17 Burst results for "British Expeditionary Force"

"british expeditionary force" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

03:05 min | 1 year ago

"british expeditionary force" Discussed on WGN Radio

"You know whenever the talk turns to the last war the one it's between the correspondence of the overseas Press Club on Fleet Street it becomes a hop to a fight between the Americans and the English myself I am a shy man I keep out of it no to myself the shot of Benedictine brandy but privately I have my own they don't take it for what it's worth but I'd nominate old Sam gates I don't understand because I had occasion to cover the story by the time it was during the days of the blitzkrieg whenever lands Norway and Belgium and already fallen before the German Panzer divisions and the British expeditionary force was doing its very best to help out in France exam gates was on Mr dodges bombing how was your mowing turnips waiting for his knees agian will arrive twice daily at dawn and at the time what is possible who Worrell Aggie how let alone cook is there any news you are asking me the same question yesterday he died yes on the day before that another day in the news today news what do you want to go what news should there be no I'm asking yeah my food here ya go we can't open a new cheese for Europe have a taste of it right now these companies follow got out last night at least a Dodge want you to kill another pay dimana that I've got here is bloodied uses of the war these very brains ours and their did you know that Mrs Hardwick nephew Larry is joined up he's lying as Big Five well I knew he'd never amount to much this is Todd which says that geek girl that Carlos made milk I can't even get cross selling good morning thank the girl at the eyrie planes well Sam gates went back to his turnips and muttering to himself about this full world and its inhabitants but it wasn't about a letter that his thoughts were interrupted by another plane overhead he waited for it to go away but it didn't nobody heard made it look up startled the plane was coming down with a **** swastika clearly marked on inside and it was coming down on his and.

overseas Press Club British expeditionary force Mr dodges Worrell Aggie Europe Larry Todd Carlos Norway Belgium France Mrs Hardwick Sam gates
"british expeditionary force" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"british expeditionary force" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"With the sixteen highest one day scores in the show's history in all professional gambler holes, our one nearly two and a half million dollars that piper CBS news. AM seven sixties micro-climate forecast, partial clearing this afternoon. Otherwise mostly cloudy, highs in the upper sixty s along the coast, mid seventies inland, partly cloudy tomorrow and warmer right now. It's cloudy and seventy five in santee. Well, the injury list is growing for the Golden State Warriors, coach Steve Kerr announced today that Kevin Durant is out of tomorrow night's game. Three Klay Thompson is questionable and kevon looney is done for the finals with a chest injury. There's more Brett winnable. Coming up, AM seven sixty talk and breaking news Wednesday morning Armstrong and Getty show, tech giant's under the scrutiny of congress what's going to happen and why now back to Brent winnable on AM seven sixty talk and breaking news. That's amazing about this this week in terms of world history. There's a couple of very interesting events that are all kind of confluence at the same time. The first thing is this happens to be to the math really quickly here, this, this happens to be the seventy nine. Anniversary of the rescue, at Dunkirk remember that big famous movie that was made last summer two summers ago Dunkirk. And, you know, the story, well the, the, the British expeditionary force and, and their allies are backed up against Dunkirk and the greatest naval rescue in the history of white humanity takes place, as eight hundred ships boats, pleasure craft life boats. You name, it came across that channel to rescue these, these men trapped on the on the beach, and you at eight hundred of those vessels, come across and evacuate three hundred and eighty three thousand people like that, that is a massive number. Right. So that's, that's your first touch point in history. Big time history, this week, the second one obviously coming up d day on Thursday. That is. Also this week. It's the anniversary simultaneously to the landing of the liberation of Rome of the invasion of Italy. And the liberation of Rome from, from the fascist forces, you have at the same time in nineteen forty five so not seventy five years, but seventy four years ago you have the decision by the great powers in World War Two to partition and divide, Germany, in.

Dunkirk Rome Klay Thompson Golden State Warriors santee CBS Steve Kerr Kevin Durant kevon looney British expeditionary force Brett Getty Italy Armstrong Germany Brent congress seventy five years
"british expeditionary force" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

08:34 min | 2 years ago

"british expeditionary force" Discussed on KGO 810

"It's a great pleasure to speak with Andrew Roberts, the author of Churchill walking with death. This is a story of one man Winston Churchill who was a force to be reckoned with in the second war from the American point of view, but he was forced to be reckoned with throughout the first half of the twentieth century in Europe through parliament and through his part taking part in governments cereal government sometimes in different parties for cereal governments. However when America I noticed as Winston Churchill is when he's called to be premier in may of nineteen forty we all know, the story, the heroic story of Churchill rallying the country to send the little boats the fleet across to rescue the British expeditionary force that's been cut off by Hitler's attack. And it's on the beaches at Dunkirk Andrew this is where America. I notice is Churchill because of these events, but the the tumult of that may is breathtaking. No one believes that he can do this. They all believe he will fall immediately. They doubt him. And here's the hard question. I have for you right away. With a ready to surrender is he the only one of cabinet who believes they could win would Halifax have negotiated a armistice with Hitler. Yes. This was very much faxes policy at the time. The the troops had no yet been released. They were beginning to be brought back from Dunkirk there were three hundred twenty five thousand troops that eventually did get back, including eighty also thousand French and Belgian troops so but at the time they that the whole of the British expeditionary force might well just be scooped up and captured inputs in German prisoner of war camps say the foreign secretary the best thing to do. Louis Halifax would be to open peace negotiations with Hitler, Mussolini and church who was adamantly opposed to this. And in a series of next five days, as of course, more and more troops were coming back successfully being back across the channel that we lost forty thousand all the equipment and all the guns all the tanks, all the heavy artillery. The troops came back literally with their rifles and dannettes and nothing else. So so the during those key days, the discussion was whether or not we should try and make some kind of peace with Hitler and Churchill held out against it. And he did he wasn't the only one in the cabinet. He did bring the other key figures, the two labor members and also Neville Chamberlain. The former prime minister round his way of the cabinet. No, it was Kevin tactically and author Greenwood easy to admire Bevan. I am place up. There are problems with him. He's anti semitic which went when he was foreign secretary with very difficult after the war. He did everything he could to try to stymie the state of Israel. Oh, let's mention the Churchill was out of step by being followed a huge now to step Churchill light Jews. He went on holiday juice, his father and ensure that he grew up with Jews he represented Jews in his first constituency, and he had support he supported the Balfour declaration, of course, cooling for the creation of a homeland for the Gs in Palestine, and so and a lot of the people of his age and class and background. We're anti semitic and so- Churchill clashed the whole time because of his his attempts and desires to promote the interests of the Jewish. You have a surprising footnote where one man observes it. Winston likes the Jews too much. Yes. It's at least two fond of the mind. Yes. That's right. That was saved by. One of his supporters in in may nineteen forty the the the one thing that he didn't like about Winston Churchill was that Chechen like Jews questioning how did we get to may have nineteen forty Churchill having all these members of cabinet along with members of parliament along with the British public thinking that the way forward is to surrender or negotiated an armistice and that requires us to dip into the years when he was in the wilderness, he becomes a member of government in the nineteen twenty. She becomes chancellor dick sector by his like his father in the late nineteen twenties into the crash into the catastrophe of the stock market crash. And he's thrown out of government. He falls away, and he leaves cabinet. Nobody wants to deal with him will they they lost the general election, and then he resigned from the shadow cabinet. Of course, you know, we're we've got the raw we responsible for India. And so you must never never take. Away the Indian aspects of British politics. Empire. Yes. And the crown of the empire the key to the empire. Once you lose India. The rest of the empire doesn't really make much sense is understanding of the empire is everything you say that he made the empire. His secular religion even during the period of the wilderness all during nineteen thirties. What does that mean? Well, he wasn't a Christian in any normal sense. He in the five point two million words that he spoke in the six point one million words that he wrote he didn't mention the where Jesus Christ at any stage. But he did believe in an almighty, although it seems very much that the primary duty of the almighty was to take care of Winston chat show. The other thing he believed in was the British empire. The idea that the people of Britain who had created this empire, which at the time stretch around a fifth of the world's land surface were had a duty to make the lives of the natives. The British empire better. And and to protect them from attacks from any other empire. And so he felt very much that what he was doing was the the will of the almighty almost so. An understanding of the empire was everything to him. And therefore India represented the part of the empire that he could not lose or everything would tumble apart. And of course, he had personally fools as you mentioned earlier in your instruction in the North West Frontier, he fought against the three D And Pathein and Talib tribesmen. And he fought the dervishes in the Saddam. And of course, he say food in South Africa. So he had actually been on the frontiers of the empire and. Shed a bit of blood for them during the nineteen thirties. He is adamant at first hesitant. But once nineteen thirty six comes and Hitler moves against the Rhineland. He's adamant there's something wrong in Germany earlier than that that really nineteen thirty three. And he has Hitler takes when Hitler became January thirty three when he became chancellor in January. Exactly. But also he'd been to Germany in nineteen thirty two he read he was one of the first people to in Britain to read Mein Kampf. And so he explicitly to hit leaves the first person to spot for the danger that he was much earlier than any of the other British politicians of the era, partly of course, as we mentioned earlier about his Phyliss embolism because it gave him an early warning system because he could see the Nazis and Hitler for what they were almost meets Hitler in nineteen. Thirty four and it doesn't happen. Am nine hundred eighty two thirty s I though it was before he became channels. Yes. He was on Churchill was writing a biography of his great ancestor who we mentioned earlier John Churchill first, you could move and he was going around the battlefields, and he was in Munich at the same time that Hitler was in Munich and the the press could tree puts ham. Stay. Asked whether or not church would like to meet Hitler said. Yes. And but it never happened because Hitler thought that church was has been and would never be heard over again by history book. Yes. Don't ask famous men or infamous men prediction Churchill walking with destiny when we come back..

Winston Churchill Hitler Churchill British expeditionary force India John Churchill Dunkirk Andrew secretary Germany chancellor Andrew Roberts Europe Dunkirk Neville Chamberlain Britain America Palestine Israel Halifax Munich
"british expeditionary force" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

08:34 min | 2 years ago

"british expeditionary force" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Show is a great pleasure to speak with Andrew Roberts. The author of Churchill walking with destiny. This is a story of one man Winston Churchill who was a force to be reckoned with and the second war from the American point of view, but he was supposed to be reckoned with throughout the first half of the twentieth century in Europe through parliament and through his part taking part in governments cereal government sometimes in different parties for cereal governments. However when America I noticed as Winston Churchill is when he's called the premier in may of nineteen forty we all know, the story, the heroic story of Churchill rallying the country to send the little boats the fleet across to rescue the British expeditionary force that's been cut off by Hitler's attack. And on the beaches at Dunkirk, Andrew this is where America first notice is Churchill because of these events, but the the two. Tumult of that may is breathtaking. No one believes that he can do this. They all believe he will fall immediately. They doubt him. And here's the hard question. I have for you right away. Were they ready to surrender? Is he the only one of cabinet who believes they could win would Halifax have negotiated an armistice with Hitler. Yes. This was very much faxes policy at the time. The the troops had not yet been released. They were beginning to be brought back from Dunkirk there were three hundred twenty five thousand troops that eventually did get back, including eighty also thousand French and Belgian troops so but at the time they thought the whole of the British expeditionary force might well just be scooped up and captured inputs in German prisoner of war camps say the foreign secretary thought that the best thing to do. This is how Lord Halifax would be to open peace negotiations with Hitler, Mussolini and church who was adamantly opposed to this. And in a series of. The next five days, as of course, more and more troops were coming back successfully being back across the channel that we lost forty thousand all the equipment and all the guns all the tanks. All the heavy artillery. I mean, the troops came back literally with their rifles and bayonets and nothing else. So so the during those key days, the discussion was whether or not we should try and make some kind of peace with Hitler and Churchill held out against it. And he did he wasn't the only one in the cabinet. He did bring the other key figures, the two labor members and also Neville Chamberlain. The former prime minister round his way of Bevan on the cabinet. Kevin tactically and author Greenwood easy to admire Bevan. Place up. There are problems with him. He's anti semitic. Which is when he was foreign secretary with very difficult after the war. He did everything he could to try to stymie the state of Israel. Oh, let's mention the church was out of step by being follow semester. Huge outstep church light Jews. He went on holiday with his father. Ensured that he grew up with Jews. He represented Jews in his first constituency, and he had support he supported the Balfour declaration, of course, calling for the creation of a homeland for the Jews in Palestine. And so and a lot of the people of his age and class and background warranty semitic, and so Churchill clashed the whole time because of his his attempts and desires to promote the interests of the Jewish. You have a surprising footnote one man observes that Winston likes the Jews too much. Yes. Too. Fond of the yes, that's right. That was said by. One of his supporters in in may nineteen forty the the the one thing that he didn't like about Winston Churchill was the Chechen like Jews, and how did we get to may have nineteen forty with Churchill having all these members of cabinet along with members of parliament along with the British public thinking that the way forward is to surrender or negotiated an armistice and that requires us to dip into the years when he was in the wilderness, he becomes a member of government the nineteen twenty. She becomes chancellor dick sector by his like, his father in the late nineteen twenties into the crash into the catastrophe of the stock market crash, and he's out of government. He falls away, and he leaves cabinet. Nobody wants to deal with him. Well, they they lost the general election, and then he resigned from the shadow cabinet. Of course, we've got the raw we're responsible for India. And so you must never use never take away. The Indian aspects of British politics because that wise the empire. Yes. And the crown of the empire the key to the empire. Once you lose India. The rest of the empire doesn't really make much sense is understanding of the empire is everything you say that he made the empire. His secular religion even during the period of the wilderness all during nineteen thirties. What does that mean? Well, he wasn't a Christian in any normal sense. He in the five point two million words that he spoke in the six point one billion words that he wrote he didn't mention the word Jesus Christ at any stage. But he did believe in an almighty, it seems very much that the primary duty of the almighty was to take care of Winston Churchill the other thing he believed in was the British empire. The idea that the people of Britain who had created this empire, which at the time stretch around a fifth of the world's land surface were had a duty to make. The lives of the natives the British empire better. And and to protect them from attacks from any other empire. And so he felt very much that what he was doing was the the. Will of the almighty almost so. An understanding of the empire was everything to him. And that therefore India represented the part of the empire that he could not lose or everything would tumble apart. And of course, he had personally forces you mentioned earlier in your instruction in the North West Frontier, he fought against the three D And Pathein and Talib tribesmen, and he falls at the dervishes in the Saddam. And of course, he does say food in South Africa. So he had actually been on the frontiers of the empire and. Shed a bit of blood for them during the nineteen thirties. He is adamant at first hesitant. But once nineteen thirty six comes and Hitler moves against the Rhineland. He's adamant there's something wrong in Germany earlier than that. I didn't really nine hundred sixty three and he Hitler takes when Hitler became January thirty three when he became chancellor in January. Exactly. But also he'd been to Germany in nineteen thirty two he read he was one of the first people to in Britain to read Mein Kampf. And so he spotted hit leaves the first person to spot for the danger that he was much earlier than any of the other British politicians of the era, partly of course, as we mentioned earlier about his file semitism because it gave him an early warning system because he could see the Nazis and Hitler for what they were almost meet Hitler. And I should. Thirty four and it doesn't happen. Nine hundred thirty two thirty two. Oh, it was before he became chance. He was on Churchill was writing a biography of his great ancestor who we mentioned earlier John Churchill first, and he was going around the battlefields, and he was in Munich at the same time that Hitler was in Munich. And the the press could tree put see stay asked. Whether or not church would like to meet said, yes. But it never happened. Because Hitler thought that church was a has been and would never be heard over again by history book. Don't ask famous men or infamous men prediction Churchill walking with destiny when we come back. The.

Winston Churchill Hitler British expeditionary force Churchill Dunkirk John Churchill India Halifax secretary Andrew Roberts chancellor Europe Neville Chamberlain Britain America Israel Munich Germany prime minister Bevan
"british expeditionary force" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

12:50 min | 2 years ago

"british expeditionary force" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"John Batchelor. This is John Batchelor show. The melodrama of the collapse of the Habsburg empire. Conrad is the general potty Orrick has the general Franz-Josef the eighty four year old man who rules by avoiding all problems. And yet the war is upon them. Jeffrey warez here, the a mad catastrophe as the book the outbreak of World War One and the collapse of the Habsburg empire. There are plans general staff plans they've had maneuvers for years where they've planned what will happen when war breaks out Jeffrey, there are two enemies that they must concern themselves with in Vienna. One is the Russians the great Russian empire from the north. The other is Serbia, but Serbia is a minor frat to Vienna. Marching on Serbia is a waste of time and money, you emphasize that when the Germans made common cause when Berlin made. Common cause with Vienna. They always believed that the Austrians would go to war with Russia that they would help the Germans hold Russia in the east while Germany destroyed France and the British expeditionary force in the west before they came back and finished it. But that the Austrians didn't tell Germany about the Serbian feud is that correct? Well, yeah. I mean, the book talks a great deal about this in the sense that. The younger helmets. When mocha the younger, the the German general staff chief and Conrad the Austrian general statue have had intermittent staff talks in the years before World War One they'd had a meeting eight in one thousand nine at a meeting in nineteen twelve where they talked about war plans. But the war plans were always very vaguely elaborated by both men for a couple of reasons. First the Germans, never trusted Austro-Hungarian security arrangements and were right. Not to because the book talks in fascinating detail about the Radel affair. Nineteen thirteen when when the when one when one of the best and brightest, and the Austro-Hungarian general staff is discovered to have been selling German and Austro-Hungarian war plans as well as information on German, and Austro-Hungarian technology and fortress provisioning arrangements, and that sort of thing to the Russians, and so the Germans always kept things close to the vest. The Australian guarantee under Conrad also shared very little with Germans Conrad actually had a rubber stamp on his desk in the general staff building it said not to be shared with the German general staff, and he would stamp documents for that. In the reason, they did this. They both sides Germans in the Austrians wanted as much freedom of of the numerous they could. And so they didn't want to commit themselves to definitely to each other because they wanted to maintain flexibility that Germans because they were they were nursing the plan and they were planning to throw. You know, nearly their entire army against the British expeditionary force in the French and the west and then only once they were beaten move everything back to the east. So they didn't want the Austrian saying, hey, you got to commit to leave a dozen divisions or twenty divisions out east and the Austrians because they had this very flexible flexible in theory war plan where they would have a large echelon of troops that would entrain for the for the eastern front. They would have a a very small echelon of troops that were trained for the Serbian front in the event of a two front war, and they would have a floating reserve of a dozen divisions that couldn't train for either front and the Austrian didn't wanna have to kneel down that's floating reserve, they you know, because of German demands they wanted to have automated flexibility use it. So there was this very dangerous vagueness about the arrangements between the Germans and the austro-hungarians both general staff saw that as being convenient. But it would prove fatal in wartime as you say. See in the book because basically what happens is that the war, basically is triggered by the assassination assassination in Sarajevo, and the Austrians have an opportunity to mass everything against Serbia because so great is the international outrage this assassination. I mean, remember these Bosnian Serb assassins, killed the crown prince of the Austro-Hungarian empire in the streets of Sarajevo Bosnian Serbs. It was assumed by richly everyone that they had some kind of Serbian government Servian military connection. This was telling the Austrians win ultimatum. We're going to investigate improve up. But in the meantime, everybody from Saint Petersburg across London was horrified by the deed. So the Australians actually had an opportunity to roll with everything into Serbia and crush the Serbs, but they wasted the opportunity wasted an entire months the whole point of July. They were all literally on vacation. They didn't even come back to Vienna to plan this war that they had been wanting for years. They're mobile. Around the issuing an ultimatum month after the assassination indignation has ebbed away everywhere and now from Saint Petersburg to London instead of people thinking, hey, Austria has a right to invade survey. Everybody's saying, hey, Austria, better nowadays, babe. Serbia and Russia and France are saying don't invade Serbia because Serbia has friends. So at this point by the time, the Austrians actually get around to going to war. They no longer have the option of a one friend war. It's definitively going to be a two front war and yet, and here's the madness of Conrad's Hudson Dorf, he decides to direct the bulk of the army south against the Serbs and send only. The other half of the army out to the Russians. When in fact, he needs to be sending forty divisions to face the Russians and eight divisions down to face the Serbs. But instead he sends twenty against the Serbs and and twenty eight against the rush and the Russians are going to build a strength of a hundred and ninety six divisions. The three armies corps that are sent against the Serbs are in the hands of PLO. Tara who is the rival of Conrad and potently Arek is even less effective as a commander and more hysterical as a man searching for victories than Conrad, and what they what they wind up doing is trying to cross the Drina river to press into the surmounting. And we learned for the first time in Jeffrey's book that the Australian citizens are totally unaware of how to fight a war. They're barely trained. And this is the first and best of the draftees. They don't have enough weapons is generally Jeffrey said, but they fight. Badly. They bunch up and charged with ban arts into what you end infiltrating fire, and it's a disaster in the heat and they're beaten by their own tactics. Have I said that correctly Jeffrey? Yeah. Yeah. Exactly. And and you're right. The really hasn't been covered. If you look at history the rule where one the Austro-Hungarian vegan. It's it's quite puzzling. How they actually lost. But no historian has really gone in any detail into how that campaign was fought. And how it turned? And you know, what happened was the as you said these were the best troops in the author, and these were the long service troops and my book, by the way. Conclude by saying really by the end of nineteen fourteen is game over because the trained army has been utterly and the train and they start getting in the Serbian campaign in the Russian campaign in nineteen fourteen. Wayne, what's happening here in August in August, September nineteen fourteen invade Serbia is we see that these troops. Even though they are technically the long service professionals or anything. But and that's because the Australian Gary army was so penurious that it it didn't keep the troops very long with the colors, then when they and they and it would furlough the troops frequently or in other words, instead of keeping them two or three years of constant service. They would just send them off for six months back to their villages because they couldn't afford to pay them. So these guys were very lightly trained it had very little practice with their rifles. They'd had no practice entrenching, there'd been no combined arms practice maneuvers where infantry. Practice with the artillery to sort of advance with covering fire, your Tillery, shoot them through enemy positions. This was unheard of. And so because troops were so poorly trained and poorly equipped and also hard to lead. Because remember this is a polyglot army. Speaking a dozen different languages. There's a German language of command eighty words that all recruits, regardless of nationality need to know. But you know, realistically, they don't really know them. I mean, you're taking uneducated peasants, they probably heard these terms, but they have a hard time. Remembering what they all mean? And in the heat of battle, the chaos of battle these units completely come undone, and you see total demoralization suing against, you know, very light reverses where a whole unit will just turn around and retreat covering the ground with its weapons in as it retreats back out of Serbia. So the invasion of Serbia, which was meant to be a. Expedition quick strike toward valuable that would would enveloped the Serbian army, and then in occupation of Belgrade and the partition of the kingdom and a little pieces much of which will be taken by Austria the rest by Austria's Balkan allies. Instead the Serbs throw the Austrians back and defeat them. They defeat them in August, they defeat them in September. And then they just beat them again in December three invasions in one thousand nine fourteen all the seated by a Serbian army that it maximum strength is dozen divisions. The first a turn back is at the end of August by August, twenty four th potty Aric orders the withdrawal Jeffrey there were atrocities committed in Serbia, and I'm surprised to see that there were Tross cities committed right away. Also in Galicia was that an order from hockberg? You've you very carefully. You put pictures in here of it of executing civilians was that commonplace. And was that known about in Vienna. Oh, it was absolutely place. It was definitely known about the two fronts were rather rather separate Serbia was regarded as being a different kind of place than Galician the rules. We're supposed to be more strictly enforced in Galicia. There were no rules in Serbia because there was a great hatred between the kingdom of Serbia and the Austrian empire. The Serbs called the you know, the Habsburgs. You know, birds with borrowed feathers because they felt that they were camped out on probation territory Serbian Hungarian polish Ukrainian territory, but what were the Habsburgs the Serbs called them Swabians 'cause they came from southern Germany, and they thought it just in aim that this south German dynasty, founded in the thirteenth century was still governing Serbs and Croats in poles and Ukrainians and checks. They thought they completely obsolete and the Habsburgs reviled. The serves for treating them that way would that kind of disrespect. They thought of them as rascal little boys that needed a good beating. And they also had observed the the Balkan wars in nineteen twelve nineteen thirteen and the use of atrocities by all sides Bulgarians, you know, Bulgarians Greeks Serbs in Romanian in all of these battles in Baltimore's. There was frequent resort to atrocities in order to intimidate civilians. And make annexation easier for whichever nationality was trying to make them. And so the the Austrians joined the difference was is that the Austrians were held to a higher standard. They went into Serbia saying they were going as a western civilising agent, and they were going to improve Serbia they were going to make Serbia ready for prime time. And in fact, they went in and they'd behave. Absolutely. And the most the most appalling way, I mean, I tore it all of these battlefields in the course of my research, and you see charnel houses all over northwestern Serbia. These a little chapel set up with frescoes inside depicting villagers with their hands bound behind their backs being shot at point blank range men, women and children by troops in their pike grey uniform that in August of fourteen we're gonna go north when we come back because Conrad remember him he has four core that are four armies that are attacking north unaware of the fact that the whole of the Russian. Empire is coming his way. Jeffrey Juarez the author of mad catastrophe. The outbreak of World War One and the collapse of the Habsburg empire. I'm John Batchelor..

Serbia Jeffrey Juarez Conrad Vienna John Batchelor Serbian army British expeditionary force Germany Austria Russia Berlin Sarajevo Orrick PLO Saint Petersburg Australian Gary army
"british expeditionary force" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"british expeditionary force" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"He's interface with the paranormal only started after while the tragic events in our family which happened in nineteen seventy six he was he got married during the second world war he was he joined in nineteen fifty nine he went on the british expeditionary force to france and he was vacuum at dunkirk he was captured in the royal artillery on the overseas on the over channel guns and just before the end of the war he mentioned married my mother had three children myself my system out in my younger sister janet and life was proceeding normally and successfully when one role for year nineteen seventy six my younger sister who's twenty two at the time and it was a cub reporter in south of wales in cardiff was involved in a motorcycle accident and she ended up in a hospital in cardiff on a life support and it was a very sad situation my parents came across the holiday in jersey which is an island off the south of england i traveled from london i stood my sister and we join together in a hospital room in in this in this hospital in cardiff and we saw my sister janet lying on the bed with a head swathed in bandages because she's had serious head injuries two black eyes and she was in a hospital gown and she looked extremely fall on and we anguish over the next few hours and it became apparent that anything to do with the switch off the lifesupport machine which we did and so she died and.

british expeditionary force france dunkirk janet reporter wales cardiff
"british expeditionary force" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

02:55 min | 3 years ago

"british expeditionary force" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"And he was was a very particular and grounded individual who like to read around science and like to read around things at the fringes of science so he was very interested in the things that were of the very large and of the very small he had he had he had i if i could ask real quickly had he had experiences with what we might consider the paranormal throughout his life or was it the lack of those experiences but everybody else's reports that really intrigued him no i don't think he'd had experiences where he had he was probably like everyone else in this world he you know rejected them dismiss them should be coincidences and continued with his life so he's interface with the paranormal i only started after all the tragic events you now family which happened in nineteen seventy six he was he got married during the second world war he was a he joined in nineteen fifty nine he went on the british expeditionary force to france and he was evacuated at dunkirk he was a captain in the royal artillery on the overseas on the over channel guns and just before the end of the war he mentioned married my mother had three children myself my system out in my younger sister janet and life was proceeding normally and successfully when one rather awful yeah nineteen seventy six my younger sister who's twenty two at the time and it was a cub reporter in south of wales in cardiff was involved in a motorcycle accident and she ended up in a hospital in cardiff on a life support and it was a very sad situation my parents came across from their holiday in jersey which is an island off the south of england i traveled from london i stood my sister and we join together in a hospital room in in this in this hospital in cardiff and we saw my sister janet lying on the bed with a head swathed in bandages because she's had serious head injuries two black eyes and she was in a hospital gown and she looked extremely full on and we anguish over the next few hours and it became apparent that the other things to do with the switch off the lifesupport machine which we did and so she died and.

british expeditionary force france dunkirk janet reporter wales cardiff
"british expeditionary force" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

03:08 min | 3 years ago

"british expeditionary force" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"Invented many i'm very successful machine means appetizing machines and post the post the machines and he was was a very particular and grounded individual who liked to read around stance and like to read around things at the fringes of science so he was very interested in the things that were of the very large and of the very small he had he had i if i could ask real quickly had he had experiences with what we might consider the paranormal throughout his life or was it the lack of those experiences but everybody else's reports that really intrigued him no i don't think he'd had experiences where he had he was probably like everyone else in this world he you know rejected them dismiss them considerably coincidences and continued with his life so he's interface with the paranormal i only started after the tragic events you our family which happened in nineteen seventy six he was he got married during the second world war he was he joined in nineteen fifty nine he went on the british expeditionary force to france and he was evacuated at dunkirk he was a captain in the royal artillery on the overseas on the over channel guns and just before the end of the war he mentioned married my mother had three children myself my oldest system out in my younger sister janet and life was proceeding normally and successfully when one other full year nineteen seventy six my younger sister who's twenty two the time and there was a cub reporter in south of wales in cardiff was involved in a motorcycle accident and she ended up in a hospital in cardiff on a life support and it was a very sad situation my parents came across that holiday in jersey which is an island off the south of england i traveled from london i stood by sister and we join together in a hospital room in in this in this hospital in cardiff and we saw my late sister janet lying on the bed with a head swathed in bandages because she had serious head injuries two black eyes and she was in a hospital gown and she looked extremely full on we anguish over the next few hours and it became apparent that the only thing to do with the switch off the lifesupport machine which we did and so she died and.

british expeditionary force france dunkirk janet reporter wales cardiff
"british expeditionary force" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

03:00 min | 3 years ago

"british expeditionary force" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"And he was a very particular and grounded individual who liked to read around science and liked to read around things the fringes of science so he was very interested in the things that were off the very large and of the very small he had he had he had i if i could ask real quickly had he had experiences with what we might consider the paranormal throughout his life or was it the lack of those experiences but everybody else's reports that really intrigued him no i don't think he'd had experiences he had he was probably like everyone else in this world he you know rejected them dismiss them consider vincent become incidences and continued with his life so he's interface with the paranormal i only started after all the tragic events you now family which happened in nineteen seventy six he was married during the second world war he was he joined in nineteen fifty nine he went on the british expeditionary force to france and he was evacuated at dunkirk he was a captain in the royal artillery on the overseas on the over channel guns and just before the end of the war he mentioned married my mother had three children myself my oldest system out in my younger sister janet and life was proceeding normally and successfully when one awful yeah nineteen seventy six my younger sister who's twenty two at the time and it was a cub reporter in south of wales in cardiff was involved in a motorcycle accident and she ended up in a hospital in cardiff on a life support and it was a very sad situation my parents came across from their holiday in jersey which is an island off the south of england i traveled from london i did my sister and we join together in a hospital room and in this in this hospital in cardiff and we saw my late sister janet lying on the bed with a head swathed in bandages because she had serious head injuries two black eyes and she was in a hospital gown and she looked extremely full on and we anguish over the next few hours and it became apparent that the other thing to do is just switch off the lifesupport machine which we did and so she died on my parents stayed on to deal with formalities tonight took.

british expeditionary force france dunkirk janet reporter wales cardiff vincent
"british expeditionary force" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:56 min | 3 years ago

"british expeditionary force" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"And he was was a very particular and grounded individual who like to read around science and liked to read around things at the fringes of science so he was very interested in the things that were off the very large and at the very small he had he had he had if i could ask real quickly had he had experiences with what we might consider the paranormal throughout his life or was it the lack of those experiences but everybody else's reports that really intrigued him i don't think he'd had experiences he had he was probably like everyone else in this world he you know rejected them dismiss them consider vinci coincidences and continued with his life so he's interface with the paranormal only started after the tragic events in our family which happened in nineteen seventy six he was he got married and during the second world war he was he joined in nineteen fifty nine he went on the british expeditionary force to france and he was evacuated at dunkirk he was captain in the royal artillery on the overseas on the over channel guns and just before the end of the war he mentioned married my mother had three children myself my oldest system out in my younger sister janet and life was proceeding normally i unsuccessfully when one rather awful year nineteen seventy six my younger sister who's twenty two at the time and it was a cub reporter in south of wales in cardiff was involved in a motorcycle accident and she ended up in a hospital in cardiff on a life support and it was a very sad situation my parents came across the holiday in jersey which is an island off the south of england i traveled from london as did my sister and we join together in a hospital room in in this in this hospital in cardiff and we saw my sister janet lying on the bed with a head swathed in bandages because she had serious head injuries two black eyes and she was in a hospital gown and she looked extremely full on and we anguished over the next few hours and it became apparent that the only thing to do switch off the lifesupport machine which we did and so she died on my.

british expeditionary force france dunkirk janet reporter wales cardiff london
"british expeditionary force" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

BBC Radio 4

02:53 min | 3 years ago

"british expeditionary force" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

"A parade of young musicians marched around manger square preparing for midnight mass at the church of the nativity in bethlehem the fragile peace in this holy place has been shaken by president trump's announcement earlier this month that america would officially recognize jerusalem as the capital of israel but the archbishop of jerusalem said that while jesus was born in a town under roman occupation he was identified as the prince of peace and encourages dialogue as opposed to conflict police in sorry are trying to identify a man who was found seriously ill in a ditch his believed to be in his twenties some was wearing a red and white checked shirt and red canvas shoes bbc news now bbc radio voice is at the first world war rick dance now it will be over by christmas many of the troops showed themselves but it wasn't instead the british expeditionary force had been exposed to the full might of the german army and a brutal apparatus of industrial wall a hundred thousand british soldiers had been killed or wounded for many christmas day was a day like any other that some witnessed an event that stood out in the history of the wool and in the years since has achieved the mythical status we all you and wore at iconic at uh the komo narra a bear takes you know what you did gaolathe bloom both again in we get that too much of cigarettes from the queen than when get them not yet apart from extra russians soldiers at the front in france and belgium had little to look forward to dinner was likely to be belief unless they could scavenge something from local firms but at least the rain had stopped and the ground had hardened increase may tie win undetected fall of december of feeling when netted tall and friend putin's against enemy on chris restoring aren't here fourteen you're bring a beautiful day for us and apply up beautiful in the sudden showing when the sun came up there was a fiji in the air we control on key challenge today and she was neutral pd on both sides various points along the frontline a series of ceasefires spontaneously broke out historian pizza heart carried out many of the interviews with veterans in the imperial war museums collection it was a chance to meet to talk for.

the queen belgium world war bbc archbishop of jerusalem fiji chris putin france nativity german army british expeditionary force christmas rick dance jesus israel america president trump
"british expeditionary force" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

03:01 min | 4 years ago

"british expeditionary force" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"And the risk and the bad decisions of nineteen forty two 2017 good evening michael good evening john the movie is remarkable in its capacity to um separated so from the traditional tropes oh of war movie that focus on um ooh stories uh uh individual soldiers and the like and and rather it it takes account of sweeping oh you up the entire experience is something that was wholly chaotic and without um compass or reasson for those involved and i think in in the sense that it it shows p o remarkable capacity of the british expeditionary force and a large portion of its french how i sent some others to to escape uh what look like uh completely o n s capable cobra attack it is is tremendous on the other hand the movie uh without ever saying so and without having a lot of you know agenda driven dialogue because there's a great little dialogue in the movie at all but even in it it's simple representation of the horror of the evacuation from dunkirk it it actually preserved fee uh the powerful a trope or themes of the mic narrative that as a merged uh out of dunkirk and and one element of that of course is the fact that the nazi war machine could have completely overrun the beach said it could have captured every one but but somehow the germans hesitated foolishly so that put the german in a position being you know uh somehow oh weaken incapable and their judgement but also it adds an element of uh kind of divine uh uh uh intervention in that somehow the germans could at one but they uh was somehow their hair and with state and and the second thing is the idea that it was a miracle that the army got off in the face of all the studios and uboat and and fast attack craft and all the rest and and third uh is fat uh had uh the uh british expeditionary force been captured along with those remaining french but mostly it's about the b e f being lost then britain would have been broke him wide open to invasion and in a position.

british expeditionary force army britain michael
"british expeditionary force" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

03:13 min | 4 years ago

"british expeditionary force" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"The movie over to you because i am told that this movie is not detailed history hence they don't mention the germans but it is very much telling a story to translate the heroism and the risk and the bad decisions of nineteen forty to 2017 good evening michael good evening to the movie remarkable in its capacity to separated show from the traditional trope oh of war movie that focus on uh story uh uh individual soldiers and the like and and rather it takes account of sweeping you you the entire burien something that was wholly chaotic and without there's a reason for those and paul and i think in in the sense that it it does the remarkable capacity of the british expeditionary force and a large portion of its french how i spent some others too who escape uh what looked like uh completely in capable copacetic it is tremendous on the other hair the movie uh without ever saying so and without having a lot of you know agenda driven dialogue because there's a great little dialogue in the movie at all but even in it it's simple representation of the horror of the evacuation from cart it it actually preserved fee uh the powerful a trope or themes of the mic narrative that has emerged out of dunkirk and and one element of that of course is the fact that the nazi war machine know could have completely overrun the beach said it could have captured every one but but somehow determined hesitated foolishly so that puts the german position being you know uh oh oh we can incapable and their judgement but also it adds an element of uh kind of divine uh uh uh intervention in that somehow the germans could at one but they were somehow there and with state and and the second thing is the idea that it was a miracle that the army got off and the pace of all the studios and uboat and and fast attack craft and all the rest and and third uh is that uh had uh the uh british expeditionary force been captured along with those remaining french but mostly it's about the b f being lost then britain would have been broken wide open to innovation and in a position.

burien british expeditionary force army britain michael paul
"british expeditionary force" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:22 min | 4 years ago

"british expeditionary force" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"I would bomb the dark secret place for answers on kfi am 640 more stimulating talk is replaced brian suits in here live until midnight and surroi didn't get the you'd live you to go on i'll get going here in in a second but the talking about the movie dunkirk which is doing better than it was projected because it's a very very very very very very very very very very english movie and it is perhaps not very well known to americans this piece were to history body it it is and i'm and i said this after isoed on thursday night eight that i usually frac something that i think is really remarkable i usually take a deep breath before i start gushing and so that was my disclaimer before i started tweeting and now in the fullness of time i contain a 48 hours later that year a my first impression was right it it it it has stuck with me it really is a tremendous warfilm a one of the great things about the movie one of the things that are really respect about it is that because it doesn't give you moving map and meros it doesn't explain things that are going on you you do get the perspective of the one of the central characters who's just as a simple grunt just a a kid who and and by the way kudos to chris renaud and forgetting people who are ageappropriate to play nineteen year olds he tina nineteen year olds i don't know how how old harry styles is from one direction but but he plays a guy in his early twenties as most of the british expeditionary force were and so the movie opens up and i i got this is one of the big reasons i want to go back and see it is because the i five minutes movie the movie opens up with british troops walking through the in abandoned frenchtown they're out of water very clearly been in combat for for for several weeks and they're ambushed and the sound on and i mix in a nymex theater.

dunkirk chris renaud british expeditionary force frenchtown nymex theater brian nineteen year five minutes 48 hours
"british expeditionary force" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:32 min | 4 years ago

"british expeditionary force" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"The the plight of the ground troops on the beach that story line is one week compressed into the hundred and one hundred and forty seven minute movie not data to our movie i'm sorry one hundred two hundred seventy since it's under two hours and so one week is compressed into a movie and then there is a there's the what's his name reilance tom reilance would've that that actor he's one of the british civilians bringing his civilian boat over to dunkirk to evacuate troops his story is one day compressed inla movie and then tom hardy the actor is of spitfire pilot though the other authenticity thing here is that he's wearing his oxygen mask for the majority of the movie his part is one hour so as long as you understand how this works and and of effectively think of it all as the final hour and and and so you know a week before that final hour but the ground troops the the day before with the ship in them the spitfire everything in the spitfire happens in one hour but it's it's you bounce around these three different story lines are not happening at the same time until the final hour of of dunkirk right are you in real life life but there's one problem that i had with it and maybe if you've seen it maybe you you you agree or disagree but there is very little pre story in ali star wars the scroll told you that the empire was falling apart in that and that layer organic as an ambassador to the to the imperial senate on the whole thing this basically the the christopher nolan made a conscious decision to not use the word germans or nazis he says that the enemy have surrounded the british expeditionary force at the town of dunkirk four hundred thousand three hundred eighty thousand manner are in this perimeter and then in the movie the in in conversation or whatever only that no one ever references who it is that they're fighting and that of an i know that i'm assuming nolan wants to concentrate on the universality of what the of the chaos of combat and the the whole thing probably but i do know from all the eyewitness accounts i've ever read from dunkirk that every buddy their new damn wealth who was bombing them the.

tom reilance christopher nolan british expeditionary force dunkirk tom hardy ali senate one hour one week forty seven minute two hours one day
"british expeditionary force" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:10 min | 4 years ago

"british expeditionary force" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And and the film opens wide this friday with an allstar international casted includes james darcy kenneth brannagh tom hearty and mine next guest mark rylance whose mainly been on our show in the past to discuss his theatrical roles he won an oscar since he was last year for his part in steven spielberg's bridges spies and i'm very pleased to have this opportunity to welcome him back again i love good to see you i good to be here the seemed to be a specializing in movies that take place during world war two weeks now you grew up in the 1960s heritage to learn about dunkirk who did you lend around in school i think i learnt about it from films like the bath britain why always had romantic idea of being a spitfire pilot or a bomb bahman de opponent and later on i met people who had taken part in the warn was questioned about it and then your character in this film keeps on talk about how great the spitfire czar yeah we have without the script or did youthrelated based on your pasok's your what you knew when you were a kid i had no idea is through my heart into it but it was in the script it was very exciting because chris has every everything israel in front of the camera no with chris known and so these spitfires and the measures schmitz of flu right over our heads this was a bad moment in british history what did you learned about did school yeah the british expeditionary force of about four hundred thousand men or more and the french thought that they were the most superior armies in the whole world after the first world war and the german said advanced in a in a unknown surprising way so so for these 400000 englishman of stockholm the beach at dunkirk abe the see home but not able to get home and pushed their because the germans had had pushed him to the water the this they came up in the north of the margin of the line the line of defense through the forests an and very very rapidly and push them to the water over the fivemile kind of exclusions zone a defended very very violently a and then these four hundred thousand men couldn't get off the beach because the the water so shallow that the.

oscar steven spielberg world war dunkirk britain chris israel flu british expeditionary force stockholm james darcy mark rylance two weeks
"british expeditionary force" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:03 min | 4 years ago

"british expeditionary force" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"In here until midnight next hour who leave the cold war era beef 58 ages rain out there in the middle of the desert regions driver to see the thing i will answer that question live from uh from the desert already the movie of the movie dunkirk comes out here in a few days of the twentieth or the night of the nineteenth later on this week and christopher nolan who did all the good batman secretion bail that man's he's directing this andy an allstar britishcast in in this case including harry styles from for mom oh africa that when banned by daughters toothbrush place our song and by all accounts the movie is phenomenal phenomenally filmed extraordinarily authentic it cetera one of the things about movie evidently said there's very little dialogue that there are long lingering scenes that are telling the story you're just supposed to know what's going on and if you don't know what's going on he here's what's going on it's june of nineteen forty and america's year and a half from getting in the war and some tempered 1930 nine hitler invades polen couple of weeks later stalin inflate invades poland history seems vert forget that as well but because of the alliance's france and britain are obligated andu declare war on germany what happens if the germans over in poland is ooh nothing the british send the british expeditionary force over four hundred thousand men to france to stand with the french on the french german border as well as the french belgian and dutch border because we were they remembered world war one and nothing happens through the winter of nineteen thirty nine until the spring in fact after the blitzkrieg of poland they called it the sits craig until the spring until may of nineteen forty when the.

christopher nolan america france poland british expeditionary force world war cold war andy harry stalin britain germany craig