35 Burst results for "British Empire"

David Prowse, towering actor who played Darth Vader in 'Star Wars,' dies aged 85

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:02 min | 5 d ago

David Prowse, towering actor who played Darth Vader in 'Star Wars,' dies aged 85

"Years this music You can see Darth Vader striding around the death star and some sad news this morning, the man behind the body of Darth Vader. Has died. David Prowse, the 6 FT seven champion, English Way lifter bodybuilder actor who donned the iconic black suit in the original Star Wars trilogy has died at the age of 85. He didn't provide the boy so the breathing sounds but that tall, muscular frame Just so central to the character who strode with purpose or use The force press, actually in a very long and distinguished career is 23 year turn is the green Cross code Man in The UK, though, is what he was most proud of. Was a P ece character designed to remind kids had across the street safely. Tribute this morning on Twitter from Mark Hamill, a plate of course. Luke Skywalker so sad to hear David Prowse his past. He was a kind man and much more than Darth Vader. Actor husband Father, member of the Order of the British Empire, three time British weightlifting champion and safety icon. He loved his fans as much as they loved him.

David Prowse Darth Vader Star Wars Green Cross Mark Hamill Luke Skywalker UK Twitter Order Of The British Empire Weightlifting
The International Reaction To Joe Biden's Win

The Takeaway

19:38 min | 3 weeks ago

The International Reaction To Joe Biden's Win

"Farm minister who has now tweeted. Congratulations joe biden. On your spectacular. Victory joined with other nations. Latest around the world congratulating congratulate and on behalf of new zealand. Vicky nice including lights. I want to congratulate president-elect buydell and vice president-elect harris. us allies around. The world have moved quickly to congratulate president. Joe biden vice president-elect kamala harris on their win even as president trump still refuses to concede the election for countries like canada france and germany. Biden's victory could signal a return to cooperation on alliances like nato and treaties including the paris climate agreement but the prospect of a biden administration seems less promising to more authoritarian leaders with whom president trump ford strong relationships during his time in office including north korea's leader kim jong un brazilian president jair bolsonaro chinese president. Xi jinping who so far have all refrained from publicly congratulating biden and harris. Joining me now is yes means. Sirhan london base staff writer at the atlantic. Thanks for joining us again. As mean thanks for having me also with us. Clouds ladas professor of history and international affairs at the university of north carolina. chapel hill. Klaus good to have you with us. Thank you hello. How are you doing all right. We are in very interesting political moment right now. The president trump has refused to concede and yet president-elect biden is moving forward and the world is noticing clouds. How would you describe the scope. So far of the international reaction to biden's victory well on the whole thing that has been a lot of rejoicing a lot of applause for biden. I think people are hugely relieved that the trump administration will not have a second term and most people are most leaders in in europe and asia and of people in that country's overjoyed. I six they were really getting fed up for the trump administration. It was too dramatic too. Chaotic to unpredictable and people are relieved to see a new administration. I cost you said the administration was dramatic and unpredictable. And i think many americans would agree with you but it continues to be dramatic and somewhat unpredictable. Given the fact that the trump administration is now calling for recounts and investigations into what they allege voter. Inconsistencies are world leaders looking at that and saying anything about that. The fact that they're still Has not been a concession from president trump. Well del shaking their hands. Most of them are shaking the hats but the key for that sorts to themselves because it is no point to interfere in businesses seen as domestic american politics very few people at least very few democratic leaders have any understanding for what is going on in washington. It seems to be pretty obvious that the was of a free and walls not done in a fraudulent way at all and over. Four million people can vote for biden Rather than for trump's majority will lots of for millions of popular vote. He won miss. Four million people and the people have accepted. That biden is president-elect. And booby the new president but they are. You know wondering what's going on in washington but hardly anyone is actually surprised. At the trump administration would embark on such a course of action because that fits in with what is administration was like chaotic dramatic unpredictable and quite irrational to some extent mean given what klaus just laid out there in terms of the continued reaction to the world leaders at least us allies. Saying you know okay. We'll watch what's happening and see how this all plays out. How much of the reaction you think is excitement about biden himself versus relief about removing president trump from office. It's a great question. I mean it's worth noting An and i thought can of clauses overview spot on that you know for a lot of world biden is a very familiar character He certainly not new to the world stage. I think it was in. Benjamin netanyahu the israeli prime ministers congratulations that he noted that he's known biden for forty years. And i think a lot of world leaders know biden. So it's i. I think probably if i had to guess my assessment would be that it's probably the latter. I think a lot of i think a lot of the protests you are seeing in the us in the days after the result was finally announced was probably fell at least to me is an american observing from afar like a lot more relief than necessarily you know excitement. This isn't to say that you know. Folks don't like biden or unexcited to see him at the helm on his set a recognizable figure. But i think the world generally kind of just took a big sigh of relief that you know here returns a. Us option that recognizes. The us is traditional role in the world and will hopefully be kind of retaking that spot on the international stage. And yasmin. you are in london. Where prime minister. Boris johnson has had a strong relationship with president trump. How do you think this relationship between the us and the uk will evolve under a biden administration. It's a really good question. There's certainly been a lot of chatter about that very thing here kind of leading up to the us election and now after that we knew the result i think there is some conjecture that you know obviously as you just said President trump and prime minister. Johnson had a pretty good relationship. I think a lot of that stemmed from the fact that president trump was quite a big supporter of brexit. And you know. I think kind of quite appreciated the sort of comparisons between him and johnson superficial is some of the may be particularly. I think he quite liked references to johnson. As britain trump some remembering correctly and there has been some talk about some potential tensions between biden administration and johnson's downing street. I'm particularly with regard to brexit. Biden has been very clear about his support for the good friday agreement and opposing anything that would undermine it. And i think there's also some talk about how you know johnson before he was prime minister had made some comments with regard to president obama's support for britain staying in the eu. Where i think he made comments about obama's kenyan ancestry in how he had an ancestral dislike of the british empire so these are no doubt comments that administration would probably remember well. But i think it's worth noting that you know. These are things. I do not think are going to shake up the uk us relationship. In a major way. I think there's a lot more that And biden share particularly with regard to issues like climate change like the iran deal and. Yeah i mean. I think more broadly i would expect pretty good. Relations between the us and the uk going forward While it's certainly true. That trump and johnson had had a decent relationship I think you know the uk is is certainly a country that would see its relationship with the us being important irrespective of who's empower claus does not same theory hold true for other. You leaders like angela. Merkel for example and wilma call who themselves had troubled relationships with president trump. And who i can imagine so far are somewhat relieved to see this New administration elect. Yeah the But regarding johnson outside that johnson dossier a little insecure. He was the first international leader. I believe who fold up biden and congratulate him. They said i think that shows the level of insecurity and also abidance irish background. Bill make him wonder how. how how much you consult poured onto the united states in the future and the united vendor the united kingdom needs a trade. Deal the us. And i think he is for it. You know i think he would probably have seen a second trump administration as being more helpful regarding angela merkel and other european leaders. They certainly were relieved. Undiplomatic led a very bad relationship with trump or with raza. Put it the other way. Round a macro tried in various locations to make overtures to trump it was trump really rejected it who couldn't really in the end stand. Angela merkel nothing kid. He had a problem with female leaders. You had the problem as lead us. Who voted much more open to immigration and to do something about asylum people who were looking for asylum in their countries and he could understand and he also criticised the eu including germany for its huge trade deficit of us united states or rather to the united states of course had trade deficit busy you and he almost criticized the eu and it's trade policies. As much as he did china he called the eu. Actually a foe. Which is you know really surprising that you consider your most longest standing allies in the world that you suddenly regard them. As foes at least in trade relations. So underline michael and the german establishment as well as the french and other foreign policies tablets in europe are usually relieved that they see the end of the trump administration and us yes-men just that biden has a very good reputation. He is regarded to be quite honest as perhaps a little too old for the job but on the other hand is a centrist is not extreme is on the last notes of right people know him they a appreciate his his personality is a people person you some would say. Here's a backslapping sort of politician but much more extrovert much. More outgoing and much more ready to compromise than Trump was so all that shouting at nato summits or g seven summits all that Very bad atmosphere attention. The you know the almost talk about to break up of nato and talk about that trump wanted to undermine the quesion of political union of the european union all that will be a thing of the past because by and his administration can be expected to be very constructive to what nate to enter to you however having said that may the last sort biden will also insist on the european spending more money on their defense efforts so he will not be softer regarding nate and regarding the defense efforts of the europeans and here europe really needs to do something because that is an old complaint which goes back to the obama administration and before that wasn't actually unique to the trump administration. And the you know that they are very reluctant to spend more on defense. But i think a practice the president biden will actually be more successful in persuading them at. That would be the right thing to do as you mentioned. Joe biden's age. And i think that that's something that we must talk about because if something happens to joe biden we could be looking at a president kamala harris. And i'm wondering this is something that came up yesterday in our conversation about The role that black women played in american democracy in electing joe biden. We've seen kamala harris the first woman of color to ever sit in that role that i wonder how she will be received by world leaders. Yasmine your thoughts on that yet. It's a good question. I mean i think you know. Obviously that history-making of of her being elected the first female of vice president of colors obviously huge certainly noteworthy among a lot of the congratulations. that were received. I think it was prime minister. Narendra modi of india who actually dedicated an entire tweet just tacoma harris herself And i think the reason for that is is obvious. Obviously her indian heritage. He he sees that is is an opportunity to further strengthen the relationship between india and the us. but yeah. i mean. I don't know i would anticipate We as you say. Given president-elect biden's age that kamala harris could have a more hands on role than previous vice presidents that we've seen In in for that reason we may find that world leaders will quickly get to know come harris in a way that perhaps they didn't get to know vice presidents of the past and it seems just based on the comments that we've seen uncle mirko also an a made a comment about looking forward to meeting a kamala harris that we could expect that you know the world will be paying attention to both of them very much. Not just biden klaus What's been the reaction From china and president xi jinping so far there hasn't been much of a reaction. Xi jinping has kept quiet. We don't quite know why this speculation that perhaps xi jinping want antagonize the trump administration while it is still in office. The course and ten weeks you can do a lot of arm. And he knows that relations between china and the united states are difficult as they are that will continue to be difficult under the biden administration. So he's keeping a low profile on the social media in china have however been lots of comments. Some people really regretful that Trump is leaving because it made the united states weaker. It created a vacuum in international affairs which was appreciated by some observers in china as us believe you know it is much better to have a more stable more predictable government even if that government is perhaps more strategic in its relations with china. But they appreciate that proper possible predictability and international affairs so essentially. It's difficult to say what the leadership actually things and we will have to wait until eventually shipping and The foreign ministry in beijing will come out with a statement but they will do so nothing at the latest one set to mastic insecurity about the election. Outcome has been resolved than they of course will congratulate her joe biden and kabila harris now of course Clouds one country that we know has been watching the disarray In the united states or at least the tension in the united states has been russia. What have we heard if anything from vladimir putin and or his administration so far the gun russia's keeping a low profile putin hasn't congratulated i them and He is keeping quiet. Does not much coming out of russia but the they of course are disappointed. That trump did not win the second term. And there's been talk about disinformation campaigns. Not quite as much as two sixteen but russia did its bid to perhaps enable second trump victory and trump. However the to be quite. Frank hasn't been soft on russia. The administration perhaps not the president. Personally who always had such soft spot for putin and very confidential talks with him and no one really knows. What when on doing these talks but when you look at his policy his administration's policies towards a russia that wasn't soft all imposed over forty times a new sanctions on russia. So he the administration actually hasn't been soft on putin. But i believe that russia fears of fields that the unpredictability and the chaos and the. Let's say less focused way. of the trump administration than what could you can normally expect from an american administration that that in the end helped a russia that often the president Closed both ice and that influenced also of foreign policy. Make us in his administration like the state department. Yes maine another Interesting figure here is israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu who has been a very close ally of president trump And that even translated into votes here. In the united states for the president from certain jewish orthodox communities. He congratulated joe biden and comma harris this past weekend. What do you expect to see from. Benjamin netanyahu in the near term when it comes to us. Israeli relations under a joe biden. I think this is something. That doesn't just apply to benjamin netanyahu but leeds had good relationships with president trump. I think narendra modi also falls into this category. And even figures like victor or bonham road regurgitate both of whom have also congratulated President elected biden But you know. I think he's a netanyahu in particular is a leader who obviously has a vested interest in maintaining a good. Us israel relationship irrespective of. Who's in the white house. It's no secret that obviously he benefited quite a lot. From having president trump in the white house the the moving of the us embassy to jerusalem being obviously one of those Kind of hallmark examples of a win for him That said He obviously you know. He recognizes that an admin the administration is changing. And i think he wants to shore up that relationship. But you know there's it it's been reported That the trump administration is hoping to kind of work with the israelis to sort of applies more punitive measures on tehran. Before trump leaves the white house in the form of sanctions to kind of make it more difficult for biden to return to the iran nuclear deal and try to bring that back it. This isn't to say that. Netanyahu and biden would necessarily see eye to eye on a lot of things i think we would probably see under a biden administration a return to the bit of the more traditional tone that we've known the us to take these israel Opposition to settlement expansion. That sort of thing support for a two state solution but indeed it will not be as rosy of friendship As we've seen between that and your home trump that's for sure we should also note that President trump's administration was also very close with bolsonaro of brazil. Both are considered to have really supported Populist movements and i'm wondering whether or not Desirable not who's also refrained from Congratulating harrison biden on their win and other populist movements across the world are looking at this and saying well maybe this is signals a change. Here i think it's definitely a loss for them. It's a setback. Because you know. I think particularly for leaders like bolsonaro. Who really sort of you know played on his relationship with president trump domestically I think this is a loss because you know even before particularly with populist movements even in places on like brazil where they aren't in power they could turn and look to president trump until their supporters. Look you know he's able to achieve this in the united states so we can achieve at here if know the greatest the most powerful leader in the world can do this that we can do this where we are so without question. I think it's it's a setback for them They lose that. You know that key ally in the white house But that said i think you know populous leaders like minded leaders to trump. Who could potentially take that narrative and sort of utilize it in their favor so While it is a loss for them. I don't necessarily think that it will end. Sort of their relationship trump or or will end them using trump is sort of an example to their benefit. Yes means seer. Han is a london. Based staff writer at the atlantic and klaus ladas is a professor of history and international affairs at the university of north carolina. Chapel hill

Biden Trump Administration United States Joe Biden Kamala Harris Donald Trump Johnson Biden Administration Harris EU Buydell Jair Bolsonaro Nato Russia Benjamin Netanyahu UK President Trump Brexit Angela Merkel
France reacts after Erdogan questions Macron's mental health

Bryan Suits

02:59 min | Last month

France reacts after Erdogan questions Macron's mental health

"The president of Turkey. President Erdogan has decided to chime in today. He earlier on earlier today, he said, Ah, I'm sorry. France earlier today re called It's Ambassador to Turkey for consultations. That doesn't mean they're shutting down the embassy. They that's what you do You bring them back to Paris for consultations after unacceptable comments by Turkish President Erdogan questioning the mental health of French president Emmanuel Macron because of his attitude towards Muslims. Earlier this month. Mr Macron pledged to fight Islamist separatism, which he said was threatening to take control and some Muslim communities around France, drawing a sharp rebuke from the Turkish leader. This is, by the way, there's a lot of myths about the so called no go zones in London. There are flat out no go zones in Paris. You know, the French are on their fifth generation. Of from from the high tide of their empire of Muslim immigration. From Tunisia, Algeria. Send ago Morocco, etcetera, Syria, Lebanon. And they never really assimilated the the mainland. Metropolitan French didn't want them to assimilate. Nor did they want to assimilate just that The French didn't convert them to Christianity at the sword they just tolerated. Muslim immigrants from their empire because that was what the French the French attitude about their empire was. Well. Unlike the British Empire, you you can move freely all about our empire. Oh, it's all France now. And that's why France fought to the last Legionnaire where her for Algeria before Algerian independence. Independence. But anyway there are neighborhoods in the north east of Paris. The 18th arrondissement where French is not spoken. Never mind. You know English should visit. It's Tunisian, Arabic, Algerian Arabic, and that's sort of a point of pride. And you know the reason being that when when these kids graduate if they don't go for a government job They feel a freeze out. You know they're supposed to be on their 4th and 5th generation. They're supposed to be fully assimilated French citizens with the equality, liberty and fraternity. With all other a Frenchman. But the reality is if you leave the dense urban areas of Paris Orly on to Lord to lose here out in the country and France and you're being discriminated and no matter what the French say they haven't assimilated. They're Muslims. And there are laws. There are school dress codes that would be flat out unconstitutional in the United

France President Erdogan Paris President Trump Algeria Mr Macron Paris Orly Turkey Ambassador To Turkey Emmanuel Macron London Tunisia Morocco Lebanon Syria
Disgraced mogul Harvey Weinstein stripped of UK honor

Noon Report with Rick Van Cise

00:32 sec | 2 months ago

Disgraced mogul Harvey Weinstein stripped of UK honor

"More yet another accolade gone for disgraced movie mogul Weinstein now serving a long prison sentence in New York after his rape conviction earlier this year. The award, which had been yanked was an honorary CB or honorary commander of the Order of the British Empire. It was given to him back in 2000 for for his contribution to the British film industry. Although rare czar Jonah's can be withdrawn if a person brings it into disrepute. Tom Rivers, ABC News, London and Brad Pitt and Jennifer Aniston

Weinstein British Empire Brad Pitt Jennifer Aniston Jonah Commander Rape Tom Rivers Abc News New York London
Barbados to drop Queen Elizabeth II as head of state

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:32 sec | 2 months ago

Barbados to drop Queen Elizabeth II as head of state

"Of England loses her standing in one country. Simon Ellen reports Barbados says it intends to replace Britain's Queen Elizabeth as its head of state. Caribbean island's governor general argues it's time we left our colonial past behind formerly part of the British Empire, Barbados gained independence 54 years ago. Ah, host of former colonies have already dropped the queen and become Republics. Although she remains head of state for more than a dozen nations, including Canada. Andi Australia, the

Queen Elizabeth Barbados Simon Ellen Andi Australia Caribbean Island England Britain Canada
Barbados seeks to drop Queen Elizabeth II as head of state

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:46 sec | 2 months ago

Barbados seeks to drop Queen Elizabeth II as head of state

"Barbados just announced its removing Queen Elizabeth to as its head of state and becoming a republic By next year. It'll be the first country to drop the monarch in nearly three decades. Why the Governor General Sandra Mason says the time has come to fully leave our colonial past behind. She says the country will become a Republicans early as November of next year when it celebrates the 55th anniversary of its break from the British Empire. The Queen is the head of state of the United Kingdom and 15 other countries that were formally under British rule. Many basins have long agitated to remove the queen status and with it the lingering symbolism of imperialism. And what is reality? Think about it. That's where she's from. I went there a few years ago. Beautiful country. They have something called oysters. Fish fry on the weekends out of this world, whole country gets involved.

Sandra Mason Queen Elizabeth Barbados British Empire United Kingdom
Barbados seeks to drop Queen Elizabeth II as head of state

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:28 sec | 2 months ago

Barbados seeks to drop Queen Elizabeth II as head of state

"Barbados gives the queen the boot, saying the time has come to fully leave our colonial past behind. Governor General Sandra Mason announced that starting next year, the country will drop Britain's Queen Elizabeth as head of state that makes Barbados the first nation to drop the monarch in nearly three decades. Barbados is a member of 54 Commonwealth nations made up of mostly former British territories. The move comes as Barbados gets ready to mark its 55th anniversary of independence from the British Empire. Next year.

Barbados Governor General Sandra Mason Queen Elizabeth British Empire Britain
How Are You Intelligent

Good Life Project

06:27 min | 3 months ago

How Are You Intelligent

"You grew up from my understanding in nineteen fifties sixties Liverpool. So can post war, which was also pretty interesting time and Liverpool. Yeah ours born in Nineteen fifty. In Liverpool. And was it was a? Is a city that had been devastated and the second world. War. In the middle of the nineteenth century, Liverpool was the probably the most important port in the world something like sixty percent of world trade what through the port of Liverpool side of empire. Realizes at much high to the British empire and it was the main point of entry for all the goods that were coming from the southern states to feed the the Mills of Lancashire. It was the hydrogen industrial revolution. So it was a huge import export trade. It was the of departure to the United States and also to far-flung parts. The Empire. If you had been around the pool in the. Mid To late nineteenth century defined this bustling port huge wealth great open parklands, magnificent houses, and know the metropolis Greg. Colton Center. When I was born in Nineteen fifty, it was none of that in the the docks were pretty much faltering the the passenger ships going from there anymore was international. Travel and empire collapsed so and battered by the lava. So we literally playing in bomb craters and in the austerity of Post War Britain wet food was rationed than we had. high levels of unemployment poverty I WANNA set in kids and. my dad had been unemployed for long time because of the situation generally unlivable. I Australia recently to my own kids about their life you know that that does children. You've no real. Grasp of what's going through your parents minds. That we took, we had a great childhood Safah's we're concerned we grew up playing in the streets of the full. we didn't have feel for. With every day only about a great family my dad was one of five kids. So we had. Lots of family on his side cousins and uncles. My Mom was one of Sutton in heck six girls and a boy she had giant fan found when we gather together, there were to be hundreds of his daughter actions and liberals very funny place I. REMEMBER GROWING UP A. Laugh in good times and but a call sweet new. Later on my parents, you know coping with only problems you have coming from, you know with unemployment and an economy there but they didn't let us know but. Did. You ever go back and and speak to them that what it was like for them that time curious. Yeah. Well, the thing is that. I was I was born nineteen fifty, a couple of things happened. the tech would be turning points. One was that. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, fifty, full, I got polio, which is. Endemic at the time there was A. Massive. International crisis around the spread of polio virus. So I called it around the time that Sulk came up with the vaccine. But not quite in time read. and. Until then my father was convinced, I was going to be the soccer player in the family. We grew right next auto evidence football ground, which is one of the main teams in countries. So he was convinced I was Gonna be the soccer player. So I was strong and fast and Anita, told me trauma had a great sense of Boll Control and he thought this is the one fan. My youngest brother Neil eventually went on to be professional soccer. Yeah, I'm played for evison. In fact, he my brother John were taken on by the team Neil persisted with John lack the life of it less. So yes, I got poed and that was Devastating. For the family members a kid you don't have a word I've devastating it is, but you can imagine now a spokesman about it. Later on, you can imagine your own four year old kid completely paralyze stretched out. Bad. Surrounded by sandbags, NICO overnight from being perfectly fit to being completely wiped out. And some kids didn't make it a total. So is in hospital for eight months when it came out on to braces and we will chat crutches and. I was tremendously cute. I have to say. Often, me money spontaneously in the street. So that was a big thing obviously for the whole family are seventy the only one in the whole family to get it So that was bad for them. A memoir of a friend of Mine God's. Cycle Colston rankin saved the day save is to Kensington this particular thing in the Standard on very well at his own haulage business. And my dad had been. A professional soccer player himself he'd. Run. PUBS. And have been very successful, but then the wall intervened and. he was being offered the to be the manager of this. Very successful pub, but he was then passed over by the brewers in favor of a well-known sock play who was looking to manage a pump. So. My Dad had to work a DACA long showman and. But there's whole period of unemployment than Stettin Christmases, looming and literally Christmas Eve. This guy stand rankin. Showed up at the highest where the become full of food. Tacky. Presents for us that hasn't been anything. There was just wondering how Christians tiny show with a tool. So ready for like a Father Christmas. Jonathan's exaggerated. Wasn't that we lived in abject poverty. But it was difficult for them. You know we. And we went as aware of it but but it was it was hard for them and then. In Nineteen fifty-nine. Madonna was back at work and had an industrial accident. He was what Mrs Stihler actor. And he broke his neck I'll he was Completely paralyzed. quadraplegic quadriplegic paralyzed from the neck down. To won't morning. This wooden beam they're working on fell thirty feet the rope snapped and broke his neck. Oh,

Liverpool Soccer Polio Lancashire United States Colton Center Neil Brewers Colston Rankin Mrs Stihler Safah Sulk Britain Nico Sutton Australia Madonna John
Brent Scowcroft, national security adviser to two presidents, dies at 95

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:49 sec | 4 months ago

Brent Scowcroft, national security adviser to two presidents, dies at 95

"Former national security adviser and Falls Church resident, Brent Scowcroft is dead. The late 95 year old had the distinction of being national security advisor to two presidents Gerald Ford and George H. W. Bush. No one else in history conclude that honor Scowcroft was also an advisor to Ronald Reagan and Barack Obama. Here's CBS News National security consultant Jeff McCausland. He was awarded the president Medal of freedom. He subsequently was awarded a knighthood by the order of the British Empire and in 2009 probably largely because of his work on the reunification of Germany with President George Herbert Walker Bush He was presented the Grand Cross of the order the merit by the Federal Republic of Germany. Scowcroft, who served in government posts for 60 years, was a Republican who spoke out against the 2003 invasion of

Brent Scowcroft President George Herbert Walke Jeff Mccausland Advisor Federal Republic Of Germany Gerald Ford Barack Obama Ronald Reagan Germany Falls Church President Trump CBS Grand Cross Consultant
Brent Scowcroft, national security adviser to two presidents, dies at 95

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:46 sec | 4 months ago

Brent Scowcroft, national security adviser to two presidents, dies at 95

"Former national security adviser and Falls Church resident Brent Scowcroft is dead. The late 95 year old had the distinction of being national security advisor to two presidents Gerald Ford and George H. W. Bush. No one else in history, concluding that honor His achievements are worth, noting CBS News National Security consultant Jeff McCausland. He was awarded the president's Medal of freedom. He subsequently was awarded a knighthood by the Order of the British Empire. And in 2009 probably largely because of his work on the reunification of Germany with President George Herbert Walker Bush He was presented the Grand Cross of the order the Merrick by the Federal Republic of Germany. He was also an advisor to Ronald Reagan and

President George Herbert Walke Advisor Brent Scowcroft Federal Republic Of Germany Jeff Mccausland Gerald Ford Ronald Reagan President Trump Germany Falls Church CBS British Empire Grand Cross Consultant
The Widows of Malabar Hill by Sujata Massey

Books and Boba

05:02 min | 4 months ago

The Widows of Malabar Hill by Sujata Massey

"So, re-re yes. What do you want to start with this one? I think we should start with the author's background. and. Just like the inspiration behind Irvine. So. John Massey was born in England and she was raised in the US right now, she lives in Baltimore and her parents are from India and Germany. So she did a lot of traveling. She actually wrote another mystery series back in the nineties which was set in Tokyo while she was living in Japan and it's the Ray Chamara mystery series. But this book was more in the of own voices She did an incredible amount of research for the book I don't know if the people are goods forums read the acknowledgments at the very back but I tend to read all of the acknowledgments because I. I'm usually really curious as to who the author thank and it gives me like a sense of. Their journey when it came to writing the book and she. Massey doesn't have a background in law. She reached out to people reached out to legal historians at universities in. The US who specialize in South Asian law and also in Bombay she contacted magazine editors who are familiar with Parsi customs she went she actually went to Mumbai and she visited all of the historical institutions she reached out to like even railway experts. So she could figure out like how people were able to travel from one place to another and even with the food she I think she interviewed a bunch of like food writers as well. So like the food descriptions in this book are fantastic and our main character per wien is actually inspired by two. Women, attorneys. One of them was Cornelius One of them was Cornelius She was the first woman to read law at Oxford, and the first woman to take the British law exam in eighteen ninety to eighteen, ninety two that's a lot earlier than I would expect the first. First Indian woman to to study law, and the other women that appropriate is based on is Mathon Totta lung who also studied law in Oxford and whisk first woman admitted to the Bombay bar a back in one thousand, nine, hundred, twenty, three. So. Yeah like per Venus. This this book is set in the nineteen twenties. So yeah. It's actually it's really interesting that it's actually based on women who did practice law so Yeah. I mean it's I? Don't think reunite can claim to be experts in the cultures of India but this book real you can tell that the author did a lot of research especially to portray like Mumbai such Mambi during this time period, which was a pre partition it was it depicts a Mumbai that's very multicultural multifaith like a lot of different. People Customs Cultures Religions, and even value sets that kind of coexisting with each other which made for really interesting setting especially in the context of per wien enter father Jamshedi as lawyers who had to. Navigate these. Waters right because every single community has their own set of loss at they have to understand and know how to argue and just also takes place on the backdrop of this was when India was still in imperial colony, right is still part of the British empire and so you have the added. wrinkle of a colonizing power in the form of white people in the mix as well. Yeah Like you said, I'm I'm not an expert with a one thousand, nine, hundred twenty s India But in terms of like England nineteen twenties. So that was during George, the fifth Who was the grandson of Queen Victoria? It's so it's to rains after the Victorian era. So very the the the dad of the King's speech King Yes yes. So this was during time where there was a rise in socialism. And just. I. Think it was like at the height of the British empire and then it crumbled.

Bombay John Massey India United States People Customs Cultures Religi England Mathon Totta Lung Irvine Oxford King Ray Chamara Tokyo Japan Baltimore Jamshedi George Queen Victoria Germany Mambi
Vincent Brown discusses his new book, ‘Tacky’s Revolt’

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

05:58 min | 5 months ago

Vincent Brown discusses his new book, ‘Tacky’s Revolt’

"Vincent Brown welcome to meet the rices. Slavery is war. Tell me what that means. Well. In the book. I tend to think of slavery itself as a state of war, and in that I'm following the enslaved themselves who often discuss slavery as a state of warfare amongst themselves, most famously allowed Equiano who we know as one of the most famous formerly enslaved abolitionists of the late eighteenth century British Atlantic. said in his autobiography that when you make people slaves. Them to live with you in a state of war. Now in that he was echoing the philosopher John Locke. Who said that what is slavery? But the state of war continued between what he thought was a lawful conqueror and the concord now John Locke was trying to legitimate slavery. He was an investor in the Royal African company, and he actually helped to write the constitution for the colony of south. Carolina, which became a slave state. State, but equiano was doing something a little bit different than John Locke. He was actually commenting upon the conditions of slavery, the violence that was required to maintain people in slavery and the kind of response that was bound to come by those people who had been subjected so violently so for him, slavery was a state of war, and there were other enslaved people who echoed. Seeing slavery that way helped me frame the slave revolt in Jamaica. In seventeen, sixty, seven, sixty, one, which was the largest in the eighteenth century, British Empire as a war itself right as one of a series of wars, all around the Atlantic world that then ed up in this conflict in seventeen sixty Jamaica I'd like to look at your own life, and where that intersects with war, because you grew up in San Diego, and in fact, it was very early on that. You became aware of conflicts. I did well. I'm an American citizen. I grew up in the United States. I was born in the late sixties at the height of the Vietnam War and I I'm sorry to say that I can't name a five year period when the US military hasn't been abroad somewhere engaged in conflict with somebody over the course of my entire life, which seems to me like a half century of war having. Having grown up in San Diego I grew up in one of the largest terry garrison towns really in the history of the world the US Navy is as a major base in San Diego. The US Marines just north of San Diego have a major base and so coming through high school. A lot of my friends would join the military because it was the big industry in town, right. And of course, you know, my family had been had served in the army. My father served in the army. My Uncle A. Brother had done three combat tours I. Believe one in Korea and two in Vietnam, so the history of the military, the engagement overseas abroad in military campaigns was very much a part of my thinking growing up, and so when I thought about the history of slavery. It just jumped out at me that this history was itself a history that was embroiled embedded in a world of warfare, especially in the eighteenth century win. You have got Great Britain struggling in a century long campaign against its its greatest global enemy France, and all of those European wars then topped onto. The wars of enslavement that sent people out across the Atlantic into the European colonies in America, and what you have is a world of wars within wars, which looked very familiar to me like the campaigns at the US was fighting within the larger ambit- of the Cold War so by the time I grew to adulthood in the late eighty S. I was seeing these these late cold war campaigns in these post colonial states as as part of the larger Cold War, and then you see these proxy wars between the US and the Soviet Union fought out in places like Afghanistan right, and then of course by two thousand one, you see those kind of proxy campaigns between the US and Soviet Union growing into something else what we now call the terror wars, the war on. On Terror in Afghanistan and elsewhere I didn't see those things as continuous. I didn't see the terror war something uniquely different from most proxy wars of the late. Cold War period and my thinking historically has been to ask the question. How is it that one connects these longer histories of warfare together? And I do think that I was inspired to think that partly by having grown up in San Diego in a military town. And what about your, your family's personal history with war and with slavery? Well an african-american! My parents grew up in Virginia, and so they are descended from people who are enslaved probably as far back as the eighteenth century the Chesapeake Bay area. What's now? Virginia and Maryland was one of the largest importers of slaves in North America now I say north. America because the British empire imported the vast majority of its enslaved peoples into the Caribbean but for North America the territories that became the United States, the Chesapeake and South Carolina with a major importers of enslaved African peoples, and my family is descended from. Those people probably brought to North America in the eighteenth century. History was big in your life obviously, but also the arch. Yeah well. When I was in high school I I became very involved in theater and went to college thinking that I was actually going to do a theater degree. But at some point I thought well, you know I could probably do theater without a theater degree, but maybe I should have a backup plan and my second love in college was history, and that ended up being my career.

United States San Diego John Locke Equiano North America America Vincent Brown Soviet Union Afghanistan Jamaica Atlantic Virginia Carolina Chesapeake South Carolina Chesapeake Bay Caribbean
A Manhunt on the 17th Centurys High Seas

The Book Review

08:44 min | 6 months ago

A Manhunt on the 17th Centurys High Seas

"Steven. Johnson joins US now. He is the author of many books many bestselling books including farsighted. And how we got to now but he joins us to talk about. His latest book is called enemy of all mankind. A true story of piracy power and Histories. First Global Manhunt Steven. Thanks for being here but much having me. There are lots of exciting terms just in your title and subtitle alone. I WANNA start with those even though and we'll talk about this. There's a larger story that you want to tell with this book but let's begin with piracy because that's a fun word. What happened on September Eleventh? Sixteen Ninety Five. There's a kind of interesting bleak poetry to the fact that this happened on September eleventh. Basically the events that are at the center of the book is a clash at sea in the Indian Ocean between pilot. Ship led by a very mysterious figure who would become the most notorious criminal in the world. A guy named Henry Avery and a much larger Indian treasure ship whose name was anglicized as the gun sway and the translation of that into English is excessive treasurer or exceeding treasure. So they were being pretty conspicuous with maiming. This vessel in terms of the of treasurer on board and effectively. These two ships confront each other on September eleven sixty ninety five by all rights. The pirate ship should have been easily overpowered but to incredibly unlikely things happen a cannon onboard board that Indian ship explodes because of some kind of malfunctioning design which basically turns cannon into a bomb when it explodes in so instantly. There's this you know. Many people on Indian ship killed the deck catches on fire. And at the same time. The first cannon fire from the pirate ship manages to have this incredibly lucky shot where they split the main mast of the Indian chip in two which effectively disables at in in the water and so the pirates are able to board the ship they pull off this heist that in today's currency we be would be worth as much as one hundred million dollars so it makes one of the most lucrative crime some in the history of crime and triggers a global crisis that reverberates around the world. Okay before we get to that crisis because you would wonder why one active piracy would do that. Just general picture of the piracy problem at that time. I'm always taken aback by the way that pirates are these cute Nara dwells in children's picture books or like Johnny Depp for many people. But that's not what piracy was back. Then what did it looked like? And was this unusual. Well actually one of the origin points to this project for me was years and years ago. I mean something like fifteen years ago. When my kids were very young we went to Disneyworld and we went on the pirates of the Caribbean ride and it was right after nine eleven and I had this on. I was floating down this little canals. That ride songs are being song and everything. That's very Kelly. The that the pirates were the terrorists of the seventeen hundreds and sixteen hundreds right. They were these terrifying figures would show up out of nowhere and burn your village down and attack. The women and people lived in fear of them. Here was three hundred years later. And it's just a kind of a children's story so they'll link between pirates and terrorism. Which is something that runs kind of subtly through enemy of all mankind actually began on that. Disneyworld ride in some ways. But what's historically really important about pirates at this point in history and one of the reasons why this particular story has so much significance. I think is up until this point. There was a very blurry line in terms of the legitimacy of piracy so there was this other class of occupation. That was called being a a private here. And if you were a privateer from all outside appearances you're a pirate attacking other ships and stealing their treasure and doing all these atrocious things that seat. But as long as you weren't attacking if you were a British privateer as long as you weren't attacking British ships. You're within the zone of and people like Francis. Drake a couple of generations before Henry Avery. When often basically we live the life of piracy but then came back to England and was knighted and bought a giant estate and lived a completely legitimate lifestyle. And so in a sense what happens to this period because of crime for reasons we can get into. It's a turning point where the British crown finally has to take a stand against piracy. They have to basically announced to the world that they're not a nation of pirates the way they've been accused to be. Let's talk about what made this pirate attack so noteworthy. Obviously there was the hall but were there other things that made this a big deal at the time. There are a couple of big ones. I is the other element of the crime. This ship that they attacked was a ship that had been doing business and ports of call like Mocha in the red seat but it was also filled with religious pilgrims coming back from Mecca on a whole other level was kind of a Muslim like religious transport vessel as well and among those pilgrims were a significant number of women women in the Royal Court of Aranda. Who was the great grand mogul of India? The last of the moguls and this was an unusual thing. At the time right you would not see a lot of big vessels in sixteen ninety five. That had a significant number of women on board but there are all these female pilgrims on board and so when the pirates attack the guns way they find these women there and number of the pirates rape the women on board. Some of the women commit suicide jumping overboard to avoid being attacked. And so there's this kind of outbreak of the atrocious sexual violence that happens as part of the crime and of course WORD GETS BACK TO WRONGS. Zab that not only has a hundred million dollars of his assets been stolen but members of his extended royal family have been sexually attacked and violated and this all is crucial in terms of geopolitics. Because it's right at a moment in a time where there's a major economic transition happening in the world. There's a chapter in the book called two kinds of treasure and is basically. There are two different ways of making a fortune that are in conflict with each other here. There's a very old way which is represented by Aurangzeb which is have an autocratic dynasty tax year citizens. Sit On that wealth and pass it onto your descendants. That's what every most of the rich people in the world at this point where people who were members of some kind of royal family that had some kind of dynastic wealth. But there's this new way of making money that has just appearing in it comes in the form of this interesting embryonic. New Organization called the multinational publicly traded corporation and that was the east India company. The east India Company was the first company that actually had publicly traded shares. So that people could. Outsiders could invest in the company in those shares could go up or down in value and for the first time people were making money not just through the prophets of the business but through the increase in value of these publicly traded shares and that turned out to be the future. Right dot is how if you look at the one hundred richest people in the world today. The vast majority of them were people who made money because they had traded shares in a company. They found that their parents found it. So in a sense clash between these two massive economic forces and Henry. Avery in his little pirate ship gets right in the middle of it because once. Iran's UB here's that his money has been stolen in women have been raped he threatened to eject the east India company from India which is the main source of their income. They've been trading CALICO and chinse fabrics and so on and if that had happened if they've been thrown out of India the whole course of the British Empire would have been transformed. It's entirely likely that the British Empire would not have formed in in India in the subsequent decades. If the east India company had been injected. So why wasn't it? Attracted rings up puts a number of the employees of the east India Company under house arrest and threatens to execute them and they began a furious letter writing campaign back to London. Saying we have to find the pirate we have to bring him to justice and we have to announce to the world that we are not going to tolerate piracy anymore or else this whole incredibly lucrative business that the country is increasingly dependent on is just going to disappear and so. That's what triggers this global manhunt really the first one in

East India Company Henry Avery India Indian Ocean Treasurer United States Johnny Depp Caribbean Steven. Johnson Aurangzeb Rape London Mecca Francis Drake Iran England Royal Court Of Aranda Mocha
"british empire" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:49 min | 7 months ago

"british empire" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Well done for taking it like a man you may set I intend to study said take my exams and cover this school and the people of protesting with lotus I said your basic and that's having a stroke the people of Palestine got a subject of the British Empire my father as you say is the president and he's also I have a sister but she does not and my mother is I don't have any interest in your family six down we'll get another thrashing you will not be much research you can I rinsed off my feet the Titans actually died into the old city barge street dealers British soldiers week free Syrian monks Armenian merchants into the darkness this is a different good morning I must go home right now it is urgent something upset please I cannot think of gracious the schemes college eyes for but in this case on really been in the works each day on the keyboard felt like a revelation but I will never forget my first meeting with an Arab boy even though the kids usually the only issue you're not used to the heat maybe go to the the laundry I can be a hero of labor to be sure that you don't need to replace not.

Palestine British Empire president Titans
A Walking Tour of Dublin, Ireland

Travel with Rick Steves

07:15 min | 9 months ago

A Walking Tour of Dublin, Ireland

"Start. Today's all Irish. Our with tips for a walking tour of Dublin with nearly two million people in Greater Dublin. Ireland's capital is by far its biggest city and it thrives with Arts Entertainment Food and fun just taking a walk through Ireland's capital. You can see and experience so much of its charm. That can know where to look and if you know where to walk. It's even better. That's why we've invited to Great Irish guides. Joe Darcy and Karen O'hare to join us in our studios for a guided stroll through Dublin. Joe and Karen thanks for being with us. Our pleasure great to be here so if you're going to take somebody on a walk through. Dublin where we just start. I think I'd probably start up. Stephen's Green which is at the south. End of Grafton Street is a pedestrianised shopping street and Stevens. Green is a beautiful manicured Eighteenth Century Park. It reminds me of when you get off the platform and suddenly. You're at hogwarts step out of the middle of this busy packed city into a beautiful manicured park actually reminds me of London. Very much so probably. That's because it was designed in a time when Dublin was actually the second city in the British Empire. Oh without question. In everything. From the the wrought iron fencing around the entire park to the style of landscape architecture inside the park is very very limited those parts in London and Joe when we think of Saint Stephen's Green. Today it has some connections with Ireland's difficult fight for independence Jordan. The nineteen sixteen religion on Easter Monday called eastern evasion and there was one. Contingent of artists rebelled swear in command of Stevens granddaughter. Job was to mind. Stephen Greene barricaded streets on prevent British reinforcements from getting into the city centre and amazingly their only experience of warfare. Because he's not. Soldiers was watching the pathway news from World War One and where everybody was digging trenches all over Belgium France so they dug trenches in Stephen's Green. Hold out but of course British army caught up to four storey buildings all around the Gresham hotel. They had a clear line of fire. Is like they're digging their own tombs. Yeah Yeah So. They retreated from their interface called the Royal College of Surgeons. Which is just when you come out with Stephen Screen through that gate around. He'll after all colleges charges and you can still see bullet marks into whole memorial to mention. Yeah Yeah Yeah let host reminded of the the blood that was last is Ireland one. It's independent that was no easy feat the more understanding of history you bring your visit to. Dublin the more. You'll enjoy your sightseeing today when I go to Saint Stephen Screen it's Of course you've got the history but it's just a festival of of youth and families in life. People are feeding the ducks in the pond. There's a little theater there. And it's and it's the kickoff point for Grafton Street Karen mentioned Grafton Street Joe when he walked down Grafton Street What are you gonNA find? You're gonNA find a multitude of small shops as well as the big retail shops. Actually strangely enough when you come down from Stevens Gray and one of the first big shops you say you left US Disneyland. So there's a store you know. This is the High Rent Street and you have the high rents treated drives out the local businesses and it brings in the what. Are you gonNA see Karen when you walk down Grafton Street well I think the first thing that you notice is the street is seething with life there's wall to wall people coming and going in either direction and you know living in Dublin. You're always if you live there you're gonna run into someone you know in that street. You know when you walk down it you don't see any churches right on the street but hiding a little bit off. The way is a Catholic Church. Why would a Catholic Church be hiding off the main street in Dublin? Well Saint Theresa's Church right off. Grafton Street was One of the first places that it was allowable. I believe for Roman Catholics to openly worship after the period of time in the eighteenth century known as the penal laws when open practice of Roman Catholicism was officially outlawed by British rulers in Ireland so that churches write-offs in Stephen's Green and it's very much an oasis of tranquility in the city as it has been since the eighteenth century Saint Teresa's. It's a beautiful church to depend to end. It is interesting to think that in Ireland. Dublin was sort of London's second city and it was very not Catholic but when Catholicism was allowed you could worship as Catholics in Dublin but keep a low profile exactly so these great churches are tucked away in the back streets although they were allowed to openly practice. That wasn't really opened. That was in inverted commas. The church still had to be kinda hidden away. They weren't allowed to build churches on a main street. That's why it's down outside. So it Joe at the bottom of Grafton street you come to a very important College Beautiful College Trinity College and originally for the elites for the Protestant kids but of course today Everybody's welcome as it traveled. How do enjoy Trinity College? Well the best way to visit is to go into the front main entrance on an area called college dot Grafton Street just continue on straight over to your right hand side and you come into a beautiful Georgian Square. A huge amount of Dobbin was rebuilt. George an and that's like neoclassical screams. British Empire Eighteenth Century he and George W was rebuilt in the eighteenth century in Georgia. So we're one of the best Georgian cities. In Britain colleges SORTA like the elite colleagues for Ireland. Even go to college was founded in one thousand nine hundred hundred nothing left of the original college. It was almost totally rebuilt starting in Sixteen Ninety S and then Roy Eighteenth Century Karen my favorite thing when I step through that Grand. Entrance of Trinity is a little table where our students offering tours? Yeah that's right and I used to live right across from that table when I was in college and Trinity. Right in front square and there are students known as scholars of the college who've passed a competitive examination to have free tuition at the college and they give tours of front square dressed in the academic gowns. That were still common among students until recently and they are really eloquent. Fun-loving students giving you a candid. Look at student life. It's very inexpensive. It's a great way to get a sense of Trinity College absolutely in a great way to get a sense of the tradition of wit in Dublin. It goes back to one of the most famous Students at Trinity Oscar Wilde are guides to Dublin travel with Rick Steves are irish-american Cure. No half he attended. Kennedy College is an expert on the Ellen pipes which he performs with the company trio opened the door for three Joe. Darcy provides custom walking tours of Dublin and was recently on the board of historic Sweeney's pharmacy. Where James Joyce readings are given throughout the week when we go to Trinity College? Of course you've got to go to the library and see the book of Kells and so one of the most important medieval art treasures in Western civilization when you leave trinity when I was really struck by is a bank that used to be the parliament step in there and you get a little dose of British rule of Ireland Joe. Tickets into that the most important building built in Dobbin Jordan rebuilding eighteenth century was a new bike camera. Houses apartment one of the first purpose built house the parliament certainly in Europe. If not the world took about forty years to complete S- between seventeen forty. Seven hundred eighty and housed. Two Chambers House will come in the House of Lords very much along the the British can step into one of those houses to this day. It's open during banking errors free and and you really got sense of that little after the act of union and the first of January eighteen hundred one we became part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and the Bank of Ireland. Arden's forced commercial bank. They took over the building paid for the House of Commons. Hot To be put out of use never to be used as a place of assembly again but they said nothing about the House of Lords so the Bank of art and has maintained. And it's a beautiful room. It's mostly open Jordan banking hours occasionally there's functions and there you'll see a sign outside that it's either open or closed. I stumbled into it just this last year. I never knew about it and it was great

Dublin Ireland Joe Darcy Stephen College Beautiful College Trin Trinity College London Eighteenth Century Park Karen O'hare British Empire Eighteenth Cent Stephen Greene Royal College Of Surgeons Saint Stephen House Of Commons Bank Of Ireland Stevens British Army Roy Eighteenth Stephen Screen
Inside Iran's Underground Fashion Industry

The Business of Fashion Podcast

08:59 min | 11 months ago

Inside Iran's Underground Fashion Industry

"Global News headlines have been dominated by news out of Iran where a recent US air strike killed. Iran's most senior military leader General Qassem Awesome Sulejmani resulting in growing tensions in the Middle East back at voices. Two thousand nine. We shed some light on. Iran's underground fashioned seen team Iran is a country that we in the West know very little about but over the past few years. I've been receiving messages on instagram from young fashioned creatives. Who have written to me saying that that behind closed doors there is actually a vibrant fashion culture in Iran and they are longing to connect with all of us? It seemed like the perfect topic explore voices. Twenty nine to shed some light on Iran's underground fashion scene. We were honored to introduce four Iranian fashion creatives to share their experiences of their vibrant culture. Holzer with us and also to demystify some of our misconceptions about their country based in Chicago Hoda Khattab is the voice behind the political fashion platform. Juju Jewish and hotel opened our voices session with a powerful talk which explained how Iran's fashion economy has been impacted both by an extreme regime in Iran but also sanctions from the US UK and other Western countries. Hoda was joined by Sharon and chief of Car to self taught fashion designers and co-founders Iranian fashion label car. Who came all the way from Tehran to join us and the brilliant Iran born London based sued goal Sarky founder and editorial director of Tank magazine who interviewed Hoda Sharon and Sheva together? These four challenged our assumptions about aww country that is largely closed off from the West on this week's B. O. F. podcast go inside. Iran's fashion industry and I had this really cute flowery speech. I was excited to give but given what's happening in Iran right now. I think it's only fair to sort of take a setback and talk about the situation and kind of conceptualize that so right now. It's been almost a week in which the Iranian government has actually shut down the Internet and shooting Shiva and I couldn't even be in touch until they landed in the UK. I haven't been able to have been in touch with my family for the past near week. Either and this this sort of constant and current sort of uprising protests are really in part due to economic insecurities as sort of economic degradation of society see that has been caused by government corruption mismanagement of funds but also US and UK sanctions that have literally crippled society. Every single Iranian every single day is affected by sanctions by this country and by the United States. Things like medicine is unaffordable. Everyday curable. Diseases people are dying from because they don't have access to medical care or medicine because of the high prices food commodities everyday little things are so inaccessible accessible to every Iranian right now because of the situation so so important that yes what's happening in Iran is horrible but I think we also have to understand that the United states and the UK and many of our countries are also complicit. And what's happening right now. The reason and the difficulties that she didn't she will be talking about more both domestically but also from the sanctions that these countries are having creates a larger more complicated situation that we really need to be. unpacking and fashion is inherently political intertwined and all of this and yes obviously in Iran. There's a mandatory dress code and fashion. Maybe a little bit more political explicitly there but throughout the entire world. There is no such thing as apolitical fashion. It does not exist if anybody says fashion is apolitical. Please Punch them. This Muslim is condoning violence. I'm pleased on called prevent on me but it's true because fashion ultimately at its core is the motive communication. We're communicating something able to convey really powerful messages. Tell people about a culture about society or we're not an recyling. It and silence is complacency at a time where we truly cannot afford to. The world is fucking on. I can say fucking the world is fucking on fire right now. Aw How can we ever think that what we're creating and putting out in the world should not be engaging with us and all of us were closed and are in the business of fashion. I don't even immune that fund and yet are we actually truly grappling with the complexities of how fashion is truly political on so many levels beyond just just a slogan which could mean or not mean something based on where you're producing it Fashion is even more inherently political. If we think about production and consumption what does that mean. The majority of our clothes are produced in Southeast Asia by people who look like me and you had the majority of consumed here. In the West our whole industry relies upon and continues continues to profit from histories of imperialism genocide sanctions that have plagued the entire world and yet we still profit from it. We're living in an active empire. The British Empire still exists people are still profiting off of the fact that there is no economic growth. happening in countries countries like Indonesia because we profit from it and we value this and our entire industry is built upon it. So what does that mean and also the fact that fashion literally frames our bodies like literally every time we step outside. We're deciding how we want our body to be actually presented in the world there's nothing else that's more intimately connected to our identities or the manifestation of that in public space than fashion literally. Wraps it touches our skin. So what does it mean mean for something that's made in a product of violence to be rubbing off on our skin every single day were so so concerned about what we eat where it goes in our bodies but how about what touches our skin constantly every single day most nights some nights but also but it conveys a Maybe religion the fact that I'm visibly Muslim. My experiences growing up in the United States as someone visibly Muslim has been marked with physical assault being uncalled terrorists every single day. This is a reality that every day I step out of my house and choose to present myself in a way that I know that I'm GonNa be added to another government surveillance. Watch list her. And if you don't have to think about every day when you step outside of your house who is going to profile you or what police is going to stop and search you. That's privilege which doesn't make that decision any less political so we have to think about that and right now especially the fact that the Muslim identity is trending trending in the fashion industry. My identity is sexy. Every single person wants a Muslim. Who looks like me? Walking down the runway and their latest campaign. But how can we have the fact that right. Now we're at a time of heightened anti Muslim racism on a global level partnered with the time that we see Muslim faces taking up space across fashion magazines. What does that immune for our industry? Is that a trend. Or are we actually substantially dealing with and grappling with the manifestations of what it means to support Muslims. Would it means the support people people of Color. How can Nike? For example create. A pro hit job that was created with the raw materials by Muslim wiegert Muslims and concentration camps in western China passed down to Muslims in Indonesia working in sweatshops to produce Nike Apparel and then sold here and then be a product and praise as for being so pro Muslim. Why are we allowing brands and the whole entire fashion industry to simplify and reduce our identities into just a hit job? Hit Job is not synonymous as being Muslim but we allow fashion right now to reduce simplify and completely annihilate the movements Minson identities in which we've been working on for decades actually call this revolution washing greenwashing which I think most of us are familiar with. But it's at the revolution every brand. Dan Wants to be sexy. And part of the Revolution Right now. But what are you actually doing. Are you actually simplifying. And reducing and taking away the significance of what it means to be Muslim. The complex experiences of what it feels like to wear every single day and that the government simultaneously is gonNA use that against me or use that to invade on a son and and so. I'm really excited. Really excited to also be able to be the sheet and Sheva on this panel to understand that the world is fucking complicated like there's a lot She does happening every day everywhere but rather than just being afraid of taking a step back and be like okay. We're GONNA make the simple like I don't want to be controversial. We have to engage with at that. Fashion should not be in the business of simplifying things but embracing the complexity and really being able to grapple and imagine a better world and then actively work work toward building that

Iran United States West Indonesia UK Sheva Iranian Government Middle East Global News General Qassem Tehran Southeast Asia Nike Hoda Khattab Chicago Holzer Hoda Hoda Sharon Tank Magazine London
Keith Recker on Color as Narrative

American Fashion Podcast

09:06 min | 11 months ago

Keith Recker on Color as Narrative

"Guest in the studio is Keith. wrecker who is the author of a new book true colors world masters of natural dyes and Pigments Heike. Hey how are you both pretty good Keith how did you get into color. I have to say it's been a long and winding road I come come from a background of poetry and literature and of course you know when you have that background you have to do something and I ended up having to separate careers. Maybe three three one and big retail as director of home furnishings at Saks fifth avenue gump San Francisco and Bloomingdales Direct Response and another career nonprofit as head of aid artisans As founder of the hand Eye Fund and hand eye magazine and currently as pro bono creative director of the international folk art market based Down Santa Fe and my third career has been in Trenton color forecasting with Panton. WGN A little bit with Stylus of really trying to inject a sense of adventure creativity relevance to their client base. Now when we did our episode where we interviewed Donna. Karen that was was She had part of the international folk art market in the urban store and and we were surrounded by products from that market But she didn't really talk about the interview. Can you tell us a little bit about the international folk art market. Yeah absolutely you were surrounded In the urban zone holiday market by I think it was twenty nine different artists from all over the world mostly textiles in that In that collection and the things ranged from the most amazing handspun Kunia hand-knit by artisans in Argentina And the group. That does these. Things is part of have a biosphere management program in the high dry plains of Argentina where Kunia are an essential part and the Kunas harvested the incan way where the village surrounds the Vicuna. So that there's no sense of panic. They slowly move in until the animals can be sheared It's a really touching story so you have. You were surrounded founded by twenty-five stories with that kind of depth and historic resonance And the folk art market is an annual event in Santa Fe. Happens every July. We bring together between one hundred sixty and one hundred eighty artists from all over the world fifty plus countries and they're bringing the best of what they make from a traditional point of view view sometimes from a personally adventuresome creative point of view sometimes from recycled and cutting edge social point of view. It's a real mix of creativity city that from our us-based experiences seems very out of the mainstream and therefore terribly exciting and motivating they must get a lot of just going to that and and meeting each other and seeing what they all do all around the world you that that must be just such experienced for an artisan who works in the community services that do the same thing and then meeting artisans who do wildly different things from other parts of the global. You've already understood the thing that the artists themselves I liked the best about it. They love exchanging topics with each other. Whether it's how to whether it's Oh my God you should try this. Sometimes they get together and collaborate after the market so somebody shares of an all white Chikan embroidery piece from Lucknow and they send handed off to one of their new friends to be dipped in indigo to be Bandini tie-dyed to to be transformed into something subtly and beautifully different so the exchanges which is really the magic plus the sales a lot of folks walk away from the market with a years worth of income in their pockets based on a twenty two hour event. We sell a around three three point. One two three point. Four million dollars worth of product in twenty one hours and all. The skit paid out Two days later so in five days you go from setup to pay out and reviewed archie. It's an amazing operation. It sounds like a really tight knit community than really so. Is it hard hard to join that community or WHO's finding new artisans for that. It's a very tightly jury. Joe Artists from all around the world apply online pictures and text and their two juries. There's a group of academics from museums around the world. Mostly around the. US who look at it from the point of view is of is this this really rooted in a cultural assets right that we recognize that there's techniques color languages languages motif. Is it routed somehow in community entity heritage and then the second group answers the question. Is this gonNA connect with the market. Does it represent a product. Does it represent a look. Does it represent a price is point and of course is it super beautiful. I mean that's that's the first question that we have to answer before we even proceed to the further analysis so those two groups are responsible. Secure eating something. That really is unique in the world. There's nothing like in the entire world so between that and what you're describing in your the book about being in touch with all these natural colors ways of getting color from the earth from plants a lot of this is about being in touch with what what you're making an and how it's being made and we talk about the supply chain a lot but most people aren't really at the root of their supply. I Chan they don't they don't go back to you. Know Not alive designer. Spent much time in cottonfields looking at different types of cotton as they're growing what the fibers look like in different fields. They get finished product. Kind of textiles What does it do for the world? If if people are more in touch with this I would love to answer your question in a complicated way. Cleans that's what the show is more. I think we need to look at the heritage Jane even as we look at the supply chain If you look back at how how we got where we are today in terms of what we make and how we make it into textiles especially The eighteen fifty six invention of the first synthetic dye. Mo- Oh Wien right by a teenage English chemists Perkins totally by accident. He was working with coal tar to try to find a synthetic Quinine quinine substitute right to treat malaria and the colonial era of of the British empire and he discovered that something that he was making Would dissolve Alvin Water and color rags in really very attractive sharp Purple Reddish purple. That unleashed the willful exploration exploration of using a lot of petrochemicals to substitute what were centuries thousands and thousands of years of heritage so for example the company that became. BASF right the maker of the cassette tapes that some of us are old enough to have fetish started off by making making synthetic indigo and interestingly the synthetic indigo they made did not appeal because they had not really captured that the full charm of indigo go went beyond just the indigo molecule. They had to go backward and realized that. Indie Ruben. A red molecule that would form in the process of indigo dyeing was needed to give the color depth so they had to go back and explore. Why Nature was so much more beautiful than what they were at first capable of making in any case since eighteen fifty six we have lost so much knowledge? If you and I walked down the street today and Looked at what people are wearing down the street and we asked ourselves well. How would you ever get that color? Are we using anything other than a chemical would have zero insight. Chances are right. We've left all that behind so the heritage chain I think has impoverished the richness understanding That we used to have about what comes from our world and how it's made and how valuable it is. We've gotten to a point where we're so distant from our heritage chain that things have the virtue of plastic bags of disposable valueless product after they've faded in the washed twice were done. There's a statistic out there that eighty percent of the clothing we buy ends up in a landfill within one year. And it's because we're so oh distant from people culture heritage skill invention and talent that the things we buy are not worth holding onto so then we go to the supply chain right and there really is in as an extension of this heritage chain a set of material knowledge judge that is still relevant in making textiles. It still relevant in making clothing and it's waiting for us to study at more and to really really incorporated into responsible valuable fashion creation.

Argentina Director WGN Keith Keith. Wrecker Bloomingdales Quinine Donna Hand Eye Magazine Karen San Francisco Lucknow Hand Eye Fund Santa Fe Kunia Panton United States
Bond Girl Style, an inteview with Dr. Monica German

Dressed: The History of Fashion

04:14 min | 1 year ago

Bond Girl Style, an inteview with Dr. Monica German

"Other balloons certainly wear traditional traditional western clothes. But they're also subverting. The way in which they are wearing. Those Western close bond is always impeccably dressed. The suits of the other villains from Goldfinger to Hugo drax are produced almost a grotesque effects took the bodies of the villains they move screw task aradio Britishness of course in the book as well as into film Goldfinger angle fingers. Here's an henchman odd job. Who Wears a traditional Western suits at down to bowler hat but the effectively looks like okay grotesque parody of Englishness the for reinforcing that idea of racial difference which is at all Switzer British wideness and this power dynamics play out a little bit differently in the interactions between double o seven and the ladies that cross his path in these inevitable travels? And you know as you've already touched on at the time of Fleming's initial manuscript that patriarchal mindset worn out of colonialism was still very much in place. So how did this inform the way that Fleming wrote about women and in particular the women that bond encounters brought what. This isn't a very very intriguing question. Because one of the things about Bundy's that he never seems to score we British ladies especially British winds latest. So he's loggers are always foreign or women of color so there seems to be a suggestion whereby they British woman remains untouchable and untouched. She still represents the unconquered unconquered all the old Britannia the P. to me of DC. Of course the unconsummated relationship between bond and moneypenny accursed earth. Floor extremely hard with all especially the earlier movies when she's played by Lois Maxwell but nothing ever happens. It's a safe. The reason unwritten rule in fact in the novels Fleming always goes as far as saying is there is an an unwritten rule that that relationship can never be consumated. Those women can not be touched. They are part of the civil of the of the secret service US and the they were present in a way the British empire the whiteness. So the woman of the female body cannot be conquered by boomed or anybody else of course. We have a version of acts in addition to know where Mary true blood. Am A sex trade trade working for the secret. Service in Jamaica is killed and probably sexually violated by would flaming holes H. Hi Grow It. Mixed Chinese unblocked man dot sexual assault or the assault that has a sexual connotation eight self represents a subversion of the colonial authority and ideology the bond represents by first I when bond is overseas is always able to conquer the bodies all female foreign women sometimes they are white women sometimes. They're women of color but dot kind of relationship exists. Nevertheless it's a relationship that some would say say can never lead to marriage and the only time that bond ever goes near marriage of course with tragedy Vincenzo was also also not British but is wide but those relationships never go anywhere. Because the marriage signifies somehow bones mingling angling his is blocked with foreignness and bombed cannot do money also cannot settle down because he would not be. That's

Fleming Bundy Goldfinger Lois Maxwell Vincenzo Assault United States Foreignness Jamaica Hugo Drax DC Mary
Bond Girl Style, an inteview with Dr. Monica German

Dressed: The History of Fashion

09:32 min | 1 year ago

Bond Girl Style, an inteview with Dr. Monica German

"Dr Drew Thank you so so much for joining us today. I have to say that I am a huge bond fan and a have been since I was a small child and I've seen all the movies more than once source super excited to see your book come out a few months ago. Congratulations thank you. Yeah but before we get to this bevy of beautiful women who have graced the bond John Franchise for more than seventy years now. I'm hoping that we can talk a little bit about the man behind the creation of the character of James Bond who was of course Ian Enflaming and he was quite personality in his own right. Am I correct. Absolutely to Ian Fleming was a Scottish man and no so many people realize that and then and bone these also a scotsman or half is called smitten anyway so many overlaps Fleming came came from an upper class background as bond climbing works in naval intelligence in the Second World War and so therefore he had that kind of background background in espionage on the secret services in the world of intelligence which excited him an interested in so a lot of the detail we found in the if we find in the novels is very much detail that came from slamming own experience director experience hope the world and the World Intelligence Fleming also was on various. He liked sports from his days at school. Due to these middle age he also enjoyed an defying things in life. Alcohol and Fine foods sounds simple foods but rich foods while and women plenty of them many affairs he was only married once but he had many affairs before jury and during the marriage it was sort of open marriage. I'm rather mia who then became enflamming. Of course it was also very interested in in experimenting in having relationships other than within Fleming. So so there's lots of overlap savage say between Ian Fleming James on that. I think that's also why people have been intrigued to find out about about the author behind the Noble Global Sin Short Stories. Yeah and I think that many of our listeners may not have known at the bond films were actually I based on the books and the he wrote thirteen books folks and also a handful of stories and in even as big a fan as I am. I didn't realize that Casino Royale was Fleming's very first book which was published in Nineteen. I'm fifty three. And of course it's most recent film on Carnation was the first of the bond series to star Daniel Craig back in two thousand twelve so your your book looks at Fleming's writings the books and the films. Several of these films like Casino Royale were adapted and produced decades AIDS after the books are written and many of the narratives in both books and the movies surrounding race and gender. Fill very problematic when we look at them today and this is something that you confront head on in your book like you do not shy away from this at all which was much appreciated. Might you give us a couple of examples of how some of the classic themes that we see in bond can be problematic today to contemporary audiences. Sure a mean first of all I also wanted to point out the Casino Royale was in fact I adopted in nineteen sixty seven and starred. They even this was not not a production by Company that's behind the bond franchise using independent company and really it doesn't count ended unobtainable Only takes teams loosely than the sense into a rather bizarre kind of plock. Let's just just for the sake of accuracy was casino royale before Daniel Craig's star in it yet but anyway going back to your question about gender and race you're Accident Erard said when you read the novels and when you see many of the particularly early Mondays you realize particularly with today's hindsight fight. I guess that's There are problematic relationships that are going on both in terms of race ending terms agenda. He when you look against the origins of bond in the nineteen fifties. This is a moment in time where Breton while Europe the world had been shaken up by the Second Second World War many changes had occurred in the social fabric particularly off Britain. The British empire was coming to a rapid end and The gender relations had been shaken up by the war as well because Women had been taking jobs. That had been laughed laughed at without men. Men were all the front. So women had to make the most difficult situation and as a result again to nineteen four- these women were out stronger in a stronger position than they were before the war so in the bombed novels and some of the earlier earlier films you do see tensions at work bond is a very conservative bigger. He represents a kind kind of masculinity that's in any way regressive already at the time of Fleming's writing it's a kind kind of masculinity that's still thinking of you know the kind of masculine heroism the would've been fueled by the world workers offers and I kinda masculinity that was still very much British upper-class and white now the the end of the war the end of the colonial venture the end of the Endel dot kind of masculinity so bond is very much the center of a world that doesn't exist anymore or a world is beginning to vanish. This strong women around him challenge is masculinity challenge gender roles through their emancipated behaviors and patterns of behavior that appear throughout novels and and the early films. Now Bunk reacts badly today's bond is to dominate women. Bolton's bonus patronizing to them Bondi's also condescending to people of color and they race relations in the books and the early films can also be rather difficult today. Just this in this day and age. Because there is a clear binary a position between bombs upper-class wind British ways and and the ways of the foreign villains the customs of the people he encounters and interact with when he's he's overseas so yes you're absolutely right. Gender and Rice are incredibly programmatic ended and the politics attached to them are difficult but nevertheless it's skewed because the nobles in the film's expose the problems that we can then discuss today right right and ultimately you you came away with this incredibly well formed argument that as you right. I'm going to quote you. Hear a scenario analysis of bond girls exposes their performance of femininity as an active challenge to sexist and racist ideologies rather than as passive victims of patriarchal imperial master's inscribed in their clothes are multiple patterns of disruption to the political foundation of bonds world. Wow Mad writer respect Monica that those who sentences pat quite the punch. But I'm hoping that you might. I establish some of the mainstream expectations of women. During Fleming's era in terms of femininity. So that that as we move on we can establish how this archetype of the bond girl really kind of stands in contrast of course so after the war women We Are we understand. Went back to SORTA fulfill they more traditional feminine roles that they had been performing before for the Second World War so there's different cycles during the twentieth century both worlds shaking up the gender roles that had. I've been in place before the war so after the nineteen forties in the nineteen fifties wage in regard. Thank you as a conservative day. Kids is they were women. Well go back to the kitchen. Go back to being homemakers family. Mothers wives Supporting their husbands in their missions. They rolled their professional careers and they're therefore even fashion. Of course you know that my book a is framed by the work of fashion as passionately. Scores Passion reflects this return to a more conservative traditional health. Amenity with a return to align skirts and as opposed to the more streamlined contours of until one thousand nine hundred fifty so Sarah de Paschel

Ian Fleming Casino Royale James Bond Daniel Craig Dr Drew Ian Enflaming John Franchise Sarah De Paschel Europe Aids Bunk Rice Bolton Erard Breton Director Britain
"british empire" Discussed on Hard Factor

Hard Factor

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"british empire" Discussed on Hard Factor

"Is Monday November nineteenth top stories today. Pats gonna take one about mid-term election updates Florida and Georgia are finally done the midterms are really over this time. I swear I promise probably the last time. We're gonna talk about them. Good. Good rid. Maybe. Marshon take one about Meghan Markle making waves over in the British empire. Yeah. Meghan Markle's just pissing off the Royal family staff with her Americanise. I'll do a lightning round of other headlines and west couldn't be here today. He's out there. Getting that bread. Takeaway, cheddar cheese. The recounts are over in Florida and Georgia y'all mostly Rick Scott has won the Florida Senate race flipping the seat from democratic veteran. Senator Bill Nelson, Rick is currently the governor Florida which brings us to the other recount, which is the battle of the Andrews for governor of Florida democratic Andrew Gilliam he conceded to Republican Andrew Disentis over the weekend. This was the second concession speech that Gilliam had to give the heated Florida governor's race, which frankly sucks like hate to see that. Giving one is bad enough. But he had to give another one disad this. He he was never really word apparently because he went on TV to kick Gilliam Willie was down saying, quote, I was never really in danger because my margin was big enough. Now, I can go forward without really ever having to worry about this. Yeah. The smoke winter was speaking about his massive point four one percent margin that led to a legally triggered hand recount. But yeah, you one, but yeah, that's like most smug. Victory speech since bigger n- talk shit about The protein, man. king. Yeah. It was because Gilliam he totally conceited. And then he unconsented because everyone was like, bro don't on concede the margin. So tight that legally the state of Florida has to hand recount, so he got back in and then he had to get back out still upset with people for that. Like you made me put myself back in to lose a second time. Someone got someone's not going on the next campaign. That's for sure. Yeah. Totally. And this was a weird race. You might remember that the Trump backed Republican candidate Santos said at a rally during the campaign that Gilliam would quote a point source backed activists to the state house if he had won and to say this was criticizing later when he said during a Fox News.

Andrew Gilliam Florida Meghan Markle Gilliam Willie Florida Senate Rick Scott Georgia Senator Bill Nelson Fox News Trump Andrew Disentis Santos Andrews four one percent
"british empire" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

07:56 min | 2 years ago

"british empire" Discussed on KGO 810

"Why it was that Madison was so wrong headed in assuming that what he could do was pick, off Canada just send a couple of armies up there, take Montreal and we grow the whole United States North George James Madison was. No warrior he was never in the military to. My understanding why did he assume that Canada was? Easy, pickings well, he he he greatly, underestimated The the extent to which. The Canadians and the British would would fight for? Canada, and, he, Grady greatly overestimated How effective the very small American army would would do against candidate and then, his strategy was all wrong He took the small American army and split it up into four sections so that it. Was even weaker than it was the lack of communication between him and his generals was, was a monumental. And so when he launched his attack on Canada in the summer. Of eighteen twelve it it failed miserably In in Detroit it sealed in in against Montreal and it failed to even coordinate between the various elements in the. Army trying to invade Canada there's been a change of week fiasco there's been a change of government in London. Because of, an assassin's bullet that's right a man kills the prime minister for reasons that are, madness and Percival has gone and a man named Liverpool becomes prime minister the. Next fifteen, years this is one of. The longest standing prime ministers ever in the history of Great Britain or the British empire Liverpool however. Is a cagey person who understands that the threat to Canada must always be offset but he's got a little hands are a little busy in Europe right now so George you enter into the. Debate did Madison talk congress into launching the war in may of eighteen twelve because he, knew that Bonn Part was supreme on the continent and was, ready to March against Russia was, their coordination here or was there what you'd have to say a sinister element in Madison's imagination. Of taking advantage of the Europeans well. Madison was trying to take advantage of the situation Madison don't forget have. Been secretary. Of state under Jefferson Madison had been secretary of state for eight years he was well acquainted with with how events in Europe affected events here and. He had known for very long time that Napoleon in the summer of eighteen twelve was going to invade Russia. And if, if if if he succeeded which it looked to the whole world like it was, going to then he would have control of the entire European continent and his. Next victim, was going to be England. And so with that kind of pressure he thought that the English would would agree to negotiation with Him to. 'em their practices. In the high seas that were causing the war says that mean he thought. It'd be a quick war because they'd have to settle right away he could. Threaten Canada they were distracted by Napoleon and and by the way we could make common cause. With Napoleon if they didn't give us what we wanted he assumed? That the war would be over by Christmas well like everybody who? Enters, into a war they think it's going to be over very quickly they think it's going to go the. Way they plan and it doesn't but yes he. Thought it would be over very quickly we have to introduce a few, names here because the rascals on land are so outside is George spends a time profiling them general hull we've mentioned. That was Isaac halls the the the hero of the constitution that's his great uncle I believe is ankle, that's right it's alkyl William he manages to lose Detroit without trying very hard at all because the British. And then there are a couple of, other generals who are just outrageous characters one was Whittington is Wilkinson Wilkinson was a rascal who probably took money. From the Spanish fighting The Laura about it or no probably about it did Madison no Wilkinson was a rascal in Hampton was not much better sixty years old and fifty six years old Well Madison in in January of of eighteen thirteen appointed as as secretary, of. War a guy named Armstrong who who was responsible for hiring Wilkinson and promoting, him and also Hampton both of them and? I'm strong was. A was? A. Colossal incompetent and Madison's main Madison went along with him in in these appointments and yes Madison new What Wilkinson was all about Wilkinson have been around for, a very long time and. He, was a a nefarious character who never should never should have been in the, army to begin with in Hampton wasn't wasn't much better and when they when, when they invaded Canada or attempted to invade candidate in the fall of eighteen, thirteen. After the failure failure had had of invasion of eighteen twelve they. Feel miserably, as well The frontier. Was blessed with such boobs that they were eventually to be removed replaced with some, very famous generals, one. Of them William Henry Harrison goes on later to become president another one Andrew Jackson goes on to be president. And other one Winfield Scott goes, on to command the American army in Mexico and then be the commander at. The beginning of the civil war you see all these figures come up in, eighteen twelve I mentioned also George just by the by that Palmerston is the secretary of war four of four Liverpool at this point Palmerston who. Will command the British empire during the American revolution there during the American civil war so this fifty years gets very is a very tight a number of years for, the imaginations of both countries The the the war of eighteen twelve personnel are concerned in the navy. And the army really added to the training provided additional training for all of the men would lead both services, going into a civil war that's right and Palmerston is a very. Ancient prime, minister but now he's a very young man in London we've got him mentioned quickly that. In eighteen thirteen there were, other significant events the failures along the frontier we're going to be. Offset by, one success in eighteen thirteen this is Oliver. Hazard Perry and this is the battle of the Great Lakes that becomes determinate we'll, tell that story, next. But I I want to make sure George is it true that Oliver Perry was understood to be the hero. Of his time when he won, that battle in September of eighteen thirteen that he eclipsed all heroes in America He he did the be was he was the hero of the moment and and president Madison was in need of. Heroes then. Because the war was going dreadfully for the, for the United States at that at that time. He wanted his great victory in September of eighteen thirteen riot and and what, he did he worked with. William Henry Harrison the two of them and what they did. Was take back to the,.

George James Madison Canada Jefferson Madison Wilkinson Wilkinson American army Army William Henry Harrison secretary Napoleon Liverpool United States Detroit Russia Montreal Europe Hampton London Madison
"british empire" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

08:09 min | 2 years ago

"british empire" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"The John Batchelor show the torch dog the author much much much. Fun to read new book eighteen twelve the navy's war teddy Roosevelt wrote this war up and he wrote it entirely from the point of view of the US navy and made him a very. Celebrated figure in the late nineteenth century and by, the, way became president later right now however George Spence time and a deal of energy explicatives Wyatt was that Madison was so wrong headed in assuming that what. He could do was pick off Canada just, send a couple of armies up there take Montreal and we'd. Grow the whole United States. North George James Madison was no warrior he was. Never in the military to my understanding why did? He, assume that Canada was easy pickings well he he greatly underestimated The the extent to which the. Canadians and the British would would fight for Canada? And, he greedy greatly overestimated Effective the very small American army would would do against a candidate and then, his strategy was all wrong He took the small American army and split it up into four sections so that it. Was even weaker than it was the lack of communication between him and his generals was, was a monumental and. So when he launched his attack on Canada in the summer, of eighteen twelve it it field miserably In in Detroit It failed in in against Montreal And it failed to even coordinate between, the various elements in. The army trying to invade Canada there's. Been a change of weight fiasco there's been a change of government in. London because. Of an assassin's bullet that's right a man kills the prime minister for reasons that are madness and Percival is gone and a man named Liverpool becomes prime. Minister for the next fifteen years this is one of the longest standing prime ministers ever in the history of. Great Britain, or the British empire Liverpool however is cagey person who understands that the threat, to Canada must always be. Offset but he's got a little his hands are a. Little busy, in Europe right now so. George you enter into the debate did Madison talk congress into launching the war in may of eighteen twelve because he knew that Bonaparte was supreme on the continent and. Was ready to March against Russia was their coordination here or was? There what you'd have to. Say a sinister element in Madison's Imagination of taking. Advantage of, the Europeans well Madison was trying to take advantage of the situation Madison don't, forget have been secretary of. State under Jefferson Madison had been secretary of state for. Eight years, he was well acquainted with. With how events in Europe affected events here and he had known for very long time that Napoleon in the summer of eighteen twelve was going to invade Russia and. If if if if he succeeded which looked to the whole world? Like it was going to Then he would have control of the entire European continent and his next victim was going to be England and so. With that kind of pressure he thought, that the English would would agree to a negotiation with him To end their practices on the high seas that were causing the. War says that mean he thought it'd be, a quick war because they'd have to settle right away he could, threaten Canada they were distracted by Napoleon. And and by the way we could make common. Cause with Napoleon if they didn't give us what we wanted he. Assumed that, the the war would be over by Christmas. Well like everybody who enters into a war they think it's going to be over very quickly they think it's gonna go the way. They plan and it doesn't but yes he, thought it would be over. Very quickly we have to introduce a few names. Here because the. Rascals on land are so outsized George spends the time profiling them general hull. We've mentioned that was Isaac halls the the the hero of the constitution that's. His great uncle I believe is that's right it's uncle William he manages to lose Detroit, without trying very hard at all since the British. And then there are a couple of, other generals who are just outrageous characters one was Whittington is that is Wilkinson Wilkinson was a rascal who probably. Took money, from the Spanish fighting about it or no. Probably about it did Madison no Wilkinson was a rascal in Hampton was not much better sixty years old and fifty six years old. Well Madison in in January of of eighteen, thirteen appointed as as secretary. Of war a guy named Armstrong who who was. Responsible for hiring. Wilkinson and promoting him and also Hampton both of them and I'm strong was. A was a colossal incompetent and Madison's main Madison went along with him in. These appointments and yes Madison new What Wilkinson was all about Wilkinson have been around for a very long time. And, he was a nefarious character who never put should have been in the army. To begin with in Hampton wasn't wasn't much better and when they when when, they invaded Canada or attempted to invade candidate in the fall of eighteen thirteen, after. The failure failure had had of invasion of eighteen twelve they. Feel miserably, as well The frontier was blessed with. Such boobs that they were eventually to be removed replaced with some very famous generals, one of them, William. Henry Harrison goes on later to become president another one Andrew Jackson goes on to be president and other one. Winfield Scott goes on to command, the American army in Mexico and then be the the commander at the. Beginning of the civil war you see all these figures come up in eighteen, twelve I mentioned also George just by the by that Palmerston is the secretary of war four of four Liverpool at this point Palmerston. Who will command the British empire during the American revolution beer during the American civil war so this fifty years gets very is a very tight number of years for, the imaginations of both countries Yeah the the the the war, of eighteen twelve personnel are concerned in the navy. And the army really added to the training provided additional training for all of the men who would lead both, services going into the civil war that's right and Palmerston is a. Very ancient. Prime minister but now he's a very young man in London we've got him mentioned quickly that in eighteen thirteen there, were other significant events the failures along the frontier we're going to be. Offset by, one success in eighteen thirteen this is Oliver. Hazard Perry and this is the battle of the Great Lakes that becomes determinate we'll, tell that story, next. But I I want to make sure George is it true that Oliver Perry was understood to be the hero. Of his time when he won, that battle in September eighteen thirteen that he eclipsed all heroes in America He did the He was he was the hero of the moment and and president Madison was in need of heroes then because the war was going dreadfully for the for the United States at that, at that time he wanted us great victory in September.

George James Madison Canada Wilkinson Wilkinson army George American army secretary navy prime minister United States Napoleon Liverpool Montreal Europe Russia Detroit president George Spence John Batchelor
"british empire" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

SOFREP Radio

03:36 min | 2 years ago

"british empire" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

"So woke you're asleep so what what we want to cover for this one stuff that cat at vox who wrote an article like happy fourth of july here's why your countries socks and we never should have split with the british empire thanks guy so he wrote this entire article this dude i can't remember his name matt something matthew something and he wrote this article about how it was a mistake how american independence was a mistake because had we stuck with the british empire he thinks that we would have done away with slavery a lot earlier maybe the bagel might go on a lot longer because we're part of globe spanning empire and the british empire would have had a lot less of an incentive to do away with slavery because they had the american colony so is just an article that filled with conjecture and revisionist history and then he says you never white royal family running things while longer hereditary monarch running things but that would have been good but that's i mean again you're so you're asleep i mean you're trying so hard to be trendy and avant garde and portray your country in a negative light that you've just come full circle in your monarch ist like really well at the british royal family isn't racist either there's no no racism there folks and then his other argument was that had we not split with the brits that we would have been nicer to the native americans like brother do you understand that the british were the first ones to use the concentration camp they use it against the south africans during the boer war where do where do people come up with this stuff they're trying so hard to be woke that there's fallen flat on their it's embarrassing to watch them flow around like this and then his third argument was o that a constitutional monarchy is better than a constitutional republic brother you smoking crack he says that the government if we had if we'd stayed within when we would have a parliamentary system which is better than our current republic presidential system that we have it's do you know anything about the parliamentary systems in europe like they they're shit they can't get anything done you have to form a coalition government and i mean italy did not have government for like a freaking year and now they finally formed a government and they have right now they have a pretty like right leaning somewhat even say like crypto fascist government i mean there's a lot to be said for our presidential system and it's ability to get stuff done that you don't see with these shaky parliamentary systems that they have over in europe so i mean dude i i don't even know what the say i think that article was really just trying to get clicks on the fourth of july i really like what can i do to really piss people off and it'll get re tweets from the other side of of this everyone trying to everyone trying to prove how woke they are although all the woke cards are going to re tweet it so this is kind of a it's the soak slashed throat punch for the week you're so woke your sleep it's sad sad guys all right well extra check in the shout i you know i should've acknowledged it at three hundred sixty five but we're in episode three hundred sixty seven which is insane to me because i was thinking this means literally go an entire year plus now every day listening to us ramble that's insane.

"british empire" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

04:55 min | 2 years ago

"british empire" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"One of the most important things to remember is that it was not the colonists not the patriots not the socalled revolutionaries who initiated the change as a matter of fact they were responsible mostly for resisting the change the huge distance between england and north america meant that there couldn't be day to day control by the king or by parliament of everything that happened in individual colonies in fact there couldn't be controlled by any central authority even in the colonies at that time transportation communication was simply too difficult so it was inevitable that local authority would spring up and the local authority had sprung up north america and a group of leaders had empowered themselves had been empowered and perfectly it seemed to be perfectly fine with authorities in london colonial assemblies the house of burgess in virginia the state assembly in massachusetts throughout the colonies these local leaders were controlling events and all of a sudden after the french and indian war it was the british were trying to change things it is always easier to fight to preserve a life that you love to preserve the status quo that seems worthwhile then it is to get people to fight and sacrifice to try to realize some new vision one of the important things to keep in mind about this whole revolutionary struggle and the long lead up to it was that the people who made the revolution we're fighting to keep things as they were there's a beautiful passage about all of this that sums up the way the situation was before the american revolution and the events leading to it it's a passage written by my long ago professor of colonial history at yale edmund s morgan who's really one of the best writers on this anywhere and what he writes is the government of great britain hadn't been designed to cover half the globe and when englishmen were not busy extending their possessions still farther they were apt to regard the problem of turnpikes in yorkshire as vastly more important than than the enforcement of the navigation acts in new york administration of the colonies was left to the king who turned it over to his secretary of state for the southern department whose principal business was england's relations with southern europe the secretary left it pretty much to the board of trade and plantations as sort of chamber of commerce with purity advisory powers the board of trade told the secretary what to do he told the royal governors the governors told the colonists and the colonists did what they pleased that was the status quo and it was fine with everybody the british empire rights professor morgan however inefficient its management was very much a going concern and wiseman on both sides of the atlantic believed that its success was intimately connected with the bumbling way in which it was run freedom inefficiency and prosperity are not infrequently found together and it is seldom easy to distinguish between the first to freedom and inefficiency it was this desire to suddenly make the british empire more efficient that led to all kinds of difficulties it seemed for a while at least that those difficulties might be cleared up a bit when the stamp act was repealed and there was celebration throughout the colonies it was considered to be an absolutely great and brilliant and wonderful victory for all of the colonists they had demanded the stand back be removed one of the reasons that was considered so obnoxious was because because it put a special tax on all legal documents and one of the things about north america that time was it was a very much the most lawyer ridden society in the world it was easier for somebody of relatively modest background to become a lawyer in the new world than in the old world and one of the things that british visitors noted whenever they came the colonies was how busy the courts where there were constant lawsuits back and forth and lawyers especially top lawyers and boston like john adams for instance could make a lot of money they could make three thousand to four thousand pounds a year which was compared with a top carpenter who would make ninety pounds a year so you have some idea how well they would do meanwhile schoolteacher thirty pounds a year about a third as much as a carpenter so you can see that this underpayment of schoolmasters is not a new thing in america.

four thousand pounds ninety pounds thirty pounds
"british empire" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"british empire" Discussed on KOMO

"Good morning it's first light and we're going to have the damore cast in a couple of minutes but first thirteen past the hour this june eighteen sir winston churchill's great speech rally in great britain against the nazi menace was made on this day in one thousand nine hundred forty when he said if we fail then the whole world including the united states including all that we have known and cared for will sink into the abyss of a new dark age made more sinister and perhaps more protracted by the lights of perverted sciences the british empire and commonwealth men will do finding fellow and five years later same day lord haw was charged with treason for his pro german propaganda during the war one of europe's stupidest traditions made its way to the colonies on this day in sixteen twenty one the first duel took place at the plymouth colony in massachusetts in one thousand nine hundred forty eight columbia records introduced the long playing record album record album record album record albums random we've come a long way from vinyl since then hey before uber there were taxes and the first checker cavs went on the street this day in one thousand nine hundred twenty three in nineteen eightythree sally ride became the first woman in space and this was the number one song yeah i read caras flashdance what a feeling was number one for six weeks and those are just some of the things that happened on past june eighteenth fifteen past the hour accuweather meteorologist dean devore's here so deem the summer stoles so i'm saying john stolnis the summer solstice is days away but your devore cast show summer arriving early we've been kind of waiting for some really high weather in the northeast and man we don't have to wait too much longer it's been heating up in today's really going to be the brutal day for the.

winston churchill britain united states europe plymouth colony massachusetts cavs dean devore accuweather john stolnis five years six weeks
"british empire" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

KHNR 690AM

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"british empire" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

"Of the three hours because they sent the i simple message to to to the most powerful people in singapore had nothing fifty years ago nothing no natural resources zero it was a backwater postcolonial part of the british empire now it is an international powerhouse in terms of tourism in terms of finance singapore is is the region successfully and the president is very simple message you could have this kind of development if you just open doors that's the rest of the world so you know if if if a part of the teams they were here i think a little seed was plopped had such supposedly you know they they see this as that charms to modernize nation wide sebastian gorka final question i obviously enjoyed talking to you we can do this the whole hour but i the new york times had an article and i don't know if i trust it but it had an article that the that the chinese are are a little suspicious of what's happening here what do you think the chinese walk i think the chinese civil always wanted both career as a buffer state however now this buffer state has undermined china's own security that by doing what they have been doing in the last couple of years at the end of the day like russia sign of ones the seat at the table and wants to show that they are relevant in in the region but but that's just thought of a border scheme remember there is a one belt one road strategy china has and they wish to displace america as the economic hegemony in the world by the one hundred anniversary of the revolution and plenty forty nine so china wants to to be relevant at the moment of the really doc intent is is to be to be bogle economic and military power within within a generation so will they will not support a denuclearized korea i think that the most important question right now you've hit.

singapore president new york times china america sebastian gorka russia fifty years three hours
"british empire" Discussed on The Howard Stern Show

The Howard Stern Show

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"british empire" Discussed on The Howard Stern Show

"Stern show are you like a hero in england or something i mean like you're super famous it's about it's probably about fifty fifty but didn't they didn't they night you or something or give you some or of the of the of the crown what what is what that is that what did they give you it's just so city what are they your given thing it's cool i was made an officer of the british empire will look at you wish you come on the british empire uniform no you can't give him a medal you go to buckingham palace yeah and mostly it's a lovely thing to be given but more than anything no yeah but more than anything it's an amazing day it was amazing day for my mom and dad right it's like the school you have to understand like the school i went to like was so shit like it was so bad like you you know how this this thing that happens without rich because they have a gap here like if that was my school if you had a cap here moscow you worked out the gap for year that was it like you know and and my my friend of mine mickey grew up poor nope no poor you bad no one was betting on you becoming a big so another almost betting on anyone our school like you're you're going to drive a van or you're going to deliver tv's very blue collar yet that's it you know and so for my mom and dad's to go to buckingham palace and see me received such thing but that's all i thought like for them because they made unbelievable sacrifices for me to be able to do this the i didn't even really realize at the time and and that's that's the nicest thing about it really nice for them yeah can imagine the rush of that like you're getting the highest to order you know whatever the highs there's some high benedict cumberbatch has a high won't what is he he's a commander.

england officer benedict cumberbatch commander british empire buckingham palace moscow
"british empire" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"british empire" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"And metal and you have photographs of her being awarded now you have to love the british empire that's gone that they give animals metals does this give judy any money does franken and award for this or is it just the photograph me he he got money but it came from people who read about the story in the apprehension tail wagner magazine mostly but also in the papers as well and you know he had had to pay for judy being boarded in that quarantine kennel he had to pay for many things that he really couldn't afford i mean he got them back pay but he was still living at an raf salary which you can imagine was not very didn't go very far so a lot of people chipped in and helped out and and send him money at the daily mirror to made sure that judy wouldn't have to wouldn't have to want for food ever again so they were were you know not only were they fed but they were also critical in an aspect of visiting homes of families who had lost loved ones families who had fan loved ones become prisoners of war and not return prisoners of war who did come home and we're having trouble adjusting franken judy at this stage where really a totem of survival and also you know sort of an amazing kinship that that can develop during war and and just having them in in people's living rooms really assisted them in at least a momentary ability to get past their loss frank was a young man when the war broke out twenty three years old he's still young but he's aged by the experiences he and roberts speculates shrewdly that ptsd shows up and he has wanderlust he goes to africa with judy what does he intend to do well he just didn't want to stay in england for one thing i mean i think you know and i make this point in the book a lot of these men who came home from the tropics even if they're experiences were terrible as franks where they still missed the beauty of the scenery and weather and coming onto freezing cold and bleak england just wasn't doing it for him so he when the chance came along to sign up for.

judy franken tail wagner magazine frank england franks roberts africa twenty three years
"british empire" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

Monocle 24: Midori House

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"british empire" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

"Yeah i mean look at the anglican church managing these these things either i mean it's the most right the commonwealth is a very bizarre institute is not like the eu or nato where you have to sign up to a set of principles you belong to the commonwealth by and large because of your history as a former colony or part of the british empire each probably a useful ish institution i'm absolutely convinced that it's of immense utility better to have people sitting down and talking to each other the not it does bring together countries from the north and the south countries which are wealthy not so wealthy and gives them a forum in which to discuss things but i don't think you can start laying down the lore about how they again to given things as sensitive as sexual relationships that being said i mean presumably they comes a point where if we dealing with what we might even from all sort of you know western european viewpoint as more or less absolute so you know the decriminalization of homosexuality would be one such fundamental is an point where we say well look it doesn't matter about the history and our hypocrisy given what britain as an empire and colonial power did things i'll just absolutely right and wrong and you must confront those who disagree i well ghost if you were to start taking absolute positions on right enrolling confrontation in the commonwealth the you just might find yourself sitting in an empty.

anglican church eu britain
"british empire" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"british empire" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Had the best fingertip feel for democracy of all the founders and for the university of pennsylvania it was to help any aspiring person any inspiring person who was going to be diligent and work hard whatever their station in life to help improve them to become better citizens and he wasn't trying to create a new class society or a new elite but just a better society all around in which people from all walks of life i got a very practical and solid a chance to be better citizens as much as he'd accomplished in america benjamin franklin had much more to do overseas in the years leading up to the american revolution franklin did what he could to prevent war but without compromising principles he finally goes over to england after that to help here's a man of great hope for the british empire and he basically felt all problems could be solved by looking at the underlying values and saying we can find common ground and he mistakenly thought that he could find a common ground that would say the british empire and keep what he called the fine nobles china vase from shattering apart does never being able to be put back together he finally ended up using the humor again those hoaxes just like when he was silenced do good one of my favorites is a newspaper article he wrote it was apt to england imposed a lot of taxes and tariffs and they had justified the taxes and tariffs on the colonies for variety of reasons including the fact that they had colonize you know this part of the world and they protected against wars and had the right to impose taxes so he wrote the edict from the king of prussia which appeared in the papers it was an edict from prussia in which pressure announce it was imposing a tax and tariffs on english because they had colonized england and protected him certain wars and he was in a.

benjamin franklin prussia university of pennsylvania america england
"british empire" Discussed on Lovett or Leave It

Lovett or Leave It

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"british empire" Discussed on Lovett or Leave It

"Don't were great we got our best team only we got double d david stipulated i visit yet brexit trade is a guy called david davis who ran for leadership of the conservative party in two thousand and five and for his campaign he had teeshirts printed for women to where we which said its double d for me over the boobs and he is now in charge of our entire country's future a site best known for the he's got the combination of humor sexiness who is what we're looking for shakes them what a mess what a massive mess right who's going to clean this up i blame i blame you hey british cities brexit love you should have had the conversations we had in the green room about the british empire the continuation of the isn't that access of real scott there are some real schools that old from like a by going to make the team the the audience for the oriented home niche they highfives over the fall of colonialism i did not participate in it but i would have like to have been offered the chance because honestly we held in my job regal the british empire sure we made some mistakes but some you know railway love extricate of your everyone loves cricket you're welcome are you his critic cricketer steven it doesn't matter so as you have been dealing with this debate over racism and brexit and apparently some sort of a eugenics conference what the fuck why not going to take that one.

david davis cricket
"british empire" Discussed on Omnibus

Omnibus

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"british empire" Discussed on Omnibus

"So because of this strong isolationism s in the united states at the time nobody wanted to be selling armaments overseas but it was clear that this was going to have to happen right so there is a loophole we're going after fdr president rosenello says we're gonna we're gonna let you borrow oil and tanks and planes and a you know armament that's not the right word munitions munitions what's the name for the things you shoot munitions univision's but we're we're just hughley bar them we're like a lending library were like the blockbuster of missiles mmhmm warprofiteering but but there were a lot of conditions placed on lendlease stuff sure i i seem insisted by a largely republican isolationist congress right and one of the things that uh the british empire god were these catalina see they weren't even call catalin is back then i believe the british named them because they came from san diego and this was the sort of poor geographical understanding what if you're in britain i guess the difference between catalina in san diego is not that great catalina island is off the coast or was at least before the seas rose was off the coast of its northerly right it's yeah it's a wrong beach your cynthia it's closer to la but so the british started calling me seaplanes catalina as the australians get a hold of five of these and the military gets this crazy idea that they can fly one of these seaplanes all the way between western australia and say lawn modern day sri lanka perhaps it's say lawn again in your listeners all the way across.

united states rosenello univision san diego catalina island fdr president britain la british australia
"british empire" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

03:23 min | 3 years ago

"british empire" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"British empire we from age by by through five get cash for instance guide key skied age unfortunate we slavery happened his conscience it was wrong uh huh baghdad absolute white house gene in in applause so there's a number of big power play for born with schutte has has a number of comments about national america for some other shaw i personally always this way uh far yom what do you got to be made the nationally tuesday and i'll shooting it anybody else if they want it nato which she or stand knowing their hair i don't really care why i do seeing the national real gdp judy y sean well uh bop decide how bad on i'll take my handle all rubbish so occasionally there were tyron jr here i get chills up and down my spine age and we i i love the national anthem to our national interest particularly sousse since you've inch the war of eighteen twelve how we held our actually and wrote a poem about he could have lost all gwb uh it's just unbelievable shall all right i had a good evening uh is much brews gene our country need number nine twenty to 66 jana alleged essex hammed welcome carole to wcbm carol for horn counterpart fail harrier i'm very honored that you would give me the title of my cousin i think you're going to find me night for i don't qualify anymore well i hope you will i hope you will vouchers name doing like sunday night i now um if you don't mind that fits better and say we guarantee if i could k short jeurys my father in my own all right appreciate it issued if pat have adage have adam honored okay well my uncle it was my my father's from clearfield vania he's gone to cease for years and it was his nicole who needs the civil war and he belong to the found the forty nine pensilvania buck tells us they were called john vidale with that i i've i'm familiar with that that regiment yep and at one time they were actually in washington can and they were president lincoln uh garg diplotic feel anyway he uh uh number of big cars and he fought at gettysburg and survive nato has any john wearing any of the civil war died at age eighty two years old and his daughter's home he.

lincoln clearfield adam horn essex hammed jana baghdad nato gettysburg schutte washington john vidale civil war pat carole tyron jr america eighty two years
"british empire" Discussed on Probably Science

Probably Science

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"british empire" Discussed on Probably Science

"If you had on monk lead in like go floor florida's you're not playing the game like i genuinely don't know joe donor community just makes them feel it's he's he's doing version of the worst yes and no here is a bit your you've you're you're back from 24 what do you want to people about i feel like aliens as easy what about the british empire what about idea i would i would say i would say out cambridge analytica what's gone on facebook computer program that hoehn's in on people and they believe was easing up of the company that is probably has the most to resposibility for trump and brexit and about three or four other elections around the world but did sturdy too late coming up today okay di what i would warn people but time shen oh careful gonna create thymine sheets and i'm going to choose now to combat we can only come back to the worst time in known our life comeback as we do not believe the shit i was doing with this don't get in it what does 24 this so fucking bad that 2017 was like the heyday of america now twenty as no no no no no 2016 this is my karl has the other day we were drinking it was the day of the biggest shooting and tom petty's debt and he just goes and it was the most sincerely goes were living in the bad time right now he's right we will this will be look back on it'd be like that was the bad time.

florida hoehn america karl facebook tom petty
"british empire" Discussed on PragerU

PragerU

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"british empire" Discussed on PragerU

"We can see it throughout the history of the british empire think about the vast territory of the sudan it was governed by one hundred and forty british civil servants even gandhi praised the british empire paraphrasing jefferson saying that he believed that the bus government was the government that governs least and that he found the british empire guaranteed his freedom and governed him least of all in the defence of freedom the empire drew moral lines no power did more to abolish slavery and the slave trade of the modern world than did the british empire the british treasury spent enormous sums to liberate slaves and compensate slaveowners in the caribbean the royal navy had as a primary duty the eradication of the slave trade and in fact abolishing slavetrade became a major factor driving the expansion of the british empire the british and forest date pax britannica putting down pirates taming headhunters and keeping the peace between previously warring tribes and religions while respecting and often ruling through local leaders the british still insisted on certain judeochristian moral standards they were not in that respect multicultural us they had a firm sense of right and wrong when sir charles napier was confronted by the practice of ct widow burning in india he told the brahmin priests involved that he understood it was their custom but the british had accustomed to they hanged men who burned women alive in their goods were confiscated so if the brahmins insisted on continuing their tradition of widow burning and he would insist and following his british tradition of hanging the murderers of widows widow burning in india soon ceased.

sudan jefferson british treasury caribbean royal navy india gandhi sir charles napier