40 Burst results for "British Columbia"

Fresh update on "british columbia" discussed on BBC World Service

BBC World Service

01:53 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "british columbia" discussed on BBC World Service

"World Service, Claire McDonald and Lawrence Pollard with you on the way will be finding out about the community Court of Justice of Echo was and how it's going to take on the case between Nigeria and Twitter. We'll hear about new efforts to explain the unsolved mystery behind the death of Togo's first president nearly 50 years ago as well. BBC News With Danielle Soviet SKA The Australian government has criticized a proposal by UNESCO to list the Great Barrier Reef as in danger. Its environment minister said the organization had back flipped on previous assurances. The U. N report says Australia has not done enough to protect the reef from climate change, and its status should be reviewed next month. Police in western Canada say fires which destroyed two Catholic churches overnight on Monday are being treated as suspicious. The buildings on indigenous land in British Columbia are less than 100, kilometers from Kamloops, where the unmarked graves of more than 200 Children were recently found in the grounds of a residential school once run by Catholic missionaries. The campaign group. Human Rights Watch has called on Cambodia to release three environmental activists detained on suspicion of conspiracy and insulting the king. They were picked up after filming sewage in a river near the Royal palace in Phnom Penh. Carl Nassib of the Las Vegas Raiders has come out as gay, the first active NFL player to do so. He said he hoped his example would boost the visibility of other gay athletes. Hong Kong's top pro democracy newspaper. Apple Daily has closed its English language online operation. Its offices were raided last Thursday and its assets frozen by the authorities. Police have said numerous articles in the paper violate Hong Kong security law. Voters in New York City head to the polls later for a Democratic Party primary to select the next mayor. The winner is almost certain to replace the incumbent, Bill de Blasio in the election later this year. And a prison in New South Wales in Australia is relocating hundreds of inmates and staff after mice caused extensive damage to wiring and ceilings. A big grain harvest has boosted numbers of the rodents in the states. BBC news. Thank you for the latest news update. Hello? Welcome back. You are listening to news day on the BBC World Service with Claire and Lawrence will head to South Africa shortly where an investigation is underway into the deaths of 20 minus. We'll also hear about new efforts to explain the unsolved murder. It's a mystery behind the death of Togo's first president nearly 50 years ago, we're going to hear from one of his relatives and we'll be talking about New York's mayoral election voting begins later today. Stay with us these days. Well. Investigations are ongoing.

Claire Lawrence Bill De Blasio Carl Nassib South Africa Claire Mcdonald Lawrence Pollard British Columbia Kamloops New South Wales New York City Unesco Bbc World Service Human Rights Watch Las Vegas Raiders Phnom Penh Twitter Great Barrier Reef Monday 20 Minus
"british columbia" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

02:43 min | 5 d ago

"british columbia" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

"Your guys are considerably younger than i am. And and your full of passion you have the same path. I had Back when i was your age and good to see that there are some and even around town here. The number of young hunters that i see onto five zero and talking will bear hunting and women being average. I mean the women who are hunting. And i think it's phenomenal when i see this taking place. And if they have the drive and passion. That's what's going to help change things down the road. We offering plead picture. Yep that's right. No five year goals. We need a fifty year goal. Exactly yeah well. I think that something we can take away from. First nations you know they. They're looking generation right. They're not looking two years down the road. It's a very long-term approach. And i think you know. We need to start taking that approach in our governance as well and and being so much more long-term on every level not being. You know being very holistic right like you said steve one of these problems is you get these iconic species you get a cecil the lion or you get one. You know one. Individual that pulls on heartstrings. Meanwhile there's a whole species that's being lost the as an example caribou or other species where. It's being accounted for. Because they don't have that that fairy story or that that tear jerking story that Some of these other species do so. I think the big part of it is a holistic approach in looking at long-term multigenerational. And what we need to do instead of the next four years or five years down the road and it's not about one species about all species in everything that in habitat. It's not but one tree about all trees and they can just keeps going ad nauseam rate. It's it's about the landscape and everything had habits as a whole we got formula. We just have to make it work. That's the tough part. Absolutely well on that note mike We're going to be respectful time. You took time out of your day on wednesday to come down to the steps legislature. You and your colleagues from the bbc liberal party to support our act now campaign. You took time this afternoon. You've been away all week You just got back to your Your home there going to be respectful of your time. I wanna thank you for all you've done to support While cheap act now and just wildlife and habitat and conservation in general. You're certainly somebody. I respect and beacon hope in terms of our leadership in the in the legislature. Moving forward. So thank you for your time and all you do mike pleasure and keep up the good work guys and i'm with you all way..

fifty year five year two years wednesday this afternoon five five years one species one tree steve bbc liberal party one First nations next four years zero
Fresh update on "british columbia" discussed on BBC Newsday

BBC Newsday

02:27 min | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "british columbia" discussed on BBC Newsday

"Adapting to having staff both in and out of the office. In the long term, we take a look at that in the business news. There is a new study that claims the Earth has a pulse normally good. You might say this one. Not so good. It's a destructive heartbeat beats every 27.5 million years, causing extinctions, eruptions and floods. That on the way sports news with L. Ross. We got business from Andrew and our business unit in Hong Kong as well all of the way. Here on Tuesday. Hello. This is Daniel. Yeah, Let's go with the BBC news. The Australian government has voiced strong opposition to a United Nations report which claims it has not done enough to protect the great barrier Reef from climate change. Australia's Environment Minister Susan Ley said UN experts had back flipped on previous assurances by planning to list the reef as a World Heritage site, which was in danger. UNESCO said key targets on improving water quality hadn't been met His quality Bembridge climate change has been acknowledged by the Australian government and scientists as the number one threat to the reef. And with that comes coral bleaching because you've got rising sea temperatures which causes this phenomenon. There have been five serious mass coral bleaching events in the past three years. The most severe We're in 2020 and 2016. So they are very recent, and they are getting worse, and scientists say that that will continue to happen unless global action is taken to tackle climate change. But of course, UNESCO would like Australia to take more decisive actions. Police in Canada save fires, which destroyed two Catholic churches overnight on Monday are being treated as suspicious. The buildings on indigenous land in British Columbia are less than 100, kilometers from Kamloops, where the unmarked graves of more than 200 Children were recently found in the grounds of a residential school once run by Catholic missionaries. Human Rights Watch has urged the Cambodian authorities to release three environmental activists arrested last week on suspicion of conspiracy and insulting the king. Here's Ben Loadings soon rata Lee Chandara vote and, um Langi face up to 10 years in jail if convicted. They were detained after having filmed raw sewage in a river near the palace of King Norodom Sihamoni in Plan pen. Officials have also charged in absentia. 1/4 member of the group Mother, Nature, Cambodia, A Spanish man, Alejandro Gonzalez Davidson, He was deported in 2015. Human Rights Watch urged the government of Prime Minister Hun Sen to drop the charges. It said Cambodia had stepped up its campaign to silence activists who it said were peacefully advocating to protect the environment. The Las Vegas Raiders player Carl Nassib has announced he's gay, making him the first active NFL player to come out in a video post. He said he finally felt comfortable to get the issue off his chest. He said he hoped his example would boost the visibility of other gay athletes saw people in Carl massive. I'm at my house here in West Chester, Pennsylvania. Want to take a quick moment to say that I'm gay. I've been meaning to do this for a while now, but I finally felt comfortable enough to get it off my chest. Um I really have the best life. I got the.

British Columbia 2015 Hong Kong Daniel Kamloops Unesco Alejandro Gonzalez Davidson 2016 Carl Nassib Tuesday 2020 Canada Andrew Monday Earth Las Vegas Raiders Last Week Lee Chandara West Chester, Pennsylvania United Nations
"british columbia" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

07:16 min | 5 d ago

"british columbia" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

"Really devastating on the habitat so his we have absolutely the wrong business moral for forestry. It should not be based on volume and and you know we should know that. But unfortunately that's the system that's been in play now since the mid sixty s Longer than that. Right from day. One but volume-based harvesting is not biodiversity-friendly. Use coventry's done rolling down. Roman and i think we have to get more to a A ecological model where you go in. Select the trees much like we did up until the mid nineteen sixties any tree that was twelve twelve inches in diameter and less left standing. And you logged at once. It got big enough and You know i remember hunting on parts might trap line back in the seventies were select logging taking place. There was habitat all over the place. It was lucile place there refer their raptors out. You know you go nowadays. Hardly hear all. And i never see it. Gosh gosh hawks have been red listed for a decade or more and. I don't see them anywhere is with these all. The time i was using cushion hold traffic for in the early part of the season because the goshawks rose getting into my sets and snaring them or would kill him. So if i use these these cushion holes were rubber jawed traps. You can stick your hand in walk around all day and it would hurt by will travel So i was able to go in and get off shock and i got a gold eagle on signed up and opened. The traffic would way they go and have no harmed uneven than they've never been hurt. But i don't see that anymore there's I haven't seen eagle on the travel. I know for decades having goshawks out there. Red hawks noser characters. Those things if you're walking next made knock your hat off. Well i came in. And what two thousand and four thousand four. It was about two thousand and six last time that companies started right grade. There's a. There's a key in there that i believe you pointed out that it says objectives for wildlife objectives for water biodiversity at the stand level and it says the key is without unduly reducing the supply of timber from bc forests. So that says what the number one priority is right. It's it's not the wildlife is not the water's not the landscape. It's don't stop messing with what we can cut. And i think that is something that needs to change before we're going to actually see any meaningful change on the landscape right or all those. I call them off ramps. And it's under the force and brings flat practices in planning regulations. And i think there's a dozen soul sections that have that but you know government was supposed to have they put these objective and then they they talk about what those objectives are but they still haven't defined what regionally important wildlife are they still haven't defined some of the areas in their for their objective so for the last twenty years. We've just been been cutting without any regard for that because there's no law in place. The regulations full stiffly your to do. There's nothing punitive. When i first read through the force rate practices act I shocked you. Know as being unforced normal life i looked at this work was document because little sections that you reference there steve. Yeah absolutely. it's it's it's sad when you really dial down into what government has taken from priorities like we discussed. This is again where in the mid eighties when i was in elementary school through the coat of arms and they'd always discuss that. Bc was forestry fishing and tourism. And none of those three are are doable right now. We don't have the fish. The forests are gone and due to covid. We don't even have the tourism. Sweat is british columbia falling back on now we we haven't planned five years ahead let alone fifty years ahead. That's a good aditorial. You got something a very good point. You know worry here here we are you know. And in twenty twenty one alongs that has been in existence. What has happened over that period of time. We are close to the amd unless we make that close to the end absolutely. So yeah. it's it's it's a big drago in and it can only happen with everybody's or in the water you know unless we want to wait until it so obvious that you know we got nothing left and then somebody would say jeez. Why didn't somebody do something you know. Like why the cod fishery i. I'd like to stop it before. We get to that point so that we do have a motive of of of opportunity left to rebuild wildlife populations and all wildlife populations are are raptors are fish. Update the ferber's everything that we have out there when you look at back martin all the time. Because that's what i know. Best is fisher martin and that animal and One of the primary food sources for for martin was back bowl and the back feeds on the the fungi and the and whatnot. That grows on the bottom up blowouts of trees fall down before reston when you get rid of them and you don't have slow downs anymore. Then you don't have the back wall and maybe you're mice disappear some species of mice disappear. You know someone flourish. I guess and And i've watched was dive bombing down over the trail in front of me and picking up a mouse or picking up ole and flying off into a tree in its part was. I don't have whiskey. Jacks hardly at all left on my travelling. They used to come all the time the him yet. Come to think of it. The time i've spent up there in in your area too. Yeah you pointed out. There is no whiskey jacks normally. You're you're walking in there kind of there's a person in there following you around or the magpies they're not around. There's a predator. Sign it really. The the whiskey jax will will cache their food all summer long for the winter they lived the winter. They if they were around they would and they cast their food in the branches. The upper branches of the of the forest canopy of mature for his county. And that's what they live on all winter long big stash berries nuts and mushrooms and meat or whatever they can get in there and but once that's all cut down there's nothing left because all the the small rannells down with all might smell it or see it and but we don't have them either so.

two thousand mid sixty s twelve twelve inches seventies mid nineteen sixties first fifty years three force rate practices act mid eighties four thousand five years six about two thousand a dozen soul sections four columbia british a decade One
Fresh update on "british columbia" discussed on BBC Newsday

BBC Newsday

01:25 min | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "british columbia" discussed on BBC Newsday

"The Australian government has voiced strong opposition to a United Nations report which claims it has not done enough to protect the great barrier Reef from climate change. Australia's Environment Minister Susan Ley said UN experts had back flipped on previous assurances by planning to list the reef as a World Heritage site, which was in danger. UNESCO said key targets on improving water quality hadn't been met. Here's quality Bembridge climate change has been acknowledged by the Australian government and scientists as the number one threat to the reef. And with that comes coral bleaching because you've got rising sea temperatures which causes this phenomenon. There have been five serious mass coral bleaching events in the past three years, the most severe where in 2020 and 2016 so They are very recent, and they are getting worse. And scientists say that that will continue to happen unless global action is taken to tackle climate change. But of course, UNESCO would like Australia to take more decisive actions. Police in Canada say fires which destroyed two Catholic churches overnight on Monday are being treated as suspicious. The buildings on indigenous land in British Columbia are less than 100, kilometers from Kamloops, where the unmarked graves of more than 200 Children were recently found in the grounds of a residential school once run by Catholic missionaries. Human Rights Watch has urged the Cambodian authorities to release three environmental activists arrested last week on suspicion of conspiracy and insulting the king. Here's Ben Loadings soon rata Lee Chandara vote and, um Langi face up to 10 years in jail if convicted. They were detained after having filmed raw sewage in a river near the palace of King Norodom Sihamoni in Plan pen. Officials have also charged in absentia. 1/4 member of the group Mother, Nature, Cambodia, A Spanish man, Alejandro Gonzalez Davidson, He was deported in 2015. Human Rights Watch urged the government of Prime Minister Hun Sen to drop the charges. It said Cambodia had stepped up its campaign to silence activists who it said were peacefully advocating to protect the environment. The Las Vegas Raiders player Carl Nassib has announced he's gay, making him the first active NFL player to come out in a video post. He said he finally felt comfortable to get the issue off his chest. He said he hoped his example would boost the visibility of other gay athletes saw people. I'm Carl Nassib. I'm at my house here in West Chester, Pennsylvania. Want to take a quick moment to say that I'm gay. I've been meaning.

Alejandro Gonzalez Davidson Kamloops British Columbia Unesco 2015 2016 Carl Nassib 2020 West Chester Las Vegas Raiders Canada Monday Human Rights Watch Pennsylvania United Nations Last Week TWO More Than 200 Children Mother, Nature Less Than 100, Kilometers
"british columbia" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

07:08 min | 5 d ago

"british columbia" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

"What i see. On the landscape. We are at one particular point in time in life as a punter and a trapper on a conservationist my focus was on wildlife and wildlife habitat. And now that i. I've studied things to the extent that i have. It's a complete package. We can't look at one part of it without looking at all the other parts of it. And that's why. I say when we look at something we should look at biodiversity management as a whole structure with wildlife management and and forestry and other water quality and all those things built into the same package We hear some of these groups have been talking about Moratorium on logging in the province. Which i think is a good thing. I support that You know it makes me cry. When i look at the fact that we're down to three percent growth in in a province this is that is criminal and the biodiversity. That's that's been taken away as a result of that but the end people saying it's okay. Let's log the second growth out there. But the second growth hasn't even grueling big enough to start providing the habitat necessary for the wildlife that was displaced. Who i'd like. That was that died and starve as a result of walking those clear cuts in the first place. So we need to look at the whole package. We can't say were offered wildlife management if we're also not looking at the first three logging side of things the the water habitat issue. Know the the glysophate spraying all things as one complete package that we need to emphasize. We're moving forward here. Yeah while said mike so you know in that scenario there were. We're trying to deal with these issues. Where where do we you know. What strategy do we have to change. So we have to look at holistically He's from what you've seen and and you know you're looking at it from an elected level not necessarily You know the bureaucratic level but a is together for wildlife can have that answer is more of a holistic approach to it You know or and i guess that's the question that i have is. We have three percent old-growth like you said we don't even have enough second growth to sustain us you know. Where do we go five years from now. You know that that's not a lot of. There's not a lot of trees. We have an industry to support. So what does that look. Five years down the road and to change that approach. Yeah a very good question. I have to look at you. Know how many members of Wildlife federation are in the four sector. And we're gonna sawmill under dr a logging truck or a piece of logging equipment but at the same time they're trying to support wildlife populations and how many are in in your organization that might be involved in the forest sector and so we have to get those people to understand the big picture and to start supporting some of the arguments that we hear from these groups about you. Know trying to stop the harvest of old growth forest trying to recognize all the valleys on the land moving forward and and we have to get over the fact that we may offend somebody. We may have found some industry person. We may offend some individual whose businesses reliant on the four sector or on some particular industry that you know kuzma paycheck every month but we have to understand that but i think somewhere in the middle of that is a balance where we can and that's all i'm asking for. Let's find that balance where we can still cut a tree down but we can still grow mousse or while cheap or at salmon or river or have forbears to like we like we've seen in in scandinavian part of the world or in the thirteen million hectares of pine forests that we have the. Us were nothing in the finery is hardly any birds flying in there. There's no there's no Ferber animals ungulates in. There is thirteen million hectares pine trees. So i don't wanna see that in british columbia and i think we can find that balance. It's gonna take a lot of work because we have a couple of generations. I think where we we need to take the time to repair a lot of the damage habitat that we have a wrong province here when you look at the plantation that we planted that you know when when the original was cut down it was around three hundred stems per hector we planted about two thousand stanford actor and a scoring in so thick. You could hurt. Walked through these pine tree or conifer monoculture and there's nothing growing in there so on my talk with some wildlife biologist to think that we have to go into them that out and we have to start replanting some of the simplest girl that has disappeared. So we're looking at twenty thirty forty fifty years to repaired the damage that was done over the last seventy five years and then we'll start seeing some of these wildlife populations come back and and you can't the other aspect of this is we have colleagues in end people in in the political realm that talk about a species at risk act and that was gonna save everything but you can't look at a single species enrich columbia without the impact of all the other species that are around. You know inside. The birds need Habitat and they're all part of the food chain on the raptors need to eat. It's the same as packing all out of the bush. You know the argument that that green party have is. They'll support grisly hunt. As long as you pack the edible horses the well you know. I don't know about you. But i have to receiver before and it's not one of my favorite but the other side of the coin is there's not one piece of protein that goes to waste in are forced So is out there. It is consumed right down to the last morsel approaching within a matter of days or weeks at the most and so nothing to waste. And you know it's like being trapped you skin. I've skin thousands of animals and a market. For but i've taken carcasses back out in the bush at the critters in all throw martin carcass odor handful of them every week. And they're gone by absolutely like you. And i actually actually went for lunch last week. I think it was for. He went down victorian we had a great chat about The old growth forests and how everybody assumes they're the big eight ten twelve foot sixteen foot diameter trees and up here on your line which is what an hour north of prince. George you can show growth. That is only six eight inches across right. And that's that's the other thing they're they're jumping onto you right. Is that emotional. Side of the big trees are the only the old growth in. That's that's why it's not paid attention to appear on your your rate. The argument that.

thirteen million hectares last week George three percent Five years scandinavian second growth twenty thirty forty fifty year thousands of animals six eight inches first three first place one part four sector mike about two thousand five years british columbia around three hundred stems per single species
Fresh update on "british columbia" discussed on NEWS 88.7 Programming

NEWS 88.7 Programming

01:17 min | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "british columbia" discussed on NEWS 88.7 Programming

"Journalist Jason Rezaian was arrested in Iran in 2014. He was imprisoned for over 500 days before being released. As excited as I was to join the world, I knew it wasn't all perfect in those first few months, I thought maybe there was something wrong with me that I wasn't happier than I thought. I was supposed to be his advice as some begin to emerge from pandemic isolation and embrace change. The next morning edition from NPR News. Tomorrow morning on news 88 7. Hello. Welcome. You're listening to new Tuesday on the BBC World Service. Good to have your company Claire, McDonnell and Lawrence. Pull out with you. In the next half, I will have more on Ethiopia's elections. Uh, well hell. How new Efforts to explain the unsolved mystery behind the death of Togo's first president nearly 50 years ago were going and in the Africa Daily podcast will look at the conflict in the Central African Republic and the involvement of Russian mercenaries. BBC News with Daniel. Yeah. Move yet Scar. The Australian government has criticized the proposal by UNESCO to list the Great Barrier Reef as in danger. Its environment minister said the UN experts had back flipped on previous assurances. UN report says Australia has not done enough to protect the reef from climate change, and its status should be reviewed next month. Police in western Canada say fires which destroyed two Catholic churches overnight on Monday are being treated as suspicious. The buildings on indigenous land in British Columbia are less than 100, kilometers from Kamloops, where the unmarked graves of more than 200 Children were recently found in the grounds of a residential school once run by Catholic missionaries. Carl Nassib of the Las Vegas Raiders has come out as gay, the first active NFL player to do so. He said he hoped his example would boost the visibility of other gay athletes. Health officials in Cuba say they're Abdullah coronavirus vaccine has an efficacy of more than 92% after three doses. The announcement comes just days after the government said another homegrown vaccine, Soberon, a DOS had proved 62% effective after two doses. Human Rights Watch has called on Cambodia to release three environmental activists detained on suspicion of conspiracy and insulting King Norodom Sihamoni. They were picked up after filming sewage in a river near the royal palace in Phnom Penh. Voters in New York City head to the polls later for a Democratic Party primary to select their next mayor. The winner is almost certain to replace the incumbent, Bill de Blasio in the election later this year. And a new study has found that drinking coffee could be linked to a reduction of the risk of chronic liver disease. By up to 21%. The benefits peaked at 3 to 4 cups of coffee a day with ground coffee being better than instant. That's the latest.

Jason Rezaian Carl Nassib Bill De Blasio 2014 New York City British Columbia 62% Kamloops Phnom Penh Unesco 3 Iran Lawrence Claire Three Doses Las Vegas Raiders Tomorrow Morning Bbc World Service Daniel Monday
"british columbia" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

08:40 min | 5 d ago

"british columbia" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

"Well what do you want to see. Absolutely and we do listen to our members and our supporters. You know a lot of times what we do. Listen to is how things so when we see something do well. We're like okay. That works if it doesn't do as well then we're like well okay. Maybe won't do that again. But let us know Working to to offer things that people want I can say dude gaming rules. We can't say we're gonna offer next for raffle stop when we have a couple of really cool raffles coming up So keep an eye out. You're going to see them. Pretty soon and Coming down the pipe so with that. Let's go to episode thirty two We're gonna welcome bc liberal mla. mike marsh from prince. George mackenzie to the show steve Looking forward to this one's going to be a great chat absolutely if you looked up the word conservation superhero in the dictionary. You would see a picture of our friend omer from precision optics tireless donor and supporter of all things wild sheep precision optics located in british columbia truly stands alone in the alpine from optics. Two rifles to outdoor gear and a knowledge that cannot be surpassed. Top in that killer smile. And you have total conservation. Package precision optics. We truly thankful for the support. You show us every step of the way buying them online at precision optics dot net or roma foods located just off highway ninety seven cornell b. c. Good afternoon mike. Welcome to the Talk is cheap. Podcast real pleasure to have you on and thanks for taking the time to meet with us this afternoon. My pleasure. this is scott excellent. Mike yeah we appreciate You know really what you've done for hunts to hunters across British mia You know your involvement in victoria is You know you've been very active down there very vocal on issues around sustainability conservation related issues and you know opportunities frost hunters as well so. It's something that you know. I really watch closely. What you're doing in the legislature. We're really grateful for what you've done. The while sheep. Society b c. We had this opportunity to present. Twenty thousand letters to the premier on on the ninth on wednesday and true to form. You showed up to speak in support of of what we're doing It always seems very consistent with yourself and also the liberal party to support were getting as hunters across the landscape here and being out there to support us all the time so it was a pleasure. Senior guys aaron impress or walks showed up in front of the legislature and It's too bad it was. We have to do. During covert time. So we've been quoted times now for a year and a half off. It'll be over one of these days soon. But i think the message was important that that be delivered in the way that it wasn't and i've got a meeting with the minister coming up towards the end of the month here so i might chit chat with her little bit of this issue as well yes. So let's i guess maybe jumping to that issue. You know a little bit. And i know mike. You're very active around. Conservation related issues forced related issues. All all these different things. But you know we haven't really talked about the issue at hand with some. It's something that is a huge concern for us and we've actually got a little bit. Of flack a wild sheep for kind of making a stand in a statement around you know that we want to hold the government to account on this issue around wildlife meant using science because we did see it back in two thousand seventeen when The grizzly bear just went away. You know one of the most heavily Studied animals In the province. There's a lot of time money and effort understanding them and the government shutdown. You know kind of on election promise. So you know i guess. Maybe it'd be great to hear from you on your perspective on your thoughts and science-based while they've management kind of this this issue we're having to deal with the boat social licensing and you know maybe hunters shouldn't be harvesting taking off the landscape not based on sustainability but based on. You know because somebody doesn't like that an animal dies in the process so if you could talk a little bit to that i appreciate it over. Wildlife has been undervalued in this province side Rates in the beginning went four streak came along. We adopted that sustainable yield strategy way back in nineteen forty five with a full focus on on wood and nothing else and i think that is that that began the over. Wildlife populations nbc. And because of that. focus. Well i don't think any government is one thousand nine hundred and five is put the required amount of money into wildlife management or into managing any of the other biodiversity values on which has led us to where we are today. We have no idea of you. Know there's we haven't had a good wildlife inventory program we haven't had a good wildlife you know if you talk to anybody they would be able to tell you how many how many martin we have. How many of any kind of critter that we have in the province here and i think that's wrong when you look at the value that each one of those animals provide to society at mt enter the environment itself. I read back when i was trapping. And and on these days. Maybe i'll be back to that again at ninety but i've got every study on for bears that has been written in the last fifty or sixty years and all of them say the same. You know. just the liberal bibliography i on hearten for an example is twelve pages long and i every single report and pay for that was written on biology. The habitat for martin. Also the same thing that they're declined. Premise deformed lack of habitat that as soon as you log. The mature denver that takes away nesting denning sites and food opportunities in the red back. All those kinds of things but yet we continue to do that. And then you look at the care who situation and just about every report that you see on. Caribou talks about the loss of habitat. And what are we doing. We're still having the trees down as still throwing the habitat da. These animals are in so we haven't learned and part of it is because we have this like i said this incomplete strategy from nineteen forty five that has morph into ideology that is taught in force you programs at the university level at the college level. So these these folks that are now in forestry in senior management positions all they know is how grown cut down trees and how to make it grow faster in the optimum size to put it through a sawmill on even though that the optimum sizes still half the size that's needed to produce inadequate canopy overhead and whatnot so to change the mindset of colleagues and to change the mindset of people in the industry has been enormous task Some days. I feel like i'm just bang my head against a brick wall but i do think you know if i look at the numbers in my own caucus i think i'm i'm probably fifty fifty. Now where rated beginning. I was probably want against everybody so it is working but it's a long painful process in its it's organizations like watch society and others that have made enough noise on the outside. That helps me lincoln to colleagues and other people in the political world. So don't take my word for oldest into these guys are gonna talk to one of these guys over there. And i think people are starting to get the same message from just every organization on the province so go long way to go but We're moving at least appreciate that. Mike so i guess that's kind of the next question. You know we complain a lot about you. Know what's happening on the landscape. Loss of habitat You know there's this whole predator issue which you know is kind of the heart of act now in some capacities because of some of the pushback. We've been getting we go from here you know. We've that was one of the things we're with together for wildlife we'd see some positive changes and And there probably is a very good positive things coming together for wildlife You know we seem to change government at change of a party so you know. Maybe there was some optimism there that we'd see but we're still having the same issue so you know kind of what we need to do. What are some of the things that we can do to improve things to to make a difference and actually start reversing because it seems to me. We're still going backwards from.

Mike twelve pages British George mackenzie one thousand Twenty thousand letters fifty fifty british mike a year and a half today steve two thousand seventeen this afternoon wednesday ninety ninth mike marsh highway ninety seven cornell Two rifles
Fresh update on "british columbia" discussed on BBC World Service

BBC World Service

01:53 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh update on "british columbia" discussed on BBC World Service

"Welcome to the newsroom from the BBC World Service. I'm Joe Lynam. For the first time. A current player in professional American football comes out as gay. Just want to take a quick moment to say that I'm gay. I've been meaning to do this for a while now, But I finally feel comfortable enough to get it off my chest, pretty private person, So I hope you guys know that I'm really not doing this for attention. Nicaragua arrests 1/5 political rival to the incumbent President Daniel Ortega, Mexico and Argentina withdraw their ambassadors in protest. UNESCO warns that the Great Barrier Reef in Australia might lose its world heritage status due to the impact of climate change. Democratic voters in New York City vote in a primary to see who their next mayor could be, and It only helps you if you hate people and now really have accepted what has happened, and we just have to move on. First The news Hello. This is Daniel Young Soviet scout with the BBC news. The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization has said that the Great Barrier Reef in Australia should be put on a list of endangered World heritage sites at a meeting next month. Osama Khalil has more from Sydney. The UNESCO recommendation has sparked anger from the Australian government with the Environment Minister Susan Lay, saying Australia would strongly oppose it. She added that officials were stunned by what she described as a backflip on previous assurances by the U. N that this step would not be taken. The UNESCO report says despite efforts and achievements by the state and federal governments in Australia, key targets on improving water quality in the reef had not been met. If the recommendation is followed, it would be the first time a natural world Heritage site has been placed on the in danger list, mainly because of impacts from climate change. Police in Canada say they are treating as suspicious two fires which destroyed two Catholic churches at about the same time in the early hours of Monday, the buildings were constructed on indigenous land in British Columbia, his iron shippers The local fire department chief said it was too early to conclude it was arson, but he believed liquid accelerant was used. The two churches were located less than 100, kilometers away from Kamloops, where three weeks ago the unmarked graves were discovered of more than 200 Children. They were found in the grounds of a boarding school run by the Catholic Church. Thousands of indigenous Children were sent to such institutions in the last century to be forcibly assimilated. The gruesome discovery of the graves has caused a lot of anger in indigenous communities. The Las Vegas Raiders player Carl Nassib has announced he is gay, making him the first active NFL player to come out in a video post. He said he finally felt comfortable to get the issue of his chest. Saw people on Carl Nassib. I'm at my house here in Westchester, Pennsylvania. Want to take a quick moment to say that I'm gay. I've been meaning to do this for a while now, but I finally felt.

Joe Lynam Osama Khalil Unesco British Columbia Bbc World Service Kamloops New York City Carl Nassib Great Barrier Reef Canada Two Churches Las Vegas Raiders TWO Westchester, Pennsylvania More Than 200 Children Thousands Of Indigenous Childr United Nations Educational, Sc Catholic Church Sydney President Trump
More Calls to Cancel Canada Day in Vancouver

Native America Calling

01:23 min | Last week

More Calls to Cancel Canada Day in Vancouver

"At least one. Large canadian city victoria has decided to cancel canada day celebrations on july. The first as dan carpenter reports the decision comes in the wake of the recent discovery of the remains of two hundred fifteen native children at the site of a former residential school in british columbia. Plans have now been shelled for the city on vancouver island to host a virtual candidate a celebration. The decision came after a unanimous. Vote by victoria city council. Instead officials say they will create a broadcast focused on the larger canadian history with guidance from local first nations. The broadcast will be released later in the summer. And focus on what it means to be canadian. Here's victoria mayor. Lisa helps right now. the likud nations are grieving And so it's very difficult for them to come and sing and dance and celebrate context change when those two hundred and fifteen children's bodies were discovered and and they are reeling and everybody is reeling. And so we're all just doing our best to figure out how to move forward. Some residents of vancouver island agree with the decision saying it might be best to cancel the celebrations this year and instead remember all residential school survivors and the victims. There have been similar calls across the country to cancel the national holiday celebrations. Many first nations held ceremonies to honor the two hundred fifteen children whose remains were discovered in may at the site of the former kamloops residential school for national native news. I'm dan carpenter.

Dan Carpenter Victoria City Council Victoria Vancouver Island British Columbia Canada Lisa Kamloops Residential School Fo
What Happens When Hidden Histories Become a National Conversation?

Unreserved

02:17 min | Last week

What Happens When Hidden Histories Become a National Conversation?

"At the end of may. When news broke that the remains of more than two hundred children had been found at the kamloops indian residential school. It was news to many canadians. Who learning about the history of residential schools and the role. The canadian government played in the creation. It seemed to mark a new sense of awareness across the country in indigenous communities. Grief came quickly but not shock and not surprise. These types of losses are well known in our nation's and in our families and in real time we watch the rest of the country feel the depths of this history daniel heath justice is a colorado born citizen of the cherokee nation and he's an author and professor of critical indigenous studies and english at the university of british columbia. He joins me now to talk about what happens when hidden histories come to light daniel. Welcome to the show. Thank you so much for having me. We're talking about hidden histories on the show today and for me the idea of hidden histories is interesting. Because they're not hidden for everyone up until a few years ago when unreserved would would air story about residential schools. We'd get emails from people telling us that they had never heard of this before the show for sharing this information and that's a luxury indigenous people don't share. It's in our families. It's it's part of our history. How do you think so much of this. History hasn't made its way out of our communities. I struggle with that question. I think there is a sense in many ways that this is only about indigenous people rather than being very much about settler colonial canada. I think there is a sense for a lot of people that when we say school. We mean an educational facility which these were not. I mean these were re education and torture camps. I think we have to start naming them for what they were. I think non-indigenous people Just tune out because the the level of the horror if they had to face it would radically transformed their feelings about the country that they live in if they honestly address that

Kamloops Indian Residential Sc Canadian Government Daniel Heath University Of British Columbia Colorado Daniel Canada
Indigenous Juno Nominees Show Their Range in 2021

Unreserved

01:52 min | 2 weeks ago

Indigenous Juno Nominees Show Their Range in 2021

"Julian thank you for having me falem. It's an honor to be on the show the ridge. That's the title of your latest album. What's the significance of the ridge to you or the ridges short-form for as a it's a place in british columbia. A town close to vancouver where i spent many of my summers with my grandparents. My grandfather john. Thomas gangs and his wife. Carol skanks took a big part in raising me and It's an an omaha just to to that particular time in my life to them into that place which are find very special and the ridges deeply personal album Everything on it is a true story based on something from your life. Why did you want a record moments from your life in this way going through a really hard time my mom who is a mohawk heritage her family all of them passed away within a five year period. She's the only one left out of five of them and it was very traumatic for all of us. I don't even know how mother dealt with it and how she deals with it. Because i i had a hard time dealing with it and the one thing that happens when that particular thing happens to you and your family when people pass and so many of them a short period of time. You're pretty much you know in shock. It's like you got hit with a baseball bat. You can't get up. And i needed a way to sort of trace my footsteps back to lie my youth and to remember these people and the second thing that happens is because of death other things get really mixed up complicated States of people in wills and things like that and i got caught in the middle of that a lot and it was really disenchanting. I felt as if my childhood had been stolen from me. In a way

Thomas Gangs Carol Skanks Julian British Columbia Omaha Vancouver John Baseball
Grief and Horror as Bodies of 215 Native Children Discovered

Native America Calling

02:01 min | 2 weeks ago

Grief and Horror as Bodies of 215 Native Children Discovered

"Canadians are in shock after the recent grim discovery of the remains of two hundred and fifteen children on the site of a former residential school in british columbia. The remains were found using ground penetrating radar as dan carpet chuck reports. The discovery has led to memorials across the country. Memorials began springing up across the country to honor the two hundred and fifty native children who died at the kamloops residential school. Hundreds of pairs of shoes were lined up on the steps of the vancouver art gallery by local artists. Tamara bell as a tribute to those whose remains were recently found a child. I love never coming home and not getting an answer. I every single mother. you don't have to be native. you don't have to be anything you just have to be a human being to understand that. There's a huge legacy in canada. There's so painful but this one was so hard because it's children children's shoes were also placed on the front steps of canada's oldest residential school in brantford ontario. Here's organizers charlene. Hemlock part of this too is our call to accountability and justice for our missing and murdered children. Prime minister justin trudeau ordered flags at government buildings across the country to be lowered to half-mast officials in toronto said municipal buildings. There would have their flags lowered for two hundred and fifteen hours an hour for each of the children who died roseanne kazimierz the chief of the to come to first nation in british columbia. She talks about arriving on the scene where the remains were found. I was taken back. I was shocked and so when it was shared with me that these children are children. You know from our community children from our brother and sister consultants and other communities. It was devastating. It was it was actually quite mind. Boggling and You know. I it some of us to tears and we. I was surprised. I was heartbroken.

Dan Carpet Chuck Kamloops Residential School Tamara Bell British Columbia Prime Minister Justin Trudeau Canada Brantford Vancouver Roseanne Kazimierz Charlene Ontario Toronto
Canada Lowers Flags After Discovery of Children's Bodies at School Site

BBC Newsday

01:10 min | 3 weeks ago

Canada Lowers Flags After Discovery of Children's Bodies at School Site

"Go to Canada now where flags are flying at half mast following the horrific discovery of the bodies of 215 Children. At the site off a former residential school for indigenous Children in Kamloops, British Columbia, the Canadian prime minister tweeted that the flags would stay lowered. Toe honor. The 215 Island Duma's is the grand chief off the assembly off Manitoba chiefs. He told me more about this site on the Children found there. Some of these Children were the age of three. We We know that the graves roll undocumented and we know that there's actually no they don't know what was the cause of death. Unfortunately, you know, we we sort of have a knowledge that the fact that this federally funded institution which essentially had taken these Children at gunpoint At various times were negligent and cost for the death of these Children. So we know that these these Children were murdered by the the federally funded school.

Island Duma Assembly Off Manitoba Chiefs Kamloops British Columbia Canada
Remains of Over 200 Children Found at Indigenous School in Canada

News, Traffic and Weather

00:30 sec | 3 weeks ago

Remains of Over 200 Children Found at Indigenous School in Canada

"A heartbreaking discovery and British Columbia. The remains of more than 200 Children were found in a mass grave at the side of a former school for indigenous Children in Canada, an investigation into the country's residential school system. Found indigenous Children were forced from their families to report documented abuse and found more than 4000 Children died. The schools were run from the 18 forties to 19 nineties. Maybe in Prime Minister Justin Trudeau called this quote a painful reminder of that dark and shameful chapter of our country's

British Columbia Canada Prime Minister Justin Trudeau
"british columbia" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

03:14 min | 3 weeks ago

"british columbia" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

"So yeah it's it's access is a big consideration kate Yeah for sure. So on that note bill. We have a lot of our hunter conservation. Sir listeners are gonna be out recreating this year. Probably in the back country You know maybe hunting sheep or goats or whatever. It may be what you know. We talked about these different Areas that you're going to start doing swabs and reaching three or four and eight for goats and you know try and get all the bighorn. Sheep swabbed in the province So that's obviously clearly how they can help their but what else can people do And this might be a good opportunity to jump into your app and and people are out there right. Now recreating What what can You know our listeners. Do to support the wild sheep and wild goats On the on the landscape. While the i mean everybody has a camera with them. Now right so If you see wildlife most people do they take pictures of it so but If you see something that looks on about the wildlife. You're looking at just really tried to take a picture of it and then get a hold of your your local Wildlife biologists in your region and they can direct that To whoever the right person is to look at it because you know we are white mentioned that that mountain goat kid photo that was sent to me last year and It was an area that was home. Okay well it looks like we have orf now in this area. And that's something we're going to have to. We're gonna wanna watch how that population response to that so That little nuggets of information like out her always really important now. The bbc Mountain goat and sheep bath. We originally built that on the notion of trying to identify natal rage because we were seeing changes in lambing and kidding dates in the north. And that's a response to changing environmental conditions so A bunch of anybody. Who works in industry. Probably familiar with you. Know timing windows around different types of activities that you do and those timing windows are built around sensitive periods for for wildlife in different areas and fish as well so if those tiny windows are no longer relevant then on one sense where constraining industry and when we shouldn't because it's the those constraints accomplishing anything but also from a wildlife and habitat standpoint If you don't have the protections in place when you act when the wildlife and habitat actually needs it then. You're not helping that population either so we built that app And hoped people would pick it up and use it to help us find kids and lambs and they did. People helped us. We found a new mineral licks that we didn't know existed. We found Issues with highway crossings were us were taking lambs across highway in that vehicle strike risk so by.

last year four this year eight three one sense
"british columbia" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

05:20 min | 3 weeks ago

"british columbia" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

"Of social management. Act now or the things that you love could be next. Good morning bill. How're things from beautiful smithers bc. Well the sun is shining today. Little bit of frost in the mornings. But it's warm up to the mid teen so that's feeling like spring summer. Now fantastic so you know. I get to see it out in you know in at the while she foundation board meetings. We often touch base there. And we've kind of missed out on that with kobe. So you know we've all kind of locked in a little corners of the world here and haven't been able to get together. It's kind of been a tough go for all of us here lately hasn't it. Yes yes certainly has right. Especially you know society what it's plugged into across inter provincially and internationally and then you know my role and and our wildlife health folks to write their role in terms of being leaders on some of the files that that are near and dear to sheep and goat people's hearts so It is challenge this border stuff. Yeah for sure. So bill For our listeners. Who you're on our very first podcast. talk is cheap. Which was awesome. We did a great horned aging Talk with you and but we didn't talk a ton about the conservation stuff. And i know most people that list our podcast know who. Bill jack is your. Your reputation goes far and wide in a very good way but you know for our newer listeners. Can you just kind of give us an overview talk about your position and just a little bit of your background. for wildlife management and conservation here in british columbia bill. Sure so i've been Yes i came to the province in ninety six. That's when i started with bc government and and it's worked sort of with wildlife habitat some enforcement stuff through those ranks. And and now. I hold the position of provincial. Wild sheep and mountain goats specialist which is a position that sort of grew out of necessity starting in about twenty twelve. Through to twenty fifteen. There was a lot of conversation in british columbia about the importance of Wild sheep and mountain goats. they're not atip as much as they are a freezer species. They're not the typical freezer species that people think about when they think about moves and elk deer so A lot of the funding that became available really went into those sort of bread and butter hunted species right not so much into sheep and goats but as the international focus ramped up and as while cheap society became Really grew right. I mean if look at the evolution of society itself over the last decade. it's grown so much and it's taken on such a leadership role in a whole bunch of different conservation. Initiatives.

today Bill jack twenty fifteen first podcast british columbia ninety six bc government british about twenty twelve bill last columbia
"british columbia" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

02:30 min | Last month

"british columbia" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

"You know and started out as a guide rotated into the hunting side of one side. Got a crude hours days in the field. Coast guard license. There's a lot of boxes to check. Alaska is a great state in the sense that they really do. They really do enforce regulations about guiding you. Just don't like california california you fill out a one page form and your magically a guide alaska is a process end. It's a couple years to get your assistant license. A minimum of three more years to get you registered guide license and another twelve years if you want to upgrade to master guide so it's a real process and it's good because you come up through the program and you do all the grunt work i Which weeds out the people that think they wanna be guides but once you pack loose out of a swamp butcher moves into water. You really find out who wants to be a guide So it's a good process and it was good for me and it's been good life and The hollywood thing comes from the fact that i graduated from humboldt state university with a degree in film and theater of always been an actor of always been on stage from the time i was little kid and that just kind of grew and developed and i met my agent in los angeles. He was a fly fisherman. And it just kind of came up like what you do when you're not guiding and i said well you know i'm an actor and i'm gonna degree in film production and he said really. He says a lamin agent. You should come to la and we'll give you shot. And so i did. And i got some positive feedback right off. The bat was really encouraging. Did some national tv commercials Decisions small movies. Nothing really breakthrough and really. It was because i was my own worst enemy. Because i had this other life i had this life in alaska i had this guideline that was every fall. You had to answer the siren song and go to the mountain and the people in los angeles. The you've heard me say before from the stage. They thought i was messed up on drugs. Because i just dropped off the face of the earth. I don't answer the phone. there's no emails. I just vanished. That they thought i was in rehab somewhere and then come back from alaska and say no i work in alaska..

los angeles twelve years california Alaska three more years alaska one side one page form earth humboldt state university couple years hollywood siren
Major League Baseball (MM #3708)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | Last month

Major League Baseball (MM #3708)

"The Maison with Kevin Nation. There is a buzz around the city when Rumor Has at the Oakland A's might be looking for a new home. The Oakland A's happening in a horrible stadium for years. From what I understand. It's one of the worst in Major League Baseball. They can't compete anymore. They're not making enough money. So the commissioner is allowed them to start looking at alternate cities to move to the Oakland A's used to be the way, the city pays which used to be the Philadelphia A's. So, then moving again, after all these years is not that big a deal. Now, they won't leave if they get a new stadium. That's what this is all about. But if they do, leave Las Vegas Portland, Oregon came over British Columbia. Those could be three options for them to go and would make more sense for them to stay on the west coast, but that isn't stopping. The people who want to bring Major League Baseball to Nashville to get going. They've already got a plan in place to look for an inspection team but if we can jump on the bandwagon now, why not? I didn't live here when the NHL and the NFL came to town, but I know it's crazy and this is going to get crazier Nashville's, a growing town, the it's City and who knows? They could come home.

Oakland Kevin Nation Major League Baseball Philadelphia British Columbia Portland Las Vegas Oregon West Coast Nashville NHL NFL
Major League Baseball (MM #3708)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | Last month

Major League Baseball (MM #3708)

"The Maison with Kevin Nation. There is a buzz around the city when Rumor Has at the Oakland A's might be looking for a new home. The Oakland A's happening in a horrible stadium for years. From what I understand. It's one of the worst in Major League Baseball. They can't compete anymore. They're not making enough money. So the commissioner is allowed them to start looking at alternate cities to move to the Oakland A's used to be the way, the city pays which used to be the Philadelphia A's. So, then moving again, after all these years is not that big a deal. Now, they won't leave if they get a new stadium. That's what this is all about. But if they do, leave Las Vegas Portland, Oregon came over British Columbia. Those could be three options for them to go and would make more sense for them to stay on the west coast, but that isn't stopping. The people who want to bring Major League Baseball to Nashville to get going. They've already got a plan in place to look for an inspection team but if we can jump on the bandwagon now, why not? I didn't live here when the NHL and the NFL came to town, but I know it's crazy and this is going to get crazier Nashville's, a growing town, the it's City and who knows? They could come home.

Oakland Kevin Nation Major League Baseball Philadelphia British Columbia Portland Las Vegas Oregon West Coast Nashville NHL NFL
Supreme Court Affirms American Indigenous Man's Right to Hunt in Canada

Native America Calling

02:14 min | 2 months ago

Supreme Court Affirms American Indigenous Man's Right to Hunt in Canada

"The supreme court of canada friday ruled seven to two in favor of a washington state man who was charged with illegally hunting and canada more than a decade ago. Emily swing reports in two thousand ten. Rick data crossed the us. Canada border into british columbia. Where he intentionally hunted for elk without a license back in nineteen fifty three the last surviving member of desautels ancestral tribe. The cynics passed away in british columbia three years later. The province reclaimed cynics lands and canada's federal government officially declared the tribe extinct does to wanted to prove his people were anything but extinct. He was acquitted in two thousand seventeen but the province appealed twice and lost now. The supreme court of canada has sided with denzel via zoom defense. Attorney mark underhill delivered. The news to desa tell his wife linda and dozens of other cynics who had gathered to celebrate the rooms on behalf of canada. Welcome we want. This is the first time. The supreme court of canada has interpreted what it means to be an aboriginal peoples of canada in the majority opinion. Judge malcolm rowe wrote but cynics rights are protected by canada's constitution and that to exclude aboriginal peoples who were forced to move out of canada would risk perpetuating the historic injustice suffered by aboriginal peoples at the hands of europeans loggers miners and white settlers who moved into british columbia in the nineteenth century proved to be hostile. Neighbors and many strikes were forced to move south across the border onto the reservation of the confederated tribes of the call ville in washington state. Rodney causton is the call chairman. He's also cynics. He says his tribe will now work to protect cultural resources and sacred sites in canada. We will begin looking at are averaging title back to orlando are traditional homelands and also the recognition that we do have rights as the first nation in canada.

Canada Supreme Court Of Canada Emily Swing British Columbia Attorney Mark Underhill Judge Malcolm Rowe Desa Washington Rick Denzel Federal Government Linda United States Rodney Causton Orlando
"british columbia" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

02:16 min | 2 months ago

"british columbia" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

"Political is play closing. That's the right word for it but politicizing wildlife management. And what what that says to me is people. Don't care about the outcome as long as we're not offending people as long as everybody's okay with what happens in to me that blows my mind because we talk about You know bear hunting. It's so much let's talk about black. Black bear. hunting is there are so many black bears in british columbia for them to say it is purely a trophy hunt lows my mind. I absolutely love black. I me it's amazing but at the same time I like to hunt black bear in areas. Where i know i see a lot of lack deal does spend a lot of their time so i want to try and pull some blackberries over those areas and help the ungulates out. I mean we wanna make sure that we're keeping an effective balance. We are part of nature whether we like it or not. Humans are part of nature. We are part of the ecosystem and we need to do our part to make sure that. That's a sustainable. Balance is kept so this conversation of saying well. We shouldn't do it anymore because some people might be offended by it is crazy to me because there's a lot of stuff that happens in society. That people don't wanna do that. People think is not the greatest job to do but it has to be done. Because that's what is needed so to say we're going to start you know adjusting regulations not because it benefits the wildlife but because some people will be less offended by that it blows my mind. That's that's my biggest struggle with it. And i don't know about how you guys feel. But that's the biggest pill to swallow in my head. No i completely agree Channel collar earlier. And i believe bc has anywhere between one hundred twenty two hundred sixty thousand black bears. That's the biggest population in north america. And to see that we're short of them is it's narrow minded and it's selfish right and as you said we're part of nature and everywhere you go we've had an impact and if it's a it's a beautiful myth that if we left nature alone would balance itself right. The only way that's going to happen is that human beings are wiped off the landscape and well realistically. That's not going to happen anytime soon. So we have to do our part.

north america one hundred twenty two hundred british columbia so
One dead and five wounded in stabbing at Vancouver library

News, Traffic and Weather

00:20 sec | 3 months ago

One dead and five wounded in stabbing at Vancouver library

"A library and north Vancouver, British Columbia. Almost Michelle Esteban police say there is a man right now in custody who they believe acted alone and the motive remains unknown. One official says that man accused was taken to the hospital after he appeared to stab himself. Before he collapsed and was arrested were Northwest News an exchange of gunfire yesterday morning outside of

Michelle Esteban British Columbia Vancouver Northwest News
Woman dead, suspect in custody after 7 people stabbed in North Vancouver

Glenn Beck

00:18 sec | 3 months ago

Woman dead, suspect in custody after 7 people stabbed in North Vancouver

"Say a man went on a stabbing spree around a library in British Columbia and killed one woman and injured six other people. Policia suspect a man in his twenties, is in custody following Saturday's attack. In north Vancouver. No details yet about a motive. One witness says he believes the victims were just in the wrong place at the wrong time.

Policia British Columbia Vancouver
"british columbia" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

01:44 min | 3 months ago

"british columbia" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

"It's <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <hes> <Silence> <SpeakerChange> just like a stage <Speech_Music_Male> question right <Speech_Music_Male> like hey. I'm <Speech_Male> looking backpack. <Speech_Male> Need talk me a little <Speech_Male> bit about. Your pets is packed <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> in the market <Speech_Male> We liked the <Speech_Music_Male> octa. People like to <Speech_Music_Male> be a part of your geared selected <Speech_Music_Male> and on the <Speech_Music_Male> other side of that. <Speech_Male> We're here if things <Speech_Male> go wrong to you <Speech_Music_Male> so <Speech_Music_Male> go on our website. We've <Speech_Music_Male> gotta facebook page. <Speech_Music_Male> Instagram <Speech_Music_Male> <hes> you know <Speech_Music_Male> account <Speech_Male> All the <Speech_Music_Male> places you can see updates <Speech_Music_Male> and things of that nature <Speech_Music_Male> especially with some of those new product <Speech_Music_Male> coming out <Speech_Music_Male> website or <Speech_Male> good old fashioned <Speech_Male> the phone and <Silence> call ups <Speech_Male> And <Silence> we love the <SpeakerChange> criteria. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Awesome matt while. <Speech_Male> Hey kevin. i can't thank <Speech_Male> you enough <Speech_Male> For your time <Speech_Male> today but <Speech_Male> also just your <Speech_Male> conservation footprint <Speech_Male> yoon. I've <Speech_Male> had many a <Speech_Male> conversation. <Speech_Male> Cold winter nights <Speech_Male> cold. Winter days in alaska <Speech_Male> talked about <Speech_Male> chiffon about <Speech_Male> ethics conservation. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And and <Speech_Male> i know that. You're a diehard <Speech_Male> shape under an year. <Speech_Male> Just as passionate as <Speech_Male> anyone. I know about <Speech_Male> it it shows <Speech_Male> and what you do and <Speech_Male> and And <Speech_Male> you put your money where your mouth <Speech_Male> is always supported the <Speech_Male> society and <Speech_Male> we're not the only ones who <Speech_Male> support as well. <Speech_Male> The barneys <Speech_Male> ultimate sheep camp <Speech_Male> Has become <Speech_Male> a mainstay in what we <Speech_Male> do. <Speech_Male> And you fully <Speech_Male> donate that stuff every <Speech_Male> year so <Speech_Male> we can't thank you enough <Speech_Male> it's just phenomenal. What <Speech_Male> barneys does and what you <Speech_Male> personally do. So <Speech_Male> i wanna thank you for your <Speech_Male> time and and just <Speech_Male> everything. Do to support <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> she <Speech_Male> conservation. <Speech_Male> Yeah well. I appreciate <Speech_Music_Male> the opportunity <Speech_Male> in as i've always told <Speech_Male> you kyle. I mean <Speech_Male> the opportunity <Speech_Music_Male> at the small <Speech_Music_Male> shop to helping <Speech_Music_Male> you know asking <Speech_Male> for you know. Be <Speech_Music_Male> a part of it is <Speech_Male> is all <Speech_Male> that matters to us. <Speech_Male> And and <Speech_Male> you know if <Speech_Male> we can help will help <Speech_Male> and and <Speech_Male> We love to be a part <Speech_Music_Male> of it so <Speech_Music_Male> definitely <Speech_Music_Male> Appreciate the opportunity <Speech_Male> to come <SpeakerChange> on and talk <Silence> with the evening. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> westbrook cheers. <Speech_Male> how good night all right.

"british columbia" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

02:53 min | 3 months ago

"british columbia" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

"Is once in a lifetime. This is a draw that you're to get a chance to win super exciting. So yeah ben reached out he goes. I gonna personally guide the hunt. And i'm going to get while wildlife captured to donate it so this is a fully donated hunt from canadian. Wildlife capture guided by banbury cough with coastal inlet adventures of a lifetime. There's only thousand tickets available. Odds are very good on it. Tickets are fifty dollars a piece and we're going to run this through Until august it'll be drawn in august is season. And it's this exactly i attempt Twenty twenty one and this is really appealing for british. Columbia's out you know. A lot of these hunts guided hunt sir appealing to foreigners but bbc. How tough is it to get a roosevelt draw and and certainly wanted a coveted area. Like this you can't get it. It's the odds are so slim. I've been putting in for roosevelt for ever since i've been hunting here bbc and i've never got drawn right. I put in for areas known for better on spy or lower odds but fantastic And yet definitely want to get tickets on that. So that's available saturday Go to our website and it'll be under a raffle stab and you get Get tickets on that hunt so fantastic. Oh yeh just like just like everything else. Every single dollar stays rate here in bc and goes on the ground projects. What was our total dollars in two thousand twenty. That went on the ground from from raffles. Like this. Two hundred seventy thousand is what through actively we did. You know that's a lot and again you say it all the time. It just doesn't help the sheep. It helps feeling all the all the species right Stuff we hunt stuff. We don't hide everything benefits from it. So yeah it's across. The board absolutely caused could be better yet. Pretty exciting raffles on the badgers to butterflies and mule deer stone cheap rate. It's just because it says cheat society doesn't mean everything else doesn't benefit when we do projects like this so stoked stoke for this one and I i can't wait to get mine tickets right on. Okay episode twenty four. I believe we're up to it is hard to believe it's It's been a a wicked ride. Lots of great feedback from you guys. Keep the ideas common. We want to hear who you want to see on the show But this was really cool Were sitting down with. Tanner banished from frontiers men gear They're doing some fantastic work in custom knife world in british columbia We've partnered with them on the stony which we talk about on the show and Tanner brings up a lot of really cool aspects the knife making world a some really good relevant.

two thousand Two hundred seventy thousand saturday Columbia thousand tickets Tanner fifty dollars a piece twenty a lot august Twenty twenty one canadian episode twenty four once columbia single dollar british bc
"british columbia" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

05:56 min | 3 months ago

"british columbia" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

"We only wanted one day. But we're a couple of days travelling into camp and having that whole piece of it you know. I mean the day one. I'm only counting us hunting day. We were probably two or three days. You know we had a twelve hour horseback the first day or first before even that you know you fly into moat camp and you get on the horses. We fly into remote camp. That's day one or whenever you know then you get on the horses for the whole day you know. We didn't even make it to to remote cantu. They take camp that night we we. We stopped about three quarters of the way there and then finally got so. It was two and a half days travelling into hunting. And that's the kind of stuff that i have absolutely loved. Sorry that's the kind of stuff that i absolutely love. Is that piece of the hunt. you know. I mean the getting nafta that sheep is great but the whole adventure. Pirate is is what i really love with a great point dean and you look even in british columbia here. She punt every year and we're two days in before we even think about you know pulling the optics outright. So yeah that's that's the cool part of sheep on for me as well as the whole adventure you know even if you kill us sheep on day one you probably spent four five days getting to that point you could pull that trigger on day one and then you're going to be another three or four days getting hold on top of it so you got certainly week invested. It's a little different than what i used to do. When i grew up white. Wait till hunting on on the farm you know drive out in the backlash or go for a walk and and then be home for dinner right. Yes i think about that all the time. Especially when i'm hunting. My brother only gets cold white tail and he'll be like oh freezing. We'd be in the tree for an hour and a half. I'm like you have no idea like this is nothing you're gonna get chocolate heat right on so Let's fast forward to the stone. Sheep talk a little bit about that experience and how that came about. Yeah so that. I mean that was with nathan again. You know after the doll sheep. I mean obviously. I just always hit it off day. One and the stone sheep pun. I got in a lot better shape for that was the one thing i I realized on my my doll was never in bad shape. But i wasn't a cheap shape So i really really try. I got into yoga. I was doing. I was doing everything so i really felt like going into the stone. Cheap on i was. I was better prepared for it What i think a lot of people don't don't prepare themselves for as the mental aspect. I think the the first doll hunt really kind of threw me into the mental aspect. I mean there was a point on probably dates. Twelve on the doll. She pot that you know we will make another climb. And i. I just sat down. I'm like i'm done like i was. I was mentally and physically done. I mean we haunted another day. But i think that day before was my breaking point so i i really was able to prepare myself mentally I mean obviously the physical aspect of always came easier because it was an athlete. And i knew that part of it but the mental aspect is tough. Is anybody thinks they are these. She can get to a point in and sometimes it doesn't take too long that until it can beat you up mentally. You know you question. Why am i here. or you know..

two three days three twelve hour four days Twelve an hour and a half one day first two days first day two and a half days One five days four point dean one thing british columbia first doll yoga
"british columbia" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

03:43 min | 4 months ago

"british columbia" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

"Whether you're somebody who enjoys joys the rodeo whether you're somebody who raises beef or hogs chickens i mean we see here no berta where people did a sit in on how to write a turkey farm not too long ago and create a biosecurity hazard on that farm and interrupted with that lawful farming practice. We only to stand together and like i said an attack on one is an attack on all and if they can take away Say the for lack of a better term trophy hunting and For those of us that might not be trophy hunters We sit back say well. It doesn't affect me well. Guess what your next Once they moved the goalposts A little bit further they move. The yardsticks down the field you're next There's a tax rate now on farming communities. There's a tax rate now coming from from all angles and look at. It's largely coming from people who You know It's not good enough for them that they choose their own lifestyle. They need to be able to seem to choose everybody else's lifestyle for them and It's a really really frustrating things. So i think we can do some smart things I don't you know we. We shouldn't buy into their language and their rhetoric. We should be using our own language. We should be calling. I'll hunting is conservation hunting in my opinion Whether with whatever the motives happened to be and We are ethical people. We create jobs and opportunity. And you know we just need to We just need to stick together on these things and create a different narrative and just remind people with acts up but we can make our own Emotional appeals as well We can make appeals to the fact that some people actually depend on Subsistence lifestyles People that live in remote parts of even british columbia alberta the northwest territories nunavut and the yukon and other parts of canada actually rely on filling their freezers with wild game mousse or an elk or caribou If it's available to them it is a part of their food source and its supplements You know the ability for them to feed their family So you know. Various there is no reason that That we should be allowing this bizarre bizarre argument. And it's an emotional argument and we just have to take a look the government of and ep. If i remember. Car the governor of bbc if i remember correctly even sad. The minister actually said When they announced the closure of the grizzly bear hunt. Nbc a science evidence based decision. It was purely emotional absolutely dick. So what's the consequence of that decision. The consequence of that decision is going to be increased. Grizzly bear populations In the next twenty years based on their reproductive capacity and you're going to have Wildlife and While that human conflicts that will emerge people that live in the proximity to grizzly. bears will have higher risks. because there's going to be more encounters. The grizzly bears going to expand their territory potentially moving into areas where they're going to be in conflict with livestock and the ranching community and none of this affects somebody in downtown victoria or downtown vancouver and yet they're making that determination on enforcing their opinions and feelings on people who live with a completely different reality out in rural or a semi wild environment and You know these are going to be problem. we're going to see it. You will see Somebody somebody somewhere in the near future. In british colombia will be killed by grizzly bear. And it will be because. There's a lot more. Grizzly bears and that human conflict will inevitably happen. There isn't a massive amount of interactions right now with mountain. Lions where you are specifically on vancouver island..

canada vancouver island nunavut british Nbc columbia bbc colombia alberta victoria vancouver downtown years turkey next twenty
"british columbia" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

05:23 min | 4 months ago

"british columbia" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

"Care about where your food comes from and our concern for the future of wildlife and the environment that they need to survive hole up a seat. We have a story to tell welcome to our campfire. Good morning and welcome to the show. Hey kyle to be here then. Great to be here with you to steve. Yeah it's fantastic. So we met with you while chief society. We flew out to l. Berta myself and darren app met with you Back in november. I think at twenty nine thousand nine hundred a visit within the office there and really appreciate you taking the time to meet with us today and delayed a little bit this morning. You had some government business to take care of so i guess you're in alberta. You're not out in ottawa right now. Yeah that's right. I'm i'm Tuning in here from my constituency office in beautiful black vaults burn just north of red deer proud member parliament for the fine folks regular comb which is a north central alberta constituency. That's awesome blame. So you know. I know. You're a huge hunting advocate Angling and you look out for you. Know the rights for us Outdoors people Can you talk a little bit about You know your job and about the Conservative caucus for hunting and angling a little bit about that force. Yeah a number of years ago A number of mp's were enthusiasts about hunting and angling and trapping and all the issues surrounding it formed us with the called the conservative hunting and angling cock is. We're the only party that actually has its own hunting and angling group and That varies between parliaments. Of course with the number of conservative. mp's and senators that we have but we've typically had about thirty to forty conservative members of parliament sender's Every parliament Who are interested in advancing the issues that are important to us as the hunting Fishing trapping and general outdoor enthusiast community so So a lot of these issues of course of provincial jurisdiction but the ones that are federal for sure we We we take these issues very seriously. And we're always advocating a four or defending from attacks from those who would basically threaten our way of life fantastic blaine and we're super grateful for it And i guess the liberals have something similar right. No they don't. We're the only party. I know a strangely enough. There is an party outdoors caucus that deals with this So there is sometimes a collaborative approach to dealing with this. But the reality is there is no There's nobody that Takes apart inside on these issues like the conservative party does so Yeah no you're not going to find a hauntingly caucus in any of the other political entities. Believe yeah yeah. Absolutely and i guess You know the the issue with around this this hunting issue that we're seeing This anti hunting movement It all kinda gets wrapped up into the gun lobby and And everything around that. See twenty one. We're seeing that now and an all kind of infringes on what we do in the outdoors. You know our ability to carry a firearm for you know for harvesting and that sort of thing so you know it's a much bigger issue than just the hunting and angling aspect of it as well. There's a lot of things wrapped up in there that kind of touch on the sides with all this as well so You know before we get into to that aspect of it Let's just keep it. I guess high level. And can you talk a little bit. So i think you guys entered a private member's bill around the national hunting angling And what was the The hunting hunting angling trapping heritage day..

ottawa kyle alberta today steve november twenty nine thousand twenty one this morning nine hundred forty conservative members north central alberta constitu a number of years ago red deer l. Berta four darren about thirty
"british columbia" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

05:06 min | 4 months ago

"british columbia" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

"And if you do nothing there's only one thing you need to do. There's a forum on their filled that form out and it's going to send a letter to the elected government stating our position on this that we believe in science based wildlife management and our opportunity to hunt So that's a big part of it so if you do nothing that's that's what you need to do. Now there's four steps we'll talk about the end of the show on the road but the most important thing is to go to wild sheep society dot com for slash. Act now to fill that for and make sure to share to your friends and your your hunting friends non-hunting friends your shooter friends. Your anglers just just people that are don't want to see extinction of species because we're not gonna we're not gonna see extinction of species immediately but by letting wildlife run unmanaged we're to rate it's it's it's a. It's a pretty myth that lakes that we'd like to see spun by these communities that that says nature will balance self. We know that were. That's not true. We're a part of nature and we need to take action to balance like no hunter wants to see extinction at all. We're the first ones to sound out saying. Hey there's a problem and we know there's a problem right now with the way things are going so as carl said you need to hit the website while chief society dot com forward slash act now. It's thirty seconds of your time to fill these these This auto it auto populates for you type in your name your email address and you figure out what your m. l. a. is and we've even got a link free to do that so yeah can't can't urge it enough. We saw a great rise up years ago and we actually change policy. We can do it again. And we can enact policy and it takes thirty seconds so if if you care about your future as a hunter you need to get on there. this is not a This is a community approach and we said our goal is to get fifty thousand. Letters are thousand members of society. Bbc's not gonna cut it so we're going to be reaching out to other conservation organizations people that. Think like we do asking for their support to get their membership of together. We wanna show up with fifty thousand physical letters and all it takes us thirty seconds of your time and then just take a little bit extra effort and tell your friends If you care about an opportunity to be on the landscape to hot And you believe in science based while they've management. You need to do this. it's important saw. Sure shirt to your networks share to influencers share it to television networks. Get it to your media. We don't characters get that exposure. We can't sit back right on so on that note. We got a really cool yesterday. we have Blaine calkins in episode. Twenty two Blaine is the conservative member of parliament. For red deer lacomb. He's representing that writing on the hill in ottawa. Blaine has pretty fantastic resume. He's been in ottawa for years. He grew up hunting and fishing..

fifty thousand Blaine calkins ottawa yesterday thirty seconds Bbc Blaine one thing first ones fifty thousand physical letter four steps thousand members carl years Twenty two com
"british columbia" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

04:07 min | 4 months ago

"british columbia" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

"I don't think that memory serves me correct. Wolf scott had some a little release too up for. I wasn't sure if that Those bugs came from the wall to sell for ready. Got into the. It will scott after but either way of little disturbing for sure. Yeah so yeah to say we got fresh per after that staring at it. So but have you ever done the tablets or anything like any other there with reports that make the new tablets or no sorry for water filtration diner or anything like filtration on new. I think those. As far as i understand me to carry those i mean. I think that as a boy scouts. In john cadets in those listen when people learned a lot of impact country's survival skills to carry these tablets that i don't think you know Was actually. They're meant for emergency. Use as far as andrew stand as opposed to daily use. 'cause i don't think they're all that healthy to tell you the truth. I understand these tablets. I think that's what you're talking about. I don't know if i'd wanna be ingesting that much. I dine on a daily basis So yeah. I don't carry them..

john cadets scott andrew Wolf scott
"british columbia" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

05:19 min | 4 months ago

"british columbia" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

"Welcome to talk. It's podcast by the wild sheep. Society british columbia join us as we cover conservation elites tips and tricks to campfire.

Giving sources the power to tell their own stories

It's All Journalism

06:40 min | 4 months ago

Giving sources the power to tell their own stories

"Breeding is the deputy director of the global reporting center. The center has recently produced documentary series for pbs. Newshour called turning points which uses the empowerment journalism model. Britney's here to talk to us about that series and explain exactly what is empowerment journalism. Welcome to the podcast brittany. Thanks so britney you said before we turn to the that you had. You've heard our podcast and so you kinda know how we start out things. Could you tell us a little bit about how you got involved in journalism and how you ended up at the global reporting center so i think you're probably the first person asked me how i've gotten into journalism since my first day of journalism school but sometimes when i think back on it i'm not even sure how i ended up here but what i think happened was i graduated from undergrad with an english degree in fine arts degree and i was sure that i was going to be a teacher though. I moved to south korea just to sort of try it out and see what it was like to work as a teacher. I was teaching english as a second language. But in a funny way. I sort of missed being a student. I love reading and writing and losing myself in research and so i started to think really hard about what kind of career would lead me to new discoveries into an opportunity to spend more of my life learning and i think that that's really what led need to journalism and so i moved back to canada and enrolled in a master's degree at the university of british columbia. And they have this incredible program that was formerly known as the international reporting program is now known as the global reporting program and that really drew my attention and it gives you a chance to spend a full year working on enterprise investigative work of international journalism. And my year. We were lucky enough to travel to china to report on the emerging environmental movement. And it was just this amazing opportunity to really dig in and learn and after i graduated from my masters a new that daily news was not going to be my thing. I wanted to be somewhere where that freedom to explore a story to stay with it. And i know that those jobs are also a few and far in between but at the time one of our professors at u c was just starting to build a global reporting center and an adviser at the school had recommended me when our director. Peter klein was looking for someone to help out part time so i started working with him in twenty fourteen. Just right after graduating. And i was working part. Time will working some other jobs and just trying to fill out that full time schedule. Then when we launched in two thousand sixteen we had a lot of momentum. And so yeah. I've been with the goal reporting center basically ever since i graduated from a masters. And it's been a really wonderful opportunity in place to work because peter in the team are always willing to listen to new ideas and new projects in there's this openness to experimentation and i even working now with the golden pudding program as their multimedia producer so in some ways. My story is a bit full circle. Because i have both that career that allows me to discover learn but also one where i'm getting to work with students and help them grow in home their skill. So yeah it's been really great. And i i feel like i'm really lucky to have found myself where i am. We have peter klein on the podcast. A couple of years ago. And i remember having a really great conversation with him and he reached out to us about a month ago and said. Hey you should talk to the people about the turning points program that's being produced with pbs newshour. You know this is something interesting something different and had a chance to check out some of the The videos that you guys have produced for that project and it's really really powerful so before we get into that just could you explain what is the mission of the global reporting center. What are the types of stories that it does. Yeah of course so. We thought a lot about this. And i think i mean are small mandate are sort of one liner is global journalism done differently and then when you expand that in what that means split into three distinct areas so the first being the focus on collaboration so we work with journalists from around the world we work with a variety of media partners with researchers and scholars which we're lucky based on our position at the university to sort of have this wealth of scholarship around us an even now at this turning point project working roy subjects we. We don't generally work with fixers. We use journalists partners. So collaboration is really at the heart of what we do. And i think that that sort of sets us apart a little bit because you know. Journalism has been shifting for a long time towards less competitiveness. More sort of working together in this idea that we tell better stories when we're not silent off in working together in that something that we really take to heart and then the other sort of areas that set us apart. Are that experimentation innovation sort of area where we try to do our journalism in different ways. Were open to new methods and new methods. Don't always work out. Sometimes they fail and for us. That's okay because we just want to be able to experiment and try new things and see what works in take those pieces that are successful in and bring them to a new stage in the last focuses on our education avenue so on global reporting program and bringing on students every year to work with us when we have big projects in production like turning points. We like to give students opportunities to work on projects in meaningful ways and allow them in on the production process so that they really get that experience when they're going out into the world they have these pieces that you know they can point to and say that they worked on okay so now is a fair to assume that the the turning points is a collaboration that you're doing with the pbs newshour partnership with pbs newshour. We originally didn't bring on a media partner at the beginning and there were a couple of reasons why we didn't do that. I because we weren't really sure. This method is going to work empowerment journal. The model was very new to us. And so we wanted to make sure that we had that freedom and adaptability to sort of shift change and potentially fail if it was going to fail and so we didn't bring on a partner from the very beginning. We've actually been working on this project since two thousand sixteen

Global Reporting Center PBS Peter Klein University Of British Columbia Britney South Korea Newshour Canada China Peter ROY Newshour Partnership
"british columbia" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

04:56 min | 4 months ago

"british columbia" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

"Episode. Nineteen another epic with omer. Never boring I i always. I always feel lake We we should do What do you call it like a warning of language. And i think we're gonna have to again. But as we said to him. At the beginning pete if he restricted himself he wouldn't be over and that's why we love him right. It's it is. He says it like it is. What's on his mind. We're definitely put explicit on this one but the truth is funny as he is. He is restricted on these. Because i've seen him when he's not on the bad guys out there was there was no mention erupted. Jeremy on this one. So i was a little disappointed but whatever it was so well not not that we recorded Anyway this is a great episode with omer episode nineteen and we dive deep on optic so You know i. I've been dealing with precision optics for last fifteen years. I bought a bunch of stuff for them on the biggest thing for me. When i'm dealing with owners the honesty the honest conversation and lately could said on the podcast. There's been a few times where he's talked me out of stuff somebody said. Oh you gotta get this. And i go in and say. Hey what about this. And he's like no. That's not what you need man like this is. This is what you need in. This is why you want to use it And he's for me. A trusted source now when i call him. I know he's not steering me wrong. I just talk about what. I need a out of something. What i'm gonna use it for. And he tells me what i should be looking at. And he's not he's not a salesman in in the true sense of the word he's he's not trying to sell you a product. He's trying to sell you what you need. Not not what necessarily what you want right. Yeah absolutely and this is a really interesting one. I learned a lot on it You know i. I've got some of his products. So what i learned on there and some stuff too. I was like it was over my head. But i'm actually offline gonna chat with them about some things you know..

Jeremy last fifteen years episode nineteen omer pete Nineteen
The Lost Joys Of Talking To Strangers

Short Wave

03:14 min | 5 months ago

The Lost Joys Of Talking To Strangers

"So your way to find out why you were feeling high. After talking to random people you delved into the science of strangers. Yeah i i started looking into it and it turns out. There's this newish line of research examining this very question. When is the last time you yourself. Talk to a stranger. Gosh you know. Usually that would be so easy to answer. This is elizabeth done a psychology professor who studies happiness at the university of british columbia. Done i started thinking about the importance of strangers when she noticed something odd happening with her boyfriend. Back in grad school. Benjamin was a lovely person. But benjamin happened to be a little bit of a bad mood. He would act a bit cranky grumpy around me. One girlfriend knowing that you know that was okay and i would i would with it. We are crankiest around the ones. We love true true. But but then you'd run into a stranger on their way to dinner or something and her boyfriend perk right up like he would suddenly become pleasant and cheerful and often stay that way being a better mood even after the running Like a little stranger boost. Yeah and wanted to know why she conducted a study. She got a bunch of couples together in a lab and she asked everyone to predict if they'd feel happier interacting with their own beloved partner or complete stranger from one of the other couples. I'm guessing they chose their own partner. Like that feels like the safest choice. That's definitely what they chose but with done found was that people actually ended up reporting feeling just as good after interacting with a total stranger as they did after interacting with their own partner. Ooh drama drama. Yo i know it was also surprising because for a long time. Researchers had mainly focused on the effects of spending time with intimates like our friends and family not complete randoms You know. I think we consider these interactions to be trivial. They happen quickly and spontaneously most of the time. Don't really give them a second thaw so don't want it to know like what is up with. These stranger interactions and over the next decade she conducted a few more studies looking at how these interactions affect our wellbeing including the study at a coffee shop in vancouver where she got people to either have a conversation with a barista or just get their coffee and get out. Be totally utilitarian about it. Which by the way is how done usually likes to roll. I really like efficiency. This is a woman after my own heart. Yeah me too. But what done found is that just. Having brief interactions with the barista would on a scale of one to five make people feel happier leagues six tenths of a point better in terms of positive affect and a half. A point might not sound like that big a difference but actually compared to a lot of other findings in our field. It's pretty solid given how the intervention that

University Of British Columbia Benjamin Elizabeth Vancouver
Sarah Chalke Talks Rick & Morty

Q

12:43 min | 5 months ago

Sarah Chalke Talks Rick & Morty

"About what a dream career in acting might be. Sarah Chalke has sort of had it. She's been on some of the best love TV shows of all time, Roseanne. Scrubs How I met your mother. Not too shabby, right? But you know things must be slowing down during the pandemic for actors. Well, not for Sarah. Now she's part of the one of the most popular shows during this pandemic, the animated series Rick and Morty, where she does the voice of Beth Sanchez. I had the chance to talk with Sarah Chalke out in Vancouver, British Columbia last year after season four of the show rap. We talk from her home, NBC. Don't worry, I wasn't NBC hears our conversation. Hi, Sarah. How are you? Hey, I'm great. Nice to talk to you. Where are you? I'm in British Columbia and s O feel like you'd be here. You're still able to work right? You're on Rick and Morty. It's animated show. Are you still able to do voices? Yes, I'm I've been recording three cartoons up here, and it's been such an interesting adventure to find like the most acoustically positive sound And really, that's like a dead sense. You have to find somewhere small and s O. I started out in the lower bunk bed surrounded by every do they and pillow that was available to me and then try taking the kids play tent and duct taping seven moving blankets around it. Um and then you know you're in this kind of like dark space. And then I take like make a stack with like a thing of poker chips and Harry Potter books and then bounced the microphone on top and hope for the best. And I also say that like Beth on Rick and Morty Is not like a A super kid friendly cartoon character like No. Are you worried about your kids here in here and what's going on with mom in the room? So what if he like up and you know you're recording off campus in a sound contained sound booth? Um, so yeah, yeah, that's also been part of this figure out a way to not only keep the dogs from barking, um, and hearing birds, but also, uh, the Children not hearing you. So it's an interesting um Dynamic. They get to have some really loud. Screen time, huh? Get they get to watch their iPad as loud as they want so that mom could say rated r things into a microphone in the bunk bed. Totally. I mean, I was already worried about like my daughter who's three going to preschool and like she loves we have all the Rick and Morty like stuffed animals, and plus, she's and so she'll play with them. If you like, mister Q. B Butthole. Yeah, I don't know how that's gonna go over playing that with other Children. It's been really amazing to see how big Rick and Morty has become, like I remember when it was sort of like this little niche. Animated chauffeur for nerds and for You know, for people who like really kind of sophisticated comedy, and then it just becomes this worldwide phenomenon. And it made me think about your character, Beth. So for people who haven't seen the show, can you tell me who Beth was when you started and sort of who she's become, as the serious has gone on. Yes. Oh, so she's the sort of mother of the family. Um, Rick and Morty is the grandfather of the grandson. And you think you're gonna watch this grandfather grandson? Go on these like wild sci fi adventures. But what it ends up going into is like these real kind of rough family dynamics and on day kind of You know, not just this sci fi cartoon but asking these existential questions like if life is meaningless, and there are infinite universes, does anything really matter? So that's rickon Gordy in general, and then the best starting out kind of that, you know, as the Matriarch of the family and playing the mom and then over time, And as the seasons went on, you find out how much she is like her dad and the fact that when she was little, he had to build her a secret world. Because she was making whips to make people like her and mind control hair clips. As a young girl. You find out that she is kind of a lot like her dad, and and then and then, as the seasons go on. She wants to either stay or leave, And we don't know if she's a clone or not a clone, and that's been super fun to play kind of death. And then this alternate best as well. Space that it's funny like it. Z must be a challenge to sort of play your character and also sort of more sinister. We're like, deceptive version of your character. But it's all the same voice like You're not changing too much, you know. Yeah, Totally, totally. It's been. It's been super fun, and obviously we didn't know at any point that that was coming like we just get the scripts as we get them. We have no knowledge of. You know what's happening down the road in the future, so that part's so fun. I mean, to see like a Rick and Morty script in My Inbox is one of my favorite things because the minds of Justin Royal and and Dan Harmon are Unbelievable. There. So the scripture so smart and so funny and so wild. I love them. It's the number to show in all of North America like we were looking at in the US anyway. We were looking at the survey was conducted in the US to see what TV shows were being binge the most during the pandemic. So number one friends. Friends is number one. Right? Yes, I love it. I'm a big friends fan. And then sort of like the anti friends Rick and Morty is is not know that his number two in some states record is number one. What do you make of it? What do you make of it that during the pandemic, it's gotten even more successful. That's really cool. I didn't know that. I think I think people want to laugh and people want to escape into another world. And I think that it's a You know, a time for For a real need for for comedy, and the growth of It has been interesting to watch kind of through the eyes of comic con over the years like we would go to comic con You're one. It hasn't been released yet. So all the questions were to Dan Harmon about community and then the next year, it was like a couple of weeks walking around and then the next It was like a sea of Mr Poopy bottles and bricks and all these different characters was kind of cool. I get to see how it's how it's growing, but I'm glad it's bringing people less. Is it this time? Is it ever a bit intense? Like I know that I know that Even Dan and Justin, the folks behind the show have had to come out and talk to the fans of the show. Because they could be intense. They could be a bit toxic. That could be a bit sort of awful. Now when we're talking about a pretty small Group of fans of the show, but I can't imagine what that's like to be sort of in it to be in in the show, with all that's going on. Yeah, it is. It is wild. The degree to which you know I can't watch all the little pieces and I am you know, I think that That, you know, I don't. I don't actually read a ton of those, uh, those sites and comments, but I think it's It's cool how passionate people are about it. It reminds me because when you started, I think the first way we all knew you was when you were on when you were on Roseanne and you were brought in court famously, is second Becky. Like one of the biggest shows of the nineties, You replaced the original actress who played the daughter Becky, until the original Becky came back again. From what? I understand you were in high school in Canada, and then it got that gig. Yeah, it was crazy. I was 16 when I auditioned and I I was living in Vancouver and working on a couple things that were filming up here, but really haven't done anything under very much. And and, uh, got this audition and put myself on tape. And, um, I think we even like Mailed a VHS tape, You know, down to the states, and they called and said, We're gonna fly you down for an audition on day were seven of us and all the others were like 21 living in L. A actresses and all of us were doing this scene with Glenn Quinn. Who played Mark back his husband and the whole scene was like making out. You're making out with him. And you're like, you know, get job. The gas station, baby. Come and get it down to the gas station, baby. Come here. That was the same like there's this 24 year old, handsome Irish actor. How am I gonna remember one line and they said we'll let you know within a week. And then, a week later, they called back and said, Okay, come back tomorrow and do a scene with Roseanne and was like on the infamous coach on the set, and they were calling out. You know, camera numbers and having a laugh track and seeing if you could kind of adjust to those elements, and then they called and said, You got it. And Remember going to a party that night and telling a couple people and it just sounded so crazy. Sounded crazy. Yeah. Sounded crazy that you were in. You were in high school, and you were telling people having to be on the number one sitcom in the world. They would have been right to be like They're not. You're not like taking over for someone else like they're gonna not have like It just sounded insane. And we already had, like great seven. We already had, like someone like lied about being on the mini pops. Remember the many pox which were so amazing? I don't I don't know. The minibar like a Canadian band was like a Canadian kids. And you would like You know they would sing covers, and they were dressed these cool eighties clothes and they were amazing and someone in our schools that they were going to be in the mini pops. That wasn't true. So all the sudden I felt this feeling of like I'm lying about being in many parts, and then so then I kind of spread it on our school pretty quick. And then they called me back on Monday morning, and they said We're having cold feet about replacing Becky. So we don't know if we're gonna do it. We will do will pick you if we do it, but we're gonna put you on hold for four months. We're going to tell you in September just got this is jumping. You couldn't be a Minnie Bob situation, right? You're gonna have to go back to all of them ago. No, no, they change their mind like all you have Sara? Sure they did Change your mind. And then you then you find out Yeah. And then s O was my great 12 year and, um And I would go back and forth because they would shoot two or three weeks on one week off. So we would shoot Monday to Thursday. I would get on a plane first thing Friday morning and be at school in Canada on Friday afternoon and then and then fly back Sunday night or stay home for a week if we had a week off and kind of commuting back and forth I'm really interested in people like you who have On gun traditional first big gig like I was talking to Linda Cardellini the other day who played Lindsay on Freaks and geeks, Right? And you know, so there you go. She's her big break. Is this show that considered to be the greatest show of all time and then gets canceled after one season and I said, You know, what does that do for you for the rest of your career, and similarly for you your first Big is to replace beloved Actor. In a show that is the number one show on that, and it was it was controversial. When it happened, it was people couldn't believe that it was happening. And then I wonder if that taught you anything in your career going forward, whether it had hardened to you or heart And you do you think it did something to you? I think both of those things I think, you know, I mean, because Yeah, came. She would least he was Becky from seasons 1 to 5. I was six and seven. She came back for the beginning of eight. And then I came back for the rest of eight. And for nine. And so it was definitely, you know. As a kid. Um, it's you know, it's confusing and hard when they brought her back, and then they called this. Okay. Now, will you come back? And and so that piece, I think, um Was the challenging part of it for sure, And the other piece that was challenging was just going from complete obscurity to going on the number one show, and then you're at that age where gynecology just kind of wanna blend of a sudden that piece of it was it was hard, but they incredible part was the obvious, unbelievable gift of working with John Goodman and Laurie Metcalf and Roseanne and Sara Gilbert and Johnny Galecki and Sandra Bernhardt. And I mean it was It was crazy. It was like stepping into having not really worked out much to working with this top, unbelievably talented comedians and just watching them. Work and what They would do with a script from a Monday morning table read Till Thursday night Tape night. It was such a huge learning experience and so so interesting and obviously You know, open so many doors for me. I mean, I was Like my entire diamonds, girls. My nickname was second package would be like we got second back in the seventies. Really Good. Yeah. Yeah,

Morty Rick Sarah Chalke Dan Harmon Roseanne Beth Beth Sanchez British Columbia NBC Becky Rickon Gordy Sarah Justin Royal Mr Poopy Vancouver Glenn Quinn Harry Potter North America Minnie Bob United States
Unlocking Your Brain's Potential With Dr. Ryan D'Arcy

Good Life Project

05:56 min | 5 months ago

Unlocking Your Brain's Potential With Dr. Ryan D'Arcy

"We have this conversation. I'm hanging out in boulder colorado. You are in vancouver and You grew up in british columbia. It sounds like in a small town. Did which is known it. Tell me if. I have this right as the second largest stampede. In canada behind calgary is that right. We're gonna go that right. Yes yes. I've lived my entire life telling people that factoid and for non canadian listeners. The stampede is certainly it biggest rodeo on the planet candidate you've I grew up by Surrounded by cowboys and gold. Rush prospectors bright williams. Like the. it's the town. It's pretty small town though isn't it yet. Is sub between fifteen and twenty five thousand depending on over the course of years. So it's it's pretty small it's largely in the interior of b. c. so it's a lot of mountains nearby and a lot of outdoors and that sort of thing. The caribous right. That's right. yeah it's in the cariboo. Yeah so were you. Were you ever participant in the rhodesia side of things. Actually my father was the the head of the rodeo. When year. But i was really small. I was never a participant. We had sort of friends that had ranches in for a while. We had cattle and horses forces scared me in the sense that they they had their own minds. I wasn't entirely sure when i was on a dirt bike. I knew how to control that but horses had to actually be a lot smarter than i was to know how to get on with horses so my sister wrote a lot got. That's kind of really interesting foreshadowing in a weird way though right because you sort of like as a as a kid you see these animals and realize that they have their own mind than their own will. And you're not entirely sure how it works. How to relate to them or had a surly interact way where you develop a mutual understanding and then you look pretty far far forward actually like a couple of years down. The road and your life has been devoted to similar process but with human beings absolutely. Yeah it's it's really interesting too because you see come full circle and not for me personally. But now acquaint therapy you have these people that are really being able to understand. The phenomenon of the brain is the brain is the brain right. So it's it's fascinating to see it across not just humans but across all animals. Yeah a much. A curious is so you do all this work on Measuring what happens in the brain and detecting what happens in the brain then translating that. Because i i've also seen sort of this really fascinating emergence of therapy and known people who both Lead therapy and have been through it. You have been inclined slash patients and shared how they feel like a horse's or these deeply wise animals who are fiercely intuitive and consents. Everything about you so that there there is this sort of connection really unusual connection that tends to happen with human beings as a neuroscientist. Does that land trudy. Yes it does. It's actually where. I'm i'm right now. I'm really interested in tobacco up a bit when ibm i built watson and challenged Jeopardy champions i got called in the neuroscientist to compete Sort of debate with computer scientists about the brain and a and all that stuff. And i got fixated on this interesting thing. I stumbled across my research where somebody proposed that there could be more functional connections in the human brain than there were atoms in the observable universe and over the years. I've really found that interesting. Because i've i've tried to work the numbers and that sort of thing and what i realized it. You know if you reduce that down to a simple circuit of neurons it is possible that that circuit can have more connections than it actually has atoms that compose it and when i really realized it was kind of cool is when if you think we'll wait a minute that's the neurons are not just within our own. Skulls are neurons. Interact with each other all the time right so minor runs right now. Are changing your functional connections in yours are changing mind so so i thought wow. Isn't that cool. Because that's like a really heavy kinda insight into ways. We could tap brain potential brain power to do good things in life. And so yeah. I'm always thinking about those things. Yeah and it's and it's really interesting to right because the fundamental assumption there. Is that the things that go on in our brain can in a very real way affect what's happening in the brain of being whether human or animal in proximity to us in some way shape or form. Yeah yeah we just had one of our Cyber narrow factoid and one of the facts that was really interesting as when musicians are playing music their brainwaves synchronized and doing all these things now. I don't personally do it but through in the field. There's all these meta scanning where they can show the neuro relationship between mom and baby and different people far away as just fascinating. Yeah that's amazing because then if you can show that the brainwave sink. Then if that sentence than has almost like this trickle down effect on the physiology and the rest of the nervous system then maybe that also part of the basis for people who were new you have these phenomenon where it seems like physiological cycles. start to sink Yeah yeah. And i think it's interesting because the more that we become mindful of that the more we can actually use it for positive impacts right and i think in the world today you can maybe start to ask the question if some of that is there and has just out of control and so how could we actually harness that. I think that's just such interesting ways to think about how you know we never really think about our brains right. It's just what moves our body and our personality and all that but if you could actually think about it in different ways i've i've always loved creativity in that. Yeah

Bright Williams Cariboo Rhodesia Boulder British Columbia Cowboys Calgary Vancouver Colorado Canada Trudy Watson IBM
Court rules blocks Seattle's efforts to create supervised heroin injection sites

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

01:26 min | 5 months ago

Court rules blocks Seattle's efforts to create supervised heroin injection sites

"Injection site for heroin users in Seattle suffers a setback because of an appeals court ruling in Philly King County Public Health greenlighted supervised injection sites three years ago, but an effort to find a fixed location like the ones of British Columbia failed. An effort to create mobile sites. Stalled plan now is not Tonto. Build standalone facilities instead, go with the drug users already go for help, like the Aurora Commons and let injections happen there under the supervision of a nurse. But Wednesday, the third Circuit Court of Appeals denied a Philadelphia nonprofits push to open up a fixed site. Thereby Seattle's plans are up in the air again. This is another wrinkle that we're gonna have to deal with the Justice Department, agreeing with the court's ruling injection sites violate the Federal Controlled Substances Act. That prohibits any person from knowingly and intentionally maintaining a place for the purpose of illegal drug use. The acting attorney general, saying injection sites are not the solution. But the court didn't go that far, saying Congress needs to change the federal drug laws for the sights to be legal. Seattle's city attorney responding as city struggled to respond to overdoses wrought by the opioid epidemic. The ruling is a disappointing one. But soon we'll have a Democratic president and a Democratic Congress, which could breathe new life into legalizing these sites. It violates federal law that was U. S attorney for Western Washington and Trump nominee Brian Moran two years ago, telling me he would stop any site in Seattle from opening Almost Matt

Philly King County Aurora Commons Seattle British Columbia Circuit Court Of Appeals Justice Department Philadelphia Congress Western Washington Brian Moran Donald Trump Matt
Interview With Dan Westergren

PhotoBiz Xposed

05:07 min | 6 months ago

Interview With Dan Westergren

"I was recently exchanging emails with today's guest. A bad he's premium membership and it turns out he has a love of sauk cling lock. Do he used to rice and he even spent time in south australia from the us. I while on assignment for white for national geographic now is picked up and i poked a few more questions by any told me on the nat geo and commercial travel photographer stock at home trying to decide how to make money with that getting on an airplane right now putting my towards commercial real estate architectural things but honestly don't know what's going to work out a cape listening to the podcast about facebook marketing for portraits etc thinking. Maybe that's the way to go. We exchange and other email to and i post a few questions and he said for more than twenty years. I was director of photography for national geographic. Travel up magazine. I had an editor who let me find the graph. A couple of stories a year usually adventure top stories and i was lucky enough to photograph stories to the magazine. Such as climbing mont blanc the matterhorn and skiing to the north pole now following that exchange. I invited him on for this recording. I'm talking about dan west to grin and i'm wrapped to having this now. Dan welcome andrew so good to talk to you. Do you still pinch yourself when you hear an intra liked about the things that you've done in the past. I do i do. It's it's kind of funny. It's a hard act. Live up to for many many years. I would tell my photographer friends who seemed to have up and down lives. You know the freelance yoyo. And i would joke to them. Well you know. I'm addicted to my paycheck. And i have the chance to send you guys out into the field my editor lets me go out every now and then you know. This is working pretty well. Well you know the media marketplace changes and so now here. I am not working on the staff at national geographic anymore doing some projects for them but just trying to figure out how to make this thing happen as a photographer. Yeah the tables have really turned. I think not only for youtha for all of us. Haven't i this year. Oh yeah yeah. I mean and it's a double whammy with a travel photographer because i don't even of course you can imagine after all those years. I have this huge rolodex of all these photo editors of magazines and things like this but nobody even pays money for magazines to take pictures anymore. It's like the rug was pulled out from under my profession. The one savior for me. The last few years has been you could either call it native advertising or content marketing or partnership projects. That's the kind of things like last year. I got to go to canada. Three times for national geographic. To do ten day long stories about places and so i did prince edward island nova scotia new brunswick last year and british columbia and those were my favorite Trips to take. Because i will talk to my producer at national geographic since i had a background in doing the photo editing. At national geographic. The photo editors really acted like a regular editor at most magazines. If we thought that a story was not sufficiently visual we would tell people. We didn't think we should do the story. And a lot of magazines. The phone will editors are just kind of in their corner in somebody throws them a manuscript is air pictures to go with this so when they tell me okay we wanna to do an online piece about adventures in new brunswick ten adventures in new brunswick will then i get to study new brunswick i pull out a map i get defined tended ventures. I contact all the people that i think might lead me to those adventures and then make pictures that i hope people find interesting and then when we get back in my case usually i sit down and they know that i've chosen the photo subjects with story line and so they don't even send a writer. They have a friend of mine. Who i get on the phone marielle. And is her name. And she sorta ghosts rights for me. And i just tell her what my experience was like and why i went to particular plex. And that's just that's what i love about. It all is to do the research into a place and then actually go take those pictures myself in sounds amazing and said the way you described this right now the role you had. Oh have you familiar with the movie. The secret life of walter. Mitty of course. Yes you the walter. Meeting is at your role in national geographic traveler. It was a little bit different because he was more had a role that we would call film review which were the people that actually got to look at the pictures. I didn't have a big role in putting the magazine together. So you know that was kind of funny. It was interesting that i love that movie. You know he got to go out into the field. And i've just i've seen that movie so many times i was watching it and my kids. My son is twenty two. My daughter's twenty five and they're really into music and david bowie died. We had to listen to all the versions of space. Oddity that we could find.

Travel Up Magazine Dan West New Brunswick South Australia Skiing Andrew Facebook DAN Prince Edward Island Marielle Nova Scotia British Columbia United States Canada Mitty Walter David Bowie
The Latest: Canada records 1st cases of new virus variant

News, Traffic and Weather

00:51 sec | 6 months ago

The Latest: Canada records 1st cases of new virus variant

"Canada by the way, now confirming that new strain of covert 19 that was first identified in the UK has now been detected near Toronto. This new variant is believed to spread more easily and faster. Researchers do not think it is more deadly Thedc Anade Ian cases were confirmed it a couple who had known known travel history. They also did not have any known exposure. That couple is now isolated. One infectious disease expert in British Columbia, says he's not surprised this train was detected in Canada. We need to do much more testing. We need to understand where this couple became infected. Obviously, they were in contact with travelers, so someone else might have transmitted it to them. Those people may have been in touch with traveler's health experts say the new variant was circulating before it was actually recognized genetic analysis is being done to identify any previous or new cases in British Columbia. It may be associated with that

Anade Ian Canada Toronto Infectious Disease UK British Columbia