk trend had SARS COV to it. Maybe one sample had some doubts about it. But essentially in this small study has to be said, no evidence of transmission of sauce cartoon, the breast move what about a win we're taking a swab from someone's noise to test them from covid. Is there a best way of doing this? You know really interesting piece from an ent surgeon talking about how sometimes people who are taking swabs, and of course, this is in the American context get the anatomy. Wrong. So we think that the way into the nose is straight up. Since painful when in fact, it's actually imagine you've got your nose it's actually straight back and it's actually quite deep. So it could be centimeters back. So you've actually the swamp has got to go quite far back, and if you tell people this won't be uncomfortable. You're Aligarh it will be uncomfortable, and so he's got to go right back and quite deep to get to the. Back of the nose in the throat, the nasal ferrings. So it's not up it straight back my eyes were watering just looking at it either way it sounds

Victoria World Health Organization British Medical Journal Rhino Mcintyre Aligarh Meeks Kirby Institute Vietnam Sydney Australia India
"british medical journal" Discussed on 1202 - The Human Factors Podcast

1202 - The Human Factors Podcast

04:23 min | 1 year ago

"british medical journal" Discussed on 1202 - The Human Factors Podcast

"But there are very few studies that have demonstrated what I can do when embed it into a clinical system, right? And I think that is what our perspective becomes very relevant because we are all about the system. We wanted understand the interactions between technology and people and the organization. But in the practice of AI and Healthcare that is currently lacking. So most of the studies have claims such as our deep neural network, which looks breast cancer or mammograms, you know outperforms Radiologists, but usually on a small sample size and it hasn't been embedded into clinical practice. May I assist and I was just recently a sobering paper in in the British medical journal which actually looked at I think ninety or so studies of using deep neural networks for medical diagnosis and instead actually the evidence for supporting these claims that AI outperforms doctors that evidence-based is across the narrow, right and quite quite limited and with lots of holes and gaps in there. So, I think we need to be bit more cautious optimistic what causes but then quite importantly you put your finger on in a really important issue. How do we engage with patients wrong with the public around a I now I did did do an interview study on this topic and it was as always with interviews superb interesting what people were saying by and large my conclusion from these interviews is people are very optimistic. But they place a lot of trust in the NHS and by extension into people who regulate or don't say I okay so often, you know patients were saying, yeah, I mean, you know, I'm all for it if it makes me better, you know, or they were saying but if it's going to be used in the NHS, and of course, it's going to be safe home, I think and I was thinking but I would like to see the evidence that it is actually safe. And so, you know, they have a lot of implicit trust in the grand off NHS and the question which be and everybody in are just need to ask ourselves is do we live up to that trust to be married that trust? What can we do to regain honor that trust and that comes them back a lot to first of all regulation. So I think b as in fact a specialist need to support regulators. We need to support developers of Technology as I mentioned my background in computer science. For example a long time ago. I hadn't considered users. It's fairly normal to kind of focus on the exciting bit of the technology and you know already developers of a I super clever people and they get excited by very technical issues, which I wouldn't be able to comprehend now, but do you use as might not be at the Forefront of their mind and probably shouldn't be because they focus on technological aspects and that is what the multidisciplinary working, So interviewing people interviewing patience. There was a question about how much to patients and the public really need to know about a month it often conjures up the image of robots. Yeah and something like, you know, what is referred to as general artificial intelligence. So, you know almost they can do a job. Anything like a person who do whereas a lot of the applications are fairly narrow in what they can do. So maybe you know the public shouldn't be expected to become Experts of artificial intelligence. But maybe some of the distinctions and limitations. I think there is a lot about understanding the limitations not just patients and Public Health Care users as well. So that's the professionals. So do you think there is something there then about.

NHS British medical journal AI
Why Was a Doctor Once Ridiculed for Recommending Hand Washing?

BrainStuff

05:53 min | 2 years ago

Why Was a Doctor Once Ridiculed for Recommending Hand Washing?

"Even, when there isn't a pandemic gone, we all know were supposed to wash our hands especially before we eat or after we've touched something gross, but that wasn't always the case. As recently as the eighteen hundreds, a doctor was mocked for even suggesting that physicians wash their hands before working with patients, and that dear listener is how we begin the strange and sad story of Nets, some of ice, a nineteenth century doctor sometimes called the father of infection control. them vice was born in Hungary in eighteen, eighteen and graduating medical school. He started a job at Vienna. General Hospital in Austria in eighteen forty six there there. He became a gas to the mortality rate of new mothers in one of the hospitals wards. In this ward up to eighteen percent of new mothers were dying from what was then called child, bed, fever or pure berle fever. We know today that this is a fever caused by infection of the reproductive or urinary tract in new mothers? Yet another of the hospital's wards where midwives instead of doctors delivered all of the babies, only about two percent of mothers died of this then mysterious fever. similize vice began reasoning his way to the root of the problem. He considered climate and crowding, but eventually ruled those factors out in the end. The midwives themselves seems to be the only real difference between the two wards. Then Zuma vice had an epiphany one of the hospitals doctors, a pathologist accidentally nicked himself the scalpel that hit used during an autopsy of one of these unfortunate mothers. The doctor was sick and with child bed fever and he died. Zamel vice made the connection that doctors were performing autopsies on patients who died of child, had fever, and then immediately afterward going to deliver babies without stopping to wash their hands. He suspected that this was the source of the deadly problem. We spoke by with Dana Towards e eski philosophy professor at Purdue University whose name I hope I'm pronouncing correctly. She explained, basically has hypothesis here was that it was cadaveric matter from scalpels, the entered the pathologists blood, and caused the infection and same material could be transferred to the women on the hands of the doctors, because the doctors do autopsies, and then go straight to examine the women who had given birth without washing their hands, changing their clothes, or basically taking any hygienic measures at all, he then tested this hypothesis by requiring people who had performed autopsies to wash their hands with chloride of lime, a disinfectant before attending the weapon and this, the mortality rate in the first clinic fell to that of the second. You'd think that some of fellow doctors would have lauded him for this discovery, but you'd be wrong. You see in the eighteen forties. Germ theory hadn't been conceived yet. That's the theory that diseases are caused by organisms, not visible to the naked eye and people still suspected the diseases transferred from one person to another via toxic. Not Bacteria or viruses, this was called miasma theory in washing their hands. They probably wanted to be rid of whatever was causing a bad. Not to kill germs that might wreak havoc on them or someone else. We also spoke by email, but Michael Melanson, an adjunct professor of medicine at. University he said physicians of Vices. Time simply did not understand or believe that something microscopic could be wreaking such havoc on their patients. They literally believed their own is less. We feel too smug. Consider how many people currently embrace a lack of COVID, nineteen deaths among people like me geographically racially economically or otherwise as evidence that scientists are overestimating the pandemics risk. Better hand washing regimens dramatically improved death rates at the maternity ward, but some vices colleagues were at best miffed at the implication that their ignorance was killing their own patients, and perhaps implication that midwives were better at delivering babies than they were. It didn't help that Zimmer Vice essentially laid the deaths of the wards mothers at the feet of his superiors. His own supervisor countered that the hospitals new ventilation system must be the reason for the decline in maternity deaths. Also, Zimbabwe's was a Hungarian in Austria A. Working in country in the throes of xenophobia. So those doctors rejected his theories and some of ice himself as being inferior, they opted to stick with their miasma theory, and for good measure in eighteen, forty nine did not renews vices appointment. As vice eventually got a medical position in Budapest where he according to the British Medical Journal quote publicly harangued doctors nurses about hand, washing and reduced maternal mortality. He eventually published a book on the subject some fourteen years later, but it was poorly written and poorly received. Possibly, experiencing mental disorder or extreme stress from his rejection by the medical establishment, Zim of ice ended up a patient in an asylum in eighteen sixty five weeks later, he was dead of an infection from a wound that he received in the facility. She was just forty seven years old. similize left behind monumental legacy, but the tragedy of his story has made it Garner a few minutes. One of those being that demo vice was the first suggested theory about doctors transmitting germs. Kaletsky said he wasn't really a pioneer. Other people before Zamel vice had hit upon the idea that child bed fever could be transmitted from doctor or midwife to patient for example Alexander Gordon of Aberdeen showed in Seventeen Ninety. Five child had fever was almost always transmitted by doctors or midwives, and also that it was connected to a kind of streptococcal skin rash. He also thought that the best treatment was copious bleeding.

Fever Zimmer Vice Zamel Austria Vienna General Hospital Hungary Nets Zuma British Medical Journal Purdue University Kaletsky Zimbabwe Professor Garner Michael Melanson Berle Adjunct Professor Supervisor
Is there a link between coronavirus and vitamin D deficiency?

News, Traffic and Weather

00:32 sec | 2 years ago

Is there a link between coronavirus and vitamin D deficiency?

"Two studies in the lancet and British medical journal pointing to a possible connection between vitamin D. deficiency in severe covert nineteen disease we've seen it dramatically increased risk of death amongst black and brown population the elderly people with obesity all three populations known to be associated with low vitamin D. level we also know based on past data that low vitamin D. levels are associated with an increased risk of upper respiratory infection Dr Jennifer Aniston is ABC news chief medical correspondent

British Medical Journal Obesity Jennifer Aniston ABC
How to enhance your immunity

Dr Ron Unfiltered Uncensored

07:00 min | 2 years ago

How to enhance your immunity

"I've had four weeks of this Discussions Kobe nineteen and I was actually thinking of not going on the air today because everything I said is coming true and everything. I said in the first episode about strengthening strengthening. Your immune system is really what we have to do. That is our line of defense. I said four weeks ago and it's true today. It's going to be better than a vaccine. It's GonNa give us the ability to fight off the virus and if we do get it to make it less severe so what what. Where should we start there? I think number one. We have to realize that What we're being told is really good advice. Isolation distancing handwashing. They're all effective ways to avoid exposure to this virus and they are absolutely absolutely crucial to avoid a catastrophic overwhelming of our healthcare system. But there is this second powerful tool and that's strengthening our immune and body repair systems. Because if we do what the CDC tells us About distancing and washing we will The combination of the two increasing our immune system will buy ourselves some time until more is known about this virus and and how to treat it so are a strong. Immune system makes this virus and other infections milder in briefer it'll reduce the risk of these fatal monies that people have and and and these are currying in the older people ever average age of seventy eight point five years of age. Maybe we can create virtual ventilator. Maybe our illnesses will be milder and briefer. So we're going to be on an immunity mission today. You're not gonNA hear a lot about that from the CDC who world health or was Asian. You're not going to see it in the paper but it's really important really important to keep our immunity. We've had her immunity for thousands of years before the pharmaceutical companies came along. We we we lost people. Don't get me wrong. But the ones that survived with because they had a strong immune system. I was surprised to see the New York. Times actually came out with an article stating the eight immune boosting methods. They said Sleep Com. Yeah they said about meditation. Nutrition exercise reducing alcohol. Hydration are all vital to your health. Immunity what you eat drink breathe doing feel eat drink free. Do and feel all important to your immunity. Not Going to see a lot of articles about the vitamin D vitamin C. They WanNa say a myth. We'll talk more about that. You're not gonNA say anything about Colorado silver. We will talk more about that. So Ladies and gentlemen let me look at my list here and Gosh you know and don't forget to tell you. Please avoid ibuprofen. You think you have the flu or this. Cove virus. It is really badly. There are so many articles from especially France. Who has really dealt with this as showing that this guy be proven Can can make the covert virus deadly. Okay so I told you about that a month ago to I told you. Because that and the ace inhibitors bloodpressure tells if you take a lot of them and get the vitamin and get the virus. You could risk the death remember. I told you about low tension capoten phase attack Mono Perl. Okay they are ace two inhibitors and these. These articles were in the Lances Journal. The British medical journal Nature The Daily Mail. But you're not seeing a lot about it or you see people being Not Nonchalant about it but I tell you what and says and this virus or deadly. Okay so let me get that off the table before we move forward okay. So let's just talk a little bit about the history of goydos silver because I know I got a lot. Of flack on the show. I did with the feel safer about silver but you know what ladies and Gentlemen Two thousand three hundred years ago. Twenty Three Hundred Years Ago Alexander. The great surveying his battlefield. And guess what he was drinking water from Silver Urns. Why because he knew nothing about bacteria but he knew that silver containers had a seemingly miraculous way of keeping water fresh. That's been used for thousands of years where it's health benefits well. The people in the Middle Ages gave their children silver spoons to suck upon. Why because they knew it would prevent illnesses. It's legendary remember silver. Dagger was all night needed to vanquish evil and a lot of the history is falsified at one time. Silver was used by most healthcare practitioners as an antibiotic at an antiviral. Nothing worked better those days but the FDA started crusade against Silver Thirties nineteen thirties. Because it could not be patented and now. The pharmaceutical companies started making antibiotics in the vaccine industry partners. They WANNA be able to sell their stuff. You know. The Food and Drug Administration used to be called the bureau of Chemistry and it's real mission started out to protect the chemical industry

Silver CDC Food And Drug Administration Silver Urns Kobe FLU France Ibuprofen New York Lances Journal Colorado Nature The Daily Mail
"british medical journal" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"british medical journal" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Cyclists the results are published in the British medical journal it is five forty two on Thursday he's working on our forecast what's ahead today by later today we may have some concerns this morning your guys are just a little patchy drizzle out there but by mid to late afternoon thunderstorms will start to erupt across the area and there is a marginal risk of severe storms in the south hands rest on Evansville stay with us Sir what time without and also we have a changing weekend forecast this is day break on wish TV and ninety three W. Y. B. C. mobile news loading up on things from Walmart yeah I use my new Capital One moment rewards card it is unlimited five percent back on everything I buy from Walmart online see what's five percent back five percent what with the Capital One Walmart rewards card earns unlimited rewards including five percent back at Walmart online on top of America everyday low prices what's in your wallet Capital One USA an EA you can see what I'm seeing right now a cheesy sauce the G. tasty toasty breakfast deal for my belly that's right it's your favorite McDonald's breakfast Sammie and right now you can pick two of them for just four blocks from the bacon egg and cheese biscuit sausage McMuffin with egg and bacon egg and cheese with grills now let's say you had met drive through to get more out of breakfast at participating McDonald's for a limited time only you're breakfast single item at regular price wake up breakfast let's say you just bought a house bad news is your one step closer to becoming your parents you'll probably mow the lawn ask if anybody noticed you mow the lawn tell people to stay off the lawn compare it to your neighbor's lawn and complained about having to mow the lawn again.

British medical journal America McDonald Evansville W. Y. B. C. Walmart Sammie
"british medical journal" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

08:24 min | 2 years ago

"british medical journal" Discussed on WTVN

"It you can get it in digital form but actually this I think this one is something that it be fun to have in hard copy and I I know we like a hard copy of it here at the station E. I. B. that's so Rush Limbaugh dot com very special edition of the Limbaugh letter from March twenty twenty you don't want to miss it all kinds of news stories we haven't got to I always like the medical news is not just the coronavirus this whole kinds of medical conditions around the world but we don't I feel we don't give enough attention to and this is a study in the British medical journal that came out a couple of days ago and it is about it's a study all of the sex ratio of babies born in Ontario basically in late twenty sixteen of the twenty seventeen they've done this study now if you know if you're one of these binary people old fashioned binary people he thinks they're just two sixes boys and girls I know I don't want to distress and the liberals I know you think that just like the fifty seven genders and and and all the rest of it apparently there's a new one actually they wanted included on the census or something hetero flexible flexible I don't know what that means I'm not I'm less inclined to be had for flexible I used to be recently had for flexible when you look at what happened to Chris Matthews is say it's gonna be I think it's been dangerous pay yet Chris Matthews was on the and then he described this girl as being an absolute knockout and now he's over and he's available to guests taste again as you know Chris Matthews yes so you sit back in the nineties he's available for the guest hosting roster because he obviously any people they don't care you know they discovered I thought I was finished I'm about it back in I think this was like only nineteen ninety three on Monday not only nineteen fifty four coming to remember some of the Joe Biden stage and I walked in and I said to the receptionist why ms Jones you're beautiful without your glasses and when when he got to be heard about this they called security and wanted to have me escorted from the building but fortunately fortunately they change their mind and let me back I've been through the treatment they've given me they made me go through the classes I came to see how hateful I was nominally a track to tomato pizza the classes work and tastic way and so Chris Matthews might well be back on the guest host Ross as soon as he learns to something quite so hetero flexible anyway this survey in the British medical journal it says that Donald trump's win in November twenty sixteen now when you have boys and girls and women a stress this manifests itself in a reduction in the number of boys born proportionately compared to the number of girls so the boys girls sex ratio women were so traumatized by trump's victory and I don't know whether this is replicated in the buff rates south of the border but I can believe it because we had all the stories we had all the stories that from people women were saying they were so traumatized by trump they were unable even to have sex receded to live actually had this abortion rally where I Chuck Schumer threatened to have the judges went to the Tyron receipt until I was warning the crowd don't even think of having sex with me I don't know why I yeah I wasn't honestly thinking of having sex with received its allied the number no no because you know I will be so I know what I have so you anyway she said you shouldn't even want to have sex with me and at that point everybody in the crowd said aha and turned around and went home it was amazing but at any rate it appears trump's powers know no limits if you're tired of these greedy little snowflake pajama boys who seem to be everywhere now you know the the the the kind and and even though they purport to be they they they they they said they don't tip they they they pitcher they purport to be perfectly normal specimens all of a gold American manhood these kind of D. B. little snowflake triggered pajama boy types don't worry about it because if this British medical journal is anything to go by in fifteen this time when they should be a lot of them in the voting booths they in fact what is trump so traumatize them mothers the boys were never born and their old girls he his powers also wholesome it's not just the Iranians saying he he managed to implement the corona virus in the heart of the Iranian parliament so that eighty percent of all Iranian MPs now have the corruption of oculus every big shot M. M. N. kun is sweating and clammy and up and paving have the corona symptoms it's not just that he's managed to actually find the one thing that will take out the Iranian regime after forty years of trying he can he can destroy it Muller's improvement and he can wipe out Canadian boys in Ontario there is nothing that president trump cannot do according to his sentiments but that's the headline for the day trump's twenty sixteen win may have resulted in fewer boys born in Ontario that headline is from C. T. V. news in Canada had a sea of the British medical journal mark Steyn for rush your cold straight ahead you're listening to the EIB network the Rush Limbaugh show radio sixty so Karen we've been talking with you for a while now about Lone Star transfer your family business and how you and your team legally and ethically relieve people of the financial burden of a time share so why is it important to you that Lone Star transfer is successful what is really important to us Larry is when a time sure owner comes to a time in their life when they realize that their time Cher just is not working for them that they have a company that they can turn to a company that they can trust to get them out of their time share legally and ethically and in a guaranteed time frame which is really important speaking of taking care of your customers can you tell us about how you and your family do that I mean I know Tyler.

"british medical journal" Discussed on News Radio WGOW

News Radio WGOW

11:06 min | 2 years ago

"british medical journal" Discussed on News Radio WGOW

"I like the Limbaugh letter most months because it's using up terrific interviews and ask a lot of fun the store is called a spirit of the age stores that I always like you know some lunatic bit of nonsense about big trans or some other particularly sensitive movement that is encroaching on our liberties but the but the but the new issue the March issue of the Limbaugh letter is actually in a different category because it's actually a profoundly moving it dition of the Limbaugh letter as you know it has been a dramatic few weeks for rush he told us the big announcement on the Monday and then the Tuesday he was in Washington DC at the state of the union about to be given the surprise of his life and rush writes about what it was like that day when he got the cold that was one of what it was seven o'clock eight o'clock in the evening eastern time he got the call in the morning from the president and the president on the telephone telling him to drop everything and what he had to drop was actually a major medical for CEDIA with the doctor's old standing by and rush in a T. shirt and shorts and the president said the you know get someone to go out and grab your suit off the bag and come to Washington because you're not gonna wanna miss this as soon as if it's a different kind of limbo letter and you want to if you've been listening to the show does matter whether you've been listening to the show for thirty one years or just the last thirty one months you're not going to want to miss this it's it's as beautiful issue and it's got a rush on the cover with the middle of the day First Lady is just put around his neck and with Catherine behind in giving the thumbs up it's it's a a rare and different edition of the Limbaugh letter and you can get it just by going to Rush Limbaugh dot com and you will see on the home page there you'll see the button for the Limbaugh letter you can click on it you can get it in digital form but actually this I think this one is something that it be fun to have in hard copy and I I know we like a hard copy of it here at the station E. I. B. that so Rush Limbaugh dot com very a special edition of the Limbaugh letter from March twenty twenty you don't want to miss it all kinds of news stories we haven't got to always like the medical news is not just the coronavirus this whole kinds of medical conditions around the world but we don't feel we don't give enough attention to and this is a study in the British medical journal that came out a couple of days ago and it is about it's a study all of the sex ratio of babies born in Ontario basically in late twenty sixteen of the twenty seventeen they've done this study now if you know if you're one of these binary people old fashioned binary people who think seven just two sixes boys and girls I know I know when the distress in the liberals I know you think that just like the fifty seven genders and and and all the rest of it apparently there's a new one actually they wanted included on the census or something hetero flexible flexible I don't know what that means I'm not I'm less inclined to be had for flex and I used to be recently had for flexible when you look at what happened to Chris Matthews is say it's gonna be I think it's been dangerous pay yet Chris Matthews was on the and then he described this girl as being an absolute knockout and now he's over and he's available to guests taste again as you know Chris Matthews guest hosted back in the nineties he's available for the guest hosting roster because he obviously any people they don't care you know they discovered I thought I was finished about it back in I think this was like only nineteen ninety three on Monday not only nineteen fifty four coming to remember some of the Joe Biden stage and I walked in and I said to the receptionist why ms Jones you're beautiful without your glasses and when when he got to be heard about this they called security and wanted to have me escorted from the building but fortunately fortunately they change their mind and let me back I've been through the treatment they've given me they made me go through the classes I came to see how hateful I was nominally a track to tomato pizza the classes what kind tastic way and so Chris Matthews might well be back on the guest host Ross as soon as he learns to stop being quite so hetero flexible anyway this survey in the British medical journal it says that Donald trump's win in November twenty sixteen now when you have boys and girls and women a stress this manifests itself in a reduction in the number of boys born proportionately compared to the number of girls so the ball you gals sex ratio falls in favor of girls when women are stressed and then reporting this is a serious report in one of the most prestigious medical journals in the planet the British medical journal that in late twenty sixteen Ontario women gave birth to a few of the boys I'm the thing the report says it's because they were so stressed out by trump's victory in November twenty sixteen and the and the and the sex ratio did not recover until late twenty seventy so the women and they break this down according to who's in liberal constituencies in Ontario and and who are in more conservative ones and the liberal constituencies were hardest hit the women were so stressed there was hardly a boy born in Ontario in late twenty sixteen to twenty seventeen because they're so stressed out by trump's victory the headline trump's twenty sixteen win may have resulted in fewer boy spoke enough area now this is fantastic actually because in China they have this huge sex imbalance because of the one child rule so the girls will get aborted all once they get actually that born and then they get killed in the maternity ward so they've got all these boys in China that they got no girls fall and in Ontario they've got girls that they have no boys fall because all the women were so traumatized by trump's victory and I don't know whether this is replicated in the buff rates south of the border but I can believe it because we had all the stories we had all the stories that from people women were saying they were so traumatized by trump they were unable even to have sex receded to live actually at this abortion rally where Chuck Schumer threatened to have the judges went to the Tyron receded to live was warning the crowd don't even think of having sex with me I don't know why I yeah I wasn't honestly thinking of having sex with Rashid it's alive the number no no because you know I will be so I know what I have so you anyway she said you shouldn't even want to have sex with me and at that point everybody in the crowd said aha and turned around and went home it was amazing but at any rate it appears trump's powers know no limits if you're tired of these greedy little snowflake pajama boys who seem to be everywhere now you know the the the the kind and and even though they purport to be they they they they they said they don't tip they they they pitcher they purport to be perfectly normal specimens all of a gold American manhood these kind of D. B. little snowflakes triggered pajama boy types don't worry about it because if this British medical journal is anything to go by in fifty this time when they should be a lot of them in the voting booths they in fact what is trump so traumatize them mothers the boys were never born and their old girls he his powers also wholesome it's not just the Iranians saying he he managed to implement the corona virus in the heart of the Iranian parliament so that eighty percent of all Iranian MPs now have the corruption of oculus every big shot M. M. N. kun is sweating and clammy and Amanda and paving have the corona symptoms it's not just that he's managed to actually find the one thing that will take out the Iranian regime after forty years of trying he can he can destroy it Muller's improvement and he can wipe out Canadian boys in Ontario there is nothing that president trump cannot do according to his sentiments but that's the headline for the day trump's twenty sixteen win may have resulted in fewer boys born in Ontario that headline is from C. T. V. news in Canada courtesy of the British medical journal Markstein for rush your cold straight ahead you're listening to the EIB network Michael savage weeknights at nine on so Karen we've been talking with you for a while now about Lone Star transfer your family business and how you and your team legally and ethically relieve people of the financial burden of a time share so why is it important to you that Lone Star transfer is successful what is really important to us Larry is when a time sure owner comes to a time in their life when they realize that their time Cher just is not working for them that they have a company that they can turn to a company that they can trust to get them out of their time share legally and ethically and in a guaranteed time frame which is really important speaking of taking care of your customers can you tell us about how you and your family do that I mean I know Tyler is your office manager and plays a huge role in your customer service department yes our customer service is the most important to all of us at Lone Star transfer we're going to make sure that every caller is treated with the utmost respect and help them in any way that we can what can be done to get out of a time share what can callers expect when they call Lone Star my son Tyler is here with me today I'm gonna let him answer that question thank you Larry that's a great question there are so many different times your situations it's really important that you call our office today and one of our representatives will ask.

Limbaugh
"british medical journal" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

08:23 min | 2 years ago

"british medical journal" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"The answer Bob Donnan did with foremost customer Scott Walker in the first hour but I want to revisit the it is really striking to watch the competing responses from them at least because I free societies as compared to the command control societies the Taiwan's the Singapore's the Israels the United States as compared to China Iran North Korea it really tells you something about perhaps what system of government you'd prefer to live under maybe something that informs wide swaths of the American electorate over the next eight months give me an example the a Singaporean president here of prime minister I should say we shouldn't Leung this is an example of a a public a pronouncement he made providing information to Singaporeans about the nature of the threat as well as the response by the government thank you coronavirus is similar to saas but with two important differences first the new virus is more infectious than sauce therefore it's harder to stop it from spreading second the new wireless is much less dangerous than saas about ten percent of those who caught Thomas died with the new wireless outside of Kuwait province the mortality rate is so far only zero point two percent in comparison seasonal influenza has a death rate of zero point one percent so in terms of mortality the new virus is much closer to influenza Ventas right in court to be provinces where Wuhan is located in China also the Taiwan in response compare that to China good piece of the diplomat dot com Chinese scientists are by the way in terms of your she was still you know what we know and what we don't know go back to the interview we had a last night's program with Roger Clyne microbiologist former head of oncology at the Cleveland Clinic you know the thoughtfulness the restraint we're talking about an expert expert with respect to infectious diseases consulted the FDA and CMS and HHS HHS we don't still know with any certainty of competing theories about where the virus originated Chinese scientists writing in the lancet medical journal respected British medical journal revealed that the first patient of contracted the corona virus had no link to the will hunt seafood market that the Chinese government pointed to as the source of the outbreak and yet they're still credible infectious disease experts to think that it probably originated with a bat and one of these food markets in Wuhan maybe it did we don't now point is have some humility about what you know and don't know and listen to medical professionals who are exercising restraint and discipline and thoughtfulness and taking the time to offer explanations as opposed to hysterics on your television screen or dumb dumb politicians now going back to this comparing China to Taiwan even though the you know Taiwan and not been kept officially informed by the WHL World Health Organization about the epidemic the Taiwanese government promptly undertook measures to prevent the spread of the virus in Taiwan in late December of last year organize the central epidemic command center in January then set up us since the set up of that command center it's been holding press conferences almost daily to announce the latest policy and information on the epidemic the clarify rumors that are circulating on social media the Taiwanese government also uses digital tools to communicate with the public in the virus out above me the virus outbreak our politicians there have you social media accounts and the you know the associated platforms Facebook YouTube to keep the public informed on everything from the number of available available facemask to update the policy they also you had to somebody an entrepreneur here we go to the entrepreneur response time any software engineer built online online real time map that can show wear masks are stocked at convenience stores and drug stores across the island following this idea digital minister of the government according to between government private sector developed a better version of the information platform with government data that's the appropriate response and now what do you have and despite being very close to China the number infection cases in Taiwan is thirty two as of February twenty sixth compare that to South Korea twelve hundred Japan eight hundred eighty five and obviously whatever the number is certainly north of eighty thousand and China I mentioned when we spoke with Scott Walker Israeli scientists are on the job too they're on the cusp of developing the first vaccine against the corona virus according to Israel science and technology minister if all goes as planned the vaccine could be ready within a few weeks and available in ninety days which would be great I mean that's may speak to something about the regulatory bottlenecks in in our country have you heard from Tony Fauci at the national zoo for health trumps address the nation on the topic where he basically said you know we're looking at in terms of the vaccine we're looking at a year to a year and a half because of the trials you have to go through and so forth he suggested you know antiviral therapies different may be available in about the same time period that Israel is talking about they may have a vaccine so we'll see we'll see but even for the people who her hysterical you know I mean take some of the right click the worst actors and the worst institutions and even take note of what some within those outlets I'm talking about the media course are saying Richard Engel NBC news from you know a virologist he actually spoke with rather than these guys playing armchair infectious disease expert we're thirty angle tweeting don't panic doctors virologist I'm speaking to say ninety eight percent of people will be fine even if they get covert nineteen they expect it will go around the world but that most people get it at the but that most people who do get it will be a little sick then recover the danger of course is vulnerable people hospitals old age homes yes and you don't want to be flippant about anybody's life or about any cohort of the population you want to be measured that's all you don't have to be throwing little girls off a flight the family of five is from the the sun across the pond family five kicked off a plane just before take off over fears the coughing toddler could be infected with corona virus a Canadian family it's a the Rockefeller passengers asked the air transit at cabin crew to question the family over the twenty one months old the twenty one month old coughing and so she sure the crew that the mom assured the crew cab was safe and tell them they have been given the all clear by doctors earlier that day he said the girl had nothing but I had a call but nothing more however since they could provide a written document about their daughter's self they they they a flight attendant asked a doctor on board to examine the girl who also confirm she was fine to fly but the captain wasn't happy with the doctor's diagnosis contacted Metlink a company specialising aviation medical issues and reported the vice chair Jack the girl from the plane because she did not have a medical certificate to say she was not infected with the virus I mean really from people beating poodles to death with bats in China to taking little girls off the planes because you're so hysterical I mean get a fracking grip.

Bob Donnan Scott Walker
Could we say 'goodbye' to cervical cancer by 2120?

WBZ Morning News

00:30 sec | 2 years ago

Could we say 'goodbye' to cervical cancer by 2120?

"Say mass rollout of cervical cancer vaccines could potentially save sixty two million lives over the next one hundred years that's according to an international study by Harvard the cancer council New South Wales and love all university in Canada this study focused on the world's seventy eight poorest countries were few girls receive the vaccine and few women are screened for cervical cancer it's published in the British medical journal

Harvard South Wales Canada Cervical Cancer British Medical Journal Cancer
"british medical journal" Discussed on The Attention Collection

The Attention Collection

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"british medical journal" Discussed on The Attention Collection

"There's this story about a twenty nine year old builder in the UK who on a job site jumps down on a six inch nail in drives through the bottom of his boot and all the way through his foot in somehow he manages to get to an ER and he stumbles in and they get him on a stretcher and they take him back but they can't even touch the nail without the man screaming and writhing in pain in fact they have to administer to different sedatives for him to even calm down enough to be inspected and when he does they take the nail in they pull it out from below and they take the boot off of his foot and slowly removed. The sock to find a miracle has taken place. Because there's no blood there's no puncture site in confused. They do a little more inspection and discover actually. The nail went between two hose to quote the British Medical Journal. Here word for word. The foot was entirely on injured. So what happened here? How can a man screaming and writhing in pain? Having to be sedated heavily with enough narcotics to knock out a horse somehow be found completely well on injured not a scratch on him. What in the world is going on here? Well it turns out the brain is powerful thing. This episode is about the importance of taking your placebos..

British Medical Journal UK
Is meat the new tobacco?

Thom Hartmann

04:23 min | 2 years ago

Is meat the new tobacco?

"No one Australia is on fire right now we have a a climate disasters happening all over the planet we've had our share of them here in North America as well and one of the things that is feeding this is meat they get the consumption of meat around the world is contributing about ten percent of the greenhouse gases out there so you've got on the one hand scientists climate scientists saying that we all need to eat less meat and re visit our we do agriculture and then also you've got health folks like you know the the lance at the the the British medical journal came out this was a new report published in the British British medical journal lancet recommends a largely plant based diet this is of a group of scientists from around the world to study nutrition food policy deliberating for three years and said that around the world meat consumption should drop by fifty percent that's for health that's to reduce the number of heart attacks to reduce the number of strokes to reduce the amount of obesity and and the concomitant so type two diabetes and problems that that follow along with that last October a power and a another separate completely separate study was published in the journal nature that essentially said the same thing and then this is impact here's the ABS abstract health risks associated because I'm sure if you happened email logical studies this was in the journal of nutrition research consumption of increasing amounts of red meat particular process meat is us here the increased risk of total mortality cardiovascular disease colorectal cancer in type two diabetes both men and women and that's even when you consider things like age race BMI history smoking blood pressure lipids in physical activity none of those things have as much impact apparently or were you know they are not fit to swing the the variables as simply eating me in terms of your risk of dying young single at and in my opinion between version of climate change and did you want to die on meat has become the new tobacco which is I guess my question for you do you think that meat is the new tobacco because guess what read the back fought back the track you know Mike pence water not bad for a one of the newspapers in in Indiana back in two thousand saying tobacco doesn't cause addiction nicotine doesn't cause addiction tobacco doesn't cause cancer a so now you've got you know the kind of the equivalent of the of the tobacco industry has you know the meat industry has one of these two and that is an amazing story James tapper writing for the guardian the headline red meat plays a vital role in diets claim expert in fighting against veganism never has a red meat will begin a call right back against the growth of veganism this week at the UK's biggest farming conference with claims and eating lamb and beef is vital because drum roll some plants a fisherman drained of their intrusion yes factory farming has caused the nutrient level in our vegetables to drop by fifty percent over the last fifty years in a speech at the I had the option farming conference Alice stand will tell ministers farmers and environmentalists a key nutrients and some fruits vegetables and grains and drop by up to fifty percent over fifty years the solution when you think the solution would be out of farming practices that keep the nutrients in the soil so the plants can absorb them or how about farming practices where you're growing nutrient rich species rather than ones the simply don't be known white button rapidly on the way to the store or as a ship across the country no no no no there there responses you're lacking nutrients unity made I don't get it made is pretty nutrient poor I mean if you want the nutrients from eating animals basically need the entire animal all is organ meats and brains and got some and all that kind of stuff you know like they did back in the old days Justina Burgess team muscle meat is not gonna do it so is meet the new is meet the new

Australia
Male infertility linked to prostate cancer risk

BBC World Service

00:51 sec | 2 years ago

Male infertility linked to prostate cancer risk

"New research indicates that man with fertility problems have a higher risk of them all those of developing prostate cancer we get more details in this report from which account and the research published today in the British medical journal was based on data from more than a million births in Sweden over twenty years K. stress this is not the result of the specific types of fertility treatment being used but instead it could be that male infertility and prostate cancer well somehow linked.

British Medical Journal Sweden Twenty Years
Vegans, vegetarians at more risk for stroke, study suggests

WBZ Midday News

00:28 sec | 2 years ago

Vegans, vegetarians at more risk for stroke, study suggests

"For you some new research out there this week so there might be a downside to going meat free a study in the British medical journal says vegans and vegetarians do have a lower risk of heart disease but a higher risk of stroke the findings based on data for forty eight thousand people who self reported for up to eighteen years now the researchers note that simply showing a correlation doesn't approve of calls and died experts say whatever your dietary choice eating the widest range of foods possible this best for your

British Medical Journal Eighteen Years
More of any physical activity tied to longer life

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:51 sec | 2 years ago

More of any physical activity tied to longer life

"Doing white physical activity such as cooking or washing dishes each day is enough to substantially lower the risk of early death that's according to a new study published by the British medical journal researchers say people can raise their chances of living a longer life by moving just a little bit more and sitting a little less in the study led by the Norwegian school of sport sciences deaths fell steeply as levels of light intensity activity increased with every minute up to five hours offering additional benefits for person's well being the study by the way also found that sitting for nine and a half hours or more each day was linked with a significantly higher risk of death a lead researcher says if you're someone who doesn't achieve the recommended levels of moderate intensity physical activity the just generally being on your feet more we'll still be

Researcher British Medical Journal Norwegian School Of Sport Scie Five Hours
"british medical journal" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:33 min | 3 years ago

"british medical journal" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Be the true OR one so I am looking at twenty sixteen British medical journal reporter about whether genetic testing leads people to alter their lifestyles are behaviors and identifying basically it doesn't it says quote expectations have been highly giving people information about their genetic Rhys will empower them to change their behavior to eat more healthfully or to stop smoking for example but we have found no evidence that this is the case so we know behavior changes really hard and I'm just curious I guess about holistically overall confidence that the information will actually be a net gain I throw the Larry page go back at you if you're really that down on humanity that you don't think people can change their behaviors and there's no way of getting them to change their behaviors it's a really sad outlook and I believe that there is a way to do that and we just haven't figured out the right way and I look at a lot of these cognitive behavior tools that are online that are working like honestly you look at the diabetes prevention program that started in the early two thousands and that that was better than most drug therapies out there so there are ways to get people to change their behavior I'm really optimistic about the potential of the internet I think it's a sad state that the majority of the medical world has essentially resign themselves that people are not willing to change and I am a believer in humanity that people given the right tools I think people will step up I am so optimistic about your optimism and I'm generally very much an optimist as well but the only thing I would say on this point in particular in terms of especially personal health is that we do have a lot of data in the modern era when the risk factors to personal health have been really pronounced in part by the abundance and cheapness of low grade for and the ability to be really sedentary and what we see is that even though we have known for a lot of quite a long time now what a good diet looks like what could sleep looks like the dangers of smoking the benefits of exercise center to under center the vast majority of people are not able to commit themselves to that routine even though the knowledge is there and it speaks I think to a you know a lot of things are complicated by humans which is things that are pleasurable are really hard to constrain and I just wonder if maybe you know the issues that the people like you who are incredibly accomplished and intelligent but also disciplined maybe assume that the rest of us are as disciplined as you are and whether that's the sort of disconnect I base more of this experience and even a lot of my customers like customers all over the world that I in that meeting or people who you know are doing my hair for a talk and and telling me about what they learned and how they've changed I think the one thing to recognize like it's absolutely hard it's much easier to say here's a pale your high risk for type two diabetes are your pre diabetic here's Matt foreman like take a pill and be done it's harder to change behavior and and that's a hundred percent but it doesn't mean it's impossible and there's something about your DNA of getting something that's in black and white that's like wow we should potentially really take this seriously.

reporter British medical journal hundred percent
"british medical journal" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:26 min | 3 years ago

"british medical journal" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"So I am looking into twenty sixteen British medical journal reporter about whether genetic testing leads people to alter their lifestyles are behaviors and it and it finds basically it doesn't it says quote expectations have been highly giving people information about their genetic risk will empower them to change their behavior to eat more healthfully or to stop smoking for example but we have found no evidence that this is the case so we know behavior changes really hard and I'm just curious I guess about holistically overall confidence that the information will actually be a net gain I throw the Larry page co back at you if you're really that down on humanity that you don't think people can change their behaviors and there's no way of getting them to change their behaviors it's a really sad outlook and I believe that there is a way to do that and we just haven't figured out the right way and I look at a lot of these cognitive behavior tools that are online that are working like honestly you look at the diabetes prevention program that started in the early two thousands and that that was better than most drug therapies out there so there are ways to get people to change their behavior I'm really optimistic about the potential of the internet I think it's a sad state that the majority of the medical world has essentially resign themselves that people are not willing to change and I am a believer in humanity that people given the right tools I think people will step up I am so optimistic about your optimism and I'm generally very much an optimist as well but the only thing I would say on this point in particular in terms of especially personal health is that we do have a lot of data in the modern era when the risk factors to personal health have been really pronounced in part by the abundance and cheapness of low grade food and the ability to be really saddened and what we see is that even though we have known for a lot of quite a long time now what a good diet looks like what good sleep looks like the dangers of smoking the benefits of exercise setter Teter center the vast majority of people are not able to commit themselves to that routine even though the knowledge is there and it speaks I think to a you know a lot of things are complicated by humans which is things that are pleasurable are really hard to constrain and I just wonder if maybe you know the issues that the people like you who are incredibly accomplished and intelligent but also disciplined maybe assume that the rest of us are as disciplined as you are and whether that's the sort of disconnect I base more of this experience and even a lot of my customers like our customers all over the world that I in that meeting or people who you know are doing my hair for talk and and telling me about what they learned and how they've changed I think the one thing to recognize like it's absolutely hard it's much easier to say here's a pelvic your high risk for type two diabetes are your pre diabetic here's Matt foreman like take a pill and be done it's harder to change behavior and and that's a hundred percent but it doesn't mean it's impossible and there's something about your DNA of getting something that's in black and white that's like wow we should potentially really take this seriously.

reporter British medical journal hundred percent
Half of all harm caused by medical care is preventable

Atlanta's Morning News

00:21 sec | 3 years ago

Half of all harm caused by medical care is preventable

"Your health medical mistakes for more than one in ten patients according to the British medical journal researchers at the university of Manchester same mistakes involving drugs account for half the preventable error is jury it during surgery and missed diagnoses also lead to human because patient harm the head side to says getting drug dosages right should be a core area of focus for hospitals clinics and

British Medical Journal University Of Manchester
Ultraprocessed foods are easy, cheap and could be killing you

Steve Cochran

00:32 sec | 3 years ago

Ultraprocessed foods are easy, cheap and could be killing you

"Rauner, new research, says eating sausages, and other ultra processed foods could increase the risk of early death by sixty percent. Two studies published in the bread bit a British medical journal leak, ready meals, and other foods containing high levels have added fat and sugar to an increased risk of heart disease and stroke research found that eating those foods for portions of the day, had a sixty two percent increase mortality risk compared with those consuming less than two servings daily each serving increase the risk of early death by almost a

Rauner British Medical Journal Sixty Two Percent Sixty Percent
Red Yeast Rice Supplements Likely Damaged This Woman's Liver

Sports X Radio

06:07 min | 3 years ago

Red Yeast Rice Supplements Likely Damaged This Woman's Liver

"So many of you have asked me about the red yeast rice and somebody called a red race race race. I don't care what you call it. And it's an over the counter supplement that people are taking to lower their cholesterol. And I would tell my patients or I would tell my listeners be careful because it acts like a Stanton. And so with the statin medications, we watch her liver. We kind of know what those you're getting. And when I started statin medication. I check your liver in about six weeks. And then I check it again at the three month Mark the six month, Mark. So I know you're tolerating the Staten. But if you're taking some over the counter, red rice, yeast or read east rice. Two. Lower your cholesterol. I not really watching your your liver. And to be careful. Well, now, we have a report that a woman in Michigan developed sudden liver damage after taking a red yeast rice supplement, the sixty four year old woman recently visited doctor was told she had I- cholesterol levels, but she was hesitant to take the status. Most people are hesitant because I don't wanna hurt deliver. And they think that the stands are gonna hurt deliver. So instead, she turned to the supplement red east rice, it's a type of fermented rice that's marketed to lower cholesterol, but it acts like a statin, and it contains a compound called, mama, Colin k it's identical to the active ingredient in the statin drug level, Staten. So red yeast rice supplements with Monaco k. Have the same risks as drugs containing the status. The only difference is you don't know how much you're getting. Whereas you think you're taking love Stanton twenty or love stat and forty milligrams. You have no idea what the hell you're getting. What the red right right east rice? So after six weeks, she went to the signs of liver injury. Fatigue dark urine. John, john. This is the yellowing of the skin of is which is a sign of kidney damage or liver damage liver damage. Then she has got a liver biopsy. And she was diagnosed with acute drug induced liver injury or liver damage would drug or supplement in this case was the rate east rice supplements. Now. This was published in British medical journal case reports. So the woman's case prompted doctors who treated her to issue a warning about the potential harm. They say physicians and patients should be made aware that read east races, not harmless supplement and those choosing to use it should watch for symptoms of Pat o' toxicity. Now Luminoso also drank a couple of glasses of wine a day. So that might have also made or more vulnerable. If you drink alcohol with a statin medication or red yeast rice that can increase your risk deliver damage, but they say the woman's case enough the first incident of this supplement causing liver problems. There have been other reports. In fact, there wasn't studying Italy the found ten cases of liver damage ties at the supplement over thirteen year, period. So love astatine may even be safer. The FDA doesn't allow products to be sold as dietary supplements they contain more than trace amounts of this, Monaco, Kate. But despite FDA actions, whereas we know a lot of supplements out there have mixed amounts of components. A two thousand seventeen study found that levels of that Monica Lacaille in red yeast rice supplement sold in the US range from undetectable to nearly eleven milligrams per daily recommended dose, which basically can equal a love Stanton. So you have no idea what you're getting. And so the NC CIA age is saying that people should not use it to replace standard medical care. So what did they do to help her well one they stopped the supplement south the alcohol treated or restored? So provoked prove or liver function. She was monitored weekly. And I'm not sure if she's back to fully recovered. She could have some irreversible liver damage, but hopefully, it's reversible. So, you know, people look, I I get I get I don't like to always take prescriptions. Also, I get. And. To that high maintenance regimen of being on a cholesterol medication where you take it. And then you have to be screened in a month for six weeks to see if it's affecting the liver. We used to wait three months. I never waited three months. I would I would check your about a month because if it was going to damage the liver. I would see it in a month. You'd start to see some of the liver injury. So, you know, if I saw significant bump up and liver enzymes, which was rare because I always start on a very very low dose, then I could go. All right. I'll check it a month or six weeks than three months and six months, and if you're good I would just monitoring every six months. But I have no idea what the hell you're taking over the camera. And I get. If you can manage your cholesterol over the counter, then you don't have to go in for blood work. You don't have to wait hours to see your doctor. You don't have to pay towards your thousand dollar or twelve thousand dollars deductible. I get that because I'm a patient to and I cannot stand the way healthcare is right now. And I want to do more. Do it yourself. The problem is that you don't know what you're getting. And when I see people go. No, no, no. I don't want to use the pharmaceutical. I want to do all these supplements. I wanted to what natural. It's natural natural stuff out. There has very similar chemicals. As what's in the pharmaceutical Jila difference is the pharmaceutical is tight traded. It's tested, and it has to be very consistent. You can only get a consistent amount of that. Medication? You don't know what the hell these supplement companies are giving you. That's a

Liver Damage Stanton Staten Kidney Damage Mark FDA British Medical Journal Jila Dark Urine Michigan Pat O Colin John Luminoso Monica Lacaille United States CIA I Italy
You can tidy up your digital life, too

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:01 min | 3 years ago

You can tidy up your digital life, too

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by ultimate software dedicated to putting people first with innovative solutions for HR payroll and talent management. Learn more at ultimate software dot com. Ultimate software people first and bell Novo for business. You're an IT. But why do you do what you do to make a difference? Emlyn ova was here to be a difference maker for you by providing innovative technology solutions to learn more. Visit Lenovo dot com slash SNB. Powered by Intel. All those unread emails in your inbox causing you stress. It may be turned to tackle them head on from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm jed Kim in for. Molly would. It's spring, which means it's time to clean your winter. Clothes and storage swept and mopped cleared up the gutters. But what about that laptop that's littered with ten thousand photos unsorted documents and a barely visible desktop since digital storage space is so cheap. It's easy to keep amassing files. But that can take toll on our work in our wellbeing. Deb Lee is digital productivity coach she helps people weed out the virtual messes they've gotten themselves into we after what makes people finally give in decide to declutter. Well, usually there is some sort of a pain point. You can't find what you want. Maybe you're wasting time looking for what you want or you just can't seem to focus. So there's usually some sort of pain that triggers the desire to start getting things organized and putting things in order. How is doing a digital declutter different from doing declutter of your house? Well, the good news is that it's not that dip. Different. It's pretty similar. You still have a goal that you're trying to achieve most of us have things that we're not using. Sometimes we have duplicates of things because we couldn't find the original thing. So we went out and got the next thing. Right. So it's a pretty similar process. You have duplicates of things you have things that are just sort of lingering on your on your device that you're not using taking up space that you could use for other things that you are using or want to use. You know, how many times have we tried to take that photo? And it says up you're running out of space. Are you can't take that photo? Right. So that usually becomes a pain point. And then we recognize I can't capture these really important moments in my life because I've got all the stuff that I don't use. Or I don't need any more. What you find is the hardest part to declutter what it goes to our digital lives. I think it's the process of trying to fix it that perhaps sometime stops us that fear of goodness. It's going to take all day or take too long for me to manage this. I think that's. Where some of that reluctance to tackle it comes about. And sometimes when it has to do with things like your photographs they come with memories and special memories. You know, we sort of we feel attached to them. We remember those moments when we look at them, and we think well, we can't get rid of this photo. But if it's the fifth iteration of the same photo, then yes, you can so to make it a little bit easier. Start with those things that are obvious those duplicates or the the blurry photos or the ones where you can't make out. Exactly what it is that you took the picture of anyway, or those burst photos where you hold your finger on the phone so long that it just takes five hundred at the same time. And I know that because that just happened to me recently, but it's easy to delete. So definitely make deleting in Pershing sort of a regular habit. So it doesn't feel so much like a chore deadly is a digital productivity. Coach I asked her about her personal habits. And she's got a simple tip. You know, the home screen that pops up when you unlock your smartphone. She keeps it completely clear of anything except a calming picture totally stealing that. Then now for some related lists not into the idea of digital decluttering suppose, you could go the other way digital hoarding. That's the compulsion to save all things digital Mike photos of every receipt. You get or every single Email you've ever received. It's been studied. And some researchers think it's a some type of hoarding disorder witness the case in the B M J, aka British medical journal of a Dutch man who took and saved hundreds of digital photos every day turns out he hoarded physical objects to find yourself saving a lot of files. Get don't necessarily have a problem. Maybe you just get a kick out of collecting Gizmodo has a deep dive into digital hoarding. It makes a distinction between hoarding and collecting a digital collector might be the person who digitises all his old family photos and videotapes it can actually be a source of pride and positive feelings. Fine. Finally, if you think if firm morality is the answer for digital clutter by which I mean that some things can be put online with the expectation. They will disappear like Snapchat. Thank again. An article in wired questions the privacy expectations. Many people have with FM morality. And of course, there could always be a digital hoarder saving screen shots of whatever you typed. I'm jed Kim. And that's marketplace tech. This is APN. That's marketplace podcast is brought to you by well frame does your healthcare organization. Give people the support they need outside the walls of care delivery. It's time for a new approach. Well, frame calls it digital health management by delivering resources and guidance to address chronic conditions transitions of care as well as lifestyle, wellness and social determinants. Well, frame helps people and care teams build trusted relationships that Dr early interventions. Learn more at well frame dot com.

Jed Kim Lenovo Intel Emlyn Deb Lee Molly Pershing British Medical Journal Coach I B M J Mike
"british medical journal" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"british medical journal" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"The story continues. The reality is that when viewed in a wider context there is nothing unusual. The current weather patterns, despite this fact, the media directly indirectly or by inference often attribute the current weather to global warming. Yes, they now call the climate change. But that is because activists realized around two thousand four that the warming predicted by their computer models on which the scare is based was not actually happening carbon dioxide levels continue to increase, but the temperature stopped increasing. So the evidence no longer fit the theory English biologist Thomas Huxley commented on this dilemma over a century ago. The great tragedy of science the slaying of a beautiful hypothesis by an ugly fact, yet the recent weather is a stark reminder that a colder world is a much greater threat little warmer what governments plan for warming. All the indications are that the world is cooling and contrary to the proclamations of climate activists every single year more people die from the cold. Then. From the heat a study in the British medical journal, the Lancet reached the following conclusion cold weather kills twenty times as many people as hot weather. According to an international study analyzing over seventy four million deaths in three hundred eighty four locations across thirteen countries. How did this bizarre situation develop? It was a deliberate orchestrated deception. The results of the investigation of the UN intergovernmental panel on climate change. We're deliberately premeditated to focus on the negative impacts of warming in their original nineteen Eighty-eight mandate from the UN. Global warming is mentioned only three times a cooling has meant not mentioned. Even once the UN notes that continued growth in atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases could produce global warming with an eventual rise at sea levels, the effects of which could be disastrous for mankind timely steps are not taken at all levels. The narrow focus was reinforced in the nineteen Ninety-two UN framework convention on climate change. Defying climate change is being caused by human activity working group. One produced the evidence that human created CO two was causing global warming that finding became the premise for working.

UN Thomas Huxley British medical journal
"british medical journal" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"british medical journal" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Hey, doc. I want you to share if you could with our listeners real quick some of the research because that my all this is research on omega threes and how they have such an important positive impact on so many areas of our health vitality and longevity. Yeah. Yeah. Well, you know, I just read a nice piece at the two thousand eighteen British medical journal, really great study because they follow twenty six hundred seniors. Now, that's a big study their age sixty five and older. And they followed them from nineteen ninety two to two thousand fifteen so a. Twenty-three year long study great study, the scientists measured the omega three levels in the blood to see if the concentration of omega threes in the blood was correlated to healthy ageing. Now in this study what they meant by healthy aging. They had all sorts of measurements. But of course, those measurements included the big three health concerns. We've been focusing on the heart the brain and the joints and bottom line, the omega threes knocked it out of the park higher levels of omega threes in the blood were highly correlated with healthy ageing. What the scientists in this study called successfully there's literally hundreds of studies just like this. So Megan threes supportive to every cell and tissue and organ in the body, the krill omega threes work, even a little better than the fish oil Amiga threes, but unfortunately, not as many freeze in krill oil. That's why we sup- it up with the concentrated fish oil. She were really boasting a very high level. A maker threes in the krill omega super pill, and that's one of the main reasons this has such a profoundly positive effect. When people start to take there's a lot of companies out there that offer discounts. But I gotta say purity does things a little bit differently. They're letting people have a trial bottle of krill omega super Bill is we just been talking about for five bucks. The.

Megan British medical journal Twenty-three year