21 Burst results for "British Library"

Judy Batalion on her new book The Light of Days

Can We Talk?

01:57 min | 2 months ago

Judy Batalion on her new book The Light of Days

"Judy battalion is a writer comedian. And the granddaughter of holocaust survivors her new book and soon to be screenplay is called the light of days. It's about women resistance. Fighters in hitler's ghettos they were oftentimes hidden underground for long periods of time and could only come out at night and they craved. They crave food. They craved drink and they crave the light of day. The stories of the women. Judy writes about in the light of days had nearly been forgotten so much so that when she first discovered them she thought she had made a mistake. Judy was born in montreal but was living in london. When she was researching the world war two heroine and martyr khanna sanish buried deep in the stacks of the british library. She found an unusual book. It's an old book. It's you know in this blue fabric cover with gold lettering and the yellowing deck alleges a i opened the book and it is about two hundred pages of tiny script in yiddish. What even more unusual is i happen to speak yiddish. So i start flipping through this book. Looking for hana sanish. But she's only in the last ten pages and in front of her. There are one hundred eight hundred ninety pages of other women stories with pictures and snippets and bios of other female fighters and the chapter titles are like ammunition owed to weapons it. The fight in vilna and i should say the title of the book was flowing into ghettos women in the ghettos but this was a very different ghetto story than i had ever expected or anticipated

Judy Battalion Judy Khanna Sanish Hana Sanish British Library Montreal London Vilna
"british library" Discussed on Unexplained

Unexplained

02:09 min | 6 months ago

"british library" Discussed on Unexplained

"His help trying to secure the throne. What exactly brought to england like much. What we know of his life is unclear. What is known however to arias written by him were featured in an opera performed the haymarket in london earlier that year the pieces of music along with roughly forty more italian arias seven solos for the violin and a collection of english songs can be found in the classical music archives at the british library as musical historian. Charles burney wrote in his seventeen eighty-nine book a general history of music. An opera was attempted on april the seventh at the little theatre in the haymarket under the direction of geminiani prince lab covets. Who was at this time in london and fond of music and the celebrated mysterious count. Sandra man attended all the rehearsals. Perhaps this is simply more evidence of the high regard with which the council musical talent was held and yet it remains unusual. The two man of which so little has been recorded would have his work performed in this manner. Things only become more intriguing when we take into account an unusual mural that was painted at the home of johann jacob heidegger once manager of the renowned king's theatre in london heidegger bought the property in seventeen forty four and had several murals of swiss and italian landscapes painted throughout it and over one doorway still existing today forming part of the mural. You'll find the painting of a book open on.

Charles burney arias london british library little theatre england johann jacob heidegger Sandra king's theatre
Has Scott Morrison spent too much?

Between The Lines

09:41 min | 9 months ago

Has Scott Morrison spent too much?

"Me. If you've already heard me mention this but one of my favorite quotes during the covid crosses a pdf the guardian. This is the British lift wing newspaper. Now, this was the heart of the coronavirus crisis. It would have been light much quote just as there are no atheists on a sinking ship, there are no free marketeers during a pandemic. Now, the author of that apt quote Jonathan Freedland, he was referring to the audio logical revolution within the British conservative. Party. Now, according to Freedland Boris Johnson's his have defied four decades of thatcherism small-state free-market, thinking I to spend staggering amounts of money and then subsidizing the wages of workers. Could the same thing be said about Australia's Liberal Party they're the party of Howard and Costello now embraces big-spending high deficit government interventionism. And is a permanent state of affairs poor kilis editor at large of the Australian US pipe and Judas Brit is emeritus professor of politics at Latrobe University poll judy welcome back to the show. Hristo Paul, you've written to calms about this subject in the past week, summarize your faces. Will Martha is that all parties and all governments have to respond to the times in which they find themselves on display in Australia. Now we face an extraordinary economic crisis and the response reveals the nature of Scott Morrison, his prime minister and the Mars and government. So Morrison, not responding as Liberal Party progressive or is it Liberal Party conservative? He doesn't see himself in those terms his responses pragmatic selects able and practical. He's not inhibited by former policy and audio logical icons of the Liberal Party. Say What we say is the government has abandoned the long-term syllabus aspirations. It's A. Big Spending government it's a government government intervention focused on Keynesian demand management. It does however on the Liberal Party tradition of tax cuts will see next week. So it's prepared to regulate or deregulate according to the situation according to what's required. So to sum up say that Morrison wants to be defined by results and outcomes not philosophical principle. Okay. You mentioned the tax cuts leaving that aside traditional liberal governments are about balancing the books Paul, how much an as do you think aries in the Liberal Party about in the parliament and outside about these handouts to preserve jobs and livelihoods? Are. I. Don't think there's much on these at all OPTIMA and Tom. and. A couple of reasons for this if there is to be on, he's He's will come through the down the track, but essentially what's happening here is to govern is following the Orthodoxy or what you might call the new Orthodoxy in terms of meeting the financial and economic crisis. So roller response is sort of radical. It's also conventional. The official family is working together very closely. The Treasury the Reserve Bank, what the government is doing is essentially supported by private-sector economists. It's in law and with Patrick amended by the VCD and the IMF not the cabinet is very nodded, the Prime Minister and the treasurer are working very closely together so far the results look good. I think the Overwhelming sentiment on the back benches. Support, the government strategy in the hope that this gives individual employees, the chance of actually being reelected and my will give the government the chance of being reelected. So the reinvention of Australian liberalism is on full display with this budget judith break you agree with Paul Kelly about the the audio logical significance of these changes but actually think the government had much choice in that sense I do think we can see something audio logical preferences in a couple of the policies poor mentioned the tax cuts they've chosen tax cuts over for example, committing to a permanent increase in new act now co Job Seca. They've also, for example, if we look at the way, they wanted to stimulate the housing market. They've gone for giving money to individual owners rather than, for example, embarking on a social housing project. So I think in some of the means, we can still see some of the ideological preferences of the Patty. One of the things I've wondered when I've been watching the events unfold. If Labor had won the last election was in government with the Liberals have supported the same levels of spending or would they have if you like stayed in the sort of ideological bunker bean and attacked the blow out of the deficit? I mean, it's a hypothetical. In some ways I think we've been very lucky that it's been the liberals and the coalition in government because they can sense being able to Ghana much more support. I, think than I have been able to do for the same levels of spending but isn't cameras response to the COVID crosses more consistent with other Western governments during the pandemic Judy. Yes that's what I think. I had much option but the question is if the coalition of being opposition, would they have supported a Labor government going? You've written a lot about this have many many decades about when orthodoxies or overturned. It's usually bipartisan is that you'll since if the coalition cypher argument's sake wherein opposition I would have gone along with this big spending interventionism. Look are essentially agree with what Judy's said about this I think in a sense we're. Fortunate, if you liked that the coalition's in government because it's taken all the big spending decisions. and. Lay has been prepared to go along with back. In fact, it's argued that there should be even more spending. So in that sense, we've had a broad degree of thought-out ship within the economic framework. It is hot the typical of course to tron speculate about what would have happened if alive had been in office doing this but I do think that the coalition in opposition would have been tempted to make caught a lot of criticisms and to suggest that the spending had gone too far. There's a big difference for party thing in government managing across and being an opposition. Cape with this theme of a political realignment among center right parties around the Western world. If you think about Donald Trump in two thousand sixteen, he tapped into widespread anxieties. America's rust belt. What can class constituencies? Boris Johnson showed last December, he resonated with traditional British Library voters in the Midlands and northern England. Judy. Do you think that Morrison in a wise doing the same thing here in Australia? Now, I think they're very different sorts of crises. I mean the pandemic is an external. Crisis, it's not being caused by politics in any way it's not back nationalism versus globalism or any of those things, and so I don't agree with that. I agree with what Paul was saying earlier that Morrison's shown himself to be pragmatic and quick footed in this and I think we're lucky for that. But I I don't think that this lines up with bricks and with trump's appeal to the rest spilled poor Kelly. Well I think conservatism is changing if you look at. America Britain Australia and there's not a dopey getting very significant changes into servitude. Thought. Different changes argued very strongly that there are very substantial differences between Donald Trump and Scott Morrison. I think people who argue that. Morrison is a pilot version of DONALD TRUMP MAUREEN DOWD in the New York Times by the way, but go on. I think. I think turned him mentally misunderstand the situation I. Think the change in conservatism is very dramatic in the United States. If you'd like because we've got the transition from Ronald, Reagan who a generation ago was the great conservative champion, and now we have Donald Trump, who if you lock is a populist conservative? And that transformation is simply enormous install ending content I mean trump violates all the virtues of conservatism in terms of restraint prudence disciplined respect. Regard for the political system, he thrives on division. So he likes all the traditional conservative norms, and then when looks at his policies. Well he's sabotage the global trading system. He's an arch protectionist. He's engaged in this trade war with China he's appraised dictators and suspicious about. So I guess one of the Fundamental Christians here is the extent to which trump is an aberration. And the extent to which post trump American concert is we'll have to try and create a new position cognisant of the damage that trump has done to the traditional Republican Party

Government Donald Trump Liberal Party Scott Morrison Hristo Paul Australia Freedland Boris Johnson Jonathan Freedland Judy Paul Kelly United States Republican Party Prime Minister America Optima Covid Latrobe University Treasury Martha
"british library" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:10 min | 1 year ago

"british library" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The British Library in London. So stay with us for the forum on your ages. Historic silk routes after the news BBC News. Hello, This is Jerry Smith. Russians are starting to vote on constitutional reforms that could see President Vladimir Putin remain in power for another 16 years. From Moscow. His Sir Rainsford. There are dozens of amendments to the Constitution. But the voters, I guess or no to all of them for the Kremlin. There is only one critical change here, the one that would allow Vladimir Putin to run again as president. Twice if he chooses. His critics call it a power grab even a constitutional coup and it's happening is Mr Putin's approval rating is on the wane. It's likely to fall further is the full economic impact of the Corona virus pandemic is felt. And that's why this vote's happening Now, even though the number of covert 19 infections is still rising, the balance has been spread over a week for safety for the criminal wants to secure a large turnout to give the process legitimacy. A 14 day quarantine has come into force in New York, New Jersey and Connecticut. For all arrivals from eight other U. S states with surging Corona virus outbreaks in New York waverers transmission has slowed hefty fines had been threatened against those who don't comply. The states affected include Texas, Florida and the Carolinas. David Willis reports. Eight states are included in the quarantine order, some of which, like Texas, Arizona and Florida, have seen a dramatic increase in Corona virus cases in recent days after lifting lock down restrictions. Anyone who violates the quarantine order could be fined. Meanwhile, the University of Washington is forecasting that the number of deaths caused by the Corona virus in the U. S could reach 180,000 by October. Currently, that figure stands at around 122,000. Three men in the U. S. State of Georgia have been formally charged with the murder of the modern robbery. A young black man who was shot dead in February while out jogging. They faced nine counts, including murder. They called county District Attorney Joy it. Holmes announced the charges at a news conference. That indictment does have nine charges on it. There was no in charges are malice murder. Four counts of felony murder and four felonies under which the predicates for felony murder charges. This is another positive step. Another great step for finding justice for Ahmad. Finding justice for this family and the community. Beyond 1000 troops have been deployed to the Australian state of Victoria, where intensive testing is under way to bring a Corona virus outbreak under control. The soldiers will help with testing and monitoring quarantine programs at hotels for return travelers. The state Premier Daniel Andrews said hundreds of people would find out across neighborhoods in Melbourne, the country's second city, knocking on doors to invite residents to be tested. Load news from the BBC. The Australian airline Qantas is to cut a least 6000 jobs and ground 100 aircraft for up to a year as it deals with the In fact the Corona virus pandemic. Some planes may be mothballed for longer. The company is also looking to raise $1.3 billion to help with the impact. The U. S Defense Department has named 20 major Chinese companies that it says either owned or bagged by the country's military. The list includes the telecoms John Holloway, video surveillance from Hick Vision, China Telecom and China Mobile. Karishma vous Wani reports. Washington says companies like Wal Away aren't operating simply is private enterprises. Instead, their tools of the Chinese state and Communist Party and actively seek information from their customers to hand back to Beijing quality in Beijing have consistently denied these allegations. This new list for use by U. S. Congress members and businesses could pave the way for financial sanctions against these companies, which would make it harder for them to operate and make transactions within the U. S. Banking system. The Supreme Court judge has ordered the release on bail of a right wing campaigner who organized rallies calling for military intervention in Brazil. Sara Jeremy, any known as Sarah Winter, was arrested last week with five other activists. An outspoken supporter president useable scenario. She's campaigned for the closure of the Supreme Court and Congress, accusing them of undermining the president's powers. Miss Jeremy will have to wear an ankle bracelet in orderto have her movements traced. An American racing driver has Bean posthumously awarded the fastest land speed record by a woman nearly a year after she died trying to achieve it. Jesse Combs was killed when her jet powered car crashed in Oregon last August. After clocking a record speed of just over 841 kilometers per hour. BBC news. China, Iran, Afghanistan, Syria, Uzbekistan and India. If you went to any of these places 1000 years ago, you would find goods and produce from the others. It. How did they get there? And why? In this week's form from the BBC with me, Bridget Kendall will be exploring the ancient network of trade routes that made possible the long distance exchange of goods and much more all across Eurasia. It's a network sometimes known as the silk trade, but in fact, there was never one single road connecting China with the rest of Asia Further west, and it wasn't just silk that was traded along the way. So to set the record straight. I'm joined by three experts who share their knowledge with us. Valerie Hanson is professor of history at Yale University in the United States, and she has a particular interest in how good's people and ideas moved about in the past. Susan Whitfield is a historian and curator of the Central Asian collections at the British Library here in London and tomorrow, Chin is professor of comparative literature at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island in the United States. Her work focuses on ancient China. Welcome to all of you on dimension that silk rage isn't a very accurate term. In fact, it was invented by 1/19 century German geographer. So it's not even a very ancient term. So very briefly. I wonder what the three of you think would be the best description of this trade network and why, Valerie. So I have two candidates. One is thie Ammonium chloride Road on the other is Central Asian overland trade. And I think when I tell you those you'll see why the silk Road continues to be in use. Thank you will hear more about the reasons for those later in the programme tomorrow. What about you? Well, I would go with Valerie's second version of the Central Asian trade routes and my second option would be step child of globalization. To emphasize the fact that this notion off a single Afro Eurasian trade network is a modern global tail and not necessary, reflective of how people experienced it at that time. What aboutyou season. I would stick with Silk Road. I think it's a word that's resonates that is well known now and why I reject something so well known. Of course, we need to add provisos that we understand. It's not just so can not one route on maritime routes as well as Landry. Oops. Okay, well, I think onion opt for silk routes. It still has an air of beauty and luxury about it. But it pays tribute to the fact is you said season that the merchandise moved around by many different routes..

BBC President Vladimir Putin murder China president Valerie Hanson British Library Supreme Court London Sara Jeremy New York Texas Jerry Smith Moscow Ahmad Qantas United States Beijing Daniel Andrews Washington
The Thinking Behind the Book 'Home Coming'

VINTAGE Podcast

09:53 min | 1 year ago

The Thinking Behind the Book 'Home Coming'

"So homecoming is such an incredible book? And it's already having an incredible impact. I really enjoyed hearing all the different things and actually I listened to the audio book. I know that a lot of our listeners. Love audiobooks listening forecast. Say The audiobook. Because they're really interesting experience to hear the voices as well Tennyson it will a- and about your the thinking behind the book when when I can concept came into your head and what it was like an his first stages of planning a few years ago I wrote a memoir about growing gluten with my Jamaican parents called bad guy at the wheel. By guys. My father's nickname his Jamaican can. He had baggy is an all of his friends equally. Funny Nicknames that define them and they adhere to whether they liked the name or not so there was one man called old shine. Who was bowled? Like me anxious was very anxious. Tidy boosters very fussy but his footwear clock had one arm longer than the other. My favorite was manacled somewhere. And when somewhere came to this country from Jamaica in one thousand nine hundred system light summer suits tropical suits the matter. The weather weather come halo storm and when I thought about writing this book ask my mom. Whatever became of somewhere and she said well he caught a cold and died within a few months and I was shocked by that straightway which she spoke to sit in very matter of fact way had an edge to it but also it was quite a funny and I remember that when asked let's grapple loosened in the sixties all? The people were really really funny. There were like in my mind. CAST members of guys and dolls the Damon Runyon and they were all of my figures. We had no television until nineteen seventy two but they were television and what. I finished that Book Burger at the wheel about six seven years ago now I was wanted to continue it and away. The beginning of homecoming was a continuation of that story story but equally there were books. I read as a young man about Caribbean people in this country especially a book by Sam Cell Phone. Call the Lonely Londoners which is a book about a man called Moses who is kind of meet and greeter. So Kirby America's Dan to Waterloo station or Paddington and greets this carbon pioneers come off the boat train and equally. They have Wonderful characters wonderful names as a character. Awesome Galahad is rather light my car somewhere and when I finished up I wanted to myself. Well what would what would become of those people from the nineteen fifties and sixties if they were still alive today and what were their stories. What was the story of their great pioneer migration to prison? And although there have been books about that I don't think anyone's really interrogated the individual stories. And what you get with this book which is kind of oral history is a kind of an accumulation of similar stories and by that accumulation. You realize there was a bigger truth because sometimes when you hear stories you think that's just a one off when you hear again again again and you realize the experiences and I wanted to to have that kind of course onus in this kind of chorus line because right the way through But also the kind of gives you some of the shape and the contours of their lives from six to the present day and the people that you you chase to feed the book is e. Say An instruction that you you kind of chose intention eaten interview more women than men. 'cause you know those stories are represented. And and also more Chinese these people than Jamaican tell us parents Jamaican and three quarters of the migrants came from the Caribbean were Jamaican. But I right now. The Jamaicans take up too much room in the culture. The make too much noise have to credit opinion on themselves and they're over represented in our culture in terms of books books films music and sometimes they're kind of eclipsed some of the other islanders so I was very keen to address that so if that into more from Guyana kits and I was interested to find out why people ended up in certain parts of the country. So if you're from Saint Kitts you end up open leads. If you're from Saint Vincent in Hiwickum if it from Trinidad you end up in North Hampton and I think we want to these areas because they they were pay people were or their friends and associates broke. Equally is very keen to complicate the story because many of us will see those photographs photographs of the wind rush generation. The wind rush people coming off that ship. Ninety forty eight and the kind of I chronic now these men in Fidora's and zoot suits behind. You ever see any women in this girls but on that ship is often said from the beginning of that story. That now was that the five hundred Jamaican men. That's not true. There are other islands on that ship and the two hundred women on the ship including a woman called Mona. Baptiste's this wonderful jazz singer so I wanted to tell this story but also I wanted to use them to complicate the stories because the women were actually much more generous with their antidotes. Does that much more prepared to interrogate the interior lives and live longer but also in all honesty but I went to interview them. They're prepared to feed me saying that being you played this game I think three hours and the men wouldn't think to feed me and I'll be the on the floor gasping for water a little bit of bread but women would feed me straight away and actually what was interesting to me. I thought began to re revisit. Some of the stories. We're kind of finishing but some of the stores were not familiar. But I heard this story again and again from these elderly people who are now in the eighty s and ninety s had remind. I was on the antiques roadshow. And that what I was hearing were these jewels or this precious antiques. That not been added it for many many years. They've been stored away in cupboards in people's minds and never had a pap form and as an dustin down and reveal them to the reading public because to me they are wonderful rich funny cide. Moving polemical sometimes Philosophical stories that. Give a real sense of the panoply of of of of carbon life in this country. Because I think sometimes sometimes we have very reduced idea about the carribean presence in all honesty. If you look in terms of the archive in film and Television News Pretty Negative and right from the word go. It was pretty negative. People talk about the hostile environment. That Theresa May introduced in two thousand twelve but in my research it was not a new venture. She was very from the very beginning. And I. It's what I was interviewing a lot of these people who are in their eighties nineties to some of the archive of this month. Lockup in the British library the BBC See San Marcos in the BBC people around Archives let the deejay Don Letts had done lots of news twenty years ago. He's archive you've but also I would to my hometown is Brighton. Went to Sussex University where the Mass Observation Archive is held old and in nineteen thirty nine mass version which is so socialist research tool wanting to discover how people live. That was the whole idea of massive station Tau to working people live. What do they do with their money? How they use this time they still go to church too? They gamble. How do they make love but not at thirty? Nine maps vision decided to do a survey about black people. What did people in this country? Think about so-called Negroes in nineteen thirty nine and it wasn't very flattering it was pretty obnoxious really And I wanted to give a sense of what this carbon people who come into because in their minds I say this is true was everybody I spoke. They were a British. I'd even my mom for the book my Mom's from Jamaica and when she was growing up making the nineteen forties she knew how to fold the union flag flag. She could site keats. Shelley Wordsworth automatic pope's by Roach. She knew them all didn't need any book to repeat this poems and she told me that when she went to the cinema the reality cinema and Kingston in one thousand nine hundred dollars at the beginning of the screening of a film people. Stand up to sing the British national anthem and at the end of the screening people. Stand up to sting the British national anthem and I interviewed amount from Guyana. Who told me that when he came to this country went to the cinema and at the end of the film he stood up and such and he was amazing Nubia standing? He was really perplexed by that. So the sense of why they felt Brigitta. So what idea of Britain coming to see if they'd had it had access to these archives from from muscles version. They might have been a bit perturbed but what was interesting also. Is that the British. Sometimes they produce these booklets which they sent out to the Caribbean to give people an idea about what to expect. So there's one booklet produced by the BBC called going to Britain question. Mark as a small pamphlet is western some idea about Codes behavior so if I was to say to nineteen forties forties as an English person and you How do you do? What did you think MSA

BBC Caribbean Guyana Jamaica Britain Damon Runyon Tennyson Sussex University Theresa May Sam Cell Moses Saint Kitts Brighton Brigitta Fidora Kirby America Baptiste Waterloo Trinidad Mark
"british library" Discussed on Escape the Rat Race Radio

Escape the Rat Race Radio

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"british library" Discussed on Escape the Rat Race Radio

"To scales business that they are provided as blended learning with the practical training that will go to later and also online first aid training, so that we can sell internationally and that's been written by myself, and with, with the first aid experts and it to Naples, me scale, and I ate pets dot net, which is a brand new market. It's mainstream in the US, so since John on the Red Cross of a first aid to pets as born everyday offerings. It's a brand new mock in the UK. We haven't quite enough competitors to make it completely viable, but we have. The times newspaper coming to join us on Monday to come in bright above us, and we get quite a little, too publicity, because it's new and it's directly related to the state the humans because it's very, very similar and the same principles apply. So we've worked with vets to create those courses, and I have written books that accompany, the pet side and the human side. Very good. And if the business for for a number of years now, when was it that you set up two thousand seven so a low time we're well, established and would you mind sharing with our listeners what it was that you were doing before you started your own business? Absolutely. So I was unearth. So my background is nursing. I trained Thomas his eons ago, and I've worked all over the place in from burnt units to pediatrics to once with prison. And really joint my nursing, and then went into hospital management is a clinical manager, so I would Hammersmith insuring cross for ten years, and then children does up your career little bit. We do. Love them, though. So I became a niece ole teacher, so I gained a teaching qualification that I was able to use as well. And then I was able to combine all those things together and start up a first aid training business, which was something that always being passionate about doing so the k- there is you actually started. Right. You actually took is something so many, many escape race listeners. They are still currently employed. And on that commute everyday back and forth to work, and, you know, perhaps not enjoying the work as much as they could do thinking is, perhaps, greater things out there for them in life. So how'd you come about sort of making that decision? See new, you had a family on the way and things needed to perhaps change you needed bit more time. I'm presuming I'm sure it's very demanding job. But how did you just kind of figure out in your head, how you were going to transition from a monthly paycheck to actually generating an income from a business and you know what point did you say? Okay. Well, it's, it's the right time to make. The switch. I don't think there's ever a right time. So I think you just have to do it. It's just like you'll never get it perfect. So if you forever striving for perfection, then you will never do it. I think we'll always be out as I remember my cousin saying to me, hope you know, will anyone ever pay twenty-five pants for course site. Well, yes. And a lot more as well because we run very quality courses, and it will be viable business, and, and it will grow so have confidence in faith in yourself, you're obviously speak to others as sounding boards, 'cause ever useful and listen to the misery, -ality check. But if you feel confident that it is right for you. Then do it, and it will be hard work. So only starts up thing if you are passionate about it. I I'm a mental I will businesses through the. British library, and one of my first men tease wills who she called herself a serial entrepreneur, but actually, they hadn't screened properly, and she had lots of ideas that she never got any of them off the ground..

Naples US UK British library John Thomas The times ten years
"british library" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

04:32 min | 2 years ago

"british library" Discussed on Science Friction

"This is an image. That is in a encyclopedia. That was written around thirteen sixty five by a clerk in London named James Palmer, and it's heavily illustrated. And this one image is of a bunch of clerics. So people in the church perhaps monks being instructed by their Bishop. The men are all covered in spots. The text around the image talks about the fact that this is a Bishop giving instruction to clerics as to what they're supposed to do or what rights and benefits they have if they fall ill while they're in their position. And should they be thrown out of the church? Exactly. And whether if they're too sick to work are they allowed to get the income that they would normally get or do they need to hire somebody to take their place. Okay. Sounds pretty reasonable doesn't it a very likely fourteenth century scenario? But none of that context was being distributed with the image as it sprayed across the internet. And when historian sort being described as a group of plague infected monks with a priest. I smelled a rat. Not a plague infected flea on a red just a read it didn't quite seem right because people with the plague first of all don't have those kind of spots that we're aware of and also probably wouldn't be standing up because once you have the plug you're quite ill. And you'd probably be lying down and dying. There were whole lot of things that seem to be wrong once historians like sill started digging. Yes, exactly, it's so they're certainly not dressed like monks, and the priest doesn't look like what a priest would have been wearing either. So we have clothing issues, you have disease pick Shen issues that none of it. Quite lined up and infect spotted Skien tended to mean, something else in medieval, iconography it. Did it meant leprosy? So it wasn't the bony play at all. And if you read the original manuscript, it was very clearly that the clerics head literacy not the plague so Laurie and her medieval history colleagues went hunting. Dan, the source of the area, and it lived them to no less than the esteemed British library, where the original was held. And then it was given to somebody to create a caption for it on the online version, and that person took the image and called it the plague and what happened next because what this image effectively sprayed like the big. And then it got picked up by Wikipedia in English and every other language that has wicked pedia black death pages. And then what happens is people go online and they're looking for images, and they pick up this image either from the British library or from Wikipedia that says. Here's an image of the black death. And there we go. This now is an image of the plague and it's from the British library. So you have to believe it. And that's part of the problem is that the people who are doing the captioning for these online sites might not have any direct knowledge of what the image is actually about. And now at least three commercial stock photo, libraries, sell it as a definitive historical representation of the plague. So science information that is misuse you. Probably come across that a lot on your own shows. It's somebody will do a scientific study, and it will be misinterpreted and used to promote something else entirely. It's the same with historical textual information that if you're misreading it you're misrepresenting what people at the time we're talking about. But he's really an issue. This is a fourteenth century need. So what if it's Lipsey not plague? So what if the main man was a Bishop not appraised? So what if the clerics went monks? You know? What what's the problem here for historians? The problem is that people are misrepresenting the past when I teach history of disease courses, I try and tell the students that you wouldn't take an image of somebody with chicken pox to explain to somebody what the flu is like there is some speculation that the plague in the fourteenth century, maybe even during the fifteenth century might have looked more like this spotted disease,.

plague British library London James Palmer flu Skien sill Shen Dan Wikipedia Laurie
"british library" Discussed on Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"british library" Discussed on Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

"In this case, it was Theresa May take a kneecapping over a check his proposals, the music at Salzburg, yesterday Thursday, they was deliberately the way they do. The west is the British library, which is almost exactly where we recorded two sets of emergency for cuts in rather. Bickers thing Theresa May's about to make dining street announcement, obsolete. This is she's gonna make a Downing Street, and now you've got to get on a train. Yes. And this is why we do it now. The whole thing is prone for disasters achieving a moment that Theresa is not going to stand up, say, screw the lot of you. Yeah, I what happened yesterday in Salzburg, that is, we'll have Cohen. And so nothing changed in terms of objective reality. They've always been quickly. Comedy, get anywhere with check on a tone. Checkers just takes the goods part, the single market. And actually you can have that bit. There isn't dreams may propose. It's not because she likes it basically because it's the only way you can join up around the back of the backstop proposal fraud and actually make sure the some kind of system that keeps you together. Whoa, satisfying that aspect of it. It's never been ago. We've always known that everyone from every perspective on this thing knows to go. We presume that even in Downing Street, I know it's not a go. Well, it's, they've always been very clear someone a web, but they usually bit more conciliatory bit more positive because they're trying to shore up support yesterday. Something changed that nine which became much of this people out there, saying washing of changes today, the same along the lines of what they did before looking at it in context, it was a much more bruising counter than she was expecting that they had led her to believe she would get. We're not entirely sure why it seems that she really caught Bobby misjudge the speech he made to them ten minute speech made at the end of the dinner on the first night with it's four hours all over immigration. She comes in this very boring speech, basically reading on the Oscar, she'd written for German newspaper. Again, there have been a new each them trying to sort of divide European need is a strategy. She must know, isn't gonna work by this stage in the name of God, but nevertheless, you keep on doing it. I don't know basis then came out and they going just to. Though. So I've told to say, we're not going to do the fudge game with you anymore. And the fudge game was basically you have to give us on and you're gonna give us like stock when it comes to the futures or relationship than normal legal part of the agreement. We can fudge that into oblivion. Just go, well, look, it's going to be a wonderful future of the two of us economically. You don't really say with your lining and that allowed the battery take place. Once the deal had been secured in Brexit happened. The fact that they went prepared to do that. He's not gonna do that. Don't with that means things become much more specific now and specificity is the opposite of what she needs, what she needs. Everything's very fuzzy inveigh because she company parts specific proposal for the future relationship in the Commons. She condu- Brexit. She colonies of Brexit. She can't deal. She needed to be fuzzy in order to get it passed the Commons and yesterday was the moment that they seem to be saying, no one..

Theresa May Salzburg Brexit Commons condu- Brexit Oscar fraud Bobby Cohen four hours ten minute
"british library" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"british library" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"More My name is Polly Russell and I work as a curator at the British library for longtime I've been very interested in ideas about food are narrative and identity so food and stories is what I'm interested in what is the, link between feed, the story and the notion that feed has to have a story it will be really hard to disassociate the idea of food. And stories because food is so central to. Who we are as social beings is so found with how, we are placed. In, time how we place geographically you who we? Are how? We feel and so stories as in what we understand about food where it's come from are integral. To our experience of food and eating they sort of mediate the food you're, eating they tell you whether it's going to be safe to eat and. That's safe literally has this thing come from a safe source can I Put it in my mouth and swallow it but also kind. Of metaphorically do I understand where come from is it risque my. Prepared to take that risk and when you have. A story associated with food it mediates some things arty when you see the rise of industrialized branded. Foods grounded industrialized food is not closely connected to the consumer in terms of production as a distance between what you eat and where is being produced and the stories of branding of food help to mediate not distance they tell you that, the food has, been produced in this massive factory hundred thousand miles away on knowable safe familiar and that's very important stories are very powerful when. It comes to making us understand like particular..

Polly Russell Foods
"british library" Discussed on Business Daily

Business Daily

04:44 min | 3 years ago

"british library" Discussed on Business Daily

"Thirty percent of total retail sales. So it certainly market with chasing something that shortage is doing right down to the street up. Having graffiti arrived is like making the stations of the cross. It's paying your due to the fact that this area's got a bit of a background if that isn't. Any graffiti on your. You can telephone them for a -mergency gravity. The idea of authenticity is also deeply ingrained in the food industry from fruit smoothies to hold chickens. The packaging falls aver itself to tell us where it's from or Hebrew it, and why we should care food and short is rest. Storytelling comes into its own. I traveled into the bowels of the British library to find out more. My name is Polly Russell, and I work as a curator at the British library for longtime. I've been very interested in ideas about food and narrative and identity. So food and stories is what I'm interested in. What is the link between fade the story and the notion that feigned has to have a story. It will be really hot disassociate the idea of food and stories because food is so central to who we are as social beings. It's so with how we are placed in time how we placed geographically who we are, how we feel, and so stories as in what we understand about food where it's come from integral to our experience of food and eating, they sort of mediate the food you're eating. They tell you whether it's going to be safe to eat, and that's safe. Literally, has this thing come from a safe source? Can I. Put it in my mouth and swallow it, but also metaphorically, do I understand words come from? Is it risque my prepared to take that risk? And when you have a story associated with food, it mediate some of things Artie. When you see the rise of industrialized, branded fades in branded industrialized, food is not closely connected to the consumer in terms of production. There's a distance between what you eat and where it's being produced and the stories of branding of food help to mediate not distance. They tell you that the food has been produced in this massive factory, one hundred thousand miles away on knowable safe familiar. And that's very important stories are very powerful when it comes to making us understand and like particular foods and food traditions, the idea of using feed to communicate what's important to us, a thoughts, feelings, motivations and desires is the very essence of. A rather exclusive restaurant Michelin starred chef. Tom sellers opened his restaurant story in two thousand thirteen. Surprisingly small metal and wooden structure it clings to the edge of occur in the fashionable Lyndon bridge enclave of east London. Since I've Ning attracted a coat following food as desperate to dive into the tales of the next -pected that permeate the menu king to get on with the day's work. Tom sat down with me one morning before service to explain his novel approach to find dining. I came up with the idea for the restaurant, ten eleven years ago. I was cooking at pussai at the time which is a restaurant in America Watchfulness on this keller. Keller. New costume, modest, three hundred twenty five dollars. I had this kind of brainchild idea about having a narrative that runs alongside food. I think anyone that can connect to the story instantly feels more engaged with what they're doing. The stories come from all different kinds of influences. I some maybe a childhood story or something. This infants, my life personally, maybe about supply reformer grow from the story that we have with them in the connection we have with them. But I think what's stories leap back to why we created the food that we created in front of his is one of your most well-named dishes. It doesn't actually look like food to you've got candle holder with a candle in it. There's no suggestion whatsoever that this is edible, say, what is it? It's a Sunday candle made from beef tipping. We take the family slightly salting, cure it with it, and then we shaping two candles. And then we lie to the table, your normal candle in it melts and then you bread inside what would be seem to be the wax, but obviously. Be fat, and the story behind that was my father used to eat beef dripping every Sunday. I was inspired by going back in time. And I, I think if you look back, you know, a tallow candle was a kind of it was made of beef..

keller Tom sellers Polly Russell Michelin Lyndon bridge Artie London America three hundred twenty five doll ten eleven years Thirty percent
"british library" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

02:56 min | 3 years ago

"british library" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"The arrival of the boat the empire wind rush new london on board was several hundred migrants from the carribean hoping to start new lives on monday the government said there would be an annual wind rush day marking that date from nine hundred forty eight but it follows a political row in april about the residents writes in brisbane of that generation it's all given extra significance to an exhibition about the wind rush generation at the british library in london arts correspondent vincent dowd went to see it this exhibition tries to get beyond the arrival of the wind rush near london on the twenty first of june nine hundred and forty eight it doesn't take nor the newsreel in the calypso's mike the british library is also interested in what came next call in prescott of the institute of race relations acted as adviser who are these carbon people that were coming out of a history of deep engagement with britain that went back as far as slavery into the colonial period though product populations trying to change the society from being dominated to being free vert with the context they came from nine hundred forty eight or a new british nationality act which at the time gave commonwealth citizens new rights in the uk st looked rally divine in her crimson robe with a mind that you come at enviro dictate night and need sat beside her admiral of the fleet the exhibition shows a war weary britain in need of new arrivals but ill prepared and ill informed curator elizabeth cooper interestingly a lot of people who migrated here from the caribbean in the middle of the twentieth century talk about their surprise and sometimes in their disappointment that having gone through colonial british schooling they knew so much about britain when they arrived and met so many people who knew very little about where they were coming from the exhibition has become much more than an exercise inist alger this spring the uk government found itself in political mess over the status of the wind rush generation of migrants to the uk difficult questions that we're trying to ask seem pertinent and more more relevant than ever before and challenging the notion of simply having a commemoration rather than really thinking through critically and confronting very difficult historical forces was really important curator wind rush songs in strange land is at british library in london until toba and that's all from us now but that will be updated version of the global news podcast later if you want to come on this podcast all the topics covered in it you can send email addresses global podcast at bbc dot co dot uk i'm nick miles until next time goodbye

london brisbane british library vincent dowd prescott britain elizabeth cooper caribbean uk nick miles institute of race
"british library" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:55 min | 3 years ago

"british library" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"After a while it wasn't enough to research what we were eating or the jews of egypt where eating because i was wondering how they fitted in with the rest of the middle east i knew i could only deal with the middle east at that time or i only wanted to that's still a huge task to deal with the middle east it was and so it became a passion i mean when my children were at school or nursery i would go to the library and read up the history and so when i went to the british library i ask them for any books on our food everyone was thirteen century there was no contemporary book on arab food in the british library they usually have everything after years of research and begging for recipes a book of middle eastern food was published in nineteen sixty eight it reads a little like a memoir as much about the stories of the people in it and what they've lost as the food closure opens the book by explaining it's the fruit of the nostalgic lungs for and delighted savoring of a food that was the constant joy of life in a world so different from the western one i really tried to put all the recipes that i could possibly find it and it was as though they had to be recorded and but that's a risky approach for a cook that he wants all the recipes to be perfect well at the time my obsession was to record and actually in some cases they're not such a good food dish and sometimes i just say it's an acquired taste means you might not like it but why put in all these stories is that when i was collecting recipes a lot of people were telling me jokes and stories and i just felt maybe if people read all this they will feel the food might be interesting because in britain people didn't really want to eat anything that came from the middle east at that time it sounded disgusting to them the idea of the middle east because already they had been at war but also the countries had been their colonies and they despise them but also wendy english at the time traveled the english in egypt would never eat anything local the earn food and even i remember reading about those who went to discover the to.

egypt middle east britain wendy english thirteen century
Dame Muriel Spark on BBC Radio 4's Bookclub

BBC Radio 4's Bookclub

06:21 min | 3 years ago

Dame Muriel Spark on BBC Radio 4's Bookclub

Jean Brodie Muriel Spark Marcia Blaine School Maggie Smith Sandy Hitler BBC James Naughty Francis Writer British Library Joyce Emily Edinburgh Aylesford Ella Brody Franco Rita LEE
"british library" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"british library" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Well romesh inside the british library and it's weeks since we last met what fuping up to a novel since then it's been going very very story i thought i would have got much much further in in revising the know who tried to get the sentences just a little bit better and one of the things we are here for now is because i got to the point on pitch hundred twenty win this boycott room young boy twelve cutting the to the bridge has gone with his friend on the trip out of kalumbu out in the countryside in pena elite of house little touched house there's no electricity there's nothing but as he was packing his little bag picked the book from his father shelf it was the tennis bookie could find and beck night constantly because it's strangely quiet in this place was not a sound and he has tucked away his little book at the end of the britain he decides while he'll repentant beach have little flashlight sticks flashlight pitstops reading the book is called problems of life which is one of the reasons why he picked it he thought bowe this latvia time i might solve a few things off from myself what is the problems of life as luhn trotsky sees it well we have the book in front of sits by the russian revolution rayan marxists thing canal trotsky it's very slim and it is actually the book that he looks at because this particular but because published in ciller on as it was than in colombo fifty one a peterson lane in columbus sex properly not very far from where i once lived this is urging a written a ninety 24 but this addition is published in 1962 in my book nineteen 64 so he could very well have big this very copy how important is this book to the novel it has grown i saw this book by accident renault's researching the rise and fall of political parties his in sri lanka and i was looking at the left wing parties in i came across.

british library britain bowe luhn trotsky ciller colombo renault sri lanka beck latvia columbus
"british library" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"british library" Discussed on KQED Radio

"British library as part of the x ray audio project it's creator is steven coats and he's been speaking to the newson's reporter which at hamilton the huge amount of music had been banned for ideological reasons so western visit rakhamo jazz was but lots of russian means it was becoming forbidden music that was made by russian emigres people ipo truly shaneco he was living in the west singing gypsy tango's he didn't come back to the soviet union so he was seen as a traitor all his repetoire was have been in the who's hugely popular but also you had a situation where it was not possible to these singersongwriter patrons soviet union you have to be a member of the composer's union to records zero music yet remember the rights union to have you lyrics recorded it was a huge amount of russian folk music underground music which was forbidden because he was songs about the on the side of the us sa so how do people smuggling music can if you wealthy son and daughter of a diplomats of a high level or a patch nick you had access to west than music gramaphone records in a place that leningrad which was a porch sale is coming and going would smuggle gramaphone records by from the west and then of course we the bush urged americans were actively broadcasting into the soviet union we'd radio free europe voice of america liberty cetera and some ingenious person at some point at what time that it was possible to use used x ray film as a base to make your own records they'd monies to get hold of a recording machinery coating laid we would kulik these are the things that used by journalists radio journalists in the west to make recordings in the field onto a kind of vinyl disc type record they've got all the one of those they copied it and they used xray film as the base for making their own records see that the x rays unexposed than for some reason unexposed film recorded by evan exposed him but you can see cycles the it's a little bit hazy but it's nice and fifty six other thought so this is an icing 50s recording lay this is assessed used by the bbc ciller it's the equivalent of the machine recording the on that weighs about forty five kilos and is a gramophone in with us instead of a needle which is reading.

steven coats newson hamilton soviet union bush reporter rakhamo leningrad europe evan bbc forty five kilos
"british library" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"british library" Discussed on Little Atoms

"On andy miller and you will listening to little atoms a radio show that only dis and culture lecico her nicholas not survey sen who is a to begin revenge took it away you'll fashions rosy in the novel well in the novel nicholas notes which is an ambitious young man on the make who grows up in a grows up in a lower middle class is a shopkeeper son from church with crimea in the russian empire who's bitten by the bug of journalism once the glamour of he follows a rally glamorous war correspondent into the balkan wars ends up in paris men is as many rights have found as time before and since his stock in italy's serie korea with all its uncertainty and is trying to make money and gradually gets entangled with those r's secret police in paris in his efforts to his efforts to make a living and the real not surveys what do we actually now of him pretty much that it that is also true of the real notes of each i've when quite deep 102 up i met neelam ain't that be the world's khreisat authority currently on nicklaus notes of it well he's nor grand claim obscure but he bought i've i went to the british library and there are there will some declassified documents about him because he was up sums skulduggery talking to the compare the british india office who was trump's busy trying to get on the payroll as a double agent and there's an account of the person who interviewed him in simla.

andy miller italy serie korea paris british library trump simla nicholas nicklaus india
"british library" Discussed on The Food Chain

The Food Chain

01:59 min | 4 years ago

"british library" Discussed on The Food Chain

"The pasty's then rolling did o and would you from the insects extracted and bhutto vein a beacon to some fought plates over here eat it out and various chemicals added to it to make it a boot oil the idea caught the attention of a bigname us investor needs to remain on named for now we are so excited with this improvement because this will allow us to finish our pilot gear to see if this could be a workable business and also it's make us way more is your to act or get access to market so now they're setting up a factory in bali next year to see if they can make the idea economically viable one of the products they have made from the insect oil is module region before i left i tried it on a piece of bread it's creamy and delicious and you would have no idea that you're eating insects rebecca hentsch to that so what did on judges think polling russell was on the panel she's a food historian and a curator at the british library in london i think they've potentially got a problem to overcome which is that many people are turned off by the idea of eating insects will of course about two point one billion people on the planet do we insects but i think easing insects in oil form in that process form might allow them to get around vat squeamishness a lot of people have and potentially solve some pretty important problems i wien insects in that role phone so i've eaten crickets and meal worms fried and i have to get over squeamishness i've done that but actually easing in an oil form i think it would be sort of hidden it wouldn't that will not be a problem may i didn't intrinsically that was and thing worse about eating a meal one than eating a cow poly russell uh second shortlisted organization could also face the problem of consumers squeamishness.

us russell british library bhutto bali
"british library" Discussed on Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"british library" Discussed on Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

"General warmth tool just object without properly during a review so i'm a big found one has called them i think that what it manages to do is to take a very very tricky source and make it theatrical and cinematic in a way that utterly work so as we said before this the story is that essentially bill noise character who is this detective inspector john killed there is pro in is the full guy there is a series of grisly murders happening in the 1890s aim in in london and they can't solve them so they think what they'll do they'll get him in because he will take the full when the murders are unsolvable because he's somebody whose position has not been advance because of as daniel mice were saying rumors about his sexuality the phrase not not the marion kind he then very quickly figures out that there is a link between these murders and directive highway case but i wish to quincy wrote he as again is you mice were saying narrows it down to four possible suspects in the reading room of the british library which is comax george casing dan lino and john crawley john cribbing the playwright whose wife is now on trial for allegedly poisoning her husband and what the film manages to do is to take these various threads keep them all up in the air intertwined them by cyncially having the killers version of events raid imagined raid by various of the different characters suggesting that any single one of them may be the killer all may be implicit in the crimes or may be connected in these concerts incomplete disconnected.

quincy british library dan lino london marion john crawley
"british library" Discussed on WGIR-AM

WGIR-AM

02:51 min | 4 years ago

"british library" Discussed on WGIR-AM

"Kind of glossed over version of his wisdom is wisdom came from his knowledge of the control of spirits who accord the gene all the genes and this is where the legend of the thousand and one nights come from because king solomon summons spirits he summoned the general the genies and he designed a special bronze vessel and this his described in books of black magic which has supposedly been authored by king solomon which a cold grim loss and the most ancient of these grimwasde books his today you can go and see them they're in the socalled kings library which is a library inside the british library and all of these books on black magic roamed buying the crown isn't that the same library the once erected brazil the demon on its roof because yeah well then the century of possesssion position who isn't ancien babylonian demon supposedly an evil demon to ward off evil i mean that's the cover story for peruzzi diseases the demon this featured in the exorcist movie it's a real demon the exorcist film shows this statue dancer real statue there's many of these statues but the most famous one is in the louvre museum in paris and the queen gave planning commission for a very very large fibreglass statue is usually this evil iraqi demon to be erected in the royal mail on of one of the nashville olding's which he owns and that is on soap of the institute contemporary odds which is a building is a safe zone by the crown going you know yeah you can take from them you know what sir what he won't but essentially london and britain in general is sustained with satanic statues uh we have the shedevil statue in hyde park if people want should have a look on google limoges for that is called the shedevil it's in hyde park also have signed the world's most expensive upon block which is one hyde park corner there is a very strange bronze statue of a naked family with naked children running from the devil playing a flute and he's gordon erection um you know this this just so many of these satanic statues on so while defending telling symbol is a bit is being do we do we or do we not think or do we not a realize that.

king solomon louvre museum paris the queen olding hyde park brazil nashville london britain hyde park
"british library" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:49 min | 4 years ago

"british library" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Russian government towards this enormously important historic event on the one hand the president putin said that this was the biggest calamity that happens to russia on the other hand extremely lee significant part of putin's supporters are people who were brought up in the soviet union people who cherish their ideas and the practices that had existed before the collapse of the soviet union so it is a very complicated release on the one hand poignant sees himself as an ancestor of the huge russian empire and the same time he reinstated the soviet national anthem and therefore what is interesting black okay we are here in the british library which it come emirates the center of the russian revolution and then i talk about these events the my friends in the russia they just wall here we have nothing they say there's void the whole idea is being played down is being silenced and that's extremely interesting political phenomenon how thalji think the russian revolution what happened in nineteen seventeen has shaped the world we live in today it dictate the wealth it was a great experiment the experiment that didn't and happily but it also released a lot of questions questions of equality questions of the methods of fighting for rights and for better world which we haven't onset he had like a terrorism as a method of fighting all equal rights or refugee crisis we still do not the answer to this questions at the russian evolution is something to look at to learn from and to protect catch yet rogachev scab key rated the hype tragedy myths exhibition at the british library in london and the bbc's alexander com on the cultural legacy of the russian revolution now as we had writers in savior russia was seen as useful tools in the propaganda machine that supported the system and for those who complied they were awarded with better housing and high regard however since the breakup of the union the demands on writers his changed in the region this pakistan declared its independence in ninety ninety one but the soviet legacy continues that in many ways the late president.

putin soviet union british library russia london bbc alexander com russia president pakistan one hand
"british library" Discussed on Rick Steves Britain & Ireland Audio Tours

Rick Steves Britain & Ireland Audio Tours

03:23 min | 6 years ago

"british library" Discussed on Rick Steves Britain & Ireland Audio Tours

"Bach. Beethoven brahms bay. the beatles. future generations will have to judge whether the musical cortez. The beatles ranks musically with artists such as handel and chopin but no one can deny their historical significance. Look for photos of john lennon. Paul mccartney george harrison and ringo starr before and after their fame the rock band burst onto the scene. In the early nineteen sixties unheard of popularity with long hair and loud music they brought counterculture and revolutionary ideas to the middle class affecting the values of an entire generation during the globe. They served as a link between young people everywhere. Among the displays. You'll find the manuscripts of song lyrics written by lennon and mccartney the to guiding lights of the group. I wanna hold. Your hand was the song that launched them into stardom a hard day's night and help we're titled songs of two films capturing the excitement and chaos of their hectic touring schedule. Some call a ticket to ride the first heavy metal song. Yesterday by paul was recorded with guitar and voice backed by a string quartet. A touch of sophistication from producer. George martin also read the handwritten poem by young john lennon labeled untitled verse. Rambling depressed cynical but humorous. Is that a self portrait down at the bottom. The beatles memorabilia hangs alongside manuscripts by mozart. Beethoven schubert and others kind of an anti-climax after the fab four i know off and on display a work by german-born composer who found a home right here in london. Find george frederic handel's famous or a you the messiah. It was written in a flash of inspiration three.

George martin john lennon london Beethoven lennon Bach handel chopin paul mccartney Yesterday early nineteen sixties george frederic handel Beethoven schubert two films Paul mccartney george harrison german three first heavy metal song four