40 Burst results for "British Columbia"

Fresh update on "british columbia" discussed on KYW 24 Hour News

KYW 24 Hour News

00:27 sec | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "british columbia" discussed on KYW 24 Hour News

"In covert 19 hot spots, regardless of their residents. When they come into New York, the mayor said, people have to take this quarantine order seriously. If we're going to hold at this level of health and safety in the city and get better, we have to deal with the fact that the quarantine must be applied consistently. Steve Kastenbaum, New York Pandas eat a lot of bamboo, and now there's a shortage because of the Corona virus. The Calgary Zoo says it's running short of bamboo because the pandemic has limited supplies from China. It had planned to return to pandas to China. But the Corona virus outbreak has put that on hold. Two pandas eat more than £80 of fresh bamboo daily. So far, British Columbia is providing an emergency supply, but I could run out. A month. 10 48 on the cable I w scoreboard. The Phillies hold back A rally by the Yankees.

New York China Calgary Zoo Phillies Steve Kastenbaum Yankees British Columbia
Fresh update on "british columbia" discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

01:11 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh update on "british columbia" discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"Power. Speaker. Just have a quick catch up with where we find ourselves today. Much of the world is in suspension, many amazing buildings and. Organizations around the world, the shutters suspension people trying to rethink where we go from here when you have such an amazing legacy of work, which is about bringing people together, which is about spaces where people can share ideas and see histories. Is the moment of concern few for architecture and design, or are you still hopeful that we can come back to the long view? I think that architecture March sensitive to people on the environmental even more important now, people are getting. Important, it is to deal with the issues that we have our environment in our adversary relationship with different people in different countries. The problem of racism. The problem of colonialism hollies issues were. Very apparent. Now, even more apparent because of the virus. And, just tell me finally his day. Amazing to a call up with you when you speak to other young. Now. Who hopefully went have exactly the same problems that you've experienced for many years. Do. You think that Canada and the world is more open. Now to taking on board the ideas of all sorts of architects especially, in Canada, people who have an indigenous background. Well, I, think they have to because. The. Indigenous people are not gonNA put up with this settler nonsense anymore. And that's just it. The government has to address because. Just look at recently because. The government wouldn't talk to our traditional people in British Columbia about this high fine. They. Blockaded all the other railroads and stop. Communication Charley right across Canada. Until the prime minister would meet the traditional people. 'cause we had a real problem in this country because. All chiefs and councils of the reserve communities. Are Creatures of the Canadian government. So they don't represent the people they represent government, and so you have these bogus people in charge of the reserves. That are supposed to. Represent the people. They only represent government, and then you have the traditional people. That have govern themselves for thousands of years in their traditional ways. And really is the traditional people. That really. Have the government's model. In Our community. That represent. All, the people. The chief and council represent the government of Canada. So the government of Canada only WanNA recognize chief and council, of course. and. So then there's whose clash and. We're doing now is the traditional people. Are Getting more and more validity, not only with their own people. But. The problem is the government gives us the money out. To the chiefs and councils. So there's a problem economic problem of. Trying to control the people with money but. More and more I see the traditional people making headway. Making sure that. The people are properly represented. While Douglas less. I. Think is an amazing lesson that we need to rebalance the world in all sorts of important ways. But today, thank you for joining us here on the. Is. extraordinary. Speech you and what an incredible. Story and career, and Johnny had to change things in the world of architecture in the world, how we treat other people and how we go to him. So thank you. All. For this edition of the urban est today's episode was produced by Collartoo Rabelo and David Stevens. David was edited the show and play you out of this week's episode his the Black Lodge. With, listening to the elders, thank you for listening city lovers..

Canada Chiefs David Stevens Johnny Prime Minister British Columbia Charley Collartoo Rabelo Black Lodge Douglas
Fresh update on "british columbia" discussed on KYW 24 Hour News

KYW 24 Hour News

00:32 min | 10 hrs ago

Fresh update on "british columbia" discussed on KYW 24 Hour News

"Died in 1909 11 years before women won the right to vote. Kim Glovis K Y W NewsRadio, pandas eat a lot of bamboo, and now there's a storage because shortage rather because of the Corona virus pandemic here, CBS news correspondent CAMI McCormick The Calgary Zoo says it's running short of bamboo because the pandemic has limited supplies from China. It had planned to return to pandas to China, but the Corona virus outbreak has put that on hold too. Pandas eat more than £80 of fresh bamboo daily. The zoo is getting an emergency supply of bamboo from British Columbia, but the supply could run out in about a month. If there is any guaranteed winner in the 2020 presidential race, it's the recipient of all the campaign advertising spending. The Biden campaign is going big on advertising going into the November election. Democratic presidential candidate is planning to spend $280 million on digital and TV ads. That's almost twice the amount the Trump campaign is budgeting. Biden's campaign also plans to launch what it calls an unprecedented paid media campaign. To educate people on voting options during the pandemic. Pam Coulter CBS News to 50 Vine Street Expressway, We open in both directions. We'll get more good news coming up your community. I saw the swirling.

Calgary Zoo Biden CBS China Cami Mccormick Pam Coulter Kim Glovis British Columbia
Fresh update on "british columbia" discussed on Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

01:18 min | 17 hrs ago

Fresh update on "british columbia" discussed on Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

"Three point four billion years ago. I'm what the scientists have done They have looked at What happens beneath the ice sheets of actually places the in the sock to in fact, they've particularly concentrated on the place called Devon. Island. I'm not sure exactly why that is but I suspect it's northern Canada there is an ice sheet covering that landscape and beneath that landscape, there are drainage channels. So the pressure of the ice essentially melts the water underneath which forms channels in the Rock and what the scientists of dumb is they've made algorithms that essentially. The. Judgments to the shape and size. Of these networks have volleys which have which we find on Mars, and they've applied this to ten thousand Martian valleys than that new algorithm. and. A look to how that shape and dimensions compare. Excuse me with with channels on the earth that are known to have formed on the ice sheets. And Okay I'm so one of the one of the authors his he's a quote from him. Mark Jellinek, who's a professor in? University of British Columbia's Department of Earth Ocean atmospheric scientists he says. These results of the first evidence for extensive subglacial erosion driven by channel Channelize meltwater drainage beneath as ancient sheets on Mars. The findings demonstrate that only a fraction of valley networks match patterns typical of surface water erosion, which is in marked contrast to the conventional view. Using the go mythology of Mazda surface the shape of Mazar surface to rigorously reconstruct the character evolution of the planet in a statistically mean meaningful way is frankly revolutionary. So what he's saying is that most of Moses Valleys were formed not by rivers running you know. Essentially equilibrium with an atmosphere but by. Melt water underneath glacial ice sheets, and that is a completely new picture of the way Mars might have. Might have full dis. It's river valley networks. The still I think room for the planet has had a liquid water ocean because we find. There are there are features on Mars which Really characteristic of coastal coastal erosion. So I don't think the idea of. Having some stage being warm and wet has been thrown out entirely. But what these guys are saying is that most of the valleys we see on ause may well have been formed underneath I. Sheet. So exactly as you said, a nice age on Mars. The might well have been the time when most of those ballots with formed. Excuse me under the Turtle Frog in the throat again. It's it's. A. It's really very interesting piece of work, but there is a surprise to it as well. That is okay comment. If he did have you know these drainage valley networks underneath ice sheets. They claim that environment would actually support better survival conditions for possible life on Las. So you've gotta shake device and.

Mark Jellinek Moses Valleys University Of British Columbia Devon Northern Canada Mazda Mazar Professor I. Sheet
Fresh update on "british columbia" discussed on Space Nuts

Space Nuts

01:50 min | 17 hrs ago

Fresh update on "british columbia" discussed on Space Nuts

"The type the world by storm I notice he's already might a today so. He's not quite as he was right outside the door when he made a lot noise a couple of weeks ago he's done the at the moment but. I'm sure. Again. Our dont data. Yes. Indeed. he couldn't get a word in when mandate is around, but now are now he's He's taken center stage. Now, let's get on with it. Fred we're going to go back to MAS. This is fascinating plice and We do know that it had oceans and rivers and all sorts of stuff that we know and love on our own planet But now it looks like it might have had an ice age in that. Some of these river valleys may have been formed under sheets of ice that is a very interesting theory might be more on a theory. And, it could be a quite revolutionary Andrew because. What this is offering A. Completely new idea is the idea that no, actually Mars wasn't woman wet three point eight, billion years ago because that's the current thinking that Meyers. Rivers flowing and. An very similar climate to the earth, and that comes from The geological evidence has been gathered both by opening spacecraft and spacecraft on the Martian surface. This is a new idea that. Actually puts a slightly different light on what we understand Mars might be like and it comes from researchers at the University of British. Columbia in Canada. And You know essentially challenges our view of what Mars might have been like. Three point four billion years ago. I'm what the what the scientists have done They have looked at What happens beneath the ice sheets of actually places the in the sock to in fact, they've particularly concentrated on the place called Devon Island I'm not sure exactly why that is but I suspect it's northern Canada there is an ice sheet covering that landscape and beneath that landscape, there are drainage. So the pressure of the ice essentially melts the water underneath which forms channels in the Rock and what the scientists of dumb is they've made algorithms that essentially. The. Judgments to the shape and size. Of these networks have volleys which have which we find on Mars, and they've applied this to ten thousand Martian valleys than that new. Algorithm. And A look to how that shape and dimensions compare. Excuse me with with channels on the earth that are known to have formed on the ice. Sheets. and. I'm so one of the one of the authors his he's a quote from him. Mark Jellinek who's a professor in University of British Columbia's Department of Earth Ocean atmospheric scientists. He says. These results of the first evidence for extensive subglacial erosion driven by channel, channelize, meltwater drainage beneath as ancient sheets on Mars. The findings demonstrate that only a fraction of valley networks match patterns typical of surface water erosion, which is in marked contrast to the conventional view. Using. The go mythology of Mazda surface the shape of Mazda surface to rigorously reconstruct the character an evolution of the planet in a statistically mean meaningful way is frankly revolutionary. So what he's saying is that most of Moses Valleys were formed not by rivers running you know..

Mazda Moses Valleys Sheets. Mark Jellinek University Of British Columbia University Of British Devon Island Canada Fred Columbia Meyers Andrew Northern Canada Professor
"british columbia" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

09:50 min | 2 weeks ago

"british columbia" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Traditional story around the bears, which was kind of interesting, because the lines with some of the science that we've completed, but in traditional stories we have a the raven, or do we recall the Raven in our culture has of the world in also created the Ice Age. started feed. The Raven wanted something to remind himself of the Ice Age housing is flying over. He decided to turn every tenth block, white and stuff on the islands, and those areas would be protected. All Time is home of these ears. Really interesting our traditional story, it says one in ten or wait. Now, our science has basically said that on these islands now one in ten of these bears are white. Interesting. We've got a lot of questions coming in. About about the bears from listeners, online's let me just ask a couple of here. Dana piece great topic. How have these white spirit bears survived in the dark forest without any type of Camouflage Christina? Wonder what you think about that because I wondered that, too. They are so. Vibrant set off from those Dark Greens. Of that temperate rainforest, you one would think that it would actually sort of. That nature would select against this kind of coat. I mean. Maybe it is because they're so rare, but like. Why are there any of them? Yeah, it's a great question because I. Absolutely are very conspicuous in these in these dark green forests, and so there's a few thoughts around that. One is that the primary areas where these bears live Thankfully, thankfully for them. Don't have grizzly bears in these areas so in in areas where black bears and grizzly bears coexists. Blackberries usually get the short end of the stick but because there's no grizzly bears around that sort of one, I guess one point that that works in their favor, so camouflage has maybe less of an issue. If you don't have as many predators around of course, there's there's still wolves. They're another really interesting piece. Was Actually looked at by Dr Dr. Tom Rankin or the University of Victoria a couple years ago, that sort of flip that idea on its head, and said Yes, maybe two to our is a spirit, bears are really obvious conspicuous in the in this landscape, but the fish which are the salmon, the most important food resource for these bears. Maybe it's actually the opposite, and so what he some work he did. basically identified. Is that if you're a salmon and you're in a a creek in you're looking up at A. In our part of the world, mostly dark grey overcast skies there's actually less of a contrast with the white bear, then a black bear, and so from a food food perspective that these bears actually may be have a an advantage released during the daytime of able to get closer to fish and basically trick them. A little bit more are less obvious as a silhouette. So, it's like the signed version of why. Some, some marine animals are darker on top and lighter on the bottom of. Exactly. That that's really interesting. I mean but. All scientific theories they. The? They are the proven or disproven by bodies of research to take years and years and years to put together, but I am curious, though like that theory sounds really interesting, but on the other hand we're we're. We're having this conversation. Because the variant is so is actually so very rare, so doug let me just D. Do you buy the idea that it's just harder for the salmon to see the spirit bear when they're looking up at the sky? Actually worked with some of the researchers when they're doing this study. And they tried all different things like wearing white gumboots versus block gumboots when they were block come in the river, the salmon. WOULD DEVELOP A. Wide Path around it and swim around the means or the white boots Osama bin, almost swimming rate into the boots and so on. And, so they put barrels of the river and I. I worked with one researcher for four years on the project, and that was pretty interesting results. That's fascinating. Okay, so let me talk back to one thing, so this is this is a. Study based on the genetic material that you collected. Through? The process is that you just described. And, have you tagged or colored any of the bears at all? Because I'm wondering how much we know about where they go where they spend their time. Or is that being accomplished by tracking? I would say no. We haven't called any. There's we've asked you deliberately. Stay away from that because a lot of evidence that that suggests that it it can have negative impacts, bears and meeting behavior. So we try to avoid that and so. Now? Yeah it's pretty easy to track these bears. If you're walking through the forest, and you are walking on a bear trail, you can look at the branches and they'll they'll leave. That'll tough suhair. Sometimes. There's bear rubbing trees. Were you to leave up? As a stall trail that leads up to a ban Rub tree and you can look at the I can tell exactly what color is on that tree. It could be a black bear, fear bear, or could be a grisly bear so we get a lot of information than others. Just looking for tracks and was a number of ways. I think you can track the bears. Okay, so so so Christina that people don't researchers. Don't see the need to to put a put a caller on any of these bears right now. Yeah. It's a bit of a trade off rate so a Doug said there's some some concerns over impacts of of Coleraine, and that's why the the partners for this project have have steered clear of that, but also from a data standpoint for example for this study, we were able to look at the genetics of three hundred eighty, five different black bears, and so if you essentially invest really heavily in a couple bears because colorings and tranquilizing, and and that processes is far more expensive. You get really detailed information far fewer individuals, so it's a bit of a trade often for this study because it's at a Atlanta. Gail We opted basically to have this. The sort of broad stroke view another sort of advantage that we have going for us is that there's been strong investment in this project for for many years and so it would essentially, even though we only get sort of a snapshot in time where that barrier is for many of these bears. We've been tracking them for you know eight eight years so we have a pretty good sense of of of the sampling sites in our area through using year after year, and that can give us some sense of it's. It's definitely more crude than callers, but some sense of things like home range size. I see now I. Want to go back to something that you just said a couple of minutes ago. Christina about the fact that perhaps the A. Greater threats to the to the black bear population. Overall there would be grizzlies. But, I think you said that. Grizzlies aren't really on the islands where the spirit bears live, but you also wrote a paper that says that like are changing. Climate is also changing wear the grizzlies are. Are they moving into the areas of the forest where the spirit mayors are? Yeah exactly so I made earlier was sort of blanket statement of maybe what Hell Yeah these bears exist. Up into present time. Some really surprising work that we did in in twenty fourteen actually looked at in these areas. essentially grizzly bears are found from this from the tarrant study. At wrote cameras where they're not supposed to be so in our part of the world Grizzly bears. Are generally found on sort of these big mainland fjord systems that you know you can probably imagine from sort of the postcard image of these these big estuaries and embarrassed fishing for for salmon and his release sort of big big landscapes but increasingly during the study we. We kept fighting grizzly. Bears actually on these these islands, which up until recently have been sort of the the turf of the domain of a black in spirit, bears and so we don't know too, because we don't know what's what's driving that movement of these grizzly bears moving west onto these islands. and. We're still monitoring what that exact impact is going to be but we do know it in general that Grizzly bears essentially give. A pretty hard time so in some of the systems that we know for example or river systems that used to be spots where you could see Spielberg, in black bears We've now had grizzly bear. families essentially move move into those areas, and so one of the things we're trying to learn as. Did those. And Black Bears move out of those systems entirely or through a work with remote cameras, are they? You know maybe actually just coming out at night or sort of being more sneaky, essentially, because grizzly bears around now and so That's sort of one of the ongoing questions were to look at. This hour we are learning all we can. About the spirit bear. It's a rare genetic variant of the black bear that lives in temperate rainforests of British, Columbia Christina Service joins us. She's science, coordinator and.

Grizzlies Christina Doug Columbia Christina Service Dr Dr. Tom Rankin Osama bin University of Victoria Atlanta tarrant study Spielberg researcher coordinator Gail Coleraine
"british columbia" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

05:18 min | 2 weeks ago

"british columbia" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"From NPR WB WBU ARE BOSTON. Chalker, Bardy and this is on point, a black bear with a shimmering white coat. It's called the spirit bear, one of the rarest and most elusive animals on the planet. There could be as few as fifty to one hundred fifty of these bears on planet earth, and they're only found in a tiny portion of the coastal temperate rainforests of British Columbia an area aptly named the great bear rainforest well. Well a new study led by researchers and members of the kid who hey and get first nations found that the gene that causes the color variation in these bears, maybe even more rare than previously believed so this hour on point we're going to hear the story of the spirit, bear and efforts to protect and preserve not only this remarkable animal, but the ecosystem and the people that surrounded as well. Joining us today. IS DOUG NIECE LOSS? He's director of the kid. Assu Hey. Hey, first nation stewardship authority. He's also former chief councillor of the kid, Assu, Hey hey, first nation and author of the recent study, spatial patterns and rarity of the white phased spirit bear. Lille revealed gaps in habitat protection. The paper was published this month in the Journal. Ecological solutions and evidence, and he joins us from. Clemson British Columbia. Doug niece loss welcome to the program. And also with us from Cumberland British. Columbia Canada is Christina Service Science Coordinator and Wildlife Biologist for the kid is sue. Hey, first nation stewardship authority. She's also co author of that study. I just referenced Christina Welcome to you. Thanks for having me. So, I'd like to actually start with. giving. Listeners a little taste of what this magnificent forest. That these bears live in is act is like now. There's a fantastic documentary. Is both of you obviously well? No called the great bear rainforest land of the spirit bear. It was released last year and directed by Ian mcallister for McGill Freeman films. and. They follow the work that's being done to study and preserve the spirit bear, so let's first of all listen to how in the documentary. The temperate rainforests of western Canada are described. The great bear rainforest is the largest and most intact coastal temperate rainforest laughed on. This place contains more life by wait a tropical rainforest like the Amazon. Some of the largest trees here are more than thousand years old. Actor Ryan Reynolds providing the voice over for the documentary, great bear rainforest. Doug! Can you describe to us what this place is like? I would say This place is a magical place I mean this is one of the only places left. You'll get old growth in ancient growth forests. A, large biodiversity wildlife. There The some of these trees can be quite a few meters wide and. Up to two to three hundred meters tall, so you can get some really veterans of their. Wow and Christina your thoughts. How how rare is temperate rainforests there? Yeah, it's remarkably rare. I mean I think often When people say rainforest, you think as of the Amazon and the tropics but Temperate rainforest are just as magical There's so much diversity so many Shades of green, then you could, then you could even imagine with likened and is an an as Doug mentioned these join Norma's old cedars sickest Bruce's Yeah, the the forest to something that Yeah, I'd give. Everyone should should witness at some point in their life. I would agree I mean just the idea of these. Trees. That are a couple of hundred meters tall. I think as you said and also. We should underscore. It's a coastal. Temperate rainforests. It's a really really interesting. Ecosystem and in this magical place. There is this animal that has this brilliant white coat. The gray rainforest documentary Doug just full disclosure I've seen it four times and the first time I saw it. My Josh has dropped I. Mean like literally dropped could not believe what I was seeing. When the first images of of the spirit bear, we're on the. Screen in front of me. When did you first? When did you first see this animal? Who I saw this in the early two thousands plus my first time. And I remember I was actually just started up tourism operation and One of my first job is the guy was working with Look for the Spielberg. While we had a bunch of guests.

Doug niece Christina Service Science Coor Christina British Columbia Amazon NPR BOSTON Lille Clemson Columbia Chalker Canada Assu Columbia Canada Ian mcallister Bardy Ryan Reynolds Spielberg Josh McGill Freeman
Why cutting meat consumption can help the climate

Climate Connections

01:13 min | 2 weeks ago

Why cutting meat consumption can help the climate

"From growing crops and raising livestock to packaging and trucking, getting food on people's plates produces a lot of carbon pollution. According to U N estimates about one fifth to one third of global greenhouse gas emissions. Come from the food system. There are many ways to reduce those emissions, but seth wines at the University of British Columbia says that not all solutions are created equal for example. Eating locally produced food or avoiding plastic packaging can help, but he says what makes far bigger difference is when people choose to eat less meat. Eating more plants is really important because they're lower on the food chain. There's less energy wasted on your way to the top of that food chain. If you think about all of the energy that goes into raising a cow, all of the fertilizer neutered for all of the foods that get fed to that cow, the energy needed to power the slaughterhouse and so on. A ton of effort, energy and fossil fuel emissions going into that product so says it's important to help. People understand how their food choices affect the climate, so they can more effectively reduce their impact.

University Of British Columbia
States, province work together on forest health

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 3 weeks ago

States, province work together on forest health

"Some of the largest wildfires on record had swept across the West in recent years. Restoring these areas and managing forest to prevent more dangerous fires is complicated especially as the climate warms. DNC minutes with Washington State Department of Natural Resources a lot of our management has been designed up until now with an expectation of a stable climate, and that expectation is no longer accurate, and so we're having to think about things like what species should be planting here. That can survive not only in our current climate, but in future climates. To find. Solutions Agencies in California Washington and British. Columbia are collaborating in a two thousand eighteen memorandum of understanding the three agencies pledged to share data and innovations. The group also exploring ways to offset the cost of forest management. For example they're looking for markets for wood from the small trees and branches that are cut went for a certain thin. Semen says he is optimistic that by working together. The region can better adapt global warming while saving time and money where we're really learning from each other and advancing our effectiveness around this.

Washington State Department Of California Washington DNC Semen Columbia
Montana court blocks ballot collection law

Native America Calling

04:00 min | Last month

Montana court blocks ballot collection law

"This is national native news I'm Antonio Gonzalez a Montana court has blocked a ballot collection on the state which tribes a native advocates say restricts the right to vote for native Americans Yellowstone County District Court granted a preliminary injunction Tuesday halting the. Montana Bala Interference Prevention Act Tribes and native vote. Soon saying the law would disenfranchise native voters, especially those in rural areas by ending the practice, a ballot collection by vote organizers who transport ballots to tribal election offices, native groups and British Columbia to fight on after a major legal defeat as down, carpenter reports the Supreme Court of Canada has dismissed an indigenous appeal of the Trans Mountain pipeline of all the dismissal. Dismissal came as usual with no explanation from Canada's highest court, and a now effectively upholds a lower court decision, approving the project as sound was also the last known legal option to overturn federal government approval of the project government leaders say they worked hard to accommodate concerns that native communities had, but they welcome the court's decision, saying it's an important project for. For Canada but several first nations in BC say they will keep the fight against the Trans about pipeline expansion, going chiefly at George Wilson is with the sale with tooth first nation, it is a major setback for a reconciliation in reduces consultation to a purely procedural requirement. George Wilson says the ruling is not the end she will consult with their community before deciding. Deciding on the next step, other opponents say they will continue to push back some vowing that the expansion will never be completed. Government leaders say the project will provide nearly forty nine hundred jobs, and will triple the amount of Alberta oil, flowing to terminals on the West, coast, and then by tanker to overseas markets for National Native News I'm Dan Carp Chuck. The US Supreme Court's refusal to reinstate water crossing permits for the keystone pipeline puts construction on hold as environmental studies are conducted, an attorney says those studies should have been done years ago Victoria. Wicks reports a Montana. Federal Court ruled in May that the US army. Corps of Engineers use of a fast track permit was insufficient for oil and gas pipelines. Judge Brian Morris's decision applied to all new oil and. And Gas Pipelines in the country Morris isn't junction nationwide permit. Twelve was affirmed by the ninth circuit. Court of Appeals last month, and the corps of Engineers then asked the US Supreme Court to overturn that Decision Doug as a senior attorney with the Sierra, Club. He says it's important to note that both higher courts have now affirmed Judge Morris decision in the K. Excel case there's no doubt so far. Far In either the ninth circuit opinion or the supreme. Court decision that that ruling was cracked. So you know we're confident that that the night circuit will find the same on appeal. Hayes says the core now has to complete a thorough environmental study for the K. xl before it can be built I'm Victoria wicks in rapid city. South Dakota. The United National Indian Tribal, Youth Organization or unity has gone viral. Viral this year and light of the ongoing pandemic. The gathering continues this week as Christine Trudeau Reports Unity Executive Director Mary. Kim Titlists says as native youth continue to play a vital role and tribal communities combating covid nineteen. It's important for them to take time to connect with peers at workshops, shirt, talents and build on self care techniques to help navigate stress and anxiety management amid lockdowns and isolation what? Conference has to offer is a message of hope and empowerment, just connecting with each other I think that's really important. During this pandemic is that we connect with each other and we inspire each other registration is free at Unity Inc Dot Org, those with limited WIFI access can still participate by telephone or received content via thumb drive I'm Christine, Trudeau and Antonio Gonzalez.

Yellowstone County District Co Us Supreme Court Supreme Court Of Canada Antonio Gonzalez Montana Brian Morris Christine Trudeau Court Of Appeals Federal Court Canada Corps Of Engineers British Columbia United National Indian Tribal George Wilson Montana Bala Doug Trans Mountain Us Army Wicks
The Cascadia Subduction Zone

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:32 min | Last month

The Cascadia Subduction Zone

"Today we're going to look at the Cascadia subduction zone, and what could be a mega quake the Pacific northwest subduction zone earthquakes have occurred every three hundred fifty years since six hundred BC with the most recent taking place January twenty six seventeen o one evidence for earlier quakes come from core samples taken from the. The Ocean floor, and from rings counted in the Ghost forest that I'll talk about a little bit later. The seventeen hundred quake caused several coastal regions, Washington and Oregon to drop sixty six feet, massive coastal storms during nine, hundred and ninety, seven, Ninety, eight, washed away tons and tons of sand, revealing hundreds of stumps, the remnants of a Sitka spruce forced. It is through. Through a combination of carbon dating an accounting of rings that the data, the last Cascadia subduction zone or C. S. Z. quake took place. The Earth's surface is made up of seven major plates and many smaller ones. The smaller plates creator earthquakes for short durations of fourteen forty five seconds at may reach nine point five on the Richter scale. They often take place of. Of Water call faultlines between plates March Eleventh Twenty Eleven Japan experience a subduction zone. Quite that lasted more than four minutes at nine point one on the Richter scale. It was a fourth, most powerful or quake in the world. Since modern recording began in nineteen, hundred shake created a Su- Nami, the reached a hundred and thirty three feet and mood six miles inland google. Google Japan's main island upon shoot, eight feet in shifted the earth on its axis between four and ten inches, this was an earthquake created by the shifting of the Pacific Plate finally to help put earthquakes in perspective, the long Prieta quake that interrupted the nineteen eighty nine world series in San Francisco. California lasted fifteen seconds the Great San Francisco earthquake of nineteen six was. was eight point six that lasted forty five seconds, but Japan's greater earthquake of twenty eleven lasted over four minutes at nine point, one of the Richter scale based on data from Oregon see geographer Patrick Corcoran and Usgs Alaska, science center kiss, missing mysteries will now tour the predicted minute by minute impact of Cascadia. Subduction Zone earthquake on the Oregon coast after three hundred twelve. Twelve years to see S Z could no longer take the strain it ruptures at a spot fifty five miles west of Cannon Beach Oregon and quickly spreads along the seven hundred miles of its length from British Columbia to Mendocino California. The North American plate slips fifty seven feet to the south. West sliding over the Wanda Fuca plate, but remember we're talking about across more. More than fifty miles deep, the first movement sons pressure wave that soapy way that travels through the Earth's crust at thirteen thousand miles an hour, it will reach the West Coast in ten seconds. The leading edge will hit Oregon's cannon beach and seaside thirty seconds later. It reaches Portland in fifty seconds his Seattle at nine point one is what seismologist call a full rip? Most cities can withstand a six point. Eight quake lasted about forty five seconds, but the difference between a forty second, and a four-minute quake has like the difference between a head on collision at four miles, an hour and forty miles an hour within three minutes shaking continues, the coast will drop from six to twenty five feet after five minutes. The worst is over for Portland and Seattle it will have suffered from ground liquefication Berlin will collapse, and they'll be gas fires citywide after six. Six minutes people seeking high ground to avoid the soon. NAMI will be impeded by debris driving. We'll be an impossibility at eight minutes. Nami will be about twenty five miles offshore. It approaches like an enormous high tide, but a flash flood speed leading edge will only be inches, but will increase to forty feet as predicted that the cascadia subduction zone quake would create twice the impact of Japan's great quake twenty eleven. Keep in mind the by the time you finish listening to this. There will have been earthquakes somewhere in the world. The Pacific

Cannon Beach Oregon Japan West Coast Portland Su- Nami Seattle Oregon San Francisco Google Pacific Plate Sitka Patrick Corcoran Wanda Fuca Washington California Mendocino California British Columbia Usgs Alaska
Vancouver Tourism

Travel with Rick Steves

04:18 min | Last month

Vancouver Tourism

"It's often called one of the most beautiful cities in North, America for twenty one years Kenton was the president and CEO the Tourism Authority that promotes Vancouver British Columbia to the rest of the world. During his tenure, the city successfully bid to host the Winter Olympics. City's growing into a top shelf destination that attracts to end residents from around the World Vancouver is prized for its natural beauty and recreational opportunities. recanting joins US now on travel with Rick Steves to share some of the lessons. He learned as an international tourism promoter. Rick thanks for being here. It's nice to be here. Every time I meet a tourism director for a godforsaken depressing city I won't say which ones I think. What a shame and then what I meet a tourism director for a place like. Vancouver I think you got a good Gig well has a nice city to be the tourist and promoter for well. It's terrific to be able to invite the world to come and visit your hometown, and when it's a beautiful place like Vancouver in Canada. It's all the nicer, but it brings with it the complexities because it's you want people to come want them to enjoy things. You want them to extend their length of stay. You want them to feel the things that you feel on your. Want them to meet the locals, but you know that what they wanted to come and see is. That's the mountains and there's the ocean I could touch both of them right now in the next half hour. It's a pretty special place, but you were running the show for twenty years there and Essentially you're hired to ring money out of people who come to town for the economy not to help people have. Experiences I mean. How do you balance that? Did you ever get in trouble because you have some ideals? I was constantly in trouble because. I have to remind the hotel community that people don't leave home to go stay in hotel room. They leave to go and have an experience and too many in the tourism businesses. It's about a cash registering, and that is but one element and we pushed. We had it in our mission statement. That tourism is about the financial. Ecological? Social and cultural benefits that come took community by having visitors from around the world. Spend time with them, so it's four pronged. Only one of them relates to the dollar. If we don't travel, we don't have empathy for the rest of the world here in the United States were four percent of the planet, and they're actually people in our country. That think we're exceptional and you can't think that when you travel. You just can't think that if you travel smartly and tourism can help with. With that empathy or it can actually hurt with that empathy and I'm glad that there are people in tourism that can speak up for the the real transformational value travel, sadly when I go to a tourism convention, and I meet somebody from a developing country like say Egypt. They're all about sending people to a resort and a golf course and you know something where you jet in, and you have this utopia, and conceivably you would never even meet a real person. You'd meet only this. Fancy version right and when you do get the real people and the real food and the real occasions it's uplifting spiritually, uplifting environmentally uplifting and it. It works so I like your tact in that there are challenges around global warming and around the footprint of travelers, but there are solutions that can be brought, so there are offsets that can be used off her convention. Organizers offsets for their delegates that were coming for. For the air air flight damage. You know you talked earlier about conference actually. Lou, Damore, who had more that was him. Yeah, he heads up the International Institute for Peace Through Tourism Yeah and every time, I talk about tourism as a powerful force for peace I attributed to a more, but there is also an Indian cabinet minister. That I heard once at a conference for the Pacific Asia Travel Association when we're in. A New Delhi and he addressed the group, and he said something else that I will never forget, he said. Tourism sits on the right hand of peace. I love that. Yeah, wonderful it powers it is. We've got so much in common, and there's so much fear, and the fear really is strongest with people who don't get out and when you get out, you realize. Hey, we're all in this together.

Vancouver Rick Steves Tourism Authority United States Director Pacific Asia Travel Associatio America Olympics Damore President And Ceo Kenton International Institute For Pe Canada Delhi Egypt LOU
How the Indian Act continues to impact the lives of First Nation people

Unreserved

05:43 min | Last month

How the Indian Act continues to impact the lives of First Nation people

"So? Your original article on the Indian Act went viral. What kinds of responses were? Were you getting from the article lots of? Wow I didn't know that and you know sort of the moments, and we're still getting responses today you know on twitter and facebook where people are still saying you gotta read this book every Canadian Street this book and you don't know what you don't know. He'd be three times. You hear that you know we do our training workshops as well I do training for on sort of indigenous awareness. And one of the exercises that we have people do at the start of every session that they think of Dayton history and come up with a short sentence to describe it, and it's got to be specific Vo. To indigenous peoples and have a flip chart at the front and say you know we're going to put all of the old dates, the top the flip chart in the more recent ones at the bottom, and usually draw a line, know eighteen, sixty seven and another line when we pay treated the constitution that section, thirty, five and nineteen eighty two. And we get people to start putting their dates, and so what we find is shucks, Cartier and Columbus, discovering the new world and Vikings and things like that and you see a lot of recent date for two thousand ten winter Olympics things that are more. Recent oriented Ohka and those kinds of things, but always saw this gap in the middle, and it was usually between eighteen and sixty, seven, nine, hundred, eighty two. And it really just highlights what people don't know. There's a period of history there and a lot of those beats Indian. Activate fall right in that time line I would venture to say they don't know too much about the Indian Act. Most people have never even read that legislation. What is one element of it? That always surprises people for for a lot of people they think that people living on reserves and under the Indian Act live in some kind of Shangrila. Free housing free education, and they don't pay taxes. Those seem to be some of the bigger issues, but. When we when talk about things like, yes, they don't pay taxes. Section eighty. Seven of the Indian Act was put into place to protect their property from the erosion of taxes. Well, they were simulating. So that's what the Indian Act is post confederation assimilation policy tool, so we're going to protect their property from near Ocean of taxes on the face of it sounds really helpful, but you know we look at it, not more current context. It really just holds the Venetians back if If I wanted to go buy a truck for my car dealership, and if I had it delivered to the reserve, because I'm a status Indian I. Don't pay transactional taxes on that vehicle. If it's delivered to the reserve, that definitely is a benefit that people see, but what they don't see that as soon as I, declared the exemption reserves are also not subject to seizure under legal process, and so as soon as I declare the exemption, the financial services people no okay. Okay? He's a status India. Fife Thelma's the truck and he stops paying for it I can't go and take it back from him. If refuses to pay for very often, see the benefits, but they don't see some of the restrictions and some of the other things that are problematic with the Indian Act now, the Indianapolis passing mentioned in Eighteen, seventy six, and it impacts the lives of first nations people every day in almost every way it defines who has Indian status outlines chief. Chief and council systems influences the development of residential schools as a first nations person. What is one surprising way? The act influences your life. Today was just starting out my career working for a big firm here in British Columbia by then I'd had a post secondary education I was working for a really reputable solid organization, and we'll look at it from Capitol Lender perspective I I met the four CS of credit I was married had a job at a post secondary education. If I was a lender. I was the perfect candidate, but. They refused to loan me the money and wanted my wife who's not indigenous to cosign for the vehicle, which was quite interesting, just in terms of that whole understanding the impacts of you know trying to make way in the economic mainstream. Now I. WanNa get into one of the most long lasting impacts of the Indian act of the Canadian reserve system, many first nations across the country still live on reserves. Why did the government create the reserve system? The reserve system was really created as part of the old philosophy by the time we can federate Canada believed that the Indians as they're called in the Internet where a dying race of people that they're not going to be here for much longer They were going very rapid depopulation because of to the the that they didn't have immunity to, and they weren't fitting in economically info set the stage for this dine. Race people the best thing we can do to help them to assimilate and become like everybody else, and the feeling was that we would put them onto these reserves in the context of assimilation of reserves, really a holding pen. It's the place where we're going to put them until they. Didn't if simulated, that meant obviously that they were gonNA leave the reserves and go be like all other people in. Canada And they are reserves. People live on them. Don't actually own the land they live on. You can ask people hate the audio nuthouse. Legally technically speaking, the property is that of the federal government and the band is sort of the administrator of that in which people don't know right that they don't know that this is crown land actually, and it's held entrust as the term goes. Goes, and even though the government set aside this, you know this land to first nations, there are many instances where they went back on their word, and took acres away from

Twitter Federal Government Facebook Canada Fife Thelma Shangrila Indianapolis Dayton Vikings India Cartier Federate Canada Capitol Lender Olympics Administrator British Columbia Columbus
How the Indian Act continues to impact the lives of First Nation people

Unreserved

07:22 min | Last month

How the Indian Act continues to impact the lives of First Nation people

"In two, thousand and Fifteen Bob Joseph member of the Guohua Anoc nation wrote an article about the many ways. The Indian act was destructive, first nation, communities and culture. The article went viral. He has since expanded that article, and in two thousand eighteen released the book twenty one things. You may not know about the Indian Act. He's guest today. Think of him as our INDIANAP- tour guide to help us better understand the impact of this historic legislation. Welcome Bob Thank you, thank you. It's great to be here. So? Your original article on the Indian Act went viral. What kinds of responses were? Were you getting from the article lots of? Wow I didn't know that and you know sort of the moments, and we're still getting responses today you know on twitter and facebook where people are still saying you gotta read this book every Canadian Street this book and you don't know what you don't know. He'd be three times. You hear that you know we do our training workshops as well I do training for on sort of indigenous awareness. And one of the exercises that we have people do at the start of every session that they think of Dayton history and come up with a short sentence to describe it, and it's got to be specific Vo. To indigenous peoples and have a flip chart at the front and say you know we're going to put all of the old dates, the top the flip chart in the more recent ones at the bottom, and usually draw a line, know eighteen, sixty seven and another line when we pay treated the constitution that section, thirty, five and nineteen eighty two. And we get people to start putting their dates, and so what we find is shucks, Cartier and Columbus, discovering the new world and Vikings and things like that and you see a lot of recent date for two thousand ten winter Olympics things that are more. Recent oriented Ohka and those kinds of things, but always saw this gap in the middle, and it was usually between eighteen and sixty, seven, nine, hundred, eighty two. And it really just highlights what people don't know. There's a period of history there and a lot of those beats Indian. Activate fall right in that time line I would venture to say they don't know too much about the Indian Act. Most people have never even read that legislation. What is one element of it? That always surprises people for for a lot of people they think that people living on reserves and under the Indian Act live in some kind of Shangrila. Free housing free education, and they don't pay taxes. Those seem to be some of the bigger issues, but. When we when talk about things like, yes, they don't pay taxes. Section eighty. Seven of the Indian Act was put into place to protect their property from the erosion of taxes. Well, they were simulating. So that's what the Indian Act is post confederation assimilation policy tool, so we're going to protect their property from near Ocean of taxes on the face of it sounds really helpful, but you know we look at it, not more current context. It really just holds the Venetians back if If I wanted to go buy a truck for my car dealership, and if I had it delivered to the reserve, because I'm a status Indian I. Don't pay transactional taxes on that vehicle. If it's delivered to the reserve, that definitely is a benefit that people see, but what they don't see that as soon as I, declared the exemption reserves are also not subject to seizure under legal process, and so as soon as I declare the exemption, the financial services people no okay. Okay? He's a status India. Fife Thelma's the truck and he stops paying for it I can't go and take it back from him. If refuses to pay for very often, see the benefits, but they don't see some of the restrictions and some of the other things that are problematic with the Indian Act now, the Indianapolis passing mentioned in Eighteen, seventy six, and it impacts the lives of first nations people every day in almost every way it defines who has Indian status outlines chief. Chief and council systems influences the development of residential schools as a first nations person. What is one surprising way? The act influences your life. Today was just starting out my career working for a big firm here in British Columbia by then I'd had a post secondary education I was working for a really reputable solid organization, and we'll look at it from Capitol Lender perspective I I met the four CS of credit I was married had a job at a post secondary education. If I was a lender. I was the perfect candidate, but. They refused to loan me the money and wanted my wife who's not indigenous to cosign for the vehicle, which was quite interesting, just in terms of that whole understanding the impacts of you know trying to make way in the economic mainstream. Now I. WanNa get into one of the most long lasting impacts of the Indian act of the Canadian reserve system, many first nations across the country still live on reserves. Why did the government create the reserve system? The reserve system was really created as part of the old philosophy by the time we can federate Canada believed that the Indians as they're called in the Internet where a dying race of people that they're not going to be here for much longer They were going very rapid depopulation because of to the the that they didn't have immunity to, and they weren't fitting in economically info set the stage for this dine. Race people the best thing we can do to help them to assimilate and become like everybody else, and the feeling was that we would put them onto these reserves in the context of assimilation of reserves, really a holding pen. It's the place where we're going to put them until they. Didn't if simulated, that meant obviously that they were gonNA leave the reserves and go be like all other people in. Canada And they are reserves. People live on them. Don't actually own the land they live on. You can ask people hate the audio nuthouse. Legally technically speaking, the property is that of the federal government and the band is sort of the administrator of that in which people don't know right that they don't know that this is crown land actually, and it's held entrust as the term goes. Goes, and even though the government set aside this, you know this land to first nations, there are many instances where they went back on their word, and took acres away from communities. In your book, you outline how parts of Vancouver and the surrounding area were taken back by government to create the city as it is today. Can you explain how that happened? Yeah, so there was a lot of that. Initially, we put them onto reserves often for the most part left them where they were situated, which is maybe different from the US for they relocated people, thousands of miles sometimes from. From but they put them onto these reserves I think about a place like Vancouver today there's lots and lots of people and urban sprawl, but in those days there wasn't much there, and so they put up Nice generous reserves with good allotment, but then we went back and took it away because they weren't being enterprising people's. You know they're supposed to use those lands and put them to their highest and best youth. It's Kinda this really weird argument, right? We want them to assimilate, but we don't want to compete with them in the markets and so. So, we take away, their one of the things is their ability to sell off her, or they can't sell without written permission from the Indian agent or the Department of Indian Affairs and

Bob Joseph Department Of Indian Affairs Vancouver Guohua Anoc Twitter United States Federal Government Indianapolis India Shangrila Dayton Fife Thelma Vikings Canada Federate Canada Facebook Cartier British Columbia Olympics
Can trees talk

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

04:57 min | Last month

Can trees talk

"Alexia Constantino and Katie McMahon both work at the smart lab at the University of British Columbia in Canada the smart lab is a diverse group of students who study how trees and soil are connected to the ecosystem Alexia studies how forest harvesting affects wildlife and Katie studies the way. The Food Forest Web recovers after mining, Alexia, Constantino and Katie McMahon. Thank you for joining us today. Thank you for having us. Yes thanks very much for having gone. I'm really looking forward to the show. Yeah me too, and so kids. If you have questions we would love for you to call now, or you can send an email to questions at, but why kids dot. Org let's dive right into the questions and we're GONNA. Start with some basics here and then I really WanNa. Get into later on a little bit more about tree communication, which is one of the things that this lab specializes in, but let's start with this question from Lucy. I'm from? Connecticut in I. WanNa Know House cleese quo. We had another question from a four year old in Bristol. Who wanted to know the same thing so Kadian Alexia? Which one of you wants to tackle, just the basics of how trees grow. Katie year I can take that first one so just like humans trees need food and water to grow but they get this there this food and water in quite a different way than we do. So trees and plants are really incredible in that they can actually get their food from the sunlight. So this process is called photosynthesis, and it's really amazing. The trees can take energy from the sunlight and just using water and carbon dioxide, rich, a molecule floating around in the air. They can create energy. On so far this energy that forms of sugars which contain. Carbon. and so that's how they get their main energy for Brawley, but then the water of course comes from the soil. So, they can take the water from the soil, using their roots, and they also get other nutrients and vitamins from the soil as well. We'll. Let's go a little bit deeper into that with a couple of other questions. We have because you were just talking Katie. About some of the The things that a treat needs like water, and it also needs oxygen and sunlight, so here's a question from Sienna I'm eleven use old. Alvin Davis, California and my question is do trees breathe, and if they do where they breathe from all right, and before you get to that, here are two more questions, hello, my name is Luna and I am seven years old. I live in Oregon. My question is how do you choose? Give us oxygen. Hi, my name Rayvey I'm seven years old. I'm from London, and my question is how you treat bay coke should. We also got a question from ranch lives in the United Kingdom with the same question, so talk talk to us a little bit more about oxygen and the role of oxygen for trees in how they breathe, and in how we breathe. Share so you can almost think of trees as breathing backwards from us so when we take a breath in We're? We're breathing in air and we're really were taking oxygen out of it. That's what we need to breathe. And then when we x hell outcomes, the carbon dioxide, and so trees actually kind of do this in reverse So you mentioned earlier that when they do photosynthesis, they're taking the carbon dioxide out of the air and using. Their sugars energy. but then. Whence that sugars in the tree gets used up. Then that when it uses up that carbon, it actually produces oxygen, and that is released back out into the air. For us to breathe as humans And spent I think one of the question mentioned Where does that happen in so the the The air actually goes into the trees through. little pores in the leaves. Are the needles called still matter and so that's where the air comes in when they're when the leads, the needles are doing photosynthesis. Do we call it breathing I? Mean would you say that trees breathe? You know that's an interesting question People feel strongly about whether you can apply thirty human centered words to trees. I'm sure we'll get to this later today when we're talking about these communicating whether trees could talk, or only humans can talk, and so I put this in the same category The air is going in and out of trees in there using. Using carbon from it and putting oxygen back into, it so whether you want to call that breathing. Is the the scientific words, photosynthesis and respiration I. Guess Out for debate.

Katie Mcmahon Kadian Alexia Alexia Constantino University Of British Columbia Lucy I. Wanna Know House Bristol Canada Alvin Davis Brawley United Kingdom London Sienna Cleese Connecticut Oregon California Luna
"british columbia" Discussed on Cascadian Beer Podcast

Cascadian Beer Podcast

12:08 min | Last month

"british columbia" Discussed on Cascadian Beer Podcast

"Welcome to gain beer podcast. My name's Aaron I'm Cascadia. In this podcast series I, highlight the Burris of Cascadia a region that has the strong presence in the international beer scene. CASCADIA is a bio region in the Pacific northwest on the North American continent. It's made up of the states of Washington Oregon as well as the Canadian province of British Columbia. I've traveled to Kamloops British. Columbia for this episode. I had the opportunity to visit a new brewery just before they launched while I was attending brew loops. Twenty nineteen bride I bring is a project trumped up by two friends who became inspired after visiting a Vancouver based brewery. I sat down with their co owner and brewer master. I'm Brian Craig. Co Founder and brewer at Redeye Bruin and bright I, so I'm here for brew loops, and you haven't quite yet, not yet. I've had six months worth of delays, so we're hoping to start brewing next week and open three to four weeks in camp, so by the time this comes out. Yeah, you'll be open so i. sure hope so I, yeah! But this is a beautiful space so I'm in Kamloops. But where exactly in Kamloops are we? We are on the north shore on the corner of trunk. He'll and clapper ten kind of a I like to describe this areas the East van of Kamloops. It's agenda neighborhood, basically being gentrified right now bought up by developers and giving us a new building. They built this entire building over the last two years. It's exciting so with that then like were you in with the developers and building the space out and yet we were in from the time. They put shovels in the ground. Okay, yeah, they put channel drains for us when they pouring the concrete. Right so yeah, no, that's huge benefit. then. Yeah, yeah, lot less sweat and tears than a lot of various probably have to have yeah nothing like your own custom built. Space. So. How'd he beer find you probably like a lot of people in high school? Drank all the crappy macro stuff, Molson. Canadian and whatnot and. After high school I suppose legally and. and then started experimenting wanted to try new things started with Guinness. Kilkenny started making trips to Washington and basically opened my eyes to a whole new world of beer. got quickly hooked on IPA's as at a young age, and started seeking out the best ones I could find. And stumbled upon callister brewing on Vancouver trip tried machine nails, which is now superfly Asli and that blew my mind to the point where my Bruin and business partner night, Tyler we. Immediately went. Home bought a homebrew kit, so we could make as that good great, and the rest is history. So so, how long ago so why does that to three cycles ago out of calendar? Yeah I think it was around five years ago. I believe that was the first or second year of Operation Yeah Yeah so ideas been marinade is been incubating for a while. Yeah, we basically started home. Brewing loved. The first batch we made is a amazing Ip that we did was citric galaxy in mosaic. We just went all in right off the bat. loved it and immediately said. Let's do this for. For living like a lot of homers do and we created an instagram account to build a story for followers, knowing we would eventually go pro and Yeah, we've just been brewing every week since then every weekend. We've been brewing half a barrel of Beer Brian Taller thirsty friends, and right, so where does the name bride? I come from then. It's very simple. It's literally Brian Tie bright-eyed. Brewing uh-huh. Well, we needed a placeholder name for instagram account, so he just quickly thought of the first thing that came to my head, and we stuck with it. Kill announced the usually. I I usually a good one. All right, so when when was ground broke on this building? Actually then it's to be coming up on two years now, right? It feels like it's been an eternity, but I think it's been around two years. But you've you've made some beers like you're pouring last year loops yet, so Where were you brewing at that point? was that still homebrew out of the garage? Legally. We couldn't have done that and so what we did is. We got introduced to Evan Dawn by My business partner Mitchell that owns red beard cafe in town us. He Knew Evan headed on his undrafted all the time, so he. Think Evan wider reached out about some kind of collaboration with us when we talked about going pro in announced it, and we just started going there every three months and brewing with them basically my brother from another mother now lovely individual is the best man. Yeah, so that allowed us to poor events, and you had to create a name for ourselves. It was great. So once we finally get the ball rolling here on the space a you're going to be like a strictly Ip a thing, or are you going to be doing some other styles? I'm a big fan of farm sales installed as well so we'll. We'll have at least two hoppy beers on tap at all times and then. Also, have something fruited something Belgian and at least one dark beer customer permitting. Though in the end they'll probably decide. They want to buy you know and so with that then. What's the size your Brew House back there. We are ten barrel, which equates to about twelve heck's metric Twelve hundred leader are fermenters are six hundred leader so yeah, one brew will make to beer that will get to play with just like our homebrew homering. We would brew. One brew would fill three fermenters. We would make three different beers with it, so we're kind of used to it. We're going to stick with with what works right so then. How many? How many from enters and bright tanks are back there. There are five fermenters. There's four five barrel fermenters in one ten zero, and then we have six bright tanks that we're going to serve directly out of right. Yeah, and they're lined up right behind this bar. Looking very nice, so yes, that's pretty exciting. People that that feeling they're. In the BURRI when they're here is nice. So how many states are in this place? We are allowed to have eighty seats in here. There's definitely room for more when the city let's us. But yeah, we're starting with eighty seats inside and forty on the patio, patio. Seasons Yeah Yeah. I'm in conversation with. Brad I- brewing. And before we continue the COVID nineteen pandemic has radically changed the way we are all living and working, but now we are slowly starting to reopen are small businesses in British Columbia. Although travel is somewhat limited throughout the province, there's nothing wrong with planning a future trip. That is what the BC L. Trail is perfect for on the website at BC L. Trail dot ca you'll find recommended itineraries.

Kamloops CASCADIA British Columbia instagram Vancouver BURRI partner Columbia Brian Craig Brad I Washington Oregon Aaron BC L. Trail Evan wider Pacific Brian Tie Evan Molson Evan Dawn
Demonstrators voice concerns over spearfishing incident

Native America Calling

03:47 min | 2 months ago

Demonstrators voice concerns over spearfishing incident

"This is national native. News Antonia Gonzalez last month. A man shot off a gun near tribal spear fishers on the lake in northern Wisconsin for many that brought back memories protests over native spear fishing rights in the nineteen eighties and nineties. The man involved in the recent incident says he was shooting at a squirrel on his property, but is now facing misdemeanor hate crime charges. Some tribal members want tougher prosecution Ben Meyer explains the protest Monday morning in front of the violence. County courthouse was silent, but noticeable people like Shannon Retana held signs, demanding justice for tribal members and. And respect for treaty rights were tired of the hey. Tight racism is hatred and feeding, and allowing that to continue for so long is it's unacceptable and we're not going to stand for. We won't tolerate it anymore. On the night of May. Second Retinas and three others were practising their fragile protected right to spearfish for Walleye off reservation this time on little Saint Germain Lake on shore, sixty one year, old James Kelsey fired a shotgun. He says he was firing at a squirrel on his property Retana doesn't buy it, so that's why may shirt says he's not a squirrel. Now clearly, he's not a squirrel. He's a man. No one was hurt by the shots, but police arrested Kelsey that night he was charged with two misdemeanors, including a hate crime but Chelsea's attorney Steve Lucarelli, told me his client really was firing at a red squirrel on his property. These were two unrelated events. And assumptions of the meant that they are related. There's a reasonable explanation for what occurred. The attorney said he's concerned. The episode is being blown out of proportion, but Chelsea's bond includes restrictions on guns, alcohol and going onto tribal lands, the case comes against the backdrop of protests over the spear fishing rights of Ojibway tribal members which started in the nineteen eighties, and at times, became violent and racist. Britney lured all elected flambeau tribal member. Holding a sign on Monday says she had hoped the North Woods was passed those days I was just hoping that I would read about it in the eighties and never. Never really thought I had to relive it from national native news. I'm Ben Meyer and Eagle River Wisconsin the leader of a tribal group tackling transboundary issues as retiring Tis Peterman has led the Southeast Alaska indigenous transboundary commission since two thousand seventeen I work projects all my wife just said it's time to take time for myself. A few months after the commission was formed in two thousand, fourteen, the Mount Paulie mine spilled waste into British Columbia waters incoming executive director Fredrik Olsen says there are other minor activities that feed into Alaska's rivers and Salmon Habitat. Everybody already knows about Mt Holly about just a miniscule. Little. Blip on the map compared to read mine. Which is operating in a sticky river watershed right now. The Commission is working to address issues on both sides of the border. There's a lot more transboundary issues than mining. You know there's also this the cruise ships to ship waste. There's oil tankers. There's murdered and missing indigenous women. On an on Olsen has worked as the commission's outreach, coordinator and board chair. The US House Appropriations subcommittee on the Interior Environment and related agencies will hear about the healthcare response to covert nineteen and Indian country. A hearing is scheduled Thursday to gather testimony on the Indian. Health Service response and the use of emergency covid, nineteen funding witnesses include leaders from the Indian Health Service the National Indian health, board and the National Council of Urban Indian health. I'm Antonio Gonzales.

Shannon Retana James Kelsey Ben Meyer Fredrik Olsen Chelsea Wisconsin Indian Health Service Antonia Gonzalez Attorney National Council Of Urban Indi Antonio Gonzales County Courthouse Saint Germain Lake Us House National Indian Health Steve Lucarelli Britney Mt Holly North Woods
How B.C.'s Indigenous communities are facing climate change, and creating solutions

Unreserved

05:31 min | 2 months ago

How B.C.'s Indigenous communities are facing climate change, and creating solutions

"The signs of climate change are everywhere. Lighter snowpacks others rising water levels and the conversations around climate are shifting just two years ago the phrase. The green new deal was just a bullet point in political platform since then it's expanded into a worldwide phenomenon and a solution. Some feel will slow down. The human caused portion of climate change. Jillian brave noise cat is been there. Every step of the way he worked with elected officials to help draft the green new deal resolution. Julian is a member of the Canam Lake Ban to cast skin in British Columbia. Hi Julian welcome back to the show. Thanks so much for having me so first of all. What is the green new deal so the green new deal began as a resolution introduced by representative Alexandria costs? He'll Cortez of New York and Senator Ed Markey of Massachusetts. It's a resolution with big ambitions to take on the dual crises of inequality and climate change but the discourse here because America's media market political scene often spills over into Canada and Europe and elsewhere has also been picked up by sort of more left leaning forces in other countries so the New Democratic Party. The Social Democratic Party in in Canada picked up the green new deal as part of their platform and has been talking about it in the Canadian context as well and use climate activists who are also sort of affiliated with the left wing and Canada have also been talking about potentially a a green new deal for Canada. What the green new deal is in. That is big jobs infrastructure investment. Sort of package so your listeners might be familiar with sort of carbon price and tax approach. That has been led by the liberal government in Canada and the distinction between that approach and the green new deal is that rather than sort of forcing consumers and businesses to have a off where they have to pay higher prices for gasoline. And things like that to sort of benefit the environment and to lower emissions. The green new deal says that we should invest in decarbonising a whole set of industries and sectors in a way that will create jobs and promote a more fair and equitable economy. Why is this important for indigenous people in Canada so I think that first nations and indigenous people in both the United States and Canada have played an outsized role in the fight for environmental justice over the last ten twenty years? Maybe even further back. If you look at the history of resistance to pipelines and Forestry and mining you know first nations have often been some of the loudest voices you know. Putting their very bodies on the line in front of pipelines and projects. That are going to damage the environment and public health. So I I would say that. A lot of the grassroots energy of the green new deal comes from first nations for example representative Alexandria. Cossio Cortez the politician who led the charge for green new deal here in the United States actually got started as a volunteer organizer. Supporting the move. Minute Standing Rock So I would say that. The indigenous movement both in the United States and Canada really has played a significant underlying role. That people haven't fully appreciated in producing the green new deal. I think the questions that first nations sovereignty and rights raise for the green new deal or not just the fact that communities are disproportionately harmed and polluted by the fossil fuel industry in particular and other extractive industries more generally but also you know what it might look like to in both the federal systems of Canada and the United States to incorporate first nations governments as equal partners in the federal system. That is that is pushing for action on climate change. What would it look like for first nations governments in in Canada and the United States to lead a transition to clean energy to create a lot of the jobs in their communities to be empowered as environmental stewards in protectors? And I think the examples that we should be looking to are things. Like the Guardian Watchmen program in the great bear rainforest. Other parts of Canada where first nations twenty thirty years ago stood up against logging and forestry and now today employ some of their own members as environmental stewards and protectors making sure that some of the most important carbon sinks in North America remain protected and can help us in the fight against climate change. So I think it's those kinds of things that we should be thinking about and then abroad or sort of intellectual and philosophical sense. I think that climate change really is an existential threat for humans and human societies around the world and of course you know first nations you know what it means to live. Through an apocalypse we lived through the apocalypse of of colonization. We lived through the apocalypse of our children being taken away to residential schools Canada and boarding schools in the United States and in a broader sense of human sort of confronting this enormous tragic upheaval to our societies. I think that you know indigenous people in Canada and and more generally actually have perspectives and experiences to lend to those set of

Canada United States New York New Democratic Party Julian Representative Alexandria Senator Ed Markey Canam Lake Ban Jillian Social Democratic Party Cossio Cortez Massachusetts North America British Columbia Europe Liberal Government
Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou loses key court battle as British Columbia judge rules extradition bid should proceed

Daily Tech News Show

00:37 sec | 2 months ago

Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou loses key court battle as British Columbia judge rules extradition bid should proceed

"Google spokesperson said. We have always built privacy features into our products and permitted robust controls for location data with a four to setting the record straight in a blog. Post Invidia G. Force now vice. President Phil is lower announced that the company's Cloud Gaming Service will only feature games from developers and publishers who have opted into service game developers and publishers who have not opted in will be removed after may thirty first previously include titles on g force now without express permission of publishers resulting in sudden removal of titles from publishers like activision. Blizzard and Bethesda British Columbia Supreme Court ruled hallway. Cfo Wings

British Columbia Supreme Court Invidia G. Force Blizzard Google Activision CFO Bethesda President Trump Phil
Seattle-area researchers say testing, contact tracing and effective quarantines will be needed more than ever

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

01:15 min | 2 months ago

Seattle-area researchers say testing, contact tracing and effective quarantines will be needed more than ever

"Of the Bellevue based institute for disease modeling says a comprehensive system of testing contact tracing and quarantines will be needed to avoid a bird a void a burst of new coronavirus infections commerce Brian Calvert tells us one of those elements is causing concern among privacy rights activists it's the part about contact tracing which in essence means that when someone comes down with cope with nineteen health officials try and find out every person that victim came in contact with I think any reasonable person would like to be notified not controversial until you consider the lengths some officials may go to get this information British Columbia's leading voice on covert nineteen told reporters recently that they can access credit card and store loyalty card information to track down those who may have had contact with the virus well Dr Bonnie Henry says the information will be used responsibly partial wall layout with the BC civil liberties association tells CTV news I would be very interested in hearing more about how that's been used and what those the civic standards were in place and what the guidelines are can officials access your grocery or credit card information here will they former Attorney General Suzanne Anton every time you give something away you've given it away what will that order be rescinded or will it still be there five years from now Brian Calvert komo

Brian Calvert British Columbia Dr Bonnie Henry Bc Civil Liberties Association CTV Suzanne Anton Brian Calvert Komo Bellevue Based Institute Attorney
Huawei Meng's U.S. extradition case hinges on key ruling in Canada on Wednesday

BTV Simulcast

00:25 sec | 2 months ago

Huawei Meng's U.S. extradition case hinges on key ruling in Canada on Wednesday

"And the three way fight between China the U. S. and Canada over while way reaches court later Wednesday when CFO mung wan Joe has our first shot at beating an extradition hearing the Supreme Court of British Columbia will rule on whether her detention meets a key threshold of Canadian law if the judge says no she could be released from house arrest if not extradition proceedings to the U. S. will

China Canada CFO Supreme Court Of British Colum
"british columbia" Discussed on Cascadian Beer Podcast

Cascadian Beer Podcast

07:01 min | 2 months ago

"british columbia" Discussed on Cascadian Beer Podcast

"That's a that's a decent sized for production brewery is is our focus here Also works very well and then All the crims eight by mechanical down in Victoria all works extremely well. And then yeah so basically and then we Shoved on the first sight things And we just had one little Butler in the corner there and Kager and keg washing racking and stuff will abuse going on so as a little little tight and then off the first year than we took over the second bay which sitting currently and then expanded Gone Additional Butler put in more tank capacity for extra volume of beers and And then we're space do things and now we have our kanner shoved the corner here. What you're going to start far up Net late next week probably down. Yeah so yeah. No the new exciting piece of equipment so with this canning run. Then like what's what's your distribution like Radius that you're looking to achieve while we are currently basically mostly based on the island right now. We are of course our home. Turf Year in partial QUALCOMM Nymex era courtney quite a bit We'll do quite a lot of beer in Puerto Bernie and then to few new nuclear saw that and we also selling for a beer in Victoria itself down. The Cobra wants to is not We're mostly just island-based right now. It just getting the off the island. You just a little more effort in Austin. Stop anything coming and going from this island rate is pretty much. Yeah so we're literally selling everything we make here so not at this point. We're not really going to be doing distributional file and I think all right cool and then like with that like you talked about some of your inspiration in terms of ingredients Like who else on the island do you can turn to for inspiration for what they're doing for beer ideas see ourselves software very collaborative in our efforts and stuff too so I will Go Talk to Let's see I hang out at quite a bit at twin cities in Puerto Burnett quite like. I really like what they do their for their beers stuff so often when I'm going back to visit you killer pheno I'll stop there on the way back and heavy beers and chat with them Quite like gladstone. Up and Courtney I'm quite impressed. By what land and and is doing their tests of the head brewer there. She's doing exceptional quality beers. An yeah we. We actually did a beer last year. with Grant for tips are Niane like a Nordic Kovac beer with for tips which are not excellent. Yeah that sort of Cross collaboration thing I do and and of course my Victoria peeves down Victoria to and I still catch up with people on the mainland to but it's a little harder to get off our list is. I'm very much focused on the island. This yeah so like We we didn't talk about the core beers. What's what's your core beer lineup. Here that you do Let's see we got a range of. We got our Aeros with blonde which is basically every good west coast of Blonde Hop with Chinook and cascades as quite nice great for bite to it a little bit and when I put out some people are complaining to hoppy and stuff and then that one gold at the ABC words like you know what. This is the best beer in the problem. Just drink So it says one things since then. So I'm quite proud of that beer We have our sailors see Pale Ale which is in west coast a little more molt four but nice hoppy West Coast Paleo with some British Crystal Malt and mosaic hops. Quite Lake Slip Past fruitcake and Roma are jagged face in the appeal Which is again very west coast. Hoppy I it's not the east coast sort of a lactose sugared. Sweet thing With the Hayes. It's very much a clear and bitter west coast which I quite like that sort attritional beer I also do like the East Coast Beers quite Atushi. Different semantic so so so And then also we have our Low pressure porter which is again west coast e more full bodied nice rosy chocolate puerto very delicious beer thinking of we just have our We just put out a pill sner the boss sner which is a German style. Pilger north German south pills ner more dryer hop Era Culture. Minted Coins Age. The whole nine yards with that no Russians like two and a half three months old now which is exceptionally good for a logger and hop German Mandarin a Bavaria and Allerton block which are sort of new newer flavors. I the European hops The Germans quaint liked are sort of flavors of West Coast Hawks but They don't want to important so they develop their own rise hops. It tastes like ours which I think. Imitation scissors form of flattery. Yeah that's good so we talked about this candy lines as some of those beers be canned off. Then those would be your regulars and then you still have your bomber over here and you'll still be doing specialty beers from time to time in those right. That is correct. Yeah we're going to have our main brands in the cans and then were probably GonNa save one Butler for doing so special runs on whatever we will try to do like Three or four five times a year. Put something new in his string Yeah so we have the pills no right now we might bring utter see says on again in. The springtime was very popular season with one. Another one. I'm very proud of Reagan. Sort of Belgian style. Saison all your hawks which actually is a little different but I quite like Sitra. Authors through lack in there and it tasted great. I'm a big soccer for citrus. Oh yes one of my favorite west coast hops. Then yeah and in the fall. We'll be doing some other things or too. Yeah I think actually landed in twinsies a club brew here so I'm going to bring those guys into do something in the fall really well. If somebody was wanting to get into bring themselves Would be some nice practical tips. He can give them to make better beer. Clean the crap everything That's basically what it comes out. Sanitation sanitation sanitation lot of Homers get into it and again wonder whether beer tastes funny. And I'll say well. What did you clean you sanitize within? Oh just using hot water and soap. And that's not really that good. You Beers the feral perishable food product. So please get some proper cleaning chemicals. Where appropriate safety gloves goggles and wash the crap out of it. Sanitize it properly and everything be very paranoid in broom process. Everything comes contact with you. Have to think about something. You're ingesting too right so exactly. Yeah the chemical has been thoroughly to. Yeah that's the main thing there and also I always say temperature. Some people don't understand well. Yeast is living microorganism. It's very subtle. Temperature fluctuation change never gets to warm to cold it can stall the fermentation or causes control controlling create really horrible harsh flavor. So again temperature controls and other tip. I give for burs starting out right. Well thank you. Dave time really appreciate? Well thank you for coming by. Let's try Samir. Thank you Dave Woodward for his time at Mount Arrowsmith and thanks again today of Paul over Love Shack Asians gas. Hope you enjoyed this episode. Both breweries are amazing. They're a short distance between each other. I highly recommend you. Check them out big things again to the BE L. Trail for making this episode possible. If you want to you know look at the itineraries of possibilities mid island head on over to the BC L. trail dot ca for previous episodes more information and to follow this podcast series along. Come check us out at the website. Cascadia DOPP ear. Also hope that your subscribed in your podcast APP or wherever you've listened to this you don't miss future episodes and thank you again so much for your time. I really do appreciate it until next time. Remember support your local..

Victoria Butler West Coast Hawks Dave Woodward QUALCOMM Puerto Bernie Puerto Burnett head brewer kanner Atushi ABC Courtney soccer Nordic Kovac Austin Pilger Hayes Lake Slip
"british columbia" Discussed on Cascadian Beer Podcast

Cascadian Beer Podcast

10:05 min | 2 months ago

"british columbia" Discussed on Cascadian Beer Podcast

"Green system and discovered Edmund breaking bad beer and then started making better beer and then I had two hundred leaders in my crawlspace and those looking at bigger equipment and my wife said why. Don't you just open your own brewery? I thought no. That's a great idea. Especially since you suggested it. Yeah Yeah wasn't even thinking of that. I thought it'd be too much work. And she suggested it and I said well we're going to do it. I'm going to do it all myself and do it as small as possible. And and here we are and here. We are We hear actually taping this in your conditioning room. Yes first time. I've done an episode and a conditioning. Because it's great because you are open right now and I'm a very thanks for your time to break away because that's quite the crowd out there. Is that a regular occurrence here. That is a regular occurrence so with limited hours so I'm only opened Wednesday's five to nine and Saturdays one to five and an open. I am generally full the pretty much the whole time. And what is that capacity? Twenty two seats well. Yeah and So we're talking conditioning room. We're sitting amongst the bottles so there's a lot stacked in here like how many days a week are you. Bruin on average Three by summer it's on average for But generally so anywhere between three and four year round That's two hundred production bottles. They're five hundred mil bottles and I hand Bodoland bottle conditioned everything and you just reached a major milestone the other day so I figured out I have now hand bottled ninety thousand bottles right right and no draft here right that no draft. I've only ever bottled. I've actually done to twenty Liter Kegs K. Conditioned there's actually one hidden behind me right here for tap taker of rim doing Campbell River. At the end of the month and one twenty liter keg was taken before I had Bala condition it and it was force carbonated for a crappy wilderness retreat last year and that was technically the first time. I've been on tap right. It was good but I still like Bala conditioning. Right right right. I think it's just a different product. Oh Yeah I of beer in my crawlspace at home for three years ago that is just getting better and that's going to be the big milestone anniversary beer that without. Yeah yeah definitely and the mouth feel on it of Bala conditioning I find is just. It's a different. It's a different product. Really really like it. Yeah so with all these bottles. What is the size of that Brew House back there is? It's basically a very scaled up. Homebrew separate definitely. It is technically a one barrel brow. So and batches. I don't I don't Max this system out so technically one a one heck brewing system so generally make a hundred liters a batch so last year for instance in the whole from Reporting Year I made a hundred and sixty three hectolitres in a year. So that's good because the Liquor Board. Your minimum is supposed to be one hundred and fifty and one hundred sixty three but to put that into perspective. Most Burris make that in two days. Yeah a big week. Yeah Yeah Yeah I I. I like how you're coming with the numbers here right. This is great. I'm so What is the borough focusing on because it looks like you have a core lineup? And then he kinda have like some fun stuff that you're doing so I've for mainstays that I always that those were my first home. We recipes that I scaled up and I wanted a a nice. You know you need the the range so I have a coal Shukri. Male might version of an Ip a and then a porter and then I generally have four features every week and I release a new beer every Wednesday for my Wednesday crowd And I generally roll four features but then with the bottle conditioning. Since there's no shelf life I can come in here and pull another four. At least that are still you know how I'll save the last case and stuff like that. There's a case of Snow White's doubt right there. That's and then there's those six cases up there. Those are for this year the advent calendar that. I'm touch no. I do not been calendar in the fall. Brilliants yeah okay so we get one phrase. They're caught my attention My version of an IP. What is your version of an IPO? Well it's called DP and that's for Dave Paul L. My name's Dave Paul. Figured if I open for name a beer after myself I think you have to And it's It's just a little darker so it's it's like a scaled-down cd a scaled-down cascadia dark al. If you ask brilliant brilliant but not a true north west Ip. Because it's a little darker so I've got some chocolate in there and it's it is a bit motiur and it's nothing crazy on the top level. It's about fifty. I us so it still tastes like an IP. But you've got the nice dark backbone. There's I try all my beer is but I have that many that and I try not to drink too much because it's way too easy to drink too much. Yes especially when you're just sitting amongst and so I won't have a GPA for two or three weeks and then one night. I like Of A DP a try it again I think. Yeah this is This is why it started. This is why started and that was the first recipe that I made up myself right. And so it's it's near and dear to my heart for sure all right so let's talk about the specialty things like what what. What do you like them? Play with your take everything okay. So that's another reason to keep this small. I I can make as long as I keep up with those four mainstays. I have those in shady rest liquor store in town. Here is the only retail place little cell to and about eight or nine local restaurants. All small ones that I know and have a personal interest in So then after that I can make whatever the heck I want and I do make a lot of fun interesting ones and then a year and a half ago. I was approached by the anthropology professor from Vancouver Island University whose whole focus of study is the food and beverage of ancient times right and she said that they were looking for a small operation to be interested in making ancient inspired beers. Well said well. Well I'm your guy. Everything I do is small batch and I would love to try that so since then in a year and a half. We have made six different kinds of ancient inspired beers and multiple batches of two of them. We've only done one the other four. We've done multiple batches of This Thursday night at the university. We're doing a tasting a an actual event pouring all six of them So they and they are fascinating It's been such a learning curve of learning and puts a face to the past. Of course they're not authentic. We're no no. I'm not chewing the purple corn for the teacher. We terrible terrible idea makes jar thinking about it. So you know. They're ancient inspired and my first thing with her was I said to her. You know if I if we're doing this number one. They're going to be drinkable you. They're going to be sellable. Yup everyone has gone over amazingly well and they're each very very unique and different where everything from the latest Norwegian Farmhouse Beer we made with yeast smuggled out of Norway by my Norwegian friend and that is a raw ale that I've never done before to the first one we did. Was this the MIDAS Touche which is based on ancient Egyptian beer with Organic Kamat spelt and and Amer Ancient grains and then coriander saffron and honey and it tastes like seven and a half percent golden. Honey Ale man. It's that's what I'm sitting on right now Iran. Luckily we don't have an oprah opener in here. Yeah I do my keys so okay. We talked about the styles and everything so but got asked about the name. Where did it come from? I mean like? Did you end up spending all your jukebox money or what it do? So everyone asks that. But no it is the ringtone on my cell phone was in whistler and my wife and I had just outer child but if actually grew up in the island here and her mom offered to sell us. Part of an acreage right beside them. Just up the road from where we are now Just north qualcomm and my wife and infinite wisdom said. That's a great idea. We'll sell her house and will live in a tent with our nine month. Old and you can build a shack said well. I'm a waiter and bartender. I don't think that's GonNa work so one will be fine. You can do only take a couple of weeks so we lived in tent for six weeks with a nine month old and it rained. Twenty eight hundred thirty one days that May and I built a twelve by sixteen shack that we called the love shack Moved into that and we lived in that for three and a half years while he built a house. And that's where I started brewing was in the shack right. So then when we discussed opening a brewery I said well. I'm going to do it all myself. I call it love Shack libations my wife said I think you're gonNA crazy but go to have fun and look back. Yeah fascinating story okay. All right so like how it's like. How is the opening and that whole thing with the community like how's The community's response to you because not a traditional brewery or not only being open eight hours a week so the support has been absolutely amazing and even right away it was busy right off the hop when opened in February? And then just by the summer it was chocking to me how busy you get and and now after the last two years realizing that wasn't busy now now. I'm busy Have lineups in the summer. Outside and community support has been incredible especially Wednesday nights. It's a lot of the same people who have a local food truck than parks out front and Wednesdays. I like Wednesday's like really locals night instead. The weekend Saturday's get lot a lot more people who have heard about me or got dragged here by family and friends on the island or yeah you gotta go check out. That guy is only eight hours a week. You gotta see him but the the really great thing about the tasting investors cell reception so and the tables the way I built the the live staples. They're they're very you're sitting right across from someone So you can't look at your phone and if you don't talk to them you're a bit of a Dick now. The Senate community and People. The conversations have been fascinating. Well I just. I was waiting for you in the couple. There's like this this chairs open if you want to sit down I'm Leon. I'm just waiting for him. Yeah cool thanks though so that seeing that is great now people are coming back in just to see people. They've met here before. Like we'll see you next Wednesday come back So and the hipsters from east sitting across from a seventy five year old retired logger from just up the road you know where else are they gonNA do? A strike up a conversation and have a great time because the common denominators beer..

Edmund Bala Campbell River Brew House Liquor Board Bruin qualcomm Burris Norway Vancouver Island University Amer Ancient Snow White Senate professor MIDAS Touche Dave Paul L. oprah Iran Dave Paul
"british columbia" Discussed on Cascadian Beer Podcast

Cascadian Beer Podcast

01:37 min | 2 months ago

"british columbia" Discussed on Cascadian Beer Podcast

"Temporary closure brewery tasting rooms as well as restaurants throughout B C I encourage you to stay home and stay healthy for now. But you can still support your local breweries and restaurants in your local area throughout Cascadia By purchasing products from them. If you can a lot of Burris are doing some home delivery services now be sure to check out their social media channels to see what you can do to help support all these small businesses at this time. And now's your chance to go back to the archives as well listen to past episodes and you can plan your post. Pandemic Vacation Visit Breweries Out British Columbia Washington and Oregon. And I'm looking forward to getting back into those tasting rooms eventually having a pint with you and all the other friends of the podcast so for now police day home. Please look after your family and friends have fun. Be Safe and support your local and now I hope you enjoy this. Episode of the PODCAST. This podcast is made possible by the BBC Ale trail arrive thirsty leave inspired at the BC L. Trail dot CA. Welcome to the CASCADIA and bureau podcast Aeronautic.

Canadian aerobatic jet crashes, leaving 1 dead

WBZ Morning News

00:39 sec | 2 months ago

Canadian aerobatic jet crashes, leaving 1 dead

"A member of a Canadian Air Force acrobatic team captain Jennifer Casey is dead after a jet crashes into a house in British Columbia CBS is crisp everybody's saying it was all part of a cross country salute to health care workers a tribute gone horribly wrong the snowbirds acrobatic team had taken off for a final leg of flybys but just seconds into the flight one of the jets appears to stall witness video shows the plane circling back towards the airport then spiraling out of control two crew members ejected right before the plane crashed into a residential neighborhood the entire flight lasted less than forty five

Jennifer Casey Canadian Air Force
Prediction

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:54 min | 2 months ago

Prediction

"Welcome to kids Smith and mystery your host kid crumb today. We're GONNA look at several events that were predicted. And of course we'll start with our current pandemic predicted seventeen years ago by science. If you still believe in science and is this a first well of course not you can look back. A hundred years to the nineteen eighteen. Banish flu epidemic tremendous number of similarities. Between on then. And what's going on now but we're going to leave that behind. Don't look at earthquakes. Also predicted are subduction zone. Earthquakes have occurred every three hundred and fifty years said six hundred BC with the most recent taking place January twenty six seventeen o one evidence for the earlier quakes or predictions comes from core samples taken from the ocean floor. The seventeen hundred quake caused several coastal regions are both Washington and Oregon to drop sixty six feet. Massive coastal storms during the nineteen ninety seven and ninety eight storms washed away tons of sand revealing hundreds of stumps the remnants of Sitka spruce forest. It is through a combination of carbon dating and counting of rings. That the date of the last cascade subduction zone or C. S. Z. Quake place the Earth. Surfaces made up of seven major plates in many smaller ones. The smaller place creator quakes for short durations of fourteen to forty five seconds it may reach nine point five on the Richter scale. They often take place at what is called the fault line between plates March Eleventh. Two Thousand Eleven Japanese experience subduction zone quite that lasted more than four minutes at a nine point one. On the Richter scale it was the fourth most powerful earthquake in the world since modern record taking began in nineteen hundred to shake created a soon nami that reached one hundred thirty three feet and move six miles inland. It moved Japan's main island of Honshu. Eight feet and shifted the earth on its axis between four and ten inches. This was an earthquake created by the shifting of the Pacific Plate Vialli to help put earthquakes in perspective the Loma Prieta quake that interrupted the nineteen eighty nine world series in San Francisco. California lasted fifteen seconds. The Great San Francisco earthquake of Nineteen. Six was eight point six and it lasted. Forty five seconds but Japan's greater earthquake of twenty eleven lasted over four minutes at nine point one on the Richter scale based on data from Oregon. Siochana Oceana Graphic Person Patrick Corcoran and US GS is Alaska. Science Center true mysteries of the Pacific northwest will now who are predicted. Minute by minute. Impact of a Cascadia subduction zone earthquake on the Oregon coast get this after three hundred twelve years the CS is he could no longer take the strain. It ruptures a spot fifty five miles west of Cannon Beach Oregon and quickly spreads along the seven hundred miles of length from British Columbia to Mendocino California. The North American plate slips fifty seven feet to the South West sliding over the one to Fuca plate. But remember we're talking about a crushed more than fifty miles deep. The first movement sends a pressure wave that travels through the Earth's crust at thirteen thousand miles an hour it will reach the West Coast in ten seconds. The leading edge will hit cannon beach and seaside thirty seconds later it reaches Portland Oregon in fifty seconds at his Seattle at nine point one. It's what Size Malla. Just call a full rip. Most cities can withstand a six point eight quake last year forty five seconds. But the difference between a forty second and a four-minute quake is like the difference between a head on collision at four miles an hour and forty miles an hour within three minutes. Shaking continues the coast will drop from six to twenty five feet after five minutes. The worst is over for Portland and Seattle will have suffered from ground. Liquefication building collapsed gas fires citywide after six minutes. People seeking high ground to avoid the SU- NAMI will be impeded by debris and driving will be almost impossible at eight minutes to Sonoma will be about twenty five miles offshore. It approaches like an enormous high tide but flash floods speed. The leading edge will only be inches but it will increase to forty feet is predicted that the cascade subduction zone quake would create twice the impact of Japan's great quake of twenty eleven. Keep in mind that by the time you finish listening to this podcast. There will earthquake somewhere in the

Oregon Japan San Francisco Patrick Corcoran West Coast Portland Seattle Pacific Plate Vialli Cannon Beach Oregon Smith FLU Sonoma Fuca Plate California Science Center Size Malla Washington Alaska Loma Prieta
A very Canadian solution to a problem well hopefully never face

The Big Story

11:57 min | 3 months ago

A very Canadian solution to a problem well hopefully never face

"At the heart of today's topic is a problem. That Canada will hopefully never face when you just have to look around the world to see how devastating it can be when it does happen in a muddy field outside on an army of bulldozers is breaking ground racing to build up thousand bed hospital to treat victims of the corona virus the Congo. This French train is far from the usual bags and suitcases. This high speed service has been requisitioned for medical use the makeshift hospital and the javits center now is taking patients and there is another field hospital going up this in central park. If covert nineteen spikes again and overwhelms our healthcare system. Canadian officials will have to act quickly. They will need to create a task force and develop a plan to handle the overflow. Who will put that plan together? How fast can they do it? Where will the building go? Where will the beds go where we'll the nurses dress? How does a field hospital come together while sitting on some of their desks will be a very Canadian document to help them? Figure that out because it turns out that almost every place in Canada from our biggest cities to our smallest towns as a facility that is ready and waiting to be turned into a makeshift hospital. I mean you can probably guess what that is. But I don't want to spoil the surprise. The story of how this plan came together and exactly what would need to be done to execute while. That's also very Canadian. And so right. After Claire gives us an update on cove nineteen in Canada. Today I am pleased to present a very good news story. Both because of the fact that this document exists and because so far at least it looks like it won't be needed so clear. How are we doing? Canada marked a grim milestone on Monday. Topping five thousand deaths from Kovic nineteen and most of those more than three thousand are in Quebec despite this schools in Quebec outside of the Montreal area have reopened with restrictions in place schools in Montreal are set to reopen may twenty fifth in British Columbia Phase. Two of the reopening plan will start next week if the cove nineteen situation. There remains as steady as it's been so phase two means. Some businesses will be allowed to reopen with some restrictions in place and people will be allowed to gather in groups of up to six people after the Victoria Day long weekend. Bbc's provincial health officer. Dr Bonnie Henry cautioned everyone to be patient and calm in the coming weeks. Ontario saw another day of decline in cases of covert nineteen on Monday and the province's chief medical officer of health. Dr David Williams said the province is anticipating whether or not it can begin the next phase of recovery. Despite this terrier state of emergency is expected to be extended today until June second as of Monday evening sixty nine thousand nine hundred and eighty-one cases of covert nineteen in Canada with five thousand one hundred deaths. I'm Jordan he's Rawlings. Is the big story. Kennedy Smith is the managing principal of an engineering firm called integral group and He started down a long process that led to an interesting Potentially Very Canadian solution to a problem. Kenny hi I'm doing all right thanks My first question for you is just. How did the group that began? This process come together. And what was its original intention in a weekend to work from home or a couple of weeks and I was. I was sat home one night and I just start thinking by you know. How can we respond as a design construction operations community to help what's going on in the world and and more locally within our community My wife is a is a narcis sick kids. So I also start getting a bit of fear around if if additional facilities or temperatures were needed in if they're if they're put up too quickly or a certain way it may actually create another area of risk for people working within them. So I just started thinking about you know. How can we respond for the right reasons as a community? And I reached I. I'd just can reach site to some some people in Lincoln and made an open call just to whoever was interested. Whoever was willing to put forward their own personal time adds to help right across our industry. So everything from architecture engineering fabrication construction operation. Everything just kind of put it out there. And the response was fantastic. And a lot of people responded. I think I think people were kind of looking for an opportunity to help in any way they could. And and this gave them this this platform to do it So a lot of people responded and we just kind of kicked it off and started from there really moving beyond that we we started speaking to some people on the on the user side trying to understand the actual needs of healthcare professionals the hospitals. And I'm the timelines 'cause you know we're we're used to designing and constructing sewer lengthy timeline. So you know right off the right out of the gate. They told us You know these things if their needs Would NEED TO BE IMPLEMENTED WITHIN. Can of two three weeks so a create this very very fast rapids requirement. We realized that we essentially had a week to try and pull something together with team. Yeah so then. We kicked off and started going. What was the first step? I guess In that process. And what were you considering as you sort of looked around at what might be available? It was it was quite crazy. I mean I think usually you've got some more time to really reflect and gather ideas across in many different groups in this scenario you've got a lot of people That have amazing ideas but you also have to make decisions very quickly to to try and move things forward so the first step was just kinda committing to a building type and kind of moving forward with a design and construction at a church for that building type. How many different kinds of buildings did you look at? And what was the that you had? So I think initially we. We started thinking on a large scale when you saw what was happening across the rest of the world in the UK in the United States where there were retrofit saying no major convention centers arenas airports we we. I started thinking about that and then after speaking to the healthcare user groups of Front we realized that maybe a more scalable solution would be better based on the on the needs as they came in so something that wasn't necessarily a too large scale Something that was more medium scale that we could actually implement some better measures to control the The clinical functions of space and air movement. Things like that so we first started considering large and then we started thinking what is a good can building type. On that museum scale that could be easily replicated first of all locally but an essentially anywhere in Canada we thought about hotels. There is a really good opportunity with hotels for People who couldn't self isolate People who couldn't get into amp shelters Could you know accommodate the needy and The people that needs to be helped on they could safely self isolate but in terms of a clinical function. It's Kinda hard to and I'm with the constant Clinton and maintaining the conditions in that space. So yeah we landed very quickly on arenas and then very quickly on ice arenas and you know is very Canadian response They are located all over the commune insane over Canada and the buildings themselves. Although there's there's there's variations of them the main components of these buildings don't really differ that much so you have the kind of ice arena where the WASHROOMS are entranceways Asi. Tin Area Zamboni entrances. You know these. These are all things that remain pretty consistent across any facility so if we could create a designer or sponsor runs one it could easily be replicated across any so. I think that's that's how we can have whittled a dining came to that as that building site so I think everybody listening can kind of picture either a professional hockey arena or their own local arena with the same kind of characteristics. When you're starting with that what do you then have to do? In order to convert it into something that can really help patients and also maintain safety like what does that actually look like on the ground. If you were to put this into action I mean I mean the first thing you've got to consider as what are the clinical functions you know what's it going to be used for? What do the healthcare professionals need in that space? And then can hide you separate out the building to maintain separation between kind of clean and clean supplies or supplies. 'em Hygiene tain separation between people and processing people can come in and and and leaving so we very quickly came Syria. A consensus with the team with some amazing healthcare plan ours. About how do we can chop up the space and very kind of basic terms to separate and maintain these functions so it was really using that main ice arena space to to have patients fitted and embeds comfortably? That could be checked on and could be tended to And then some of the exterior spaces could be fitted for the healthcare professionals storage of supplies and and then maintain some of the base building function so still maintaining the washroom areas and the change rooms for healthcare professionals and patients alike and then in the exterior spaces at most of these locations or surrounded by parking There's there's usually space around them so we had opportunities to also include four temporary trailers or additional spaces to store equipment and to put in additional mechanical equipment to maybe have some some temporary areas for doctors nurses to actually get some downtime and to hang out so You know we could kind of add to it like Lego blocks and as as where needed with I really doing too much to the existing infrastructure. Yeah I've taken a look just at one of the little plans you kind of sketched out yet. Looks Amazingly Just like a hockey arena only It's been transformed. Did you game out? How long that would take you and how much it would cost. And how quickly you can set it up. Because I know we've heard things from around the world of you know how quickly China has thrown up field hospitals or quickly. New York has transferred stuff. So what's the timeline in the cost there so I mean the cost is something

Canada Hockey Javits Center BBC Montreal Dr Bonnie Henry Dr David Williams Ontario Quebec Claire British Columbia Phase Kenny Kennedy Smith Lincoln Medical Officer Kovic Officer China
Oh great, now Murder Hornets?

The Big Story

01:08 min | 3 months ago

Oh great, now Murder Hornets?

"Bullets been dubbed. The Murder Hornet murder. Hornets mood a hornets. The so called murder Hornets giant Hornets from Japan that are now in Canada and us. Scientists have dubbed them murder Hornets. Yeah if the first four months of two thousand twenty didn't quite have enough terror for you. No worries this year has got you covered in all seriousness be murder. Hornets are not a product of two thousand. Twenty did not just show up last weekend and we probably shouldn't be calling them murder Hornets that said they're an invasive species they have been seen in Canada they have the potential to disrupt our ecosystem and I mean they do kill people. And if you haven't seen a picture of them yet go look at one. They look like little flying demons. But what are they beyond a scary picture and a headline? What do they do? Exactly that so worrisome. How is British Columbia to control their spread and finally it? Is this another thing that seems terrifying until scientists tell us not to worry and then a few months later? I am hiding in my house again. Or what

Hornets Murder Canada British Columbia Japan
Aid programs, partisan politics and the path forward: A dispatch from Ottawa

The Big Story

07:06 min | 3 months ago

Aid programs, partisan politics and the path forward: A dispatch from Ottawa

"To Parliament Hill to get a sense of how the aid packages for Canadians have evolved. Since they were first announced. What's available now? What might or might not become available in the future and of course to see if our MP's have figured out the mute button yet. I though I will mute Claire so that she can give you everything. You need to be up to date today. Canada's Chief Public Health Officer Dr Teresa. Tam says the spread of Cova. Nineteen is slowing in Canada. But the number of deaths is on the rise and she says that's because of outbreaks at long term care homes more than three quarters of the deaths are linked to those facilities. She also talked about testing capacity two weeks ago. She said she believes the country could do sixty thousand tests a day but lately Canada's been averaging twenty eight thousand tests a day she says provinces can help by extending the criteria for who can get tested British Columbia's laid out some plans for easing restrictions around Kovic nineteen starting next weekend. The province is allowing group gatherings of more than six people as long as no one is showing any symptoms of the virus. Also this month. Some businesses in BC will be allowed to reopen including hair salons retail stores museums libraries and some restaurants Dr Bonnie Henry the Provinces Health Officer says BC has put the brakes on the outbreak. But they're not through it yet and Antero Premier Doug Ford says the provinces moving with cautious optimism in the reopening of garden centres nurseries and hardware stores. Ontario's still not technically in its first phase of restarting the economy which was outlined a few weeks ago and the emergency orders have been extended until may nineteenth as of Wednesday evening sixty three thousand four hundred and ninety six cases of Cova Nineteen in Canada with four thousand three hundred and fifty seven deaths and I'm Jordan Heath Rawlings and this is the big story. Cormac McSweeney is the Parliament Hill reporter for city news for Rogers Radio and every once in a while for us and he's working from home and so am I so Forgive the toddler noises. But how are YOU DOING CORMAC? I'm doing all right surviving like everyone else's in isolation well and we're not the only ones doing this now so my first question is just tell me how virtual parliament for the first time ever is going. Well it's been interesting. I mean as you know there have been some troubles some growing pains as MP's and the House of Commons tries to switch to this Basically a really large zoom meeting and they're actually using a version of the zoom platform to host all of this So there have been a lot of troubles as people. Try to figure it out. There were connectivity issues where people were losing their connection and that's unfortunately just a fact of life with a lot of Mp's living in rural areas of the country and not having the same Same sort of connection as you would have. Let's say in Toronto or Ottawa? A lot of 'em. Ps You know figuring out the mute button figuring out the translation button as well because every time somebody doesn't hit the right button it seems to have to pause proceedings to try and deal with it but overall. I think it's been working out all right Aside from the technical hiccups that they've had I it seems to be rolling along smoothly in terms of having MP's MP's question The Prime Minister and different cabinet ministers and I will note as well that this is not technically a sitting of the House of Commons. It's technically a sitting of this special Cova Nineteen Committee that involves every MP and the reason why point that out is because there's there's a difference of procedure so we don't have the normal question period where Thirty SECONDS OF FOUR QUESTION. Thirty seconds for an answer instead because it's a committee. Mp's get about five minutes to question. Whatever minister or the Prime Minister And they can ask as many questions within that time period and the rule of thumb. Is You answer? Just as long as the question has gone on for and so it really does allow for a lot more of a substantial debate and a substantial questioning of the cabinet. Because if you WANNA get a lot of information out of a cabinet minister keep your question short and just squeeze as as many as you can with a five minute period. So what is the tone of those questions and this sitting been lake because to an observer it does seem Less like the. We're all in this together tone That we had six weeks ago. You know when all the aid packages were coming together. Yeah you hit it right there You know at the start of all of this. It seemed like there was going to be no criticism for the Trudeau government right away because this was an unprecedented time and unprecedented measures had to be taken but slowly over the last number of weeks. We've seen The Conservative Party. Start this off where they started questioning the programs being put forward by the government and in a very public fashion. I would say that for the virtual sitting themselves. The tone is actually quite different than what we've seen from the news conference as being held by the individual parties the tone on these Virtual sittings in and these. Qna's that are happening is actually quite different. From the grandstanding and showmanship you normally expect out of question period. In fact everyone's a little bit more toned down and there's I it's much more substantial questioning There's a lot more information coming out. And I think that's a great thing It really shows that without the theatrics that we normally get in question period There can be a good conversation to be had between opposing sides in the House of Commons. But outside of the virtual sittings exactly as we were discussing You know there's been more criticism for the Trudeau. Government people are exposing the gaps in some of the programs that have been announced. And we're really seeing the ideological differences for how we should be dealing with this pandemic at this time and the Conservatives have started raising more and more of opposition to the conservatives add to the true liberals rather as every week has gone on. So it'll be interesting to see where we go from here because up until may twenty fifth were working on a system of Just having one weekly in person a in the House of Commons and then to virtual sittings But the Conservatives for awhile now have been pushing for as many as four in-person sittings each week And so as we approach may twenty fifth Towards the end of this month there'll be more conversations between the opposition parties and the government about how we proceed from here because there's still a lot to do and You know June is when normally parliament would break towards the end of June For the summer break but With this pandemic ongoing and with it being such a fluid situation. I imagine we might see some more unprecedented changes to the procedures of parliament as we move forward and continue to deal with with this pandemic.

MP Cova Canada House Of Commons Prime Minister Trudeau Parliament Hill Cormac Mcsweeney Claire Doug Ford BC Provinces Health Officer Chief Public Health Officer TAM Rogers Radio Dr Teresa
"british columbia" Discussed on Cascadian Beer Podcast

Cascadian Beer Podcast

07:37 min | 3 months ago

"british columbia" Discussed on Cascadian Beer Podcast

"Simple but delicious. Menu are mainstays our air. We make ourselves in house and so we have the donor. We have a bunch of grilled sandwiches and like a Stir Fry Buddha bowl and pretzel and beer cheese. It's all really good stuff like butcher. Quality meats bakery breads you know. Local really local produce three. Yeah it's great. I want to say that we do have Vegan and gluten free options so that was something that as we were opening people on Social Media and friends. Were telling us we needed to do all this stuff. You know. Everybody is full of all this advice in your life. Don't like like stop like I need to plan the business and we thought that people were. I didn't believe that we would have as many vegetarian. People are vegans or people need to free and so. I'm really glad that we did. Listen to a few of those people So we do have those options now and it turns out. It's quite important to have Both arm UNITARIANS. So is one of those things where I was like. Nobody will want a Vegan Sandwich. Well it turns out they do so. I think that's good to know now. Yeah yeah yeah totally and then so like the Patios like not concerned percents done yet. But how? How many people can you get up there? And they're going to be any attractions in the summer. That you're doing there. Yeah so we have a capacity of one hundred and twenty four on the rooftop patio. We currently have seating for fifty sixty. We have kind of integrated some benches around the outside and we have a bunch of picnic tables under cover. It's about forty percent covered in heated. And we're in the process of building seating for another about forty people so we should comfortably seep our capacity of one hundred and twenty four. Whether or not we allow it to get to that and are able to serve enough beer and food for that many people comfortably is yet to be determined and I should note. There is a downstairs bar in an upstairs bar. So you don't have to keep going up and down up and down the yeah. It's it was really. The focus of our project was building that rooftop patio and we almost well. We definitely put far more into building the patio than we did. The interior of the building right so the interior is kind of utilitarian and the patio is like very nicely finished. Rustic finished with style We have a bar with the same twelve tops as we do in the taproom. We have two bathrooms. We have provisions for live music. Which is going to be staple of the summertime and it's just going to be great in the sunset is like right on your patio twos. Yeah the sunset's directly in front of us and we have a view of the Albany Valley and the inlet. That is absolutely stunning. Yes yes it is so if somebody was to come here and visit a would be the experience you want them to leave with like that idea stuck in their mind. That's kind of hard to say we've had a lot of people come through and the come in the tasting room and they it's full and their little disappointed and then once we say oh well there's room on the patio and everybody is very surprised and they go up there and nowhere to lie. Everybody is amazed they walk around that corner from the stairs and they see the cover and the the lighting and the tables and we really. We really hit that the park I think and so for us like I want people to come here and you know frankly. Maybe some low expectations the you know. It's doesn't look extraordinary down here. You know our draft tower is pretty cool here. It's a very creative too. But then I want them to be to leave amazed upstairs going to be like what and then you know then they get table service. So that's a different thing we have to. We really are focused on. Customer service up there Not Standing at the bar waiting for your drinks and things like that like sit down. Get comfortable view. We'll bring you beer and I want them to leave surprise to be like they never expected this because there's nothing else like it here. There's not very many places like that. Like specifically our patio on the island and we really tried to be different and we want people to leave remembering that and thinking that cool and if somebody was wanting to open up career themselves So you can give. I would say find a community that you know is going to embrace you and maybe doesn't have a lot of in it already and choose a spot that is in the worst location that you can find so that you get a good deal on your real estate and try to buy the building that has been. Kinda that footing of our business. It's allowed us to have more stable and favorable loans. It's GonNa build you wealth over the long term and it's just a better investment than making some landlord rich in downtown Vancouver Rahman so as a yeast specialist Yemeni special strains back there that you haven't used yet or any particular use that you're going to work in the mix here. Well I don't know I would. I would just say that. We're very lucky that we were able to modify some recipes that we had already been. You know home. Brewing attest batching and use a lot of the new Norwegian strains that are out there. It's hard for breweries that are already established possibly tasting rooms haven't been around. Like the lounges. For a very long time. And they're all stuck doing a lot of production so they can't just change their recipe and use a use. That is makes your beer into glass five days right. So we're doing a lot of work with different exchange strains really having a lot of fun with that but other than that not really a. There's nothing really weird back. There were staying away from things. Like pretend to macy's we try to have a lot of very clean sessional Beers low alcohol and God forbid we did get an infection. It's just not. We're not interested in doing that as a very tiny space. It'd be rampant quick. Eric we have a very strict cleaning protocol. You side. It's tight back there. You got to keep things clean and Organiz so all right. Well thank you very much for your time. Really appreciate it and definitely GonNa come back when the PATIOS completely finished. Yeah and really enjoy that. But I mean I'm going to enjoy it now in the sunshine. I mean it'd be ridiculous I ran away so awesome right. Thank you thanks for coming. Thanks to Andy and Robin for their time really appreciate it was a beautiful day there and that was such an awesome patio. I cannot wait to go back and see that patio fully done and being able to enjoy the view and just look down the valley with some really nice beer and Something from their awesome kitchen as well really looking forward to going back and visiting both twin city and dog mountain brewing. Just before we go I want to thank the BC L. Trail again for making this episode. Possible check them out as well as their new APP at the trail. That's the if you like what you heard today. I do hope you hit. Subscribe wherever you've been listening to this podcast and If you want more details about the other burris past episodes anything of that matter Go to the website cascadia. Beer thank you so much again for your time and listening to this podcast series. I really do appreciate it. And until next time remember. Support your local..

Albany Valley Vancouver burris macy Andy Eric Robin
"british columbia" Discussed on Cascadian Beer Podcast

Cascadian Beer Podcast

11:29 min | 3 months ago

"british columbia" Discussed on Cascadian Beer Podcast

"For the most part we've had a lot of help from places like specific mechanical They've been able to kind of augment our needs so we're still very happy that we have someone locally dot com spies for things when an emergency arrives but yeah it's it's been pretty good so far we've been very fortunate and then the ingredients. Where are they coming from? Are you know? Are they being sourced from the island at all? we try to and we can I mean most of our ingredients are coming from Kevin. Malting sits super convenient. They have access to so much us. And we've really been happy with everything we've gotten. We do make a couple of years that we we feel are very Like location dependent like so we make a British Pale Ale and for us. It's like no you gotta use the imported macro solder and you you gotta bring in the hops from from the UK and we just feel like it's just creating that diversity across Siberia so that things don't all taste the same and that being said we for a very long time never did any loggers because we you know we just thought that was what everyone was going to expect and to us at the time you know. It wasn't the most exciting thing we could make being said we never. We never said we wouldn't so we started dabbling In some longer term log ring and some cool historic beer styles and for that as well we wanted to reach out and get those ingredients from where they originally were made in Monmouth and stuff like that so German pellston would bring the German multi. Use that. We're bringing the hawks to do that. And we just really want to showcase a variety in beer. I think as a small community brewery were kind of in this position where we feel forced after. Do everything good. You know what I mean like. We can't be the SAUERBREY. We can't be the Belgian brewery. We can't be the hazy brewery were catering to a community that has a lot of diverse tastes doesn't have access to a huge diverse marquette and also tourism dependent right exactly. Yeah Yeah so we. We take that challenge and we enjoy it. Were right now. I mean we've got us our. We've got a hazy. We've got a halas. We've we've got a lot of different varieties on our beer list but that's fine that keeps it interesting and we find out the stuff we we really like and if it has a cool story behind the style of cool story behind the ingredients or the technique used to make it like that's exciting new us and we realized that excitement to our customers and this is. Why the spears exciting. This is why we're excited to make and that's pretty cool to be able to kind of curate that list of Beers for the community and yeah it's been really great and we've got a lot of new stuff on the way we're really excited about this. You know this coming. Spring and summer where it's going to be pushing our production heavily and excited for that and to really push the limits styles we do and how many seasonal beers you know we can crank out of our small little worry so it's exciting. Yeah and so then. I was the community's response when you finally open. The community's response was awesome. I mean we have people knocking on our door way before we were open and the way with opening a brewery and. I'm sure a lot of people now. This happen to them as it. It's the goalposts keeps moving as far as when you're gonNA open and did you make the mistake. Printing assigned saying coming this spring and then opened in the fall. You know or we. We said coming. Soon right yeah. I don't think by many people standards that was really soon by the time we actually opened we really purposely avoided hard date and our idea was when things are perfect. We will open. I don't want to be forced by the community. I don't WanNa be forced by our financial needs. I don't want to be forced by anything to open. I just want everything to be perfect and us to be happy with it and opened with more than one or two beers on tap exactly. Yeah we were able to open a four our four core beers on a full kitchen menu. We didn't it wasn't like foods coming soon. It was like now. These are the foods we do and we're doing them just as good as we will in the next couple of months on day one right in that time. What have you learned from the community's response so much so much I think as an owner? I've taken a hard core fast crash course on everything you can imagine. I know how to I know. Our Pizza Oven works and I know how to replace parts on that a lot of plumbing electrical and house related things that I wouldn't have really been technical enough to know. I just know our mill taking our mill apart taking our heat exchanger apart things that like you don't realize you become an expert on the things that break really frequently or ties you hiccup. So there's a lot of that technical knowledge but I think we have a team now of nineteen people here and working with such a dynamic team that there's so many different people they communicate differently they have different. Needs they you know. They don't all respond the same way. I mean it's beautiful because it's what makes you know our team so lively and like engaging for our customers to cause we have such deep relationships with a lot of regulars that come in here but like working with that many people is you know every day is a learning process and it's there's so many opportunities to figure out the best way to communicate with people in the best ways to tackle any conflicts or issues that arise and it's something every business owner has to deal with and I'm really happy with our and how we really look out for each other and see everything from each other's point of view so that's been really inspiring as well as just this huge opportunity to learn these people skills that you might not have had access to otherwise so and then what about the beer then are you packaging anything sending it anyway or is it just out of here. Yeah no we. We made the decision really early on with help from a couple other burris on the island that really pointed us in the direction of you know what model makes sense right now and for us. It was no packaging so we were really inspired by those breweries. That just worked so hard to keep their local community happy. And I have to give a shadow to Cumberland brewing company. Because they've been doing this for a very long time. They have such a close knit community. They have like the mountain biking community over there. And they're so supportive of each other and it just builds this relationship where the community loves them and they love spending time there and they loved food and that was what we wanted. We wanted our local community to support us and be. We'll be looking out for them and they'll be looking out for us and everything else is just a cherry on top so you know in the in the tourism heavy season were very excited. That New People are going to experience things and we love everyone coming in stopping in by like we take care of our community and they'll take care of us so that was our model and that included you know if we're shipping pallets of cans or pallets of bombers like across the province. I think you know for some breweries. That really works well for us. I think it's a big loss of Control. I feel like I don't know what's going to happen with that beer. How it's going to be stored house can be perceived. I don't get to talk to the person that's taking a set and tell them what went into it and why it's cooler why we're excited about it and it just that opportunity to have a conversation. Tell a story with people that try. Our Beer is something we love So if you come in your we're going to tell you about every single one of our beer's relate you try them? We're going to tell you what went into them. And we love that relationship with our customers that being said we have looked into perhaps doing limited runs. 'cause we have more and more people that WANNA take it's not about a sending it. It's about people wanting to show their friends and families and they're going on trips and they can't bring a growl or and they would love some going to the coast and exactly what they want to be more. They WANNA be more lightweight when they're bringing beer around from than a growl or by so that's something we're looking into and you know it might be something that we end up looking at like a crawler option or something. A lot of people are doing the crowd thing. I'm I'm on the fence about just because I'm such a stickler for that like repeatable consistent low oxygen. I want the beer to be in the best condition. It possibly can be again because once it leaves the building. We no longer have control over that experience when someone has the beer so yeah. I think I've always liked for seventy three cans might be something we look at in the future right cool. Well if somebody was wanting to go down the path of opening up a bury themselves would be some advice. You could give him. I think the biggest piece of advice I can I can give is like who? Who who are you doing for? Is it for the local community? Is it so you can send beer across BC across Canada Figure out who the people are that you want to keep as your customers and they figure why and I think a lot of people. Now we're getting to the point where there's a lot of breweries and you have to be very careful about what your plan of attack is opening. What need are you feeling? Where do you see yourself in the market? Are you pushing other people out or you finding a new spot? That isn't being a new kind of section in the market. That's not being met. I just think it's it's now the time that we need to be careful about. What kind of breweries we open. Or you know we're GONNA see more and more closing and if somebody was to come and visit L. Bernie. What's one of your favorite things? Do around here when you're not here the Berry. Oh there's a lot of cool stuff here we have the. This is the thing that I always pushed people when they come to Port Albany if they're making like a trip out of it something really need is. There is a tugboat that has been converted into a bed and breakfast and it sits down at the harbor and lovely couple Dan and Bushra own it and they do a dinner party where you can buy. Seats to this. Like three-course four course dinner. They only twelve people like a night. And it's not like a menu. You get to choose from you. Just get what they make and like. She is a classically trained. Like french-moroccan chef and the food is amazing. It's a cool experience. Dan is very into Belgian beers. He's got some really neat stuff in his in his collection. And it's always an amazing time that you wouldn't expect to have in a small community like Puerto Bernie. It's really classy. And it's it's so weird to be on a tugboat having that experience. But it's very cool so it's called swept away in not something that. I always like people to at least do some research on and look into it because it's so cool right. Brilliant thanks Aaron. I Double Double Aron episode. That is on. Iran's yeah thanks so much for your time. Yeah big thank you Darren. First Time had a great time there and I had a great lunch as well. I'm really looking forward to going back in visiting the brewery again before I get into my next Burri while we're doing our part to be careful in staying home and flattening the curve. It isn't appropriate to travel or visit the Burris At the time. But there's nothing to stop you from planning a future trip and that's where the BC L. Trail is perfect for that on the website the BC L. Trail dot CA. You'll find recommended..

burris BC Dan Monmouth hawks Kevin Beers UK Puerto Bernie Siberia marquette business owner Cumberland BC L. Trail Darren Aaron Iran L. Bernie Port Albany Berry
"british columbia" Discussed on Cascadian Beer Podcast

Cascadian Beer Podcast

09:55 min | 3 months ago

"british columbia" Discussed on Cascadian Beer Podcast

"Of the podcast on a single community on Vancouver Island. The city of Puerto Bernie is located pretty much in the center of Vancouver Island with the drive time being just over an hour from the name. Oh I'll be speaking with. Both breweries have opened up here. In recent years first EPA brewery who established in two thousand sixteen. It's twin cities during my name is Aaron Choline. I am the owner and brew master Twin City in Port Auburn. Abc Port L. Bernie Beautiful. It was a beautiful drive up today. It is a pretty cool Dr especially going through Cathedral growth around Cameron Lake people at the lake today. So Yeah Yeah Yeah. I can only imagine that gets a busy in the summertime. Oh yeah it does. It's basically highway straight through Puerto Bernie all the way to pheno and it's always not a lot of people may not trip so Well I mean the question. Let starting off with is How did beer find you? Think beer was an escape for me. During University I was going to Vancouver Island University in Anaheim. Oh and I was doing microbiology and trying to do undergraduate stuff for Medical School and just happen to find most of my. You know weekends and evenings hanging out of the pub with friends and Longwood was close by and that was kind of the time where things are really taking off and B. C.'s. Far As your especially on the island Phillips was doing a lot and coin and driftwood. We're really just starting to show what they can do. I was telling someone about all the beers I used to drink red racer. Ip was just like an epiphany to try that compared to some of the beers that were used to so it was like something started to pull me in that direction and I think it was like the science behind it. Some of the stuff that was like. Oh well you know maybe a cool hobby to try homebrew. I wonder if I can make beer as good as some of my favorites that I'm enjoying right now. And you know bombers were huge everyone at seasonal bombers coming out and it was like the battle of who could make the coolest new beer it was. It just seemed like a different landscape for your back then but looking back. It was kind of planting the seeds. I think for a lot of people that were like. Oh man the beer industry is really cool. Making Beers really cool. It's a fun thing to be a part of the events and just the people involved are just great so I can't speak anymore highly then than I do about how great the industry is in what it's like getting to do events and things with those kind of people but I think that was it for me. It was like something started to kind of tap me on the shoulder going. Hey you you're really liking this stuff and the stuff that goes into it and I basically decided you know third year into my undergraduate degree. I'm like okay. I'm GONNA FINISH THIS DEGREE. But Med school isn't for me I I. It's just my heart is in it and like pretty much decided really quickly. After that I wanted to move back to my hometown where I was born and raised. I WanNa do something cool in the community and provide a space for people to enjoy really good beer and hang out and kind of come together as a community and I think that was something that Bernie was was maybe lacking just. All of a sudden sparked dispassionate was like Oh yeah like Bernie needs a space where people can come together and just hang out and planned the amazing things that are going to do in their community. Events and fundraisers and things like that like just meeting a friend over a beer and like I think I used to say like. There's so many times you can look back in history. It was like people met over a beer shouted with something and it was not meant a lot of cool people over the small beginnings for a lot of really cool stuff so providing that space doing something I was passionate about and really letting people enjoy that and create this welcoming comfortable environment right and so like around that time on your thinking about this. There was just nothing between nine. Mo- into phenol right like to phenol. Brewing was open and then some stuff in the NYMAN was it right. Yeah that's really I mean. I love what Longwood was doing because they really. I wasn't involved in the Victoria. You're seeing too much so I know spinnakers brought a lot of that English style. Beer too people into their community and for me. Because that's just I didn't end up going that far south when I was really getting into gear so that introduction to all these English styles and some of the history behind it and yeah there there wasn't really anything like that and it took a really long time even for private liquor stores to pick up on the craft of. You're trying to import all Bernie and is just something. We weren't seeing so getting that those crumbs made you want more than you could chase down. What was really happening in in crappier right so around. What time was this like? How many years ago when years years ago and then from idea till breaking ground? What was that timeframe like that? Was that was a roller coaster. So you know finish my degree and I started working on a business plan. I was like you know what? Burris what I WANNA do. Let's start there may start a business? Planning ended up pouring a lot of time and energy into this thing. It was thirty pages. It was as much detail as I could think of. I just wanted to be scrupulous and I realized really quickly that type of berea wanted to be was going to be something that the community got behind something that they supported and they felt like a part of so what I did is. I started a crowd funding campaign to buy a pilot system. I was using like Coleman igloo Cooler Mash Tun and a Turkey fryer stock pot like I was home brewing the way a lot of people start homering and I was like you know what I think. My Kid you everyone around you tells you your beers good because they like drinking for free. Yeah exactly show up at a party with a couple of kegs and people aren't going to tell you it's bad. I mean if somebody doesn't think that you're not their best friend. I mean anyone you turn up with that party exactly so yeah we decided. Let's really gauge the community's reaction to this idea let's see if they're going to support it. There's you know you don't really know what the community's response is going to be like especially when it comes to an alcohol establishment and what people perceive that to be so we did this Indie Gogo crowdfunding campaign. And we're like what the goal is. We're GONNA raise money. We'RE GONNA buy pilots system. That is really like it's a way for us to build our recipes and hone the skills to make them transferrable to large scale. So we can go okay. We we're we're down to the science on this. We know we're making this type of beer. We can easily scale up and it will work in our community so the thing was cool. We had over one hundred con con contributors to it ended up raising over seven thousand dollars which bought this for the nice pilot system People were able to get t shirts bottle openers. All sorts of coasters and things like that just for being a part of it. It really helped cement some of the support in what our plan would end up being and that was cool because then people knew that what we we basically said we're going to do and the community could hold us accountable and so after that everything was kind of serendipitous. I mean we found this space and it just lined up perfectly to buy so. We bought the building. I started doing weekend and evening renos until I thought I was going to go crazy on my own with no money and shopping. That business plan around looking for the right people to be involved with you know a fresh out of university student that has never owned a business before. But you know we were really passionate and we really thought we had a tight plan so we ended up just getting the right people involved over time and they to this day of all been so great to us and it helped us get things to the next level it helped us rethink some ideas that we thought we knew but maybe we needed to replant a bit and by the time. We ordered the equipment. I've I was so confident in what we were doing. And we opened our doors and just never looked back and that was three years ago. Coming up on the twenty fourth right twenty four the march. Yeah right well. Happy early at the time of taping anniversary here. So yeah so so about that equipment. What is the size of the Brew House back there. We have twelve hundred leader Bruce System. It is Chinese. We were like I said trying to do things in a way that wasn't going to break the bank. We basically we're on a shoestring budget opening and we tried really hard to make the most of that so we did buy from China. We really did a lot of shopping when it came to our house in our tanks. I it works for us. I don't know if it will work for everyone then. We just kind of figured you know. What if if we're careful enough we know what we're what does the limits of it and we can make good beer if we're clean enough and we're watching carefully so yeah it's it's been great with that system. What do you have some challenges like if parts are breaking and stuff flake and has there been like downtime as a result or able to resolve that? A little bit. I mean the one thing is we brought all this equipment and then it showed up in our electrician told us. None of it was certified for use in Canada so we had a mini heart attack. But we actually ended up. Getting someone involved was able to certify the equipment. They looked at all and they're like oh no this is actually like easier all parts that are used in North America. It's not like they were using really cheap stuff. And they're like yeah. They looked at over. They looked over. The circus looked over everything before it was hooked up and they you know put their stamp on it and it was certified wasn't as big of a headache as we thought. That was one of the challenges. I mean we tried to think ahead and be like our kettle is electric so extra elements. Please send US spare sets everything you can imagine so. We always have something in the back waiting if case we had any issue but for the most part we've had a lot of help from places like specific mechanical They've been able to kind of augment our needs so we're still very happy that we have someone locally.

Bernie Puerto Bernie Vancouver Island Port L. Bernie Beautiful Vancouver Island University Aaron Choline Cameron Lake Port Auburn Cathedral Longwood EPA North America US Anaheim Phillips headache Medical School Brew House
"british columbia" Discussed on Cascadian Beer Podcast

Cascadian Beer Podcast

01:42 min | 3 months ago

"british columbia" Discussed on Cascadian Beer Podcast

"Temporary closure brewery tasting rooms as well as restaurants throughout B C I encourage you to stay home and stay healthy for now. But you can still support your local breweries and restaurants in your local area throughout Cascadia By purchasing products from them. If you can a lot of Burris are doing some home delivery services now be sure to check out their social media channels to see what you can do to help support all these small businesses at this time. And now's your chance to go back to the archives as well listen to past episodes and you can plan your post. Pandemic Vacation Visit Breweries Out British Columbia Washington and Oregon. And I'm looking forward to getting back into those tasting rooms eventually having a pint with you and all the other friends of the podcast so for now police day home. Please look after your family and friends have fun. Be Safe and support your local and now I hope you enjoy this episode of the podcast this episode of the Cascadia. Nba podcast has been made possible by the BBC trail arrived thirsty leave inspired and the BC L. Trail dot CA..

"british columbia" Discussed on Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

04:16 min | 3 months ago

"british columbia" Discussed on Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

"Been to colona well and our best friend crystal. She is from Vernon which is I. Think about forty five minutes north of Kalona. And she's kind of like coladas. Okay word you don't remember but she was really downplaying it and saying it wasn't that cooler wasn't that she wasn't taking cheesy but it was like kind of like that and we went and we just got this debt apartment that was like on the lake that just overlook the lake. And you're on the lake and there's a beach right there and then you look at the mountains and we just sat there for four days straight just cooking hanging out drinking beer making mixed drinks going down to the beach laying on the sand going to get ice cream and I remember thinking. Oh my gosh. This is paradise right here. Yeah there was a new brewery that opened up donated launched were good. There is like a soft opening for friends and family but I walked by three times and probably like it wasn't open if we will walk by again our last day there and they're like oh well wherever like soft opening for friends and family. Why don't you come in like they want to be featured on the podcast? Now we we got him for free so yes so. Kalona was just really really really cool really neat and so much more relaxing than I ever imagined. Yeah I mean give us a body of water and a house or an apartment body of water and a bottle of wine bottle of wine and so that's Aga- coffee bean bag a bag of beans. Yeah box of beer bottled beer bottle on. So you guys go. Yeah that is our best of for British Columbia really hard. I mean as we're thinking I had multiple more stories coming up so we might have to do a longer form destination diary on or even Victoria. We ever done one on occur which in itself I know we touched on it a little bit had that city. I would move to Victoria heartbe. Yeah we love it there so much and our friends corden. Kim who used to live in Vancouver moved to Victoria for about two and a half years in real estate prices. Well Yeah it's a little expensive but it's great great city. Yeah that's our Corinthian diary on British Columbia. We will be putting these out every Monday Wednesday Friday until we either run out of material which you know. We're twenty four minutes and we got the compressor probably not run out interior or maybe the quarantine ends. Who knows when that's going to happen? But we putting these out on the podcast feed as well unedited like like you've been listening to an also an ATV so if you are a podcast listener and you wanna come see our faces a little bit or engage with us in a little bit different of a manor head on over to TV extra packing peanuts. Come Watch US pretty fun to get to do it for video to see our little background. It'd be palm headquarters. Get to see what had him wearing? And the Nice clothes at wearing the crappy close Saddam wearing if anything. It's a reason to get dressed because yesterday I see it in my pajamas all day. Our son he was running around at seven pm with the other neighbor kids in his pajamas. And I kind of want to tell people like we haven't dressed ready for bed but they knew their kids were probably pajamas. Do I just WanNa say I did? Change his image of fresh pajamas for for bad axe. So thank you guys for listening. Thanks Listening Quarantine Diaries. If you have a theme topic place anything you want us to talk about in this manner let us know. I will put it on the list. We're going to be doing some destinations. But we're also going to be doing stuff on specific travel topics as well and don't forget the regular epoch. Podcast drops every Tuesday. That's our longer form one so that is still coming out. That is just on the podcast. He is not video right now. So it's not so you guys are awesome. Stay safe during the quarantine stay sane. Don't kill your loved ones that you're living with trying to get outside. Get a breath of fresh air. If you really starting to get annoyed and go for a run even you know. Yeah that's what we've had to do until next time. I if you made it to the end of the show..

Victoria Kalona British Columbia Victoria heartbe Aga Saddam palm Kim Vancouver
"british columbia" Discussed on Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

11:07 min | 3 months ago

"british columbia" Discussed on Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

"The next one is most beautiful sites. This is near impossible when it comes to be see because part of BC's charm is that. I mean you just whether you're on the coast or in the interior. It's just the natural. Beauty is absolutely stunning in my. Gosh I I have to okay. Go ahead so well. Maybe even three. I mean we're break the rules right but I'll be got the compressor so I think one of the most stunning us is just the downtown Vancouver with the mountains behind it so that I mean like at Stanley Park Stanley Park. Yeah when you're ending your looking over at North van and you're seeing the mountains in their snowcapped for a lot of the year and it's just absolutely stunning so that kind of brings me into the second one which is going up to whistler and that whole drive we did the CD Sky Gondola in squamish. And that's beautiful so I'm going to pop in hero quakers. That will be my answer and I. It's not what's interesting to me is that it's probably not my most beautiful sight ever because that would be the road trip that we took on five eighth the interior but the picture we got from it. You having me stand on the Capistrano Capistrano bridge the bridge sky. Gondola with no one else there like we caught it when no one else was on the bridge. And so when I look at that picture of my this might be the best picture ever taken of me. We use it in a lot of our workshops. It's the most liked picture on instagram. Up until we had like a kid in right when I was there it was beautiful but it. It didn't hit me. How beautiful until we went back looked at the picture and I look at it every time we will workshop now and I think wall like this is insane. So that's my answer. Yeah and I'll just do my third. It's all kind of wrapped around the same thing. And that is taking the ferry from Horseshoe Bay which is just north Vancouver over to Vancouver Island. It just being stop. When we go to the island we take the ferry there. I guess if we were more patriotic play but sure one day. That'll be fun but just being on the ferry again you get that same view of your in North Vancouver at this point then you have all the mountains and islands. You don't on the way to Vancouver Island there's so many little islands and it's just stunning. It's my favorite in the BC. Ferries are really nice and clean. And we've taken a lot of really bad ferries so to have one that all fares are a little crowded or maybe a little older. We're looking at like you ever been on a ferry into island You ever been a ferry and Indonesia like gear. That's going to be a little different in. Croatia was not good. Oh yeah gas. Fumes made us sick on that one. All right okay meal I know right away what minus go ahead fishing ships. There are two spots. While you're gonNA GIVE BOTHA GONNA take you're GONNA take. Oh no I'll give. I'll give my original favorite. Oh go ahead and give the new favorite. My original. You're going to do. This is a Bang. Bang one of these days. We're GONNA take the plane and literally go from the dock or like the harbor. Yeah the harbor in Vancouver Grandma and we're GONNA go straight over to Victoria and then go to the other fish and chips place so we gotta decide against each other eating within an two hour time for him. Yeah so go fish in Vancouver on Granville. Island is my favorite fish and chips in the world. And I'm sorry. The U K I know fish and chips are originated. There don't do it as well and I've had some good fish and chips there but this one is my absolute fe co fishes great. Go every time at least once in Victoria. There's another one that I think is as good a canon so hard to compare because you've never been able to eat them right next to each other. That's why we will do this. You're listening. Pc Tourism Board. Let's sponsors us. We do like a three four minute. Youtube video go viral. We're in Vancouver. We eat at go fish. We take the seaplane boom willing Victoria and we go to redfish bluefish and have the fish and chips there and then we decide against each other tastes so redfish. Bluefish in Victoria also incredible incredible fish and chips. They also have really really good fried oysters there too. So Yeah Awesome Awesome Seafood. Okay NEXT CARD. Best memory okay. I'm GONNA use best memory for something else. I wanted to say about food because I was GONNA Stop You. And say my. There's a ice and ice cream that I had and so on the island. So when you're on Vancouver island you can go to a more smaller. More remote island called Salt Spring Island and we took the ferry there one time for the Saturday. Farmers Market Awesome Cool Island. Salt Spring Island went to it. Might have been the Sunday market on a Sunday a weekend. Market Sunday market and we went to a site and we did some stuff but at the Sunday market there was a woman from salt spring creamery. Who was selling her homemade ice cream and it was top three ICE CREAM. I've ever had in my life. The Cinnamon Toast Ice Cream Salzburg. Creamery now you have to know this though. They don't have a shop like there's no way you can get it other than at the farmer's market or apparently she sells a few flavors at the cheese shop. I in thoughts on Salt Spring Island and I think there's probably only when she shop and so this was like one of those magical moments where I had it and I thought I. There's a very very good chance I never ever ever have this ice cream again and the little hard to get to. It's a little hard to get to live on Vancouver. I mean it's like you gotta go to the market. She has to be there. She has to have the cinnamon toast. I mean it's a confluence of events. That may never happen again in my life. So that's one of my best memories of all time when we when we talk about. Bcc because salt spring island is cool but when he good ice cream on top. It's hard to be had. It's hard to beat. Well my best memory is also on Vancouver Island and it was going to Tofino because I had never heard of. Tofino like you know years and years and years ago and then I was reading an article in a magazine about like the Wild Coast Vancouver Island and I've been to Vancouver island but I'd never been to pheno because it's a little more remote because it's you know if you take the ferry then it's a couple of hour drive all the way to the west side the north western side of the island and I'd been wanting to go so that time I think I was. I was pregnant with wit and we went with our friends. Crystal Courtney Kalem and couple of other people and we rented AIRBNB and we stayed on the water and we went to the beaches. And you know it was a little chilly because it was in May but it was just beautiful and relaxing and we got the fish and chips and we got the Tacos Taco. Tico pheno good stuff. Good stuff we went to a really fun special dinner at this really upscale restaurant. That was really good in a fun experience. And you know it was just great and some of the best photography like some of our favorite pictures are from there so yeah the meme man. There are a lot of memories. Nbc. I WanNa give just one quick other one. That's like an everyday memory. We spent thirty days in Vancouver the one time we rented an apartment we spend it like April. May and this was the same trip. I think yeah I believe so we but we were in Vancouver for a long time. We decided to bunk down there a little bit which we always say. We're GONNA do like random place and stay for like a month or two and then we always end up flitting around but We stay in Vancouver for a month and it was April intimate and I bought a bike. And our friend Courtney and I would go out on bike rides. Just all around Vancouver and it's just it's an awesome bicoastal city and as the leaves changing like we would come down. Was that eleven serie like there was a there one. I think it's the bite the ones by ten maybe ten. You'd come down ten. They lived right off ten and like all the trees would be over the rose lowering with the cherry blossoms. You just be biking down the bike path. They're like through all the cherry blossoms. I just remember thinking like this is one of the most gorgeous spot like just this. Three block radius of tenth biking down here to their apartment in the mount. Pleasant neighborhood was just loved it. Yeah we love this city which brings us to the last card. The most surprising thing I have mine lead off. The most surprising thing to me is how often we've been like how many times we've gone to Vancouver. I don't get sick of it and I'm still in awe of the natural beauty of this whole province because it's so different you know you have the coast and you have the mountains then you go into the interior and you have the lakes in the wineries and all the green and it's just so stunning so the most surprising thing to me is how I WANNA go back there. When there are so many other places in the world that we have yet to see that are also beautiful and Would be fun to explore but we love and we have some of our best friends there so we find ourselves going every. That's a good one because I agree I could. You could say you're going back here. Not Somewhere new. And and usually I'd pick our new new all right. That's fine. This is great. We said about Thailand in our Corner Dyer Thailand. It's just a place that feels a bit like home and that is could we spent a good amount of time there and we've had good experiences now. Granted were almost always going during the summer air spring summer which in my mind to be there unless obviously there in February actually and you know it wasn't the best time to be there but still had a lot. We're like unless you want to ski. And then that's great too but I I think I agree with you that yeah you could drop there in the summer and perfectly content which is not my normal state. I'm not usually content to be somewhere I'd be perfectly content. Spend MONTHS THERE IN THE PACIFIC. Northwest is a whole but especially in the summer. My most surprising thing is colonie. We went and we knew we were going to spend like three or four days in Colona..

Vancouver Vancouver Island Salt Spring Island North Vancouver Wild Coast Vancouver Island BC Cool Island Crystal Courtney Kalem whistler Stanley Park Stanley Park North van Tofino Croatia Indonesia Youtube Colona Victoria Pc Tourism Board
"british columbia" Discussed on Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

12:46 min | 3 months ago

"british columbia" Discussed on Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

"We know that these are crazy. Unprecedented Times and there's a lot of confusion and there's a lot of uncertainty but we also know that these times are presenting an unparalleled opportunity for each and every one of us you see because there are three things we know for sure one is that during the quarantine time will pass to that the quarantine will end and we don't know when it will end but we do know that it'll end and the third thing we know for sure is that at the end of the quarantine. You can come out either better than the situation. You're in before where you can come out in the exact same spot. So if you're someone who's been singing said I've always dreamed of building location independent lifestyle but I've never been able to know what steps to take. I've never been able to get momentum. We're doing something absolutely crazy. We have fast track this and we are putting out our lifestyle launch academy three months early. This was originally supposed to launch in July. But we've been working around the clock with the team the last month since we knew that. We're going to start self isolating and being quarantined and not being able to go outside. We said people need this. This is an opportunity for some people to say. I want to take this time to really take steps forward and building a location independent lifestyle that I haven't been able to build before and so we worked around the clock to get out to you three months early. You can check it out by going to extra pack of peanuts DOT COM Slash Academy. It's extra pack of peanut DOT COM Slash Academy. But you can only sign up into Friday and after that we close the doors and we start our eight week program with everyone has joined the academy so an eight weeks you come out on the other side and say I finally have a concrete intentional actionable plan to help me build a location independent lifestyle so if you want that check it out extra packing peanuts dot com slash academy. We couldn't be more excited for the people who are joining and to get rocking and rolling with all of you and make this crazy. Time of being quarantined. Something that you look back on in the future and you say those were some of the most impactful weeks of my life. Check it out extra pack of peanuts DOT COM Slash Academy has low travel nerds and welcome to the extra packing peanuts travel. Podcast we are coming at you today from our e Pop H. Q. The show that teaches you how to travel more. Well spend less except for staying at home. So we're here to give you a little bit of inspiration today. Talking about one of our favorite places and the place that has the brewery of which which travis sporting the hat from this brewery. So heather hates this hat. I don't know why I love it. she hates it. But we're going to British Columbia today with you and this hat is from a story in British Columbia right outside of Whistler Coast mountain represent so I figured she said tribe. Your hair looks awful. Go put on a hat. So this is what I hate that. Trav- your hair looks awful. Go put on ABC. Wait a minute make us on her. Might just relaying. What happened five minutes before play guy either way quarantines getting us? It's getting a lot of time spent together and you know we somewhat too much time. We're used to spending a lot of time together but court excuse me. Quarantine is a little bit of a different animal. I do not hate the hat. I hate this. You literally said I hate this head a little too flat for me but anyway regardless British Columbia and we love the breweries in British Columbia. Yes today this is part of our quarantine. Diaries session so you can watch us on. If you're watching it then you get to see that if you're listening on the podcast and you do want to see our faces our situation and see what had a might wear for the next one. You can go do our instagram at extra packing peanuts and check it out there. So these are shorter. Form unedited podcast. That we're putting in addition to a regular Tuesday longer form podcasts. So that you have more wanderlust more travel love in your ears during the quarantines as we all go a little bit stir quarantine that's like during the quarantine it is now. I think a proper now. I think it should be Catholic. Quarantine entreprenuering quarantine and so what we've been doing recently and what we're going to do today is our best of series and this is where we pick a destination today. British Columbia Heather has a few card down there. She mixes them up and then she asked us and we don't prep for this at all. What our best memories of this specific places so today. We're doing a whole province and it's GonNa be hard because we spent a lot of time in British Columbia and we've gone all around British Columbia. Obviously we spend a ton of time in Victoria. Think Hoover Islands part of British Columbia? Spending time in Vancouver. We've been up to whistler. We'd been out to the Okinawa Gin. So it's going to be hard to pick somewhere places but hey that's what happens. That's the tough job of being travel. Podcast SO WE HAVE DESTINATION. Diaries and we have one. I'm pretty sure on Vancouver so we don't have one. I think on the whole of British Columbia. So you'll be getting some new content here with this little mini series. And I guess we should just jump right in. Let's do it okay. The first card is oh how appropriate best during so. I've been thinking a lot about this. And she told me redoing British Columbia literary four minutes ago and there have been a lot of places that we've drank at Including Vancouver we one time. We're in Vancouver for twenty one days and I did twenty one breweries and twenty days and I was pregnant so I did zero breweries. I mean I went to them but yeah so and we've spent a lot of time in Victoria. And some great wineries out in the Okinawan and all but for me. I think it will come back to a beer. Coast Mountain honorable mention and because of the hat. Awesome little brewery up in squamish tackling games. Garmisch just south of whistler fun little place cool like everything wanting to bury small little joint. That heather actually stayed in the car because again. I think you're pregnant at that point and she took a nap. I just went in and had a little flight by myself. You know really neat. People could be the coast from the brewery. No but it's called coast to Coast Mountain. Which is also a weird name. My name like it's just a weird. You're just taking two words and putting them together but it works and I love the hat and I'd like to branding but my number one favorite. So it's not honorable mention. Okay right you told me that we could go longer than fifteen minutes. Because now we have a compressor so we can put it on. Igt No if you read our post from last week. But I had the hardest time trying to get our videos out because if you video over fifteen minutes you have to do it from your granddaughter and it has to be an MP anyway. It was a whole long saga. But I bought the software. Because what does one do? I mean we needed. We needed to get the videos to you. We needed to get the videos. You so then Heather told. I said we are GONNA be fifty minutes is going to be hard for British Columbia said. Oh no no we got we got the compressor we can do want so. My overall favorite drink is strathcona brewing in Vancouver for two reasons. One Strathcona brewing itself has really good beer. Super Cool brewery really hipster in in like a gentrifying neighborhood for sure but they also at the time we were there and I'm not sure if the guy still does this but there is a gypsy. Burr call who runs a Burri called superfly. Meaning he doesn't have his own brewery brews at Strathcona and comes up and bruised. They're apparently lives in a van. No joke down by a river and then comes up to strathcona debris here and there and this was two years ago so things could have could have changed this super flex beer is awesome so they sell super flex at Strathcona brewing and their beers incredible and then bring has their own beer and their beer is really good too so those my if you want the best drink we've had in British Columbia head to Strathcona brewing. Try and try to get your hands on superfly which you can get in grocery stores and convenience stores to I would second that I love Strathcona brewery also the inside like have said is very cool and hip and they have really good pizzas and I think some ninth grade. Happy hours like half price pitchers of beer so we were getting awesome. Craft Beer for price of course light pitchers that got a little messy making artisan pizzas. So I mean. It's a win win. However I do want to shout out to another brewery. That was my first love in Vancouver as well. As Courtney or Frank Courtney who lived lived in Vancouver at the time and that is thirty three acres this brewery. I feel like it was kind of the first real history brewery. It's beautiful inside it's minimal. They do a lot of different kinds of beer so well. We tend to like the more juicy beers they they have a whole range. So that's kind of why we like Shrek Kona better because they had more of the juicy beers but thirty three acres definitely hold a special place in my heart. I didn't even go for all right. I know I mean there's too many we really in this case because it's some countries traffic as well. I don't even know if I could pick US hard in some countries for us not in Vancouver because we spent so much time there and they have so many breweries they have a wonderful wine region and they have good coffee shops. So honestly we could. We could really do one of each but we got the compressor. But we're not gonNA let all right best activity. Oh boy this is too hard or you're going to have to do it. I mean you. You're the one who made these rules. Best activity in British Columbia overall. I know what you're going to say. Okay then tell me you're gonNA say biking no. I surprised really. I love biking around Victoria or Vancouver and Victoria actually are both awesome cities to bike around. No my best activity is road tripping through interior of B. C. So we've done it twice one time we're coming all the way from Edmonton going across Canada and we are heading west and we took if you ever have a chance and you're going don't take the five take the wrong way the quote unquote wrong way which we did and take five a absolutely gorgeous gorgeous scenery some of the best driving we've ever done in our life anywhere in the through the interior BC. It's really beautiful than we did that. Coming in reverse one time. We went out to the Okinawan from Vancouver. So we went out to Colona Colona and we you know again. Amazing Dr Sue. These like you're just going through these mountains and hills and then there's lakes down there and you didn't even live here. Who owns us? I just want to like put up a tent camp here for the rest of my life so yeah road tripping through the Interior of B. C. Yeah it's so beautiful. Bc is one of my favorite places in the world. We go almost every year and I don't know if we'll get there this year. I'm hoping that we can maybe towards the end of summer or something but yeah definitely road tripping and being in Colona was such a different experience for us because we always go to the island or we spent time in Super Island over island. We usually spend time with the island. Oh it's not very tropical but it is an Hawaii of Canada. They call it. We're like man if this is your Hawaii Times or tough up here in the great white north. But I'm thinking my one of my favorite memories is on the activity memories. Sorry I'm actively. Oh Gosh coffee. Sorry the best activity I would say is doing the wineries in Colona because I love wine and when I was pregnant with it you know I really wanted to have beer and after I had him I kind of went on a beer crazy kick but when he was I think he was eight months old. By the time we went to clone. And I hadn't really been drinking wine yet and we just went to all these Weiner's and I was like yeah. I really love wine more than beer. So kind of reinvigorated my love of wine and going to wineries and it's beautiful up there because you have the lake and you have all the wineries around it and your loan. A very underrated. One of our favorite trips of twenty eight T. I guess it was. That was spending time in Colona four magical relaxing days during the summer right. Sorry for messing up on the card there..

British Columbia Vancouver Slash Academy heather Victoria Colona Canada Colona Colona Unprecedented Times whistler ABC Whistler Coast mountain Strathcona Coast Mountain travis Okinawa Gin US Hawaii Times
"british columbia" Discussed on Cascadian Beer Podcast

Cascadian Beer Podcast

04:56 min | 7 months ago

"british columbia" Discussed on Cascadian Beer Podcast

"Podcast. My name is Aaron Gas Gedeon in this podcast series. I highlight the breweries of Cascadia a region that has a strong presence in the international scene. Cascadia is a bio region in the Pacific northwest and the North American continent. It's made of the. Us states of Washington Oregon is Canadian province of British Columbia. If this is your first time here welcome. I hope you enjoy this episode and I hope you hit. Subscribe wherever you listen to podcasts. That way you'll never miss an episode. I'm in the provincial. Capital of Victoria not too far away from friends of the podcast swans brew pub and spinnakers both of which are other historic breweries in the city. But my guest today opened in Nineteen ninety-six Canoe Group is located in an historic hundred year. Old Building close to Victoria waterfront by the Johnson Street Bridge in recent years. They've had some major renovations done to the space with a few more. On the way I sat down with their brew Master Collier come the Brew Master. It can Uber Ankle beautiful building. This is a massive space kind of tucked away in the back. But you could see your tanks going on on there. So what's the size of the house? the proposes a twenty heavily. Brew House With Five. From addition vessels and seven right tanks and we We actually pour off the right tax. We don't use kegs here. The very cool. I'm so then the question. How beer find you Beer found me. My background is in Restaurant Management and the restaurant is working at the mistaken. Give me two weeks off and I volunteered for the Victoria BUREAUC- society in their first year of working. I came down here and was leading. An event chatted with the general manager here and then ended up getting a job for the summer as a server and bartender and then decided I wanted to go to bring school so I went over to quant. Limbering program over Langley did the inaugural first two years of the program. So I've a diploma and bring bring operations and then came back. Jose a part time here as well as a server on the patio inside in the dining hall that stuff and then slowly decided. I wanted to work my way. Just fulltime into the back end all right cool and so. How long have you been the head? Brewer then took over as head brew here in May So previously I was here for about two and a half years under Daniel Murphy. Who had been here for seven or eight years and then previous to him was sean who everybody knows. Owns owns of his Hungary so Daniela didn't look like he was gonNA leave. So I actually went over. Twelve Oaks Berea over and sandwich for about eight months and I was heading up head brewer there and then the opportunity sewed up to for me to come back here and take over operations here which I just couldn't pass up. It was an opportunity of like them. All right cool and so it's a massive space. I mean generally speaking normal nights. I mean you're somewhat you know full reasonable comfortable crowds by what what kind of styles do a beers do you produce to fit in with that crowd that comes here to enjoy your? Your philosophy is praising Beers at our Fresh don't don't bog you down too much I like to live a fit west lifestyle. I'm out hiking running. I'm I'm working out. I don't want to be hung over the next day I want. I won't even be have a beer after work and then get home. And maybe gopher runners coming So I like Lower Alcohol Refreshing Bright Beers though but lots of vibrancy to them lots of flavor. And that's my kind of take on it. We we produce a vast array of Beers we have from Hellas to a wit beer and then we have an ip a All the way to a ball quarter wintertime. So I don't think we really hone in on one region specific but because of the people coming into a brew pub we've learned over the years Kind of looking for a lot of people from Seattle and Portland All across Canada. Lots of tourists is our kind of our big Jam. Here she patio outside and Kinda cater to them. What are they gonna be ordering and also trying to create some fun beers in the summer This summer I did some some colorful beers at a purple Blueberry Beer I did a a peaked I Kettle Sour here today. Boys and Barry Kettle. Sorry it was really cool pink color just having fun in the summer to to really shines on the patio right and and do you have any cat. Scans at all that you work with. No casque engines. No are setup is We don't have a seller that's chilled at all So unlike spinnakers they have all their setup over there. We literally just have those seven break tanks. That are all hooked up to the tops. We have three different bars that we bore from to help with alleviating distress of the servers and allowing them to really Give exceptional service to the guests but Yes I'm stuck with the seven break tanks for the moments working on maybe increasing our bod tank volume or tank fascinating and then. Hopefully we'll be able to offer more Smart options to dance like how. How much of an expansion are you talking I would love to do like so if we have seven break. Thanks now I'd love to do like six or seven half of those size so we're turning over the options that are in them a little more frequently but It also gives us maybe six or seven new lines on the draft lines. I'm in conversation with Kyle York of Canoe Brew Pub. I just want to thank the BC. L..

Beers Victoria Canoe Brew Pub Aaron Gas Gedeon Us Victoria BUREAUC- society Pacific Johnson Street Bridge Washington Oregon Canoe Group head brewer British Columbia Hungary Restaurant Management Barry Kettle Brewer Oaks Berea Langley general manager
"british columbia" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

07:55 min | 7 months ago

"british columbia" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"J. and J. lawyer are where those in British Columbia says on my screen you guys are debt free congradulations fared very well how much of your paid off we've paid off sixty five thousand dollars well sixty five thousand eight hundred and forty five dollars want to be specific yeah yeah let's be specific how long nine and a half months wow that's quick and your range of income during that time now you've started about a hundred and twenty thousand and then with all kinds of work and promotions and hustle we enlisted it to you a hundred and sixty dollars wow what do you do for a living aso Taylor is a massage therapist and not be seen and I work as a manager at a telecommunications company and also an audio engineer on the side very cool teach at a college and I work as a consultant in so out of all three out of both of you having all the shadows which which is the best paying side hustle college education and probably audio engineer yes say okay so you teach at the college and then the audio engineers the best gigs yeah welcome cool and you do what during during the day Jake I'm a manager at a telecommunications company okay so weird you learn audio I actually went to school for a okay as hip hop dancers we are professional have up answers for thirteen years wow yeah he always played with audio and went back to school and I was part of our debt Malone because the court we found you yeah Hey Nita yeah he graduated and shortly after you graduated we were so frustrated with all the dead and we're looking for solutions so yeah so what happened then after you decide you're looking for solutions tell me the rest of story well we have two versions of the story is in her head because your dancers you're living paycheck to paycheck to paycheck for a long time as most artists do and we transitioned into your kind of our Big Boy in big girl careers and started making more money and we're just so frustrated we didn't know where the money was going and we would see at tax time like while we made more than we've ever made our lives like what's happening and I started to be diving on Google and I found a youtuber who just started your program and I was like who is this Paul guy like what's he talking he raced in the state but I don't know if this works for us in Canada and so I just kind of followed along and over a period of weeks I seemed as many podcast as they could I downloaded the audio book I listen to be out of luck and I came home and I started tracking all of our income I'm totally the nerd everything all of it being and then red jacket like this is what we're doing now ready and his version is very different than mine subject what really happened well I mean basically what what Taylor was saying like I was the worst one between the two of us in terms of our money situation so I never wanted to look at even my paychecks and even my bank account and then exactly what she was saying is that when they were just like so frustrated at why we weren't getting out of debt and all of a sudden I'm at work and at this point I'm still working at at the telecommunications limited life yeah I had a card I'm just using my credit card sure left right and center and then I get this tax and it's a link to our podcast and he's like listen to this we're gonna talk about this when we get home and in my mind I'm like all my god what did I do and then from there it was just kind of like we dove in really really fast a lot get out intensity so once you both had the information from whatever podcasts or audiobooks or whatever and you both on the same page you both knew there was a problem and then you just joined hands went for it yeah actually very cool and nine and a half months later you've got red of sixty six thousand dollars and that that someone so how much of it was student loans and what was the rest of it I would say probably two thirds of it with student loans I have some women take have some as well and then we had credit cards a personal loan to my mom we had a government loan we're basically normal yeah yeah how does your mom off that was actually written for me it feels really relieving because she was the one that kind of helped me out personally yeah to be able to get out of my my other debts but then I racked up even before that meeting her all right the most rewarding yeah we tried for so long to get out of debt and our family helped us and nothing helped deceive except for you know thank you so much Graham thank you maybe that's because this is it works in Canada right yeah yeah but there's also some who were your biggest cheerleaders outside the two of you are definitely my mom she met me here with us now for awhile and she came with us to do that your studio where an elevated by going to see you and me you and our families our friends we had blogged about the whole journey as well we had a big online community and your community at their on you right now so yeah I was just so many people were really really supportive take friends mmhm dynasty of what he calls them we had a young Michelle my girlfriend yeah I get a lot of support so what do you tell people the key to getting out of that if you've been highly successful so your advice right now matters mmhm I think Mike he is a little different than GM for me combining finances it's funny how to call just now talking to die by name really was that was the biggest difference because we did everything separately we did something as joint but not everything and when we combine finances that was like just a game changer and using a budget we use your every dollar app and every day and they were you feel like you get a raise you know when the when you say like tell your money where to go you never wonder where it went that has never been more true we went end up finding it turns out thousands of extra dollars that we can offer toward stuff for me yeah yeah I don't know what you take yeah for me it was actually one of the one of your podcast earlier when we first started this is that you mention that my need is just map and it has no motion and then for some reason I just collect house like you're right they don't care you know what what I'm doing with the money it's it's just math and then as a man I was ashamed and embarrassed that I wasn't providing well for myself and my wife and then when I heard you say that for me for some reason it just click now like you're right they don't they don't have emotions and numbers don't have to use it so and to actually move forward and move past my mistakes and I had the courage to face what I didn't know when learn how to do the whole personal financing thing so we really want to thank you Dave that sounds like a lot of stuff has changed with the on more than just money our marriage I mean we have pretty wonderful marriage here for but now it's on a whole different level that I cannot tell you how proud I am of Jake thank you your date I'm so proud of its journey that you've you've done and how much learning and growth you've done and it's so fun getting to be side by side they do that together like everything about our marriage and our life so much smoother because of this journey yeah agreed you know how many husbands wait their entire lives to hear their wife say something like you just said that I'm very lucky I love it a very cool good job yeah ladies if he does some right you can tell him you're proud of him it goes a long way really does well done I'm.

J. British Columbia
"british columbia" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"british columbia" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"They called it a scared straight tour, but it went beyond scary terrifying. And deeply from attic forty years ago on a grade. Eight student got into trouble with the law. A judge in British Columbia ordered him to visit a local prison the Ocala prison, which has since been shut down. It was to be a part of the teenagers probation there. He was taken by a corrections officer to a group of inmates who sexually assaulted him for decades, he told no one, but this week a judge ordered the British Columbia government to pay that boy who's now a man in his fifties. One hundred seventy five thousand dollars for the brutal assault. We reached that man today in Langley British Columbia to protect his privacy. We are not denting him. And a warning. This interview does contain details of sexual assault. First of all can ask you what it mean for you this week to get this financial award from the British Columbia supreme court. A little bit of help. Wasn't enough in my guys that are. Wrongfully in Britain, get more, and I'm I'm in my own little prison myself, and I will be for life. Fifties. Right. And this ordeal began for you when you were just avoid you great. How old are you? Then. Thirteen fourteen guy into trouble and you in front of a judge. What what did you do that got to in trouble with the law? Oh, I did I break and enter some friends broke into a house stole a TV. We got caught. Drinks, orange juice from the fridge, right? Stupid kids. It was more like a peer pressure thing. There. Do it. So he had a probationary sentence. The judge gave you and how did he explain this? This idea of having a scared straight prison. Visit what do you explain to my parents was the have a scared straight program? And what it's supposed to do is scare kids straight getting in trouble. And the as my parents is they would allow me to go through this program. They said, yes. Prison Ocala prison. What was it? What were you supposed to be toured? What we supposed to see when you were there. I didn't know the time. I was in the dark hours just a scared little kid going to jail. All I knew what happened. He took you to the prison gate went what happened all the pervasive dropped me off at the front gates, and that was taking in by by guard. And we went up a couple of tears in jail. There is five inmates. Danny there any person in the cell and the five guys came into the Selden new preceded rating, what did the guard. Do he was standing at the bars of the boys laughing adults vision, nobody came with you put you put in there gave you to the guard. And that was nobody protecting, you know. How long did you stay there? So like an attorney. Happy after he is finished raping me took me out of the cell. And I wanna swear what do you what happens after like you in any? Across the parking lot. I find now that it's called the whole any took me down the stairs. And but we in and lock me up. And I don't know how long I was in there like forever as many came back, and he took me out of this L and nobody's gonna believe you and then walked back to front gate in Beijing. Terrific now, when he said, no one's going to believe you being raped by these mates. Yeah..

assault Ocala British Columbia supreme court British Columbia British Columbia government Langley British Columbia officer Beijing Britain Danny Selden attorney One hundred seventy five thous forty years
"british columbia" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

Quirks and Quarks

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"british columbia" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

"An example of that in British Columbia are our southern mountain caribou. We've already lost one herd. We have two herds that are function. Extinct. We know that this is a very challenging species largely because we've left it too late when so now we're in a situation where we're, we're trying some very drastic measures to recover that species and it's uncertain whether those measures are going to succeed or not. Dr Martin Vega very much. Thank you very much. Dr. Tara Morton is a professor in conservation decision size at the university of British Columbia. Until we have sufficient resources to do everything. And I mean by doing everything I mean saving every species that's currently imperilled on this planet, we have to make choices. And those choices have consequences for humans are thrown were sent me in terms of the development. There's so much industrialization that I don't know if there's a way to cover the habitat when we apply selves and make the hard decisions that are necessary. We can change the situation such that the animals and plants can usually help themselves where we have to take the first step. One of the things that good news is that we know that from Canada and elsewhere in the world that conservation actually works. There are so many cases where when people decide that they want to prioritize species and its habitat for conservation, we can do it..

Dr Martin Vega British Columbia university of British Columbia Dr. Tara Morton Canada professor