35 Burst results for "British Medical Journal"

Russia's Sputnik V Covid vaccine appears effective, study finds

Morning Edition

00:52 sec | 3 months ago

Russia's Sputnik V Covid vaccine appears effective, study finds

"Published report today suggests a Russian made Cove in 19 vaccine is more than 90% effective at preventing disease. NPR's Joe Palka has more Russian vaccine is called a Sputnik the although it was originally approved by Russian regulators in August last year on Lee, Now are the results appearing in a peer reviewed journal. Nearly 20,000 volunteers participated in the vaccine study. Three quarters of the volunteers received the vaccine one quarter of placebo in the study. Vaccine efficacy was 91.6%. Sputnik V is what's known as a viral vector vaccine, a different kind of Xing from the ones made by Pfizer and Moderna, but similar to ones made by AstraZeneca and Johnson and Johnson. It's given as two doses spaced 21 days apart. Results appear in the British medical journal, The Lancet, Joe Palka, NPR

Joe Palka NPR LEE Moderna Pfizer Johnson Astrazeneca British Medical Journal The Lancet
Klobuchar worried about data security for Amazon Halo

The Internet of Things Podcast - Stacey On IoT

01:44 min | 4 months ago

Klobuchar worried about data security for Amazon Halo

"Talk about iot device. Privacy's specifically the senate or rather. Amy klobuchar is really wondering after reading review of amazon's tracker what the department of health and human services plans to do to ensure privacy of people's health data so club. Hr read the amazon review. Said how it takes so much personal information like naked pictures of my body which it does you can delete them it's optional. You can delete the photos from the device. Those photos amazon gives you the option of sending them to the cloud so they don't automatically go there so that's all really important but kluber chart points out in the letter that seventy nine percent of health apps do share people's data and people may not be aware of that that was a study from the british medical journal in twenty nineteen. And so she's asking the department of health and human services for questions basically. She's saying. Hey are you paying attention to this. What are what actions do y'all take to safeguard users private health information. Do you have the authority at actually do any of this. And what else do we need to give the department of health and human services like what regulatory powers we need to give so they can strengthen privacy and security protections for this kind of data and she's asking for all of the information that h h has to make sure devices like halo aren't like willy nilly grabbing your data and share in it in ways like the might be uncomfortable were even detrimental to one's health and i say thank you.

Amazon Department Of Health And Human Amy Klobuchar Senate British Medical Journal
Tobacco sales during lockdown

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:57 min | 5 months ago

Tobacco sales during lockdown

"During lockdown We sorta changed or spend money always being by mobike. Be buying jigsaw. Buying craft kits. Thinks like that and by motorola does seem that. We've been on mass buying more tobacco. If you look at the results from philip morris japan tobacco imperial brands altria group all of which have reported in the last month. They've essentially said our industry. Globally is doing far better than expected. Now of course long-term tobacco is a declining industry but it seems that the stress the anxiety. The bordon maybe even the freedom of being locked into your home has cool. Smokers either to restart smoking or to smoke more because the outlook for the industry the sales and revenue and profits. They've been reporting it being better than expected now. This is a slightly new story. Because else countries such as south africa where sales were banned entirely because of course covert isn't a disease that attacks the lungs and the chest and so smoking makes it far worse. There's also issues about some some places. Sales of tobacco products were considered essential. And therefore you could still buy them in. The shops and other countries cells of tobacco wouldn't considered non essential. And you couldn't buy them in. The shops followed by the way considered tobacco and essential purchase. So there's some confusion there's also been a pantry loading stopped loading what we saw toilet roll but also say we nuances this story again. Because of high taxes and high prices for tobacco most western countries smuggling tobacco is a massive issue. And of course what we know. We know the borders closed so again. The closure of the borders stopped a lot of that tobacco smuggling which again boosted big tobacco prophets. So so this is a really new story that straightway you'd think well covert attacks suggest attacks. The lungs people would stop smoking. Actually that's not been the case and actually people have drunk more wind. We've seen that in the uk people returning to alcohol to relieve their anxiety. It seems people have been turning to tobacco as well now. That story misses out. I think quite a key point and this is something. I'm noticing around the media. Nobody wants to report this. But if you refer to the british medical journal don't have the exact figures in front of me but it's something like this. Twenty percent of the british population smoke deaths from covid. Anchors is not point four one percent it would appear that there's something in nicotine That actually prevents prevents the virus entering the lungs. I know they should. Nobody wants to talk about. This correlation is not causality. okay speakers two things correllated does not mean one causes the other they have given you a financial answer georgie. You'd expect nothing else of me. Yeah well

Mobike Altria Group Philip Morris Motorola Japan South Africa Confusion British Medical Journal UK
Trump's Treatments & Nobel Prizes

The Naked Scientists

04:59 min | 7 months ago

Trump's Treatments & Nobel Prizes

"With me this week are one of the world's leading Patio Anthropologists. He's at the University of voters rand in South Africa, and that's Lee Burger. We'll have the British medical, Journal excecutive editor, Theo blooms. Hello to both of you great to have you with us. Hi Chris in between us we'll be talking to a range of guests who are going to be joining us over the next hour. LE- I think. It's actually this year thirteen years almost to the day since we first met in Johannesburg thirteen unlucky for some. But definitely, not for you I gather that you've discovered not one not two not three but now four new species of ancient human ancestor. It's only three new species. So we'll work on that though with these new discoveries I'm. In the middle of discovery right now and Cova kind of pushed us into a strange space and figure out something to do when we get back once lockdown levels and covid actually lowered here in South Africa and I'd already dispersed my my laboratories in there was site that we had discovered early on in the exploration activities back in two, thousand, thirteen and It was a difficult site. It was going to be a site that was hard to work. It was going to be a site that had every reason it was dangerous that I didn't do it and. I decided to take a chance on day one we hit an extraordinary discovery that that we're in the middle of right now, and so this is really the third big discovery that we've had. It's full of hominids and we're very fortunate to be able to work under these conditions. So this is a cave signed is this where Homo Naledi the smaller ancestors were burying their dead. Inside this I two hundred meters away from where we discovered Homo Naledi. It's different cage system. It was right in front of us. It's an entirely different kind of creature from Homo, Naledi. It's big tooth and it's extraordinary and how old is this? I have no idea this this whole discoveries three and a half weeks old when he heard about it here on the naked scientists first theo over to you for second what does it been like running a Medical Journal juryman covert? We've heard from what it's like trying to fill work as you make extraordinary discover new Ford what's it been like at the J.? Busy is is the one word that comes to mind I mean we. Probably most medical journals have seen attend to one hundred fold increase in submissions of papers with people very anxious to get out the latest findings about covert and we've had to sort of scale up to handle those, and of course, we've been trying to get results out very quickly if they're important the public needs to know as soon as possible. So we we're working round the clock and a lot of my colleagues working. At home with small children and nevertheless trying to do more than they ever did before. Too busy time. Is a mixed bag in terms of the quality of what you've received received some stuff that you think my goodness. That's amazing and if you also receive some stuff that makes you my goodness, I can't believe someone actually sent that to journal did their toddler ride this Yes we we we pretty much always get a range of quality I think what's happening now though is that Everyone thinks every single funding about covert is really really important and they want to get it out as fast as possible maybe when it's not quite ready. Of course, the the most recent high profile person who has succumbed to the new current Avars is Donald Trump and his doctors interesting. They've put him on a whole raft of different treatments including an antibody therapy might by the American company general also a number of other drugs and supplements. It has been unclear though how ill he actually has been summer saying he's actually been downplaying his symptoms. It's been a very interesting journey. I learned a lot about cove. I learned it by really going to school. This is the real school. This isn't the let's read the book school and I, get it and I understand it and it's A very interesting thing going to be letting US know about it. Charlotte some as intensive care consultant, she's at Adam Rex Hospital in Cambridge. She also advises the UK governmental managing the condition. CHARLOTTE, what what was your reaction to the cocktail of treatments that the president of the United States was or appears to have been given? After that it was quite surprised. They pass when the best dogs verity that I would have weeks four had I been? Lacking off the him I think most. Is probably the gentleman therapy, but he had ten of two antibodies. I'm the ADS to neutralize the virus I'm actually the company that makes these had any the I h of miss a few days before they were given the president and it was any based on two hundred and seventy five patients on trials ongoing. So we actually know whether this therapy what's not so I was slightly surprised that a very experimental therapy. Promising is greed given to the president of the United

Donald Trump Homo Naledi Theo South Africa University Of Voters President Trump United States Johannesburg Chris Lee Burger Editor Cova Medical Journal Charlotte UK Adam Rex Hospital Consultant Cambridge
Why is the seemingly simple science of masks so complicated?

Coronacast

04:55 min | 7 months ago

Why is the seemingly simple science of masks so complicated?

"The advice on masks has changed a lot over the course of this pandemic. Hey at the beginning, we were getting some mixed messages about where the mosques were effective at all whether perhaps they could do more harm than good and then over time and we have talked about it a lot on this show already and you acquire vocal quite early on. In the pace that mosques are fictive and that they should be made mandatory in the heavy made mandatory in Victoria. The lightest that we know about what types of face coverings provide the most protection against carbon. So let's just do a little bit of the history going back to the can remind ourselves in the beginning World Health Organization and expert groups such as ours in the study were down on what's called Aerosol Spray. They thought it was just about droplets nearby and you pick it up off of surfaces. Out of date research, it's important but not all aerosol spread we're just talking way. I'm talking if you were in the room with me and Snort well-ventilated room, you could catch it from me over a period of an hour or so even though you're socially distanced happens in restaurants, choir practices and so on. And that's made people realize around the world that mask wearing is really important and some countries of the world they already knew that. So we've drifted towards mask-wearing. What we know that works is at least a two layered cotton mask when the inner layer is quite closely woven in the outer layer is going to be the waterproofing or a surgical, an approved surgical mask or an in one thousand five masks that doesn't have one of those one way valves on the front because they'll just spray the virus sites to people just remember that you're protecting others by wearing a facemask others so. That's the story facemasks. Now, there's a couple of pieces of research which are out in the last few days, which are quite interesting on face masks because one of the negative findings on face masks are only from one of the proponents of face massacres, Rhino McIntyre, from the Kirby Institute in Sydney she and others did a randomized trial in Vietnam with the people who were homemade masks, we're more likely to transmit viruses. This is a few years ago before covet. They even had worries at the beginning. This was actually about the way these masks were being maintained and turned over and so on the. Reanalysis in the British Medical Journal and shown in fact, it was the way they were looking after these cloth masks and the masks that were just hand washed in warm water in a basin and heart to dry they continue to transmit the virus. But if you went into a hospital laundry or you wash them properly and sixty degrees in a proper cycle, then they were actually. Okay. So it's the way that these were maintained and the second one was face shields. Face shows were allowed in Victoria allowed anymore by themselves because they continue to spread the virus and a study of healthcare workers in India has shown that the addition of a face shield to face masks significantly reduces the chances of healthcare workers being infected. So facials do work as an extra device, but not instead of masks healthcare workers in do generally use face shield Sunday it's part of the PPI, and so they're pretty well sorted, but they're still being a problem in Australia with healthcare worker infection. Either because they've not been wearing p. not being provided and in many cases, we still don't know how many health care workers caught the infection sonoma's I'm going to reveal something to the audience about you and your e mailing habits is that you love to either get up very late at night early in the morning and look three research journals. It's a continuous variable by the way. Yes. And then it just like like randomly with research articles that we should talk about. So let's just rip through a whole bunch of them right now you're why should you sleep? You know exactly if you're not skin asleep, why should I be at asleep? So first of all, what's the chances that a baby could catch covid from? It's Mother's breast milk, I? Mean this is a very live topic and with meeks findings mean baby there are some reports of babies, newborn babies, catching SARS COV to, and this is a very small study looking at breast milk and really no convincing. Evidence that the breast milk trend had SARS COV to it. Maybe one sample had some doubts about it. But essentially in this small study has to be said, no evidence of transmission of sauce cartoon, the breast move what about a win we're taking a swab from someone's noise to test them from covid. Is there a best way of doing this? You know really interesting piece from an ent surgeon talking about how sometimes people who are taking swabs, and of course, this is in the American context get the anatomy. Wrong. So we think that the way into the nose is straight up. Since painful when in fact, it's actually imagine you've got your nose it's actually straight back and it's actually quite deep. So it could be centimeters back. So you've actually the swamp has got to go quite far back, and if you tell people this won't be uncomfortable. You're Aligarh it will be uncomfortable, and so he's got to go right back and quite deep to get to the. Back of the nose in the throat, the nasal ferrings. So it's not up it straight back my eyes were watering just looking at it either way it sounds

Victoria World Health Organization British Medical Journal Rhino Mcintyre Aligarh Meeks Kirby Institute Vietnam Sydney Australia India
Why Was a Doctor Once Ridiculed for Recommending Hand Washing?

BrainStuff

05:53 min | 11 months ago

Why Was a Doctor Once Ridiculed for Recommending Hand Washing?

"Even, when there isn't a pandemic gone, we all know were supposed to wash our hands especially before we eat or after we've touched something gross, but that wasn't always the case. As recently as the eighteen hundreds, a doctor was mocked for even suggesting that physicians wash their hands before working with patients, and that dear listener is how we begin the strange and sad story of Nets, some of ice, a nineteenth century doctor sometimes called the father of infection control. them vice was born in Hungary in eighteen, eighteen and graduating medical school. He started a job at Vienna. General Hospital in Austria in eighteen forty six there there. He became a gas to the mortality rate of new mothers in one of the hospitals wards. In this ward up to eighteen percent of new mothers were dying from what was then called child, bed, fever or pure berle fever. We know today that this is a fever caused by infection of the reproductive or urinary tract in new mothers? Yet another of the hospital's wards where midwives instead of doctors delivered all of the babies, only about two percent of mothers died of this then mysterious fever. similize vice began reasoning his way to the root of the problem. He considered climate and crowding, but eventually ruled those factors out in the end. The midwives themselves seems to be the only real difference between the two wards. Then Zuma vice had an epiphany one of the hospitals doctors, a pathologist accidentally nicked himself the scalpel that hit used during an autopsy of one of these unfortunate mothers. The doctor was sick and with child bed fever and he died. Zamel vice made the connection that doctors were performing autopsies on patients who died of child, had fever, and then immediately afterward going to deliver babies without stopping to wash their hands. He suspected that this was the source of the deadly problem. We spoke by with Dana Towards e eski philosophy professor at Purdue University whose name I hope I'm pronouncing correctly. She explained, basically has hypothesis here was that it was cadaveric matter from scalpels, the entered the pathologists blood, and caused the infection and same material could be transferred to the women on the hands of the doctors, because the doctors do autopsies, and then go straight to examine the women who had given birth without washing their hands, changing their clothes, or basically taking any hygienic measures at all, he then tested this hypothesis by requiring people who had performed autopsies to wash their hands with chloride of lime, a disinfectant before attending the weapon and this, the mortality rate in the first clinic fell to that of the second. You'd think that some of fellow doctors would have lauded him for this discovery, but you'd be wrong. You see in the eighteen forties. Germ theory hadn't been conceived yet. That's the theory that diseases are caused by organisms, not visible to the naked eye and people still suspected the diseases transferred from one person to another via toxic. Not Bacteria or viruses, this was called miasma theory in washing their hands. They probably wanted to be rid of whatever was causing a bad. Not to kill germs that might wreak havoc on them or someone else. We also spoke by email, but Michael Melanson, an adjunct professor of medicine at. University he said physicians of Vices. Time simply did not understand or believe that something microscopic could be wreaking such havoc on their patients. They literally believed their own is less. We feel too smug. Consider how many people currently embrace a lack of COVID, nineteen deaths among people like me geographically racially economically or otherwise as evidence that scientists are overestimating the pandemics risk. Better hand washing regimens dramatically improved death rates at the maternity ward, but some vices colleagues were at best miffed at the implication that their ignorance was killing their own patients, and perhaps implication that midwives were better at delivering babies than they were. It didn't help that Zimmer Vice essentially laid the deaths of the wards mothers at the feet of his superiors. His own supervisor countered that the hospitals new ventilation system must be the reason for the decline in maternity deaths. Also, Zimbabwe's was a Hungarian in Austria A. Working in country in the throes of xenophobia. So those doctors rejected his theories and some of ice himself as being inferior, they opted to stick with their miasma theory, and for good measure in eighteen, forty nine did not renews vices appointment. As vice eventually got a medical position in Budapest where he according to the British Medical Journal quote publicly harangued doctors nurses about hand, washing and reduced maternal mortality. He eventually published a book on the subject some fourteen years later, but it was poorly written and poorly received. Possibly, experiencing mental disorder or extreme stress from his rejection by the medical establishment, Zim of ice ended up a patient in an asylum in eighteen sixty five weeks later, he was dead of an infection from a wound that he received in the facility. She was just forty seven years old. similize left behind monumental legacy, but the tragedy of his story has made it Garner a few minutes. One of those being that demo vice was the first suggested theory about doctors transmitting germs. Kaletsky said he wasn't really a pioneer. Other people before Zamel vice had hit upon the idea that child bed fever could be transmitted from doctor or midwife to patient for example Alexander Gordon of Aberdeen showed in Seventeen Ninety. Five child had fever was almost always transmitted by doctors or midwives, and also that it was connected to a kind of streptococcal skin rash. He also thought that the best treatment was copious bleeding.

Fever Zimmer Vice Zamel Austria Vienna General Hospital Hungary Nets Zuma British Medical Journal Purdue University Kaletsky Zimbabwe Professor Garner Michael Melanson Berle Adjunct Professor Supervisor
Is there a link between coronavirus and vitamin D deficiency?

News, Traffic and Weather

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Is there a link between coronavirus and vitamin D deficiency?

"Two studies in the lancet and British medical journal pointing to a possible connection between vitamin D. deficiency in severe covert nineteen disease we've seen it dramatically increased risk of death amongst black and brown population the elderly people with obesity all three populations known to be associated with low vitamin D. level we also know based on past data that low vitamin D. levels are associated with an increased risk of upper respiratory infection Dr Jennifer Aniston is ABC news chief medical correspondent

British Medical Journal Obesity Jennifer Aniston ABC
How to enhance your immunity

Dr Ron Unfiltered Uncensored

07:00 min | 1 year ago

How to enhance your immunity

"I've had four weeks of this Discussions Kobe nineteen and I was actually thinking of not going on the air today because everything I said is coming true and everything. I said in the first episode about strengthening strengthening. Your immune system is really what we have to do. That is our line of defense. I said four weeks ago and it's true today. It's going to be better than a vaccine. It's GonNa give us the ability to fight off the virus and if we do get it to make it less severe so what what. Where should we start there? I think number one. We have to realize that What we're being told is really good advice. Isolation distancing handwashing. They're all effective ways to avoid exposure to this virus and they are absolutely absolutely crucial to avoid a catastrophic overwhelming of our healthcare system. But there is this second powerful tool and that's strengthening our immune and body repair systems. Because if we do what the CDC tells us About distancing and washing we will The combination of the two increasing our immune system will buy ourselves some time until more is known about this virus and and how to treat it so are a strong. Immune system makes this virus and other infections milder in briefer it'll reduce the risk of these fatal monies that people have and and and these are currying in the older people ever average age of seventy eight point five years of age. Maybe we can create virtual ventilator. Maybe our illnesses will be milder and briefer. So we're going to be on an immunity mission today. You're not gonNA hear a lot about that from the CDC who world health or was Asian. You're not going to see it in the paper but it's really important really important to keep our immunity. We've had her immunity for thousands of years before the pharmaceutical companies came along. We we we lost people. Don't get me wrong. But the ones that survived with because they had a strong immune system. I was surprised to see the New York. Times actually came out with an article stating the eight immune boosting methods. They said Sleep Com. Yeah they said about meditation. Nutrition exercise reducing alcohol. Hydration are all vital to your health. Immunity what you eat drink breathe doing feel eat drink free. Do and feel all important to your immunity. Not Going to see a lot of articles about the vitamin D vitamin C. They WanNa say a myth. We'll talk more about that. You're not gonNA say anything about Colorado silver. We will talk more about that. So Ladies and gentlemen let me look at my list here and Gosh you know and don't forget to tell you. Please avoid ibuprofen. You think you have the flu or this. Cove virus. It is really badly. There are so many articles from especially France. Who has really dealt with this as showing that this guy be proven Can can make the covert virus deadly. Okay so I told you about that a month ago to I told you. Because that and the ace inhibitors bloodpressure tells if you take a lot of them and get the vitamin and get the virus. You could risk the death remember. I told you about low tension capoten phase attack Mono Perl. Okay they are ace two inhibitors and these. These articles were in the Lances Journal. The British medical journal Nature The Daily Mail. But you're not seeing a lot about it or you see people being Not Nonchalant about it but I tell you what and says and this virus or deadly. Okay so let me get that off the table before we move forward okay. So let's just talk a little bit about the history of goydos silver because I know I got a lot. Of flack on the show. I did with the feel safer about silver but you know what ladies and Gentlemen Two thousand three hundred years ago. Twenty Three Hundred Years Ago Alexander. The great surveying his battlefield. And guess what he was drinking water from Silver Urns. Why because he knew nothing about bacteria but he knew that silver containers had a seemingly miraculous way of keeping water fresh. That's been used for thousands of years where it's health benefits well. The people in the Middle Ages gave their children silver spoons to suck upon. Why because they knew it would prevent illnesses. It's legendary remember silver. Dagger was all night needed to vanquish evil and a lot of the history is falsified at one time. Silver was used by most healthcare practitioners as an antibiotic at an antiviral. Nothing worked better those days but the FDA started crusade against Silver Thirties nineteen thirties. Because it could not be patented and now. The pharmaceutical companies started making antibiotics in the vaccine industry partners. They WANNA be able to sell their stuff. You know. The Food and Drug Administration used to be called the bureau of Chemistry and it's real mission started out to protect the chemical industry

Silver CDC Food And Drug Administration Silver Urns Kobe FLU France Ibuprofen New York Lances Journal Colorado Nature The Daily Mail
"british medical journal" Discussed on News Radio WGOW

News Radio WGOW

11:06 min | 1 year ago

"british medical journal" Discussed on News Radio WGOW

"I like the Limbaugh letter most months because it's using up terrific interviews and ask a lot of fun the store is called a spirit of the age stores that I always like you know some lunatic bit of nonsense about big trans or some other particularly sensitive movement that is encroaching on our liberties but the but the but the new issue the March issue of the Limbaugh letter is actually in a different category because it's actually a profoundly moving it dition of the Limbaugh letter as you know it has been a dramatic few weeks for rush he told us the big announcement on the Monday and then the Tuesday he was in Washington DC at the state of the union about to be given the surprise of his life and rush writes about what it was like that day when he got the cold that was one of what it was seven o'clock eight o'clock in the evening eastern time he got the call in the morning from the president and the president on the telephone telling him to drop everything and what he had to drop was actually a major medical for CEDIA with the doctor's old standing by and rush in a T. shirt and shorts and the president said the you know get someone to go out and grab your suit off the bag and come to Washington because you're not gonna wanna miss this as soon as if it's a different kind of limbo letter and you want to if you've been listening to the show does matter whether you've been listening to the show for thirty one years or just the last thirty one months you're not going to want to miss this it's it's as beautiful issue and it's got a rush on the cover with the middle of the day First Lady is just put around his neck and with Catherine behind in giving the thumbs up it's it's a a rare and different edition of the Limbaugh letter and you can get it just by going to Rush Limbaugh dot com and you will see on the home page there you'll see the button for the Limbaugh letter you can click on it you can get it in digital form but actually this I think this one is something that it be fun to have in hard copy and I I know we like a hard copy of it here at the station E. I. B. that so Rush Limbaugh dot com very a special edition of the Limbaugh letter from March twenty twenty you don't want to miss it all kinds of news stories we haven't got to always like the medical news is not just the coronavirus this whole kinds of medical conditions around the world but we don't feel we don't give enough attention to and this is a study in the British medical journal that came out a couple of days ago and it is about it's a study all of the sex ratio of babies born in Ontario basically in late twenty sixteen of the twenty seventeen they've done this study now if you know if you're one of these binary people old fashioned binary people who think seven just two sixes boys and girls I know I know when the distress in the liberals I know you think that just like the fifty seven genders and and and all the rest of it apparently there's a new one actually they wanted included on the census or something hetero flexible flexible I don't know what that means I'm not I'm less inclined to be had for flex and I used to be recently had for flexible when you look at what happened to Chris Matthews is say it's gonna be I think it's been dangerous pay yet Chris Matthews was on the and then he described this girl as being an absolute knockout and now he's over and he's available to guests taste again as you know Chris Matthews guest hosted back in the nineties he's available for the guest hosting roster because he obviously any people they don't care you know they discovered I thought I was finished about it back in I think this was like only nineteen ninety three on Monday not only nineteen fifty four coming to remember some of the Joe Biden stage and I walked in and I said to the receptionist why ms Jones you're beautiful without your glasses and when when he got to be heard about this they called security and wanted to have me escorted from the building but fortunately fortunately they change their mind and let me back I've been through the treatment they've given me they made me go through the classes I came to see how hateful I was nominally a track to tomato pizza the classes what kind tastic way and so Chris Matthews might well be back on the guest host Ross as soon as he learns to stop being quite so hetero flexible anyway this survey in the British medical journal it says that Donald trump's win in November twenty sixteen now when you have boys and girls and women a stress this manifests itself in a reduction in the number of boys born proportionately compared to the number of girls so the ball you gals sex ratio falls in favor of girls when women are stressed and then reporting this is a serious report in one of the most prestigious medical journals in the planet the British medical journal that in late twenty sixteen Ontario women gave birth to a few of the boys I'm the thing the report says it's because they were so stressed out by trump's victory in November twenty sixteen and the and the and the sex ratio did not recover until late twenty seventy so the women and they break this down according to who's in liberal constituencies in Ontario and and who are in more conservative ones and the liberal constituencies were hardest hit the women were so stressed there was hardly a boy born in Ontario in late twenty sixteen to twenty seventeen because they're so stressed out by trump's victory the headline trump's twenty sixteen win may have resulted in fewer boy spoke enough area now this is fantastic actually because in China they have this huge sex imbalance because of the one child rule so the girls will get aborted all once they get actually that born and then they get killed in the maternity ward so they've got all these boys in China that they got no girls fall and in Ontario they've got girls that they have no boys fall because all the women were so traumatized by trump's victory and I don't know whether this is replicated in the buff rates south of the border but I can believe it because we had all the stories we had all the stories that from people women were saying they were so traumatized by trump they were unable even to have sex receded to live actually at this abortion rally where Chuck Schumer threatened to have the judges went to the Tyron receded to live was warning the crowd don't even think of having sex with me I don't know why I yeah I wasn't honestly thinking of having sex with Rashid it's alive the number no no because you know I will be so I know what I have so you anyway she said you shouldn't even want to have sex with me and at that point everybody in the crowd said aha and turned around and went home it was amazing but at any rate it appears trump's powers know no limits if you're tired of these greedy little snowflake pajama boys who seem to be everywhere now you know the the the the kind and and even though they purport to be they they they they they said they don't tip they they they pitcher they purport to be perfectly normal specimens all of a gold American manhood these kind of D. B. little snowflakes triggered pajama boy types don't worry about it because if this British medical journal is anything to go by in fifty this time when they should be a lot of them in the voting booths they in fact what is trump so traumatize them mothers the boys were never born and their old girls he his powers also wholesome it's not just the Iranians saying he he managed to implement the corona virus in the heart of the Iranian parliament so that eighty percent of all Iranian MPs now have the corruption of oculus every big shot M. M. N. kun is sweating and clammy and Amanda and paving have the corona symptoms it's not just that he's managed to actually find the one thing that will take out the Iranian regime after forty years of trying he can he can destroy it Muller's improvement and he can wipe out Canadian boys in Ontario there is nothing that president trump cannot do according to his sentiments but that's the headline for the day trump's twenty sixteen win may have resulted in fewer boys born in Ontario that headline is from C. T. V. news in Canada courtesy of the British medical journal Markstein for rush your cold straight ahead you're listening to the EIB network Michael savage weeknights at nine on so Karen we've been talking with you for a while now about Lone Star transfer your family business and how you and your team legally and ethically relieve people of the financial burden of a time share so why is it important to you that Lone Star transfer is successful what is really important to us Larry is when a time sure owner comes to a time in their life when they realize that their time Cher just is not working for them that they have a company that they can turn to a company that they can trust to get them out of their time share legally and ethically and in a guaranteed time frame which is really important speaking of taking care of your customers can you tell us about how you and your family do that I mean I know Tyler is your office manager and plays a huge role in your customer service department yes our customer service is the most important to all of us at Lone Star transfer we're going to make sure that every caller is treated with the utmost respect and help them in any way that we can what can be done to get out of a time share what can callers expect when they call Lone Star my son Tyler is here with me today I'm gonna let him answer that question thank you Larry that's a great question there are so many different times your situations it's really important that you call our office today and one of our representatives will ask.

Limbaugh
Could we say 'goodbye' to cervical cancer by 2120?

WBZ Morning News

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Could we say 'goodbye' to cervical cancer by 2120?

"Say mass rollout of cervical cancer vaccines could potentially save sixty two million lives over the next one hundred years that's according to an international study by Harvard the cancer council New South Wales and love all university in Canada this study focused on the world's seventy eight poorest countries were few girls receive the vaccine and few women are screened for cervical cancer it's published in the British medical journal

Harvard South Wales Canada Cervical Cancer British Medical Journal Cancer
Is meat the new tobacco?

Thom Hartmann

04:23 min | 1 year ago

Is meat the new tobacco?

"No one Australia is on fire right now we have a a climate disasters happening all over the planet we've had our share of them here in North America as well and one of the things that is feeding this is meat they get the consumption of meat around the world is contributing about ten percent of the greenhouse gases out there so you've got on the one hand scientists climate scientists saying that we all need to eat less meat and re visit our we do agriculture and then also you've got health folks like you know the the lance at the the the British medical journal came out this was a new report published in the British British medical journal lancet recommends a largely plant based diet this is of a group of scientists from around the world to study nutrition food policy deliberating for three years and said that around the world meat consumption should drop by fifty percent that's for health that's to reduce the number of heart attacks to reduce the number of strokes to reduce the amount of obesity and and the concomitant so type two diabetes and problems that that follow along with that last October a power and a another separate completely separate study was published in the journal nature that essentially said the same thing and then this is impact here's the ABS abstract health risks associated because I'm sure if you happened email logical studies this was in the journal of nutrition research consumption of increasing amounts of red meat particular process meat is us here the increased risk of total mortality cardiovascular disease colorectal cancer in type two diabetes both men and women and that's even when you consider things like age race BMI history smoking blood pressure lipids in physical activity none of those things have as much impact apparently or were you know they are not fit to swing the the variables as simply eating me in terms of your risk of dying young single at and in my opinion between version of climate change and did you want to die on meat has become the new tobacco which is I guess my question for you do you think that meat is the new tobacco because guess what read the back fought back the track you know Mike pence water not bad for a one of the newspapers in in Indiana back in two thousand saying tobacco doesn't cause addiction nicotine doesn't cause addiction tobacco doesn't cause cancer a so now you've got you know the kind of the equivalent of the of the tobacco industry has you know the meat industry has one of these two and that is an amazing story James tapper writing for the guardian the headline red meat plays a vital role in diets claim expert in fighting against veganism never has a red meat will begin a call right back against the growth of veganism this week at the UK's biggest farming conference with claims and eating lamb and beef is vital because drum roll some plants a fisherman drained of their intrusion yes factory farming has caused the nutrient level in our vegetables to drop by fifty percent over the last fifty years in a speech at the I had the option farming conference Alice stand will tell ministers farmers and environmentalists a key nutrients and some fruits vegetables and grains and drop by up to fifty percent over fifty years the solution when you think the solution would be out of farming practices that keep the nutrients in the soil so the plants can absorb them or how about farming practices where you're growing nutrient rich species rather than ones the simply don't be known white button rapidly on the way to the store or as a ship across the country no no no no there there responses you're lacking nutrients unity made I don't get it made is pretty nutrient poor I mean if you want the nutrients from eating animals basically need the entire animal all is organ meats and brains and got some and all that kind of stuff you know like they did back in the old days Justina Burgess team muscle meat is not gonna do it so is meet the new is meet the new

Australia
Male infertility linked to prostate cancer risk

BBC World Service

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

Male infertility linked to prostate cancer risk

"New research indicates that man with fertility problems have a higher risk of them all those of developing prostate cancer we get more details in this report from which account and the research published today in the British medical journal was based on data from more than a million births in Sweden over twenty years K. stress this is not the result of the specific types of fertility treatment being used but instead it could be that male infertility and prostate cancer well somehow linked.

British Medical Journal Sweden Twenty Years
Vegans, vegetarians at more risk for stroke, study suggests

WBZ Midday News

00:28 sec | 1 year ago

Vegans, vegetarians at more risk for stroke, study suggests

"For you some new research out there this week so there might be a downside to going meat free a study in the British medical journal says vegans and vegetarians do have a lower risk of heart disease but a higher risk of stroke the findings based on data for forty eight thousand people who self reported for up to eighteen years now the researchers note that simply showing a correlation doesn't approve of calls and died experts say whatever your dietary choice eating the widest range of foods possible this best for your

British Medical Journal Eighteen Years
More of any physical activity tied to longer life

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

More of any physical activity tied to longer life

"Doing white physical activity such as cooking or washing dishes each day is enough to substantially lower the risk of early death that's according to a new study published by the British medical journal researchers say people can raise their chances of living a longer life by moving just a little bit more and sitting a little less in the study led by the Norwegian school of sport sciences deaths fell steeply as levels of light intensity activity increased with every minute up to five hours offering additional benefits for person's well being the study by the way also found that sitting for nine and a half hours or more each day was linked with a significantly higher risk of death a lead researcher says if you're someone who doesn't achieve the recommended levels of moderate intensity physical activity the just generally being on your feet more we'll still be

Researcher British Medical Journal Norwegian School Of Sport Scie Five Hours
Half of all harm caused by medical care is preventable

Atlanta's Morning News

00:21 sec | 1 year ago

Half of all harm caused by medical care is preventable

"Your health medical mistakes for more than one in ten patients according to the British medical journal researchers at the university of Manchester same mistakes involving drugs account for half the preventable error is jury it during surgery and missed diagnoses also lead to human because patient harm the head side to says getting drug dosages right should be a core area of focus for hospitals clinics and

British Medical Journal University Of Manchester
Ultraprocessed foods are easy, cheap and could be killing you

Steve Cochran

00:32 sec | 2 years ago

Ultraprocessed foods are easy, cheap and could be killing you

"Rauner, new research, says eating sausages, and other ultra processed foods could increase the risk of early death by sixty percent. Two studies published in the bread bit a British medical journal leak, ready meals, and other foods containing high levels have added fat and sugar to an increased risk of heart disease and stroke research found that eating those foods for portions of the day, had a sixty two percent increase mortality risk compared with those consuming less than two servings daily each serving increase the risk of early death by almost a

Rauner British Medical Journal Sixty Two Percent Sixty Percent
Red Yeast Rice Supplements Likely Damaged This Woman's Liver

Sports X Radio

06:07 min | 2 years ago

Red Yeast Rice Supplements Likely Damaged This Woman's Liver

"So many of you have asked me about the red yeast rice and somebody called a red race race race. I don't care what you call it. And it's an over the counter supplement that people are taking to lower their cholesterol. And I would tell my patients or I would tell my listeners be careful because it acts like a Stanton. And so with the statin medications, we watch her liver. We kind of know what those you're getting. And when I started statin medication. I check your liver in about six weeks. And then I check it again at the three month Mark the six month, Mark. So I know you're tolerating the Staten. But if you're taking some over the counter, red rice, yeast or read east rice. Two. Lower your cholesterol. I not really watching your your liver. And to be careful. Well, now, we have a report that a woman in Michigan developed sudden liver damage after taking a red yeast rice supplement, the sixty four year old woman recently visited doctor was told she had I- cholesterol levels, but she was hesitant to take the status. Most people are hesitant because I don't wanna hurt deliver. And they think that the stands are gonna hurt deliver. So instead, she turned to the supplement red east rice, it's a type of fermented rice that's marketed to lower cholesterol, but it acts like a statin, and it contains a compound called, mama, Colin k it's identical to the active ingredient in the statin drug level, Staten. So red yeast rice supplements with Monaco k. Have the same risks as drugs containing the status. The only difference is you don't know how much you're getting. Whereas you think you're taking love Stanton twenty or love stat and forty milligrams. You have no idea what the hell you're getting. What the red right right east rice? So after six weeks, she went to the signs of liver injury. Fatigue dark urine. John, john. This is the yellowing of the skin of is which is a sign of kidney damage or liver damage liver damage. Then she has got a liver biopsy. And she was diagnosed with acute drug induced liver injury or liver damage would drug or supplement in this case was the rate east rice supplements. Now. This was published in British medical journal case reports. So the woman's case prompted doctors who treated her to issue a warning about the potential harm. They say physicians and patients should be made aware that read east races, not harmless supplement and those choosing to use it should watch for symptoms of Pat o' toxicity. Now Luminoso also drank a couple of glasses of wine a day. So that might have also made or more vulnerable. If you drink alcohol with a statin medication or red yeast rice that can increase your risk deliver damage, but they say the woman's case enough the first incident of this supplement causing liver problems. There have been other reports. In fact, there wasn't studying Italy the found ten cases of liver damage ties at the supplement over thirteen year, period. So love astatine may even be safer. The FDA doesn't allow products to be sold as dietary supplements they contain more than trace amounts of this, Monaco, Kate. But despite FDA actions, whereas we know a lot of supplements out there have mixed amounts of components. A two thousand seventeen study found that levels of that Monica Lacaille in red yeast rice supplement sold in the US range from undetectable to nearly eleven milligrams per daily recommended dose, which basically can equal a love Stanton. So you have no idea what you're getting. And so the NC CIA age is saying that people should not use it to replace standard medical care. So what did they do to help her well one they stopped the supplement south the alcohol treated or restored? So provoked prove or liver function. She was monitored weekly. And I'm not sure if she's back to fully recovered. She could have some irreversible liver damage, but hopefully, it's reversible. So, you know, people look, I I get I get I don't like to always take prescriptions. Also, I get. And. To that high maintenance regimen of being on a cholesterol medication where you take it. And then you have to be screened in a month for six weeks to see if it's affecting the liver. We used to wait three months. I never waited three months. I would I would check your about a month because if it was going to damage the liver. I would see it in a month. You'd start to see some of the liver injury. So, you know, if I saw significant bump up and liver enzymes, which was rare because I always start on a very very low dose, then I could go. All right. I'll check it a month or six weeks than three months and six months, and if you're good I would just monitoring every six months. But I have no idea what the hell you're taking over the camera. And I get. If you can manage your cholesterol over the counter, then you don't have to go in for blood work. You don't have to wait hours to see your doctor. You don't have to pay towards your thousand dollar or twelve thousand dollars deductible. I get that because I'm a patient to and I cannot stand the way healthcare is right now. And I want to do more. Do it yourself. The problem is that you don't know what you're getting. And when I see people go. No, no, no. I don't want to use the pharmaceutical. I want to do all these supplements. I wanted to what natural. It's natural natural stuff out. There has very similar chemicals. As what's in the pharmaceutical Jila difference is the pharmaceutical is tight traded. It's tested, and it has to be very consistent. You can only get a consistent amount of that. Medication? You don't know what the hell these supplement companies are giving you. That's a

Liver Damage Stanton Staten Kidney Damage Mark FDA British Medical Journal Jila Dark Urine Michigan Pat O Colin John Luminoso Monica Lacaille United States CIA I Italy
You can tidy up your digital life, too

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:01 min | 2 years ago

You can tidy up your digital life, too

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by ultimate software dedicated to putting people first with innovative solutions for HR payroll and talent management. Learn more at ultimate software dot com. Ultimate software people first and bell Novo for business. You're an IT. But why do you do what you do to make a difference? Emlyn ova was here to be a difference maker for you by providing innovative technology solutions to learn more. Visit Lenovo dot com slash SNB. Powered by Intel. All those unread emails in your inbox causing you stress. It may be turned to tackle them head on from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm jed Kim in for. Molly would. It's spring, which means it's time to clean your winter. Clothes and storage swept and mopped cleared up the gutters. But what about that laptop that's littered with ten thousand photos unsorted documents and a barely visible desktop since digital storage space is so cheap. It's easy to keep amassing files. But that can take toll on our work in our wellbeing. Deb Lee is digital productivity coach she helps people weed out the virtual messes they've gotten themselves into we after what makes people finally give in decide to declutter. Well, usually there is some sort of a pain point. You can't find what you want. Maybe you're wasting time looking for what you want or you just can't seem to focus. So there's usually some sort of pain that triggers the desire to start getting things organized and putting things in order. How is doing a digital declutter different from doing declutter of your house? Well, the good news is that it's not that dip. Different. It's pretty similar. You still have a goal that you're trying to achieve most of us have things that we're not using. Sometimes we have duplicates of things because we couldn't find the original thing. So we went out and got the next thing. Right. So it's a pretty similar process. You have duplicates of things you have things that are just sort of lingering on your on your device that you're not using taking up space that you could use for other things that you are using or want to use. You know, how many times have we tried to take that photo? And it says up you're running out of space. Are you can't take that photo? Right. So that usually becomes a pain point. And then we recognize I can't capture these really important moments in my life because I've got all the stuff that I don't use. Or I don't need any more. What you find is the hardest part to declutter what it goes to our digital lives. I think it's the process of trying to fix it that perhaps sometime stops us that fear of goodness. It's going to take all day or take too long for me to manage this. I think that's. Where some of that reluctance to tackle it comes about. And sometimes when it has to do with things like your photographs they come with memories and special memories. You know, we sort of we feel attached to them. We remember those moments when we look at them, and we think well, we can't get rid of this photo. But if it's the fifth iteration of the same photo, then yes, you can so to make it a little bit easier. Start with those things that are obvious those duplicates or the the blurry photos or the ones where you can't make out. Exactly what it is that you took the picture of anyway, or those burst photos where you hold your finger on the phone so long that it just takes five hundred at the same time. And I know that because that just happened to me recently, but it's easy to delete. So definitely make deleting in Pershing sort of a regular habit. So it doesn't feel so much like a chore deadly is a digital productivity. Coach I asked her about her personal habits. And she's got a simple tip. You know, the home screen that pops up when you unlock your smartphone. She keeps it completely clear of anything except a calming picture totally stealing that. Then now for some related lists not into the idea of digital decluttering suppose, you could go the other way digital hoarding. That's the compulsion to save all things digital Mike photos of every receipt. You get or every single Email you've ever received. It's been studied. And some researchers think it's a some type of hoarding disorder witness the case in the B M J, aka British medical journal of a Dutch man who took and saved hundreds of digital photos every day turns out he hoarded physical objects to find yourself saving a lot of files. Get don't necessarily have a problem. Maybe you just get a kick out of collecting Gizmodo has a deep dive into digital hoarding. It makes a distinction between hoarding and collecting a digital collector might be the person who digitises all his old family photos and videotapes it can actually be a source of pride and positive feelings. Fine. Finally, if you think if firm morality is the answer for digital clutter by which I mean that some things can be put online with the expectation. They will disappear like Snapchat. Thank again. An article in wired questions the privacy expectations. Many people have with FM morality. And of course, there could always be a digital hoarder saving screen shots of whatever you typed. I'm jed Kim. And that's marketplace tech. This is APN. That's marketplace podcast is brought to you by well frame does your healthcare organization. Give people the support they need outside the walls of care delivery. It's time for a new approach. Well, frame calls it digital health management by delivering resources and guidance to address chronic conditions transitions of care as well as lifestyle, wellness and social determinants. Well, frame helps people and care teams build trusted relationships that Dr early interventions. Learn more at well frame dot com.

Jed Kim Lenovo Intel Emlyn Deb Lee Molly Pershing British Medical Journal Coach I B M J Mike
How to Stay Sharp As You Age

The Naked Scientists

03:59 min | 2 years ago

How to Stay Sharp As You Age

"Were often council that we should use it or lose it, particularly when it comes to keeping your mind sharp when you got a bit older, they're saying abounding crossword day keeps dementia bay, but are they actually true. A new study out in the British medical journal says not is colleges. Duncan astle. No. He wasn't involved in this study directly, but he does work on similar research projects Cambridge University, and he's been taking the findings Forrest welcome to the program Duncan. So first of all who's done. This study has been done by a group in Aberdeen led by Rodger stuff institute Medical Sciences with his colleagues, and what would they seek into find out why they recruited a group of sixty four year olds. And then they followed those individuals over the next fifteen years. Seeing each person five times each within that time period. And each time we saw them they measured different cognitive skills, like short term, memory and attention skills. And they also conducted a questionnaire, which they called the intellectual engagement questionnaire. Ask questions about in do you enjoy reading do you enjoy problem solving crosswords? Are you curious to you want to learn about new things like social media? And what they wanted to explore was how the relationship between these two different types of measures changes over that fifteen year period. And does this give them the power critically to control for people who start off from a good point? Because if taking the idea that if I do loss across words, this will defer dementia if I'm starting from a high point, then another person, it may just be that. I was always good at doing crosswords, and I'll just keep doing crosswords, and I have a low risk of dementia anyway versus someone who doesn't do many crosswords starts Molo point, the dementias manifest more, obviously soon. So that's very good questions, the parental. No problem with studying cognitive aging is that it takes a very long time to study it. And so you often end up studying people over relatively short periods of times to fifteen years sounds like a long time. But of course, in within the span, even that's short period of time. But there's something very special about these individuals and that all of them took part in a study in nineteen forty seven when they were all eleven years old. And as part of that study they conducted a cognitive assessment. So they had this very good baseline of cognitive ability from many years before the study even started what they initially hoped to see was that the trajectory of decline in the cognitive skills would be altered by the degree of intellectual engagement from the question as those people who are more intellectually engaged much reduced decline in cognitive skills as they get older. But what they found actually wasn't that the response on the questionnaire moderate the rate of decline they just found that people who were more intellectually engaged had better. A cognitive skills. Overall and everybody declines at roughly the same rate. Right. So the whole idea of use it or lose it is therefore it's a myth. It's not gonna work that way. It's not so much that it's a myth. It's the myth part. I guess is is about the trajectory. So what this study and some other previous have shown is that essentially what predicts good cognitive health in older age is good cognitive health throughout the lifespan, essentially, these people start off further from some kind of functional threshold so they have to drop before they start experiencing cognitive difficulties. Does this mean, then if you've reached old age, and and you've never been that Sharpe's tool in the draw is too late. Or are you saying actually you gotta make the most of what you have got. I think you probably have to make the most of what you have gone. So it's very hard to demonstrate that doing cross wasn't. So on will cause you to have better cognitive health. But it certainly can't hurt. But we do know that there are lots of other. Factors that are very good predictors of cognitive, health and odor ageing difference. Having good cardiovascular health is a great producer of having good cognitive health. So lead healthy life from the get-go. This have the best likelihood of preserving your intellect into old age line.

Duncan Astle British Medical Journal Aberdeen Rodger Stuff Institute Medical Cambridge University Forrest Producer Sharpe Fifteen Years Sixty Four Year Eleven Years Fifteen Year
"british medical journal" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"british medical journal" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"So welcome Dr. Malhotra we're here at the Swiss ry British medical journal conference about food for thought, the science and the politics of obesity, which is and food, which is really what you've been focusing on your kind of an extraordinary doctor. You're cardiologists from the UK. You're one of the leading voices there and fighting obesity and disease, and challenging the orthodoxy around cardiology statins bap, and you're taking a lot of flack from it, but you're also out there courageously breaking through the noise and people are listening. And I read that you had been working with the member of parliament and he had type two diabetes, and you're able to get him off his British dietetic association guidelines and eat a higher fat, lower carb diet and dramatically reversed his his diabetes, Laura's insulin. And he wrote a letter to the prime minister of of Ingo. Which is pretty amazing. How did you end up going from being a cardiologists that was trained Ellul straw was the bad guy that stands were God's gift to mankind, and they were beating eight low fat diet to your perspective now, which is quite opposite, which is stands, aren't the miracle drug we thought they were and then saturated. Fat is not the enemy according to your British medical journal article, I read years ago. How did you come to that from the traditional view? You know, mock. I think the me I had a realization many years ago probably around two thousand ten, having qualified as adults in two thousand and one and then decided specialize in cardiology much. Later on, I looked to basically what was happening with my patients. I noticed more my observation was more and more people coming in with multiple chronic diseases more city. And at the same time, you hitting the statistics in the media because two thousand four fourteen is the World Health organ. And now he is being global problem, major issue with progress. We, we haven't made much progress. So I was trying to initially look into the root causes of that because ultimately I felt as a doctor, there was more pressure on the system, and then I went to investigate the evidence behind the conventional wisdom around cholesterol or unsaturated fat. Actually looked at the data. I looked at the data look to all the research, but also I think one of the things that's really important is the when you look at the hierarchy of what's driving the epidemic, even if you take what we think is flawed. Dietary guidelines aside the food environment was saturated, Joe food, my own hospital, the hospital. So I thought to myself, how can we be advocates for patients for good health? If we are basically selling sickness in the hospital grounds? I mean, half of the healthcare workers are overweight. Yeah, absolutely. And it's the same for doctors, nurses finan clinical staff, statistics of the same. So this clearly something wrong. And I knew the always the food environment was contributing. But when I look deeper, I realized that what essentially it happened is when you go into the roots of all the change in dietary guidelines, which happened in nineteen seventy seven in the US in nineteen hundred in the UK which essentially said we should get only thirty percent of calories from fat and reduced fat consumption by the. The way on no randomized clinical trials really opposite absolutely keys. The unsecured from seven countries study which correlated saturated, fat cholesterol and heart disease. But one very passionate, determined scientists. Believed in what he was doing..

Joe food British medical journal obesity UK diabetes Dr. Malhotra Ellul prime minister Laura US clinical staff thirty percent
"british medical journal" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"british medical journal" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"With razor sharp teeth they can kill animals much larger than themselves leaving only a small wound and taking just enough meat or blood for their immediate energy requirements the fact that we can slip into small places and leave almost no trace of its passage on the body of its victim maybe one reason they are associated with mysterious phenomenon other the word phenomenon proceed at one of the earliest and most influential images of a kamikaze is a sharp clawed weasel in a spiraling world wind found in toriyama sagan's i catalog they're also very different ways of characterizing the phenomenon and gift you perfect your for example the comatose she is reported to be a trio of three gods the first one pushes over the victim the second inflicts the injury with ablade and the third administers a healing sap the wound does not bleed and is not painful attempts have been made to explain the team phenomena scientifically it has been attributed to changes in air pressure caused by whirlwinds or two pieces of debris picked up by strong gust of wind search explications are themselves a former folk belief and nothing has been proven scientifically with this in mind it is worth mentioning that as early as nineteen eleven the phenomenon was taken seriously as a medical condition worth international attention under the heading of these spontaneous wounds the british medical journal introduced to report by japanese doctor about a form of wind which occurs spontaneously and is frequently seen in japan the socalled come a touchy disease the wound is suddenly formed it usually occurs in one of the lower limbs sometimes face it is known by meteorologist but during storm say temporary back you may occur in places as a result of a stray air current and if part of the body comes into such a space a tear might result from the internal pressure and modified.

sagan british medical journal japan
"british medical journal" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"british medical journal" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"They can kill animals much larger than themselves leaving only a small wound and taking just enough meat or blood for their immediate energy requirements the fact that a weasel can slip into small places and leave almost no trace of its passage on the body of its victim maybe one reason they are associated with mysterious phenomenon although the word and pronouncement at one of the earliest and most images of a kaci is a sharp clawed weasel in a spiraling whirlwind found in toriyama sagan's i catalog they're also very different ways of characterizing the phenomenon and gift you perfect your for example the come tashi is reported to be a trio of three gods the first one pushes over the victim the second inflicts the injury with a blade and the third administers a healing sap the wound does not bleed and is not painful attempts have been made to explain the kamikaze phenomena scientifically it has been attributed to changes in air pressure caused by whirlwinds were two pieces of debris picked up by strong gust of wind search explanations are themselves a former phuc belief and nothing has been proven scientifically with this in mind it is worth mentioning that as early as nineteen eleven the phenomenon was taken seriously as a medical condition worth international attention under the heading of these spontaneous wounds the british medical journal introduced to report by japanese doctor about a form of wind which occurs spontaneously and is frequently seen in japan the socalled touchy disease the wound is suddenly formed it usually occurs in one of the lower limbs sometimes face it is known by meteorologist but during thunderstorms temporary back you may occur in places as a result of a stray air current and if part of the body comes into such a space a tier might result from the internal pressure and modified by the.

sagan british medical journal japan
"british medical journal" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"british medical journal" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Had the best story i woke up smiling the other day because added toronto on april third just a few days ago study suggests the pasta can be a part of a healthy diet without packing on the pounds carbohydrates get a lot of bad press and blamed for the obesity epidemic but a new study suggests that this negative attention may not be deserved for pasta now as a little chubby talion boy that grew up in a story queens that eight parisi bread and loved his grandmother's pasta and i'm not a big tomato sauce fan just to put that out there i was jumping out of bed when i heard it on the news to find the actual article that said pasta was okay so it finally article i'm going to tweet it out to everybody but basically unlike most refined carbohydrates which are rapidly absorbed into the bloodstream pasta has a low glycemic index meaning it causes smaller increases in blood sugar levels than those caused by eating foods with a high glycemic index now that's important of course there's a lot of different forms of pasta whole wheat pasta i personally like a fresh homemade pasta that i buy from a local restaurant that makes it for us but it's important that you take a look at the food you're putting in garbage in garbage out so pasta can be healthy now i always felt that way but i felt that i was eating a healthier pasta i was eating something fresh eating something that a restaurant made that i knew didn't have a lot of refined flour and it was just something that i thought was i was doing better but to hear this study and to recognize now that there are different degrees of healthy pasta that you can have and to realize that even pasta as a whole is not so bad was really exciting now don't by all means go out and eat all pasta because certainly if you did the outcome would be that good but this is a pretty good study the identified thirty randomized control trials involving twenty five hundred people who ate pasta instead of carbs is part of a healthy low glycemic index diet and this was published in the journal b m bush is a big deal is a british medical journal the british medical journal open it's a big deal so take a look you can have some pasta.

toronto the british medical journal obesity
"british medical journal" Discussed on Super Station 101

Super Station 101

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"british medical journal" Discussed on Super Station 101

"Cholesterol level among adult americans as 200 can compare to the borderline high that they've been setting up they used to be true cholesterol used to be to forty now that's considered high so must people keep their cholesterol levels up to that number so we need it again some doctors have there's different what there's in the research will want to keep it under two hundred okay let's just say that the researchers continuing to update there's different doctors with different views on that in the british medical journal researchers looked at some studies in denmark they found a strong link between lumps that are found these visible fatty lumps under the skin on the islet known as antle asthma case if you've got any kind of i issues you see some bumps on your eyes said that last month actually's indicator for heart disease now and heart attack so they're little little excess deposits of cholesterol cholesterol is a lot like fat they say okay to say no it looks like we tend to think high blood cholesterol is just a number from a blood test but when the cholesterol line the arteries it kind of acts like a fatty deposit that's what happens on there so get your cholesterol checked it needs to happen but you don't freak out if your numbers are right at two hundred two a fiveto10 just don't forget it's okay okay when your numbers get up and 350 420 really need to kind of say holy cow we need to do something okay so don't get overly concerned remember hdl cholesterol that you're good cholesterol h d l high density lie proteins that you're good think about hd els your vacuum cleaner the ldl is the cholesterol that goes out in from the liver goes to the body makes all this stuff happened than i just talked about and then if you have low hdl and you gotta dust buster instead of a big orrick vacuum and then you can't really get rid of the cholesterol because you do need to get rid of it a caged hanging out in the arteries that where you start getting the plaque in the guntalk gang on of the arteries so if you're hd els up like 75 and you got highpowered ort vacuum is gonna come and clean all that out that makes sense it's got to be simple for me the vacuum cleaner was always a good example on that score liked.

denmark british medical journal orrick
"british medical journal" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

03:06 min | 3 years ago

"british medical journal" Discussed on WTMA

"And a half a day smoking habit and is now spoe smoking about by his telling less than five cigarettes a day so from thirty down to five and he feels great about it so i hate to share what i'm about to about smoking but it's a report there was in the british medical journal justpublished and it was a report on the connection between smoking heart disease and stroke and they found that the results were completely different than what they expect it and when you hear what they found the reality is what you'll learn from this is that cutting down on smoking is only a step on the path to quitting so they were looking at if somebody went from smoking twenty cigarettes a day of pack two one cigarette a day what kind of reduction in health risk with ac and they expected to see the risk collapse the somme smoking a cigarette a day verses prior smoking twenty how much could that really harm them will the steiner is that someone who cuts back one twentieth will only reduce the chance of heart disease or stroke by half not by 95 percent which mathematical you would think it would be but smoking is that harmful but just the routine of smoking one a day israeli harpoon obviously my friend who's cut back from thirty two about five we'll have a lower chance of risk but if you want to get the deal done you gotta go from whatever you're at two zero now i know that it's easier to say than to do but i can speak about it because i used to be a twopackaday smoker and i haven't smoked a cigarette in decades sarah is with us on the clark howard show hi sarah hi sarah you got a question for me about a store credit card yes there i'm trying to build mcrae and i know i'll have to get a credit card and make regularity but nearly credit card that i've ever gotten application for the local so i need to know what kind of wording i'm gonna to be on okay so if you apply for a store credit card and that store credit card is also tied in with a visa or mastercard logo.

british medical journal mcrae clark howard sarah 95 percent
"british medical journal" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"british medical journal" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Implanted in the patient's body that since regular impulses to the vegas nerve which runs from the brain down through the neck chest and abdomen a review of clinical studies by the cochran collaborative found the vegas nerves stimulator effective in reducing seizures for people whose epilepsy does not respond well to drugs were for whom surgery is not a good option the cochran review also found that more study is needed on the effectiveness and side effects of vienna's therapy linzer says there is reason to believe the vienna s device can clause deadly cardiac symptoms and that it's been approved with virtually no research on how many patients implanted with bns die jeannie lens or is a longtime contributor to the bmj formerly the british medical journal and her writing has appeared in the new york times magazine the atlantic and other publications her new book is the danger within us we'll genie linzer welcomed the fresh air do we know how often medical treatments cause problems and harm people essentially the cure becoming the cause of injury we don't there are people with aloun institute and other places that are trying to get some numbers on this but it's very hard to estimate how often on drugs and devices are unnecessary and how many people there harming one of the problems with devices as that nobody's really tracking the numbers on of harm that there or the rates of harm i should say so the fda has a database where doctors and hospitals can report deaths and serious adverse events but they don't know how many people are implanted with a particular device so if you have a hundred deaths in a database from us particular device i mean if there are only two hundred of those devices implanted in people that's really scary if there two million people implanted that's another story and that's exactly what we don't know because the fda doesn't require manufacturers to report how many people are implanted in his mouth but hard we plan of chips in our cats well to keep an eye for yes and go with walmart tracks how many.

british medical journal the new york times magazine aloun institute fda cochran collaborative cochran walmart
"british medical journal" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"british medical journal" Discussed on Fresh Air

"You have clinical studies by the cochran collaborative found the vegas nerves stimulator effective in reducing seizures for people whose epilepsy does not respond well to drugs or for whom surgery is not a good option the cochran review also found that more study is needed on the effectiveness and side effects of the nsa therapy linzer says there is reason to believe the bns device can caused deadly cardiac symptoms and that it's been approved with virtually no research on how many patients implanted with bns die jeannie lens or is a longtime contributor to the bmj formerly the british medical journal and her writing has appeared in the new york times magazine the atlantic and other publications her new book is the danger within us while genie linzer welcomed a fresh air do we know how often medical treatments cause problems and harm people essentially the cure becoming the cause of injury we don't dare people with aloun institute in other places that are trying to he'll get some numbers on this but it's very hard to estimate how often um drugs and devices are unnecessary and how many people there harming one of the problems with devices that nobody's really tracking the numbers um of harm but there are the rates of harm i should say so the fda has a database where doctors and hospitals can report deaths and serious adverse events but they don't know how many people are implanted with a particular device so if you have a hundred deaths in a database from us particular device i mean if they're only two hundred of those devices implanted in people that's really scary if they're two million people implanted that's another story and that's exactly what we don't know because the fda doesn't require manufacturers to report how many people are implanted and his mouth but hard we we plan of chips in arquette's two key federal yes endo with walmart.

british medical journal the new york times magazine genie linzer aloun institute fda arquette walmart cochran collaborative cochran
"british medical journal" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:39 min | 3 years ago

"british medical journal" Discussed on KTRH

"Headline when they're is at is school right on the money alabama's trump blows declared up a the state immigration of public debate health with just emergency one question and classes were cancelled in north carolina trump may and have idaho just new as the virus negotiations spreads on abc an immigration chief deal medical with correspondent one question dr why generation are we having tells all us whether these a people multivitamin from can bleep help bleep countries there was a come steady here last year in the british medical journal that thing this was a thursday meeting congressional leaders making a deal to give legalisation to the socalled dreamers which are scheduled who are scheduled to be deported in not in march trump made the comments in response to proposal to prevent the deportation of thousands of foreign nationals from haiti old outdoor and african countries who are dwelling in the united states on temporary protected status since two thousand one seventeen eighteen years of temporary status are about the be sent back home the democrats are in a panic over this and these very refugees these very people from haiti from africa from el salvador they're telling us they can't go back to their countries because their countries are too poor there are countries are too dangerous there is jeff through made drugs there's too much violence in other words because their countries are hella holes so naturally they comment irritates lawmakers upsets them and now the democrats probably not gonna want to be seen making a deal with the president or just said some of their voters come from hellhole countries now i don't know about you but i don't wanna make a deal with these people i want to defeat these people i don't want to compromise with these people because these people are simply looking for ways to bloat the federal voter registration roles in various states and you want to have some evidence of this in a dick turban dick turban was in the meeting dick turbans back in chicago he was interviewed on tv today and he was confirming that trump said what he said trump denied using that exact language there are some people who were saying that day it wasn't it wasn't holes it was houses that trump said what regardless it doesn't matter dick turbans out there i was there i heard it i was a bald i was outraged i was this i was.

alabama british medical journal united states haiti el salvador jeff president chicago trump north carolina idaho bleep africa voter registration two thousand one seventeen eig
"british medical journal" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"british medical journal" Discussed on KTRH

"Headline when they're is at is school right on the money alabama's trump blows declared up a the state immigration of public debate health with just emergency one question and classes were cancelled in north carolina trump may and have idaho just new as the virus negotiations spreads on abc an immigration chief deal medical with correspondent one question dr why generation are we having tells all us whether these a people multivitamin from can bleep help bleep countries there was a come steady here last year in the british medical journal that thing this was a thursday meeting congressional leaders making a deal to give legalisation to the socalled dreamers which are scheduled who are scheduled to be deported in not in march trump made the comments in response to proposal to prevent the deportation of thousands of foreign nationals from haiti old outdoor and african countries who are dwelling in the united states on temporary protected status since two thousand one seventeen eighteen years of temporary status are about the be sent back home the democrats are in a panic over this and these very refugees these very people from haiti from africa from el salvador they're telling us they can't go back to their countries because their countries are too poor there are countries are too dangerous there is jeff through made drugs there's too much violence in other words because their countries are hella holes so naturally they comment irritates lawmakers upsets them and now the democrats probably not gonna want to be seen making a deal with the president or just said some of their voters come from hellhole countries now i don't know about you but i don't wanna make a deal with these people i want to defeat these people i don't want to compromise with these people because these people are simply looking for ways to bloat the federal voter registration roles in various states and you want to have some evidence of this in a dick turban dick turban was in the meeting dick turbans back in chicago he was interviewed on tv today and he was confirming that trump said what he said trump denied using that exact language there are some people who were saying that day it wasn't it wasn't holes it was houses that trump said what regardless it doesn't matter dick turbans out there i was there i heard it i was a bald i was outraged i was this i was.

alabama british medical journal united states haiti el salvador jeff president chicago trump north carolina idaho bleep africa voter registration two thousand one seventeen eig
"british medical journal" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"british medical journal" Discussed on WJR 760

"Lifestyle program at henry ford health system and particularly at the henry ford west bloomfield hospitals just been a wonderful experience in the transition it but it's great to speak with you will get well always nice we have a preeminent doctors in our area in a variety of fields and in this one uh we talk to you and we also talked to dr jewel con with his plantbased solution we're hearing more and more about plant based food and in fact uh new study that just came out from the british medical journal says saturated fat regardless of type linked with increased heart disease risk you got to get rid of the saturated fat apparently doesn't even if he even if he got him from say vegetables are what things that we thought were healthy well fair enough you know we take a uh a very practical it called reality be sites approach to this paul w so when you came up with your eat less let me just comment from what you said on saturated fat and transition into into that saturated fat looks like it really does from whatever source palm fruit oil coconut to animal fats inhibit the liver's ability to clear your blood of bad cholesterol so yes it does the opposite of what uh statin drugs might do so it's a good idea to cut back but cutting out things is not practical nor realistic at your i think mentioning earlier to uh don't quit quitting we also know that smoking less cigarettes is less bad than more so we don't wanna be extremist about this sure cut backed i'm saturated fat look at it on the labels where we recommend trying to average around 10 grams or less per day but you mentioned eating less well when you go up plantbased and that doesn't mean clamped exclusive necessarily platt base could be a healthy mediterranean approach.

henry ford health system british medical journal henry ford west bloomfield paul w platt 10 grams
"british medical journal" Discussed on People's Pharmacy

People's Pharmacy

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"british medical journal" Discussed on People's Pharmacy

"In oil and we were really surprised and delighted to discover that there's actually quite a bit of science to support enteric coded peppermint oil against irritable bowel syndrome is actually on there is a review dying number of years back now at by the british medical journal published air and ashley peppermint oil and tear quoted pepper noel on the number needed to treat meaning how many people did you have to treat to get one person get a good benefit was two point five that is that is a very effective remedy and it was actually wanted the most effective remedies when you compare it to the very limited number of options we have in conventional medicine for treating aids so i i have used my abuse betterment oil and entire quarter peppermint oil for many many many years for people with ib ask has it the reason that has the entire coded though is because the men thawal pretty much dissipates in the stomach and we won to get down further cramping in discomfort is but it is amazingly effective more than sixteen randomized controlled trials that is impressive and that number needed to tree is better than a lot of medications yes it is is wonderful and and you know peppermint just as another arms side has also been study on would it was applied topically four tension headaches and i've used that a lot in my a practice where people use a little on peppermint oil that they want to apply uh you know to there to there temples into their neck in that and all you have to do there it's super simple you would be take two to three drops of pepper that oil and put that in one ounce of carry oil like all men door you know organic sunflower seed oil any of these kinds of carrier oils and and two to three drops in one outs of a carrier oil in.

british medical journal conventional medicine one ounce
"british medical journal" Discussed on Watch What Crappens

Watch What Crappens

02:06 min | 4 years ago

"british medical journal" Discussed on Watch What Crappens

"Needham is clinically proven by the british medical journal to help people lose weight and keep it up joined the 45 million people who have taken the first step towards a new lifestyle with boom lifestyle like you know drinking in the morning four you know the afternoon if they're schremp there or the morning now if you're running the party but whatever derek bevan iron ore and douglas but i feel it's important to discuss this because i am on my home weight loss journey right now david and did you know that if you just go to noon dot com slash crap ins right now to get your first two weeks of num for free than you get ten percent off your subscription that's num n o m dot com slash crap ins to get so your tweet we by the way we are called them i believe it's a fifty percent i have to stop the shuttle madore precision or copies as ten percent but we're supposed have opted copy was all i apologise it's supposed to be fifty percent off well isn't that nice yes cited to change the rate right now middle of the every david the jump no did you know that you're between the rights of the emirate new who who for seriously does new a good a new dot com slash slash crop ins and you'll get your free trial and get fifty percent off your subscription num dot com slash graabo's team well we really stumbled our way through that ad everyone actually went onto the website 'cause you know we we checked it out and like you you entering the stop and they like figure out a whole plan for you it's actually really cool and as i am on trying to turn up a little bit i'm going to use it and you know i'm hit get some results out of a baby can be making some changes papeete notion of ingress for me baby world but see that's the thing you can have shrimp regrets you just you know he can't be like me in order shrimp regrets with the side of french fries in a starter solid with blue cheese extracrew 'tanzim lots of bread with butter guys out an yet and it's like it actually is like they're all about like not been like a diet they're sick a lifestyles.

Needham british medical journal david derek bevan fifty percent ten percent two weeks
"british medical journal" Discussed on Revisionist History

Revisionist History

01:47 min | 4 years ago

"british medical journal" Discussed on Revisionist History

"Let me just read to you from the conclusion of ramsden's research article on the minnesota study it's in the british medical journal and remember that this is a super cautious scientists speaking in the final paragraphs of a peer reviewed research paper that was probably rewritten and rewritten ten times to tone it down as much as possible the concludes available evidence from randomized controlled trials shows that replacement of saturated fat within a lake acid effectively lowers serum cholesterol but does not support the hypothesis that this translates to a lower risk of death from coronary heart disease or all causes he saying there's no good evidence that reducing saturated fat makes you live longer the best clinical trials we have reached the opposite conclusion that's why ramsden calls up ivan france's sun son before he publishes his findings he has to so he said how do you feel about that this could be a little bit sensitive for you because this was your father's life work and maybe in some situations it didn't actually have a new draw fact perhaps wasn't even good for people it's not a trivial issue for either man is it ramsden is challenging fifty years of medical orthodoxy and hidden enlisted the son of the very man who helped create that orthodoxy ramps intel's robert france i'm about to call into question your father's life's work to show that something he believed in his whole career perhaps wasn't that good for people how do you feel about that which means have i made you complicit in the betrayal of your own father.

british medical journal ivan france robert france ramsden minnesota fifty years
"british medical journal" Discussed on Talk 1300 FM

Talk 1300 FM

02:39 min | 4 years ago

"british medical journal" Discussed on Talk 1300 FM

"Five nine six eight one good day day health i'm steffan with dr can krona house nationally recognized award winning cardiologists facilitator helpful if people all over the country let's get to to our list of some of the things you've research this week news from the world of medicine there are a couple of things connected to alcohol and drug consumption that we ought to talk about both of them are bad as well the first one caddick infuses me a little bit can because we've heard before depending on how you qualify alcohol consumption why nine is considered alcohol in you hear from any number of studies at at the what's in the what's the thing the begins with p in wine feeling as vera trial it's through so those is that cata status was to be good for us but yeah this study suggests any alcohol consumption is not good for your brain right this this really does shake up the common thinking yeah and this came out this week in the british medical journal which is a very reputable medical gerald a link between heavy drinking an adverse brain health which is what you're talking about including dimension degeneration of brain ain't issue that is well established already established everyone agrees but the news this week the is it even moderate as you were mentioning alcohol consumption and that's of any kind of alcohol is linked to a raised risk of fast they're decline in brain health and mental function so compared with people who do not drink people who drink moderately in this study show a walking threetimeshigher risk of brain atrophy so alcohol consumption may be a modifiable risk factor for cognitive impairment and that's thinking and remembering thinking and remembering cognition i yep cognition and you know i've never had don't drink and sometimes people who said we'll have a little bit of wine because good for your brain.

british medical journal
"british medical journal" Discussed on No Such Thing As A Fish

No Such Thing As A Fish

01:52 min | 4 years ago

"british medical journal" Discussed on No Such Thing As A Fish

"Prozac homebase he's a professional neighbor of thickness nastase's job you just goes in yeah he saw a kind of got in the market of when people were naming new companies and he's like i can do that all all the things you need to lead a happy life found those things were home homebase of prozac yeah i hope he says when it comes to naming one it's in thirds one thirty strategy onethird is creative and the final third is checking the names and he also infants and i don't know if you much this before cello scrotum do you remember that not so cello scrotum was a as condition a medical condition the cellist scott apparently like rubbed against your scrotum you play the cello presumably played it wrong i the he roads to a newspaper actually to the b m chased the british medical journal saying that he was a doctor and that he come up with this thing called cello scrotum in a love cellists will getting getting but actually it was a trick and he was tried to make fun of the fact that all of these like housemaids knee engulf his elbow and all these kinds of things were kind of taking on and he was trying to make israel because israel i think most cellists this is a generalization are women shaw revised if you've got shallows grosjean you really have implying it wrong in april last year five men were imprisoned for stealing a trailer with twenty thousand pounds worth of biscuits and it now that was the street value of the biscuits the production route twelve thousand pounds but they nigger trailer and it was found abandoned without the biscuit said it really hit the biscuits were recovered.

scott british medical journal israel shaw twelve thousand pounds twenty thousand pounds