17 Burst results for "British Administration"

"british administration" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

07:59 min | Last month

"british administration" Discussed on On The Media

"And what it means to call a place home. It's by reporter Louisa Lim, who grew up in Hong Kong and has covered China for NPR and the BBC. The book is called indelible city, dispossession and defiance in Hong Kong. Lim's work feels particularly relevant now because this fall, students in Hong Kong will learn a new version of history. One that erases the fact that Hong Kong was ever a British colony. According to four history books now under development in China, Hong Kong has always been a part of China. Despite a 156 years of British dominion. China has promoted this narrative ever since 1997 when the British left the hundreds of islands and one Peninsula that make up the territory of Hong Kong. However, many Hong kongers can not forget their colonial history. One such Hong konger was the so called king of Kowloon. Lim describes him as a graffiti artist who went from being a quote toothless, often shirtless, disabled trash collector to a symbol of Hong Kong's defiance by the time he died in 2007. He believed that the Peninsula of Kowloon rightfully belonged to his family, and that the British had stolen it in the 1860s. In 1956 he took to the streets, painting calligraphy on the walls of Hong Kong and his shaky, stilted handwriting. He raged against the British Empire, scribbling down his entire family tree, and the names of places he believed his family had lost. And he'd write on the walls, electricity boxes, the lampposts, the flyovers, all these kind of bits of street furniture that you don't normally notice. And the government cleaners would clean away his work and he'd often come back the next day and right at the same place. In her book, Lim explains that the history of her city has always been shrouded in many contradictory myths. In defiance of these narratives, the king of Kowloon created his own personal history of the place, capturing the imagination of Louisa Lim and her fellow Hong kongers. His calligraphy became a real collective memory for Hong Kong as when the future was really uncertain. No one knew what going back to China would mean. But sort of day after day, there was the king of choline. And over time, he became an iconic figure, you know, there were songs sung about him rap songs and jazz ballads and poets wrote poems to him and he appeared in local films in adverts. He went on to represent Hong Kong in the Venice Biennale. Here's a clip from your podcast called the king of Kowloon. I was looking at him as a spectacle rather than prophet. He was completely mad completely bonkers. He was incoherent. He was 35. Decades after his death in 2007, the themes that he was writing about dispossession and sovereignty territory and loss. These are themes that are right at the very heart of Hong Kong's political crisis. And as you were investigating his life, you encountered a lot of conflicting and overlapping stories about Hong Kong and its history. And the king of Kowloon's story kind of challenges the history of Hong Kong that you were taught as a child attending school there under British sovereignty. And that version of history was dreamed up in 1841 by lord palmerston, Britain's former prime minister at the height of British imperial power and obviously it served the British interests. So what is this version of the story deliberately leave out? So the British version says that Hong Kong was a barren rock before the British arrival, a baron rock with an area house on it as lord palmerston famously wrote, it makes it sound like there was nothing there and that solely through British intervention, Hong Kong, became this international center of commerce, Britain was a civilizing force. That wasn't true. Hong Kong has an extremely long privilege history going all the way back to the middle of neolithic era. The British census is on arrival, said that Hong Kong had thousands of inhabitants, so it simply wasn't true, but that didn't mean that that's not the version that was so popular and I think still is in people's imaginations. In 1997, the British handover sovereignty of Hong Kong to China and there's this elaborate ceremony where the British flag was lowered, followed by a few seconds of silence, and then the Chinese flag was raised. Speaking for the British monarchy, which had ruled 800 million people only 50 years ago, the Prince of Wales. The eyes of the world are on Hong Kong today. I wish you all a successful transition. And a prosperous and peaceful future. And in those early years after the British evacuated the island, we see a new historical narrative emerging from Beijing, and that's one that explicitly rejects this barren rock idea. So the Chinese version of Hong Kong history claims that Hong Kong has been a part of Chinese soil since time immemorial. That Hong Kong's culture is the same as Chinese culture, basically this agrarian grain growing rice eating kind of culture, the interesting thing is that version of history is in flux, just over the last couple of weeks. It's emerged that China's rewritten Hong Kong's textbooks yet again. Now they're claiming that Hong Kong never was a British colony. They're saying that when the British took over Hong Kong, there were these series of treaties which the Chinese call unequal treaties. They say there were forced upon them by gunboat diplomacy on by violence and they never actually agreed to any of these treaties. So sovereignty was never ceded. You know, it's a crazy argument when you think of all those governors and the British administration of Hong Kong to claim that it was never a colony, but it also shows you the sort of mutability of history. And then, of course, there's this other story about Hong Kong that originates with Hong kongers themselves. It's deliberately mythical and involves a race of fish headed mermen called loting. You quote Roland Bart, the French philosopher saying the best weapon against myth is perhaps to myth by it in turn and produce an artificial myth. So the loading myth is the idea that Hong kongers are descended from this race of fish headed mermen. In Chinese texts, there are some references to the low Tang, this sort of race of fish men who live in caves, the kind of myth that emerges where these were the ancestors of a general in 5 12 AD who fought the empire and was defeated and withdrew with his army of a 100,000 men to caves in lantau where they ate so many fish that they became fish men. It was a myth that many people liked because it felt as real as any other version of Hong Kong's history or perhaps even more.

Hong Louisa Lim Kowloon China Lim British dominion Hong konger Peninsula of Kowloon lord palmerston international center of commer NPR Venice Biennale Peninsula BBC Britain Prince of Wales British administration Beijing Roland Bart Tang
"british administration" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

07:22 min | 3 months ago

"british administration" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Dot com. Tell me Eric, why is relief factors so successful at lowering or eliminating pain? I'm often asked that question, the owners of relief factor tell me they believe our bodies were designed to heal. That's right, designed to heal, and I agree with them. So the doctors who formulated relief factor for them selected the four best ingredients, yes, 100% drug free ingredients, each helps your body deal with inflammation. Each of before ingredients deals with inflammation from a different metabolic pathway. And that right there approaching from four different angles may be why so many people find such wonderful relief. So if you've got back pain, shoulder neck hip knee or foot pain from exercise or just getting older, you should order the three week quick start discounted to only 1995 to see if it will work for you. It works for me. It has for about 70% of the half a million people who've tried it and have ordered more, go to relief factor dot com or call 804 relief to find out about this offer, feel the difference. You live your life in the songs you hear on The Rock and run right here. Volkswagen back, I'm talking to John's mirac Jon it doesn't have people can read your stuff at stream dot org stream dot org. What else should we talk about? Well, Jason Jones and I co authored another piece at the stream called first China came for the Uyghurs and the Vatican said nothing. I don't know if people following China news. The most prominent Christian in China has just been arrested. Cardinal Joseph zen, 90 years old, he's the cardinal of Hong Kong. So he's from the part of China that was free until 1998 under British administration. And then was turned over to communist China. On the promise that it would retain its free political system. Of course, like all promises made by communists, that turned out to be a lie. And there have been crackdowns and arrests and China put into place a law that anyone in Hong Kong violated the Communist Party's authority could be shipped to Mainland China where the courts and the juries would be much stricter. Cardinal zen helped set up a charity fund that would help fund the defense of people against such extradition orders. China just arrested him and everyone else involved in the foundation. And they faced prison time years old. 90 years old. Are you listening, folks? Are you listening? We have companies in America making billions of dollars off of China. They arrested a 90 year old Christian hero. Do you care? Tell us the rest of the story, John. Well, the Vatican doesn't care. A few years back, the Vatican made an alliance with communist China against America. Let me repeat that. The Vatican under Pope Francis drew up an alliance with communist China against Donald Trump's America. It was a secret deal negotiated by someone named cardinal Theodore mccarrick. He's no longer a cardinal because it's come out that he was a pedophile, he had been molesting a child for years, so that's the guy. The crack negotiator of the Catholic Church in Washington, D.C.. Right. He was the archbishop of Washington. He was cozy with power, he smiled. He pretended to be the face of Catholic faith in the nation's capital. If you wonder why we have so called Catholic Christians like Joe Biden and Nancy Pelosi, you can look to mccarrick. So he was friends with them. I mean, of course. When you see the so called pro choice Catholics, they were all pals with mccarrick and with people like him. They're just sad to see. And they're just together doing the business of Caesar. So mccarrick goes to China. Again, remember Trump is president. And makes this secret deal. The terms of it are secret, which reminds me of the Hitler Stalin pact in 1939. You have two apparent enemies suddenly making a secret deal and an alliance against whom. In both cases, against the democratic west. In both cases against the U.S. and England and the free market and the constitution, it's forces of evil and in the case of Francis, it's less wing Marxist infected Catholicism that is friendly to the sexual revolution, friendly to abortion, friendly to gay marriage, friendly to the destruction of the family. In other words, the forces of evil, the forces of outright evil. So this deal between the Vatican and China. Was supposed to help protect the religious freedom of Catholics in China. It did not. In fact, it led to more of them being arrested. It led to Protestant churches that don't cooperate with the Chinese government, getting bulldozed. They're getting torn down. People going to prison. At the same time, China cracked down on the Uyghur Muslims. 3 million Uighurs and other Turkish ethnic minorities in what they call the province of Xinjiang. Uyghurs call east turkestan. 3 million of them are in concentration camps right now. Getting tortured, getting re-educated, being forced to have abortions and worst of all being cut open while they are still alive to steal their bodily organs and sell them on the international black market, which is Forbes magazine reported that. That's not weekly world news. That's not funny. If you give a penny to the NBA or if you're a fan of LeBron James, there are people making billions of dollars. Participating in the satanic evil that John just mentioned going on in China folks. If you don't care about this, you are dead inside. We need to wake up. And thank you for writing this article. And the new movie Top Gun. It falsifies American history. In the original Top Gun, they were a patch from the flying tigers from when the American airmen who helped fight for nationalist China against Japan in 1941. China said you can't have that because that represents another Chinese regime. So they took it off. Top Gun this so called patriotic movie is catering to kowtowing to communist China. So no, don't waste your money on the Top Gun. Go see something else. Stay home and pray, but don't go see Top Gun because it is part of this sniveling before the communist overlords in China. And what we need to we need to pray for Cardinals in and the other imprisoned religious believers Christian and non Christian in the totalitarian hellhole that is China and we need to hold the Biden administration responsible for whatever secret deal they have with the Chinese that.

China mccarrick Cardinal Joseph zen British administration Cardinal zen U.S. Pope Francis drew cardinal Theodore mccarrick Hong Kong Jason Jones Washington, D.C. John Hitler Stalin Volkswagen Eric Communist Party Jon Donald Trump
John Zmirak: 'First China Came for the Uyghurs'...

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:22 min | 3 months ago

John Zmirak: 'First China Came for the Uyghurs'...

"Volkswagen back, I'm talking to John's mirac Jon it doesn't have people can read your stuff at stream dot org stream dot org. What else should we talk about? Well, Jason Jones and I co authored another piece at the stream called first China came for the Uyghurs and the Vatican said nothing. I don't know if people following China news. The most prominent Christian in China has just been arrested. Cardinal Joseph zen, 90 years old, he's the cardinal of Hong Kong. So he's from the part of China that was free until 1998 under British administration. And then was turned over to communist China. On the promise that it would retain its free political system. Of course, like all promises made by communists, that turned out to be a lie. And there have been crackdowns and arrests and China put into place a law that anyone in Hong Kong violated the Communist Party's authority could be shipped to Mainland China where the courts and the juries would be much stricter. Cardinal zen helped set up a charity fund that would help fund the defense of people against such extradition orders. China just arrested him and everyone else involved in the foundation.

China Cardinal Joseph Zen Jason Jones British Administration Volkswagen JON Hong Kong John Cardinal Zen Communist Party Mainland
"british administration" Discussed on Real Dictators

Real Dictators

08:12 min | 8 months ago

"british administration" Discussed on Real Dictators

"If you remember, not long after the Uganda protectorate was established. Britain shipped in 32,000 workers from the old British Raj. They came largely from Gujarat and the Punjab. The latter since split between independent India and the new state of Pakistan. They arrived initially to help construct the Ugandan railway. The country's prime artery to the coast. After completing their contract, some returned, others chose to stay. Over 70 years, Uganda's South Asian population has increased in size to around 80,000. Still small in a country by now of 9 million, but deeply embedded into an African way of life. Broadcaster RuPaul rajani was a child during the early years of Idi Amin's rule. Her family were part of Uganda's Indian community. So we lived on a sugar plantation and my parents both worked on the sugar plantation along with my brother and my sisters who went to school there. So it was a purpose built place if you like where employees lived and worked throughout the 24 hours. It was a wonderful life because there was a temple. There was a cinema within the compounds of the sugar factory. There was also a hospital, which is where I was born. So all the facilities that anyone might need were actually all on site. It was hard they worked hard, but they enjoyed life in Uganda and particularly in cookie. The weather is something that they always always refer to when talking of Uganda and just how fertile land actually was. Memories from my sister of the mango tree that grew in the back garden in kagura and you would literally walk out and be able to pick a mango off the tree and enjoy it fresh that day. Those are the sorts of memories that my family have relayed to me over the years. RuPaul's older brother was a student by the term of Idi Amin's rule. When I was born in a small town in Uganda at that time, my father had established his own business, I remember all the shops and the customers very, very busy all the time there were. And he had a very little time for socializing as such because from morning till evening he was busy running the shop. In Uganda, especially in the cities the industrious Asians have come to form a de facto middle class. With a lock on many of the professions, they are the managers the accountants, the lawyers, the doctors, the technicians, the engineers. They have a hold in particular over retail services. With dominance given the importance of cotton ginning over the garment trade. Despite the Asian populations prominence in economic life, the fractious nature of Ugandan politics means that security can not be taken for granted. Especially since idi means Ascension to power. When it took over the country, kings became more military atmosphere round about the beginning of 1972 March April time, there were many, many people who were not treated humanly, things had changed their time from what it was under about under the British rule. Professor Marian mufti when Idi Amin comes to power after ousting Milton a bode, Idi Amin is accepted by the people, not just because he's one of them. He is accepted because he is promoting this ideology of well, I am going to give you back Uganda, right? I mean, that's the rhetoric that he's using. The British had encouraged Asians to migrate from South Asia to Uganda. First, to be a buffer between the Europeans and the Africans to be this one other ethnic group that could be a buffer between the Europeans and the Africans number one, but second to build the railroad. Third to provide the technical expertise that was lacking within the African population to build the commercial enterprise that the British needed to exploit the resources of Uganda. So the south Asians are the commercial class, the business minded, successful individuals, and Idi Amin uses this as his launching platform. I am going to get rid of these south Asians who have taken your country from your hands and I'm going to give it back to you. For the past ten years, Comcast has been helping students get ready. We've connected 5 million students from low income families to low cost high-speed Internet. We're working with both nonprofit partners and city leaders to create over 1000 Wi-Fi connected lip zones in community centers nationwide. And now we're committing $1 billion to reach 50 million people with a connectivity, skills, training, and the resources they need to succeed in a digital world. Learn more at Comcast dot com slash education. By 1972, Uganda's Asians who make up just 1% of the population control 90% of the state's businesses. In both racial and class terms, the structure of Ugandan society, however uncomfortable it is for people to articulate it, as broken down as follows. A white ruling class, a South Asian middle class, and, as a mean repeats, the exploited black man at the bottom of the heap. According to amine and his supporters, independence, has removed the ruling British administration. Although there are still whites in key positions. But africanization is not advanced at an acceptable pace. The Asians are to be targeted next. On August 4th, 1972, Amin appears at a barracks in totoro to give a speech. He makes an extraordinary announcement. Something he claims came to him in a dream. All ugandans of Asian origin are to leave the country. They have just 90 days to do so. They must sell up their homes, their shops, their businesses, and go. I mean, does not mince his words. He tells the press. Asians, their main interest has been to exploit the economy of Ugandan Africans. They have been milking the economy of the country. My economy, it has been milked by the non citizens of Uganda. I will not allow this new country. He employs a technicality as his justification. Around 50,000 of the Asians retain British passports. A legacy of colonial rule. If they are British amine says, then they are Britain's responsibility. The accusations of idiom made were that we weren't part of the communities. We weren't integrated enough. And that was one of the excuses if you like that were used to incite division and hatred towards the Asian communities. We weren't taking part in military life or involved in politics. We were mainly businesspeople who arrived from another country and taken over businesses. That was one of the allegations that was made against Asians who lived in Uganda that we were taking away businesses. We were taking away from the native communities there and we weren't giving them the opportunities to go into business to take up those roles and that was one of the things that EDR may use against us or a reason to get rid of us. If scapegoating a whole people identifying.

Uganda Idi Amin RuPaul rajani Marian mufti Gujarat RuPaul Punjab Britain Pakistan Comcast Ugandan society India British administration South Asia Milton amine totoro
"british administration" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"british administration" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Feel They're going to pull it execute us. Oh, I don't know if I'm going to see my Children again. Absolutely tragic audio from an American citizen trapped In Afghanistan. Afraid of what the next car means for her survival and survival of her Children. Will it be a suicide bomber? Will it be a group of Taliban who aren't insurgents anymore? Aren't terrorists. But are now the rulers of a nation that we have invested. This number. This number still Boggles my mind. The last 20 years. If you average it out, you dear listeners, the American people. Have spent $60 million per day. $60 million per day. In Afghanistan. And now The Taliban. That gave soccer aid and support and cover to bin Laden to execute September 11th is stronger than it was 20 years ago. When September 11th happened. I'm Sebastian Gorka. This is America, first on the Salem radio network broadcasting across the nation. Live streaming on rumble on Facebook and coming to you from my buddies, W, lt and radio in New Hampshire. What are the ramifications? It's not just the tens of thousands of Americans who are now trapped as hostages in Afghanistan. It's also the question of what this all means to the future Safety of America and America's friends and allies and partners, not just in Central Asia, not just in the Middle East, it is riven. By jihadi groups. But also What it means to a friend's Our partners who now believe they can't trust us. Those images. Of US leaving Afghanistan. Leaving our friends. Those who have risked everything for 20 years is defend for themselves. Um no. See it. On our eyes. Let me play for you An example of what this means to the closest of our allies. There's an individual called Rory Stewart. He is the former international development secretary. Of the UK, So he's the guy that helps other countries like Afghanistan. He was at the top of those programs for Downing Street for the British administration. And he uses the word betrayal. And you need to hear what he thinks. About America today. States.

Rory Stewart Sebastian Gorka bin Laden New Hampshire $60 million Central Asia Afghanistan 20 years Middle East Facebook tens of thousands September 11th 20 years ago America first today Taliban Salem British US
"british administration" Discussed on The Audio Long Read

The Audio Long Read

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"british administration" Discussed on The Audio Long Read

"Connection <Speech_Male> between these institutions <Speech_Male> and famine <Speech_Male> prevention <Speech_Male> is simple to understand <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> famines are <Speech_Male> easy to prevent <Speech_Male> since the distribution <Speech_Male> of a comparatively <Speech_Male> small amount of free <Speech_Male> food all <Speech_Male> the offering of some <Speech_Male> public employment <Speech_Male> at comparatively <Speech_Male> modest wages <Speech_Male> which gives the beneficiaries. <Speech_Male> The ability <Speech_Male> to buy food <Speech_Male> allows those <Speech_Male> threatened by famine <Speech_Male> the ability <Speech_Male> to escape extreme <Speech_Male> hunger <Speech_Male> so any government <Speech_Male> should be <Speech_Male> able to stop a threatening <Speech_Male> famine large <Speech_Male> or small <Speech_Male> and it is very <Speech_Male> much in the interest <Speech_Male> of a government in <Speech_Male> a functioning democracy <Speech_Male> facing <Speech_Male> a free press <Silence> to do so <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> a free <Speech_Male> press makes <Speech_Male> the facts of developing <Speech_Male> famine known <Speech_Male> to all <Speech_Male> and a democratic <Speech_Male> vote makes <Speech_Male> it hard to win elections <Speech_Male> during <Speech_Male> or after <Speech_Male> a famine <Speech_Male> hence giving a government <Speech_Male> the additional <Speech_Male> incentive to <Speech_Male> tackle the issue <Speech_Male> without delay <Speech_Male> india <Speech_Male> did not <Speech_Male> have this freedom <Speech_Male> from famine for as <Speech_Male> long as it's people <Speech_Male> were without their democratic <Speech_Male> rights <Speech_Male> even though <Speech_Male> it was being ruled <Speech_Male> by the former <Speech_Male> democracy in the <Speech_Male> world with a <Speech_Male> famously free press <Speech_Male> in the metropolis <Speech_Male> but not <Speech_Male> in the colonies <Speech_Male> these freedom <Speech_Male> oriented institutions <Speech_Male> were <Speech_Male> for the rulers <Speech_Male> but not for <Speech_Male> the imperial subjects <Speech_Male> in <Speech_Male> the powerful indictment <Speech_Male> of british rule in india <Speech_Male> that gore presented <Speech_Male> in nineteen forty <Speech_Male> one. He <Speech_Male> argued that india <Speech_Male> gained a <Speech_Male> great deal from its association <Speech_Male> with britain <Speech_Male> for example <Speech_Male> from <Speech_Male> discussions <Speech_Male> centered upon shakespeare's <Speech_Male> drama <Speech_Male> and byron's <Speech_Male> poetry and <Speech_Male> above all <Speech_Male> the large-hearted <Speech_Male> liberalism <Speech_Male> of nineteen th century <Speech_Male> english politics. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> The <Speech_Male> tragedy he said <Speech_Male> came from the <Speech_Male> fact that what was <Speech_Male> truly best in <Speech_Male> their own civilization. <Speech_Male> The upholding <Speech_Male> of dignity <Speech_Male> of human relationships <Speech_Male> has <Speech_Male> no place in the <Speech_Male> british administration <Speech_Male> of this country. <Speech_Male> Indeed <Speech_Male> the british <Speech_Male> could not have allowed <Speech_Male> indian subjects to <Speech_Male> avail themselves <Speech_Male> at these freedoms without <Speech_Male> threatening the <Speech_Male> empire itself <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> the distinction <Speech_Male> between the role <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of britain. And <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> that of british imperialism <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> could not have been <Speech_Male> clearer <Speech_Male> as the union. <Speech_Male> Jack was being lowered <Speech_Male> across india. <Speech_Male> It was a distinction <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> which <SpeakerChange> we were profoundly <Speech_Music_Male> aware <Music>

"british administration" Discussed on The Audio Long Read

The Audio Long Read

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"british administration" Discussed on The Audio Long Read

"Literacy rate <Speech_Male> in india was barely <Speech_Male> fifteen percent. <Speech_Male> The only <Speech_Male> regions in india <Speech_Male> with comparatively high <Speech_Male> literacy were <Speech_Male> the native kingdoms <Speech_Male> of traveling <Speech_Male> core and coaching <Speech_Male> formerly <Speech_Male> outside the british <Speech_Male> empire which <Speech_Male> since independence <Speech_Male> have <Speech_Male> constituted the bulk <Speech_Male> of the state of carola <Speech_Male> these <Speech_Male> kingdoms though <Speech_Male> dependent on <Speech_Male> the british administration <Speech_Male> for foreign policy <Speech_Male> and defence <Speech_Male> had remained. Technically <Speech_Male> outside <Speech_Male> the empire and <Speech_Male> had considerable <Speech_Male> freedom in domestic <Speech_Male> policy <Speech_Male> which they exercised <Speech_Male> in favor of <Speech_Male> more school education <Speech_Male> and public <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> health care. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> The two hundred <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> years of colonial <Speech_Male> rule will <Speech_Male> also a period <Speech_Male> of massive economic <Speech_Male> stagnation <Speech_Male> with hardly <Speech_Male> any advance at all <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> in real. Gnp <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> per capita. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> These grim <Speech_Male> facts were much <Speech_Male> aired after independence. <Speech_Male> In the newly <Speech_Male> liberated media <Speech_Male> who's rich <Speech_Male> culture was in <Speech_Male> part it must be <Speech_Male> acknowledged an <Speech_Male> inheritance from <Speech_Male> british civil society <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> even though the indian <Speech_Male> media <Speech_Male> was very often muzzle <Speech_Male> during the raj <Speech_Male> mostly to prohibit <Speech_Male> criticism <Speech_Male> of imperial rule <Speech_Male> for <Speech_Male> example at the time <Speech_Male> of the bengal famine <Speech_Male> of nineteen forty <Speech_Male> three. <Speech_Male> The tradition of the <Speech_Male> free press <Speech_Male> carefully cultivated <Speech_Male> in britain <Speech_Male> provided a good <Speech_Male> model for india <Speech_Male> to follow as <Speech_Male> the country achieved <Speech_Male> independence. <Speech_Male> Indeed <Speech_Male> india received <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> many constructive <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> things. From britain <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> that did not <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> could not come <Speech_Male> into their own <Speech_Male> until after <Speech_Male> independence <Speech_Male> literature <Speech_Male> in the indian languages <Speech_Male> took some <Speech_Male> inspiration <Speech_Male> and borrow genres <Speech_Male> from english literature. <Speech_Male> Including <Speech_Male> the flourishing <Speech_Male> tradition of writing <Silence> in english <Speech_Male> under <Speech_Male> the raj there <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> were restrictions on <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> what could be published <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and propagated. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Even <Speech_Male> some of tagore's <Speech_Male> books were banned <Speech_Male> these days. <Speech_Male> The government <Speech_Male> of india has no <Speech_Male> such need <Speech_Male> but alas for <Speech_Male> altogether different <Speech_Male> reasons of domestic politics <Speech_Male> their <Speech_Male> restrictions. Ah <Speech_Male> sometimes no less <Speech_Male> intrusive than <Speech_Male> during the colonial <Speech_Male> rule. <Speech_Male> Nothing is perhaps <Speech_Male> as important <Speech_Male> in this respect <Speech_Male> as the functioning <Speech_Male> of a multiparty <Speech_Male> democracy and <Speech_Male> a free press <Speech_Male> but often enough. <Speech_Male> These were not <Speech_Male> gifts that could <Speech_Male> be exercised under <Speech_Male> the british administration <Speech_Male> during <Speech_Male> the imperial days. <Speech_Male> They <Speech_Male> became realizable. <Speech_Male> Only when <Speech_Male> the british left <Speech_Male> they were the fruits <Speech_Male> of learning <Speech_Male> from britain's own experience <Speech_Male> which india <Speech_Male> could use freely <Speech_Male> only <Speech_Male> after the period of <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> empire had ended. <Speech_Male> Imperial <Speech_Male> rule <Speech_Male> tends to require <Speech_Male> some degree of <Speech_Male> tyranny. Asymmetrical <Speech_Male> power <Speech_Male> is not usually <Speech_Male> associated <Speech_Male> with the free press <Speech_Male> or with vote-counting <Speech_Male> democracy <Speech_Male> since neither <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of them is compatible <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> with the need <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to keep colonial <Silence> <Advertisement> subjects in check <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> a similar skepticism <Speech_Male> is appropriate <Speech_Male> about the british <Speech_Male> claim that they <Speech_Male> eliminated famine <Speech_Male> in dependent <Speech_Male> territories <Speech_Male> such as india. <Speech_Male> British <Speech_Male> governance of india <Speech_Male> began with a famine <Speech_Male> of seventeen sixty <Speech_Male> nine to seventeen <Speech_Male> seventy <Speech_Male> and they were regular famines <Speech_Male> in india throughout <Speech_Male> the duration of british <Speech_Male> rule. <Speech_Male> The raj <Speech_Male> also ended <Speech_Male> with the terrible <Speech_Male> famine of nineteen <Speech_Male> forty-three <Speech_Male> in contrast <Speech_Male> there has <Speech_Male> been no famine in <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> india since <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> independence in <Silence> nineteen forty seven. <Speech_Male> The <Speech_Male> irony again <Speech_Male> is that the institutions <Speech_Male> that ended <Speech_Male> famines in <Speech_Male> independent india. <Speech_Male> Democracy <Speech_Male> and independent <Speech_Male> media came <Silence> directly from <Speech_Male> britain. <Speech_Male> The

india british administration britain famines
"british administration" Discussed on FT Politics

FT Politics

07:51 min | 1 year ago

"british administration" Discussed on FT Politics

"Actually been realistic about the tradeoffs involved with brexit and we're still seeing the repercussions of the situation northern island particular with the protocol that's causing massive trade disruption and disruption on the province. As well you know. Do you think we have a point at which there was clarity on what brexit really means or will it always be interests of uk politicians just a fudge a little. I think almost certainly not. You're absolutely right on. Trade offs theresa may just refuse to accept the any existed. David frost hinted at them in his speech. In brussels in february twenty twenty but only hinted at them and i think from now on particularly given the coincidence of the economic impacts of the pandemic. It's not in the interest of the government to start saying okay. This is what brexit really meant. I also think you're absolutely right on the british state and there's a couple of interesting things were saying on the. I spoke to friends in member states and in the eu the start of the brexit process. And they were genuinely scared. That this rolls royce british administration must have had a plan and it was going to be a brilliant plan and it would blow inside them and they were sitting there in trepidation. Waiting for the british was skillful negotiators in brussels to absolutely mix them with the sophistication negotiating strategy and of course what we actually got even within hours of the outcome that very morning. What did we have. We had a prime minister. Who resigned and ram having forbidden his civil service to do any preparatory work. So that was a great leader of the opposition wandering over to college. Green and saying quite nonchalantly. Let's trigger article fifty this morning so you had just just a colossal failure of political leadership within hours of the announcement of the results. The born the other clear. Big impact is how both political parties being reshaped. Over the past five years the the conservatives that it was led by romania is really and now it's holy the begs party that the majority of conservative. mp's breaks. Does the cabinet have dominated by exists. It's the thing that toy party does every it just entirely reinventing itself when circumstances require it to it was obviously painful with twenty one. Mp's getting kicked out the party but it seems to found itself in a slightly more stable place than labor if you judge by the one thousand nine hundred ninety election result yes. I think that's right. I think in in reality. The conservative party is always had long. Been a eurosceptic. Party led by some pragmatic or realist leaders. Who sold the downsize and it had that division the way through it and what you now have is a policy that is clear in his position. Basically and which represents the views of its members and piece so that was made life simple for them. The other thing the president did was it allowed the conservative vehicle. And we've seen this another countries to and essentially the party. That was seen as the party of the better off. It allowed them a a means to build a coalition with people who weren't well off with people who went disadvantaged for people who are working class people who are in manufacturing jobs and outside of the outside of london and the southeast it gave them a nationalist dimension which allowed them to build a new electoral coalition which is what we now see and it's a very powerful coalition and when you add that also to their rejection of austerity. You have a a high-spending big state nationalistic policy. And that is basically the political central. Gravity is at the moon. And i think now if you look even in the next five years time when all the dust the sat order we can genuinely start to look at brexit through the historical lens. The recent arguments made labour will be far. More damage defied the brexit closest because of the weight split voting coalition. And what i think is the most remarkable thing about twenty nine is the fact. That theresa may twenty seventeen and boy. Johnston two thousand nine thousand nine hundred kept onto a lot of conservative remain whereas labor of see lost a huge amount of labor writers. That's absolutely true. It's also worth pointing out. The during the course of twenty nine hundred labour also lost a load of labor remains so there were squeezed from both sides. I think it's absolutely the case. That labor is far more vulnerable to values politics than the conservatives. The flip side is i think the current conservative coalition is far more vulnerable to the traditional politics of left versus right then labor is so actually one of the key questions about our politics is what the battleground is going to be if the battleground is. Football is taking the knee. Brexit immigration statues. The tourists will remain cohesive levels of debt levels of taxation levels of state intervention that actually. That's far far more uncomfortable for this particular. Tory coalition conscious. One more thing which. I just thought of it when robert was talking about sort of tory euroscepticism. Over the years there is delicious irony about tory euroscepticism. In the sense that it starts off postmaastricht with a bunch of people raging against the levels of regulation imposed on the british state by brussels and opposition to the european union was all about the need to get out so he could free ourselves. These regulations when push came to shove the conservative prime minister who actually negotiated. Our exit almost walked away from the talks because the european union was threatening to impose state aid controls. That meant he couldn't be as interventionist in the economy as he wants to be. He wanted to make more like germany. By the and so the nature of tory euroscepticism has done one hundred and eighty degree turn. This is now is. Robert said a conservative party on economic policy is vastly different to the policies that those early eurosceptics to see the question. I think that will still be discussing. People really want to know the answer to is. How long are we going to be shaped by that. Remain leave divide. It's obviously faded a bit over the past two years since the two thousand and nineteen. It feels to me if it's still going to be a defining thing for many many years to come do think for the rest of your lifetime or my lifetime. It will persist. People are shaped in their politics by big defining issue and that affects them in lots of other ways to so maybe the remain leave issue itself will will will fade. But the point is people's politics have been shaped by who was on their side. In that right. I remember when i was one of the big issues was the cold war and nuclear weapons and depending on whether you're a unilateral multilateralist whether you looked at america's the of russia's enemy that pretty much define the rest of your politics too and i think that is one of the things that's going to happen here is we don't know how brexit in the end will play out but assuming unusual. Ramon what will happen here is that people will be shaped by identifying with those. They thought were on their side and we saw one of the reasons. Why or as johnson's rating state a strong as they were even through the worst of the pandemic. It's the people who were on. His side. stayed on his side. What i think we'll see is the people who were on. The remain side will continue to attract that support and so the ramifications will go beyond the actual issue brexit to political identity. Because you will pick assault you'll have to solid and you will probably stick with people who were on your side that i think is is longer long-term one absolutely. I'd say a couple of things. I think all those organizations that did long-term modeling. None of them have revisited. Their assumptions those assumptions. That we're talking about a four. To five percent hits over. The medium term are still focused about economic impact. But not only do you have the economic impact of covid the highs those effects you also have the fact that this is far more slow puncture than a cliff edge so the effects are going to be serious. They're going to be pretty significant but they're gonna hit us gradually over time and in that sense at least they might not be as politically salient as some people. They might be over dan. Thank you very much for joining us. And that's it for this week's episode of pains politics. If you like the podcast and we please ask you to subscribe. You can find us or channel as apple spotify. Google and you're smart speaker to see episodes as soon as that released nichols leave us a nice positive rating..

Robert robert David frost london february twenty twenty european union five percent Google Ramon johnson both sides cold war one thousand twenty one one Brexit mp this week twenty seventeen twenty nine hundred labour
"british administration" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

11:56 min | 2 years ago

"british administration" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Ronan Chicago's most trusted me urologist Mister Tom skilling for TV news at ten what Chicago's very own WGN the little Taylor like tomorrow morning here all this talk about wildfires in Australia and assassinations Iraq during its on the phone right now is our old friend formerly the B. B. C. now of ABC news really make fairly good morning Julie how are you Hey Matt how are you I'm good it's good to talk to you it's been too long you were big star now on Good Morning America we yes now and that's a good to talk to you thanks so much for joining us I know you've been waiting quite a bit about what happened and I in Iraq with the the Iranian general and what's the reaction what are you hearing overseas because I haven't heard much of that yet and how our allies in and everybody else around the world is reacting to more tensions in the Middle East right well last night secretary of state Mike Pompeii always seem to convey some disappointment with the European allies and he singled out the bricks the Germans the French for not caring enough support and solidarity with the US action against general Qassem Soleimani he did say that he had received support from allies I think he is possibly referring to the Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu issued a strong support for the US action and said that it was a a post about him that would make the region safe interesting however that last night contact of mine a lot of people you are based in Beirut Lebanon said that they observed Israeli jets carrying out reconnaissance missions over Lebanon if the Lebanese airspace last night so but the Israelis despite what Netanyahu says that clearly on high alert for possible play back from the Iranians after this news I imagine for our allies it's wild maybe this does make the world a better place maybe this is a guy that you know we're glad he's gone how it was done and when it was done is going to cause consternation and it's hard to imagine for the allies to come and go yeah that's good because they don't want me drawn into a big mess that we might be getting ourselves into a would be my guess yeah I mean it this story is really interesting because it costs a lot of four lines this is that the way it's playing out really depends it seems all on your own pasta nature I mean Qassem Soleimani is undoubtedly one of the the what the bad guys there are out there on the Middle East he is responsible for the deaths of hundreds of American servicemen following the invasion of Iraq he is also responsible for the deaths of many Iraqi civilians Syrian civilians this money he's headed to the campaign to save president Bashar al Assad in Syria he's channeled arms to Hezbollah in Lebanon he has aged sixty rebels in Yemen that has sustained dot conflict he's also you ugh then cultivating militias in Pakistan and Afghanistan on smuggling lots of days people to fight in the war in Syria there is no doubt about it he is not a good person and it is better that he is not around many would say however that the issue is that he is such symbolic importance to the Iranians that many previous administrations governments have shied away from taking direct action against him because of fear of how the run ins might respond because and someone of of former Iraqi ambassador to Iraq I she said to robin Wright of The New Yorker he said that the killing of silly money is kind of equipment to Iran killing the commander of the center column say that I think is is there some kind of context of of how heavy this either the impact of this will be felt in a rotten has an interesting story out here and in Britain in the telegraph newspaper which claims that a previous British administration very nearly did the British SAS they're sort of equipment to you US navy seals to assassinate general so that money back in two thousand and seven but the Foreign Secretary at the time David Miliband kibosh that plan because he deems that the cost of that action was far greater the positive net outcome I'll talk to him well we've read that the same thing here in the US we've read that George W. bush and president Obama both were faced with this decision at one point and for the same reasons decided not to take action because of the fear of what would happen next does that draw you further into a quagmire of something maybe you don't want to get into we we do so much **** for tat with Iran when it comes to these things so this seems to be a major step forward talking about that earlier tonight that you know if this happened to a US official what we would do back to a country would be you know a huge show of force so I will say though is that there's a lot of people I'm on the president decide to been pointing out that while comes into the money is is for sure and I run an official and many have speculated whether he may eventually run him he may have run for politics in the future because he had developed such a cult following the could force is designated as a terrorist organization by the United States on the one hand yes he was now on in a fit around an official on the other hand the United States also classified him as the leader of a terrorist organization yes one thing that that's interesting I think it is when we look at when you know you mention responds and and and took the pot one thing that I think if we look in the context of this build up of this crisis so far Americans have been white dialed in their response say five often the striking against this the two Saudi oil fields lost yeah and the business in the Gulf commandeering ships on disrupting oil place under the very measured response to that the US carried out some cyber attacks but there was no military action at a time when everyone was speculating that tensions are going to be about so high that we were again thinking all we on the brink of military conflict with a rotten what's happened since then is this December twenty seven rocket attack in northern Iraq that killed in a U. S. civilian contractors of the U. S. strikes in response from that killed dozens of militia members it was then the assault on the U. S. embassy in Baghdad now president trump will definitely not be under any circumstances wanting to invite another Benghazi situation within its assault on the US embassy and also don't forget that beds coming day on general Soleimani they have space AP lead being thrown thing the president recently there is a tweet by how many the supreme leader toward ending present company days ago saying you call do anything only money himself he put me on social media it criticized president trump said that you'll know was responding to now with with president trump you if you will of weight and the intelligence that he received from the US intelligence community the state department has said that there was some information about a possible upcoming attack but you know so the money he has beaten conducting operations against American interests we yes that is his job that's what that is what he does I'd use a previous administrations will have had to wait the decision of the weather they they would have to do something about it what it up to take him out and what the possible ramifications what in this instance it seems that the American administration made that decision decided that now was time what what was else was going on Julie I know there was a lot of back and forth on whether there were other airstrikes last night on Friday did did that happen did it not or was it kind of misrepresented or or was the information just scattered at first I'm glad you asked about that because this is something we're following yesterday initial reports from a rocky popular mobilization forces now there's also this Shia militias which are backed by a rotten and they do you a part of the Iraqi army but they some of them have been sanctioned by the U. S. and some of them have been implicated in in in war and war crimes of targeted civilians on a recent is particularly in the in the fight against ISIS militants there were reports of sheer malicious coming out indiscriminate attacks on civilians so they how it has to be said that they are they are separate force from the formal organized Iraqi army that is allied with the United States now last night we got reports from these PMS forces that that had been as strikes north of Baghdad the Associated Press reported that though as strikes that killed five people and that they were pulled from a rocket that was identification underway to see who was targeted because there were dream is that a high level the the old one of these the mobilization forces had been killed this morning the office of the prime minister has denied that any strikes had taken taught the US coalition against ISIS B. L. I. operation inherent resolve specs when he said that there were no coalition as strikes last night in a rock there is a lot of confusion as to what is happening at the moment but it's not something we're actually still trying to work out because the militias they claim to have had lost two convoys last night but the Americans say wasn't them and now the Iraqi prime minister that says that they would never strike that took place but I mean in the in this kind of situation there is often there's a lot of really meant a lot of his say and it gets you know it gets very very difficult to ascertain what is happening at the moment but ABC's in panel is as I speak on his way to you a rock he is headed to know that and rock I had to report for ABC to keep forgetting yeah I imagine a lot of news organizations are scrambling to get people in places the science import yet put in to have people on the ground because it is very very difficult to to to get across a lot of the smoke and mirrors when you're dealing with you know a stories and and in the region yeah Julie macfarlane from ABC news follow her on Twitter she's a great follow at Julia McFarlane thank you so much for jumping on the phone I hope we can talk again soon thank you nice to see to take her to our friend Julia over in London reporting for ABC news lots to do here three one two nine eight one seventy two hundred about with you seven twenty WG.

Ronan Chicago Chicago Taylor Australia Iraq Mister Tom skilling WGN
"british administration" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

05:05 min | 3 years ago

"british administration" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"He writes the following quote I was twenty six newly married in more than a little idealistic when I set off off my first diplomatic assignment almost a decade ago as a member of the one hundred fifty seven the class of commission US foreign service officers according to a certain type of right leaning conspiracy theorists that would make me part of the deep state college the complacent state instead almost three years since his election what I've not seen is an organized resistance from within to the contrary to senior foreign service officers admonished me for risking my career when I sign an internal dissent cable against the ban on travelers from several majority Muslim countries back in January of twenty seventeen I'm ashamed of how long it took me to make this decision I can no longer justify to him or to myself my complicity in the actions of this administration that is why I choose to resign again next from Chuck park his resignation letters been published at washingtonpost dot com will Britain's foreign minister is pressing the European Union to amend the terms of great Britain's easy withdrawal agreement saying Brussels would have to take responsibility for a no deal brexit if it is not prepared to compromise in an interview with Reuters during a visit to Mexico City the Foreign Secretary Dominic rad saying the British government wanted to leave the European Union with the deal but would do so without one if you negotiators did not change their stance and the European Union has said that the withdrawal agreement negotiated by the previous British administration to resend they will not be reopened but the new government and the British prime minister Boris Johnson once the so called Irish backstop to be scrapped his way background the backstop is a provision put forward by Brussels at the European Union aimed at keeping the border between the Republic of Ireland and the British ruled Northern Ireland open and would oblige Britain obey some E. U. rules if no alternative agreement can be reached Elizabeth trust who is the British secretary safe for international trade speaking here in the U. S. about our relationship with the U. K. brexit another economic opportunities part of what she said at the heritage foundation here in Washington when the biggest opportunities brexit is the opportunity to strike a free trade deal with the United States and I was pleased to meet ambassador like ties a two days ago to discuss about opportunity and get things moving this is following the very positive fan cool between prime minister Boris Johnson a president trump I think they say this is the real economic had went behind our economic partnership but it was something the heritage foundation has done a lot of work on laying out those opportunities but I want to restate the case why all two countries should be working my small closely together we'll tell you of the freest most democratic opened nations in the world I was success is being driven by the talent and growth of all people not by bureaucrats or policy officials and ultimately is the power of free enterprise like giving people the ability to put that I you know I did some resources for it I love taking the gains of that enterprise there is power to our nation's forwards is the idea that people should have the freedom to create value goods and services to sell them thanks at home and abroad and to reap the benefits of that right and hard work what I see a free trade deal between our two nations doing is accelerating days opportunities I think the together we all the ideas factory of the world where people can dream big and they can realize that right now I'm visions we were taken power networked data driven path of nations if you think about it together we created and developed the internet this is the one of the most powerful inventions of a lifetime giving more people power taking power away from centralized authorities in allowing people to express themselves and drive that writing values for tonight is for what and it's not surprising if you look AT billion dollar tech companies the US and the UK are respectively fast inside in the world about the U. K. attracts more tech investment in France and Germany put together we go a thriving scene old growth in soft tops a five percent increase in business registrations over the past year and a huge amount of new investment being a tract today into our economy and that's from the British secretary of state for international trade Elizabeth trusts here in Washington speaking at the heritage foundation and finally on this day in history it has been forty five years since president Richard Nixon announced his resignation he did so in an oval office address on August the eighth nineteen seventy four America needs a.

forty five years billion dollar five percent three years two days
"british administration" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

04:11 min | 3 years ago

"british administration" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Britain's foreign minister is pressing the European Union to amend the terms of great Britain's easy withdrawal agreement saying Brussels would have to take responsibility for a no deal brexit if it is not prepared to compromise in an interview with Reuters during a visit to Mexico City the Foreign Secretary Dominic rad saying the British government wanted to leave the European Union with the deal but we do so without one if you negotiators did not change their stance and the European Union has said that the withdrawal agreement negotiated by the previous British administration to resend they will not be reopened but the new government and the British prime minister Boris Johnson once the so called Irish backstop to be scrapped his way background the backstop is a provision put forward by Brussels at the European Union a bit keeping the border between the Republic of Ireland and the British ruled Northern Ireland open and what a Blige Britain obey some easy rules if no alternative agreement can be reached Elizabeth trust who is the British secretary safe for international trade speaking here in the U. S. about our relationship with the U. K. brexit another economic opportunities part of what she said at the heritage foundation here in Washington no because when the biggest opportunities brexit is the opportunity to strike a free trade deal with United States and I was pleased to meet Abbas to the light ties a few days ago to discuss about opportunity and get things moving this is following the very positive triangle between prime minister Boris Johnson a president trump I think the show uses a real economic headwinds behind our economic partnership but it was something the heritage foundation has done a lot of work on laying out these opportunities but I want to restate the case why all two countries should be working my smoke Lacy together we'll tell you of the freest most democratic open nations in the world I was success is being driven by the talents and growth of all people not by bureaucrats or policy officials and ultimately is the power of free enterprise by giving people the ability to put that I you know I did some resources for it I lived in the gangs of that enterprise there is power to our nation's forwards is the idea that people should have the freedom to create value goods and services to sell them thanks at home and abroad and to reap the benefits of that right and hard work I see a free trade deal between our two nations doing is accelerating days opportunities I think that together we all the ideas factory of the world where people can dream big and they can realize that right now I'm visions we were taken power networked data driven Pat as nations if you think about it together we created and developed the internet this is the one of the most powerful inventions of a lifetime giving more people power taking power away from centralized authorities in allowing people to express themselves and drive that writing values voice and ideas for what and it's not surprising that if you look AT billion dollar tech companies the US and the UK are respectively fast unplugged in the world of thought the U. K. attracts more tech investment in France and Germany put together we go a thriving scene old grace install tops a five percent increase in business registrations over the past year and a huge amount of new investment being attract did into our economy and that's from the British secretary of state for international trade Elizabeth trusts here in Washington speaking at the heritage foundation and finally on this day in history it has been forty five years since president Richard Nixon announced his resignation he did so in an oval office address on August the eighth nineteen seventy four America needs a full time president and.

Britain forty five years billion dollar five percent
"british administration" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

11:07 min | 3 years ago

"british administration" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"And what's not we think it's reasonable to provide mandatory instinct criminal background checks for every sale at every gun show no loopholes anywhere for anyone there is another part of the NRA story and executive director Wayne lapierre front page today in The Washington Post this is the headline of the NRA chief wanted the group to buy him a Texas mansion Beth Reinhard is been looking into that story investigative reporter for The Washington Post what have you learned so we learned that last year there were discussions between the NRA and their long time ad agency Ackerman the queen about finding what at the time was about a six million dollar mansion in a gated community in the Dallas area apparently because we live here the chief executive of the NRA had security concerns on this was after the parkland shooting and February that killed at least seventeen people and apparently he was getting death threats and so there was a conversation about a place where he could be that yeah wasn't and the Washington area were you know people expect to see how and yeah where he couldn't be bothered and so my question is is there any sense of irony that that he wants to be safe with both he and his family and yet we saw what happened last year in parkland Florida and over the weekend in el Paso Texas in Dayton Ohio certainly gun right have a cat I would say so I saw some Turkey treats yesterday that said you know we lapierre as has but known for saying the only thing that stops at a back out with a guy this good guy with a gun and if people are tweeting the only thing that stops that guy with the gun is a good guy with a six million dollar mansion and again I should say this is this effort to buy this property was aborted it it didn't happen but the fact that these conversations did occur at a time when the NRA has been running a shortfall and now is is you know under investigation by both the New York Attorney General on the down low district attorney general looking at you know whether they have been spending properly as a tax exempt organization yeah this is this is not the kind of revelation that are a likes to see well that was my next follow up because the NRA is a nonprofit organization based in northern Virginia is there any precedent for an organization like this paying an estimated six million dollars for a mansion for its executive director CEO or president not that I'm aware of I mean a nonprofit is supposed to be able to justify spending like dance on behalf of an official and a board member chief executive or a member of the family as you know something that that is needed in order to advance the interests of the non profit obviously this would be a tough argument to make that that's what lawyers we talked to said in this case and as you also mentioned there are a lot of questions in terms of the bookkeeping and the compensation that and our executives including Wayne lapierre have been receiving in recent years rate went up here earned about one point four million dollars in two thousand seventeen after last year we have the tax filings so he's obviously you know in that an upper income bracket and right there was there was there is some additional compensation on top of that about sixty eight thousand dollars I believe so there is some descent from the rank and file of the NRA about spending we lost three board members resigned last week they had previously demanded an external audit and they said they were you know just ignored it repast so there is a rising amount of talk on social media for a fuming about the NRA on the other hand we tried to reach all seventy six board members of the NRA yesterday ended up of course leaving a lot of messages but the world so that we could reach about half a dozen were mostly you know very defensive in favor of Wayne lapierre he sent a good job defending the discussions about this house there's only one board member Allen west who is sort of in a liar he was the first four member to call for Wayne lapierre sizing nation he said you know something like this this the optic think it'll look good to our members says I think that's kind of an understatement based on the response is seen to the story and finally any official response from either Wayne lapierre himself or from the NRA sure the NRA has a process as part of this really bitter dispute between the organization and this longtime ad agency Ackerman the queen there's now litigation between those two entities and that the NRA and sad this house was an investment opportunity that Ackerman the queen was pitching this was not our idea and that Wayne lapierre put the kibosh on it and learned about it the stories front page in Thursday's a Washington post and also available tonight online at a Washington post dot com the reporting of Beth Reinhard thank you for being with us thanks and if you're on that website you can also find a resignation letter by a career foreign service officer with this headline I can no longer justify being part of trump's complacent state check park has published his resignation letter at washingtonpost dot com he writes the following quote I was twenty six newly married in more than a little idealistic when I set off off my first diplomatic assignment almost a decade ago as a member of the one hundred fifty seven the class of commission US foreign service officers according to a certain type of right leaning conspiracy theories that would make me part of the deep state college the complacent state instead almost three years since his election what I've not seen is an organized resistance from within to the contrary to senior foreign service officers admonished me for risking my career when I signed in internal dissent cable against the ban on travelers from several majority Muslim countries back in January of twenty seventeen I'm ashamed of how long it took me to make this decision I can no longer justify to him or to myself my complicity in the actions of this administration that is why I choose to resign again next from Chuck park his resignation letter has been published at washingtonpost dot com will Britain's foreign minister is pressing the European Union to amend the terms of great Britain's easy withdrawal agreement saying Brussels would have to take responsibility for a no deal brexit if it is not prepared to compromise in an interview with Reuters during a visit to Mexico City the Foreign Secretary Dominic rad saying the British government wanted to leave the European Union with the deal but would do so without one if you negotiators did not change their stance and the European Union has said that the withdrawal agreement negotiated by the previous British administration to resend they will not be reopened but the new government and the British prime minister Boris Johnson once the so called Irish backstop to be scrapped his way background the backstop is a provision put forward by Brussels at the European Union in big keeping the border between the Republic of Ireland and the British ruled Northern Ireland open and with a blind you written to obey some easy rules if no alternative agreement can be reached Elizabeth trust who is the British secretary of state for international trade speaking here in the U. S. about our relationship with the U. K. brexit another economic opportunities part of what she said at the heritage foundation here in Washington no because when the biggest opportunities for brexit is the opportunity to strike a free trade deal with the United States and I was pleased to meet ambassador like ties a two days ago to discuss about opportunity and get things moving this is following the very positive fan cool between prime minister Boris Johnson a president trump I think this raises a real economic had went behind our economic partnership but it was something the heritage foundation has a lot of work on laying out those opportunities but I want to restate the case of why all two countries should be working my small closely together we'll tell you of the freest makes democratic I couldn't nations in the world I was success is being driven by the talents and growth of all people not by bureaucrats or policy officials and ultimately is the power of free enterprise by giving people the ability to put that I you know I did some resources for it and it's taking the gangs about enterprise there is power to our nation's forwards is the idea that people should have the freedom to create value goods and services to sell them thanks at home and abroad and to reap the benefits of the rare and hard work what I see a free trade deal between our two nations do it is exhilarating days opportunities I think the together we all the ideas factory of the world what people can dream big and I can realize that right now I'm visions we were taken power to networked data driven path of nations if you think about it together we created and developed the internet this is the one of the most powerful inventions of a lifetime giving more people power taking power away from centralized authorities in allowing people to express themselves and drive that writing values boys and ideas for what and it's not surprising that if you look AT billion dollar tech companies the US and the UK are respectively fast unplugged in the world is not the U. K. attracts more tech investment in France and Germany put together we go a thriving scene old growth in soft tops a five percent increase in business registrations over the past year and a huge amount of new investment being attract it into our economy and that's from the British secretary of state for international trade Elizabeth trusts here in Washington speaking at the heritage foundation and finally on this day in history it has been forty five years since president Richard Nixon announced his resignation he did so in an oval office address on August the eighth nineteen seventy four America needs a full time president and a full.

six million dollar sixty eight thousand dollars four million dollars six million dollars forty five years billion dollar five percent three years two days
"british administration" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

04:16 min | 3 years ago

"british administration" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"After noon radio program on the Salem network. Also, the author of America first, and former participant in the Trump campaign and the Trump administration and we go from the alliance of nineteen forty four very strong. Very, very strong so powerful that it overwhelmed, the German, army between June sixth, nineteen forty four and the end of Germany and Hitler in may of nineteen forty five but today, the straight-set I see that the president in attending the seventy fifth anniversary of day also had a good conversation. We're told a half hour conversation with Boris Johnson, who is said to be by the economists offended times the strongest candidate to replace Theresa May as prime minister. Of the conservative party, which is dominant in the parliament, as they go proceed with Brexit leaving the European Union. I also say that the president spent time talking to Najah Farraj, who is a leader of the Brexit party at the European Union. Parliament elections, just recently, and also someone who was participating in the early days of commenting on the Trump campaign, the Trump administration twenty seventeen. Do you measure that the alliance today is capable of being strong as it was in nineteen forty four you were born in Englishman, I understand, you're an American citizen, but you were born in Englishman, and you understand the nuance of the British reporting as I do not. And I had additionally that the president has spoken of a fresh bilateral trade agreement with Great Britain. Can we reawakened the special relationship set? Absolutely. Conditions. I number one, we have to have full transparency from the next British administration from ten Downing Street as to what truly happened in twenty fifteen twenty sixteen with rebel Joan Bredon use of skew, the British intelligence services, to do a run around of the US constitution have surveillance members of the Trump campaign, the fact that the director of the NSA resigned suddenly when the director of our essay that Obama's permission in fold the president elect Donald Trump, that he had been a legally spied upon approves of this very, very serious allegations of thanks to John Brennan. Okay. Check that box off. Yes that has to happen. What else? The second thing is Brexit to be a true implementation of Brexit Boris Johnson if he becomes the prime minister would be well served by making Nigel deputy, and then making Brexit, a reality. I think it's clear, they will be very strong trade relationship bilaterally between London Washington and in that case, yes, the special relationship will be back on the rails job and good for us and good for Great Britain. How do you measure, you're, you're the, the English people are they will they embrace this? Oh, I think if we look at the fact that seventeen million people voted for Brexit, the, the, the most have ever voted for anything in the history of the British Isles. Yes. Number two. If you look at the results of the EU elections a week ago, Nitra Farraj, both of the Tories labor forty five days after stabbing his party. So, so. The British people have a fed up with three years of the elite on both left and right betraying their will, and this can all be fixed. And I think for Johnson if he knows what what's good for him will implement Brexit, with my at his Sebastian Gorka of the America. First radio program, Salem network. Also, the author of why we fight ten who is surprised to hear that Macron of France. And Merkel of Germany are unhappy with being England, rejoining America sounds a whole lot like the.

Brexit Boris Johnson Brexit president Trump Donald Trump Salem network Germany European Union America prime minister Najah Farraj Britain Brexit party Theresa May British Isles Hitler France Sebastian Gorka Joan Bredon director
"british administration" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

Jewish History Matters

04:52 min | 3 years ago

"british administration" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

"Enshrined the rights of Arabic. Speakers just not as the official language just not as the official language, and I I would be the first to suggest that that matters. And we haven't gone to the emotional impact of this law. But if we're talking about why this law matters now what its practical impacts our before we reach the stage of judicial interpretation. I think it's made a significant emotional or psychological impact a significant portion of the citizenship of the state of Israel. But this was an area where much of the Jewish. Public saw value in an equal status between Arabic and Hebrew within the state and ironically, the supporters of the law argued not only had they not lessened the status of Arabic within the state, but that they had actually enshrined constitutionally a collective right of aerobic speakers. And this is the same document that says the Jews have the sole right to national self-determination. There's a lot of intentional ambiguity here. I will say just one thing on the the question of the sole right to national self-determination where there may be a more problematic underlying motivation is if the purpose is to establish. A constitutional foundation for Jewish national privilege in a context in which parts or the whole of the West Bank were annexed. This is not generally stated as the purpose of that particular clause by those who support the law. However, certainly by detractors of the law. It is suspected that that that that is it's real purpose that in the situation in which the state of Israel annexed parts or whole of the West Bank. And in essence were had to absorb a large new population of non-jewish, citizens that no demographic change could undermined the constitutional supremacy of the Jewish identity of the state. I think that you're bringing up a very. Interesting point here, which is the electoral ramifications, like one thing that that that I think about when we look at the history of the of the British mandate, for instance, is the way in which the mandate document that the league of nations and all of that created a fundamental problem for the Palestinian Arab population. As you know, the mandate had within it the specific mandate for the British to to credit your state as one of the outcomes of the British administration in Palestine, one of the practical implications of this was that there was a very significant part of the population that did not want to engage with the mandate administration. You know? So this is where you have like, you know, the Jewish gloomy the national council that gets established, and there is not a successful Arab equivalent because they didn't want to give their sort of their their political imprimatur for the mandate that had within it an outcome that they were fundamentally opposed to end. So when we talk about the the. The implications of this law. Not just the practical aspects of the language, right? Or what is the national anthem right or the status of of Chabad, right or whatever part of the question that that I've been thinking about since the law's passage is the extent to which this will Elian eight their citizens of Israel to what extent will they feel that they have no part in the state, and you know, we're recording this before the election, right? And it's going to get I think published afterwards. Right. So we'll see to what extent the population gets out and votes, but it raises I think interesting question of how the state is defined and how that includes or fundamentally excludes certain populations from it. Oh, I think you've gotten to the heart of the matter. That is why I think that sometimes the parties are speaking past one another for the proponents of the law. They can make this. Claim that there is no single item in the law that deprives any individual citizen of any privilege or right that here she didn't have before. And so they can claim that the opposition

Israel West Bank official Palestine Elian
"british administration" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

03:53 min | 3 years ago

"british administration" Discussed on Little Atoms

"What's it like now for them? It's in a sort of difficult state of militant Nakal and really the tribes who are most urbanized most educated close to a Hema those really beautiful villages, like going stay in a guest house for week and take lovely walks and witness a really rather fine way of life and other fine traditional sustainable form of agriculture on tears of rice terraces, and they're Christian, and they talked about the. Old head-hunting days like some hazy distant with mythical past their other tribes. I went to see close to the Burmese border who are in a much more difficult stage of development and practice. Lash burn for a long time. So the landscape around is is eroded, and and they bad and among them, you'll find a lot of old men who still wear the tattoos that show. They were they took a head or they were part of a clan that took ahead at some point in their career. And they were extremely headdresses made with wild boars tasks Tigers teeth and feathers, and what have you, and they still keep onto degree a lot of the old traditions. I realized that the most recent head-hunting instance, actually recent as nineteen ninety and nine hundred eighty three so there were still feuds between tribes we talked about. Oh, I mean in the book is is concerned the few. Utility of the British administration in that part of the world. And indeed when you look nog land on a map now where it is in relation to. Says a pair of India whilst relationship between the Indian government and the British administrators who will on the grand Naga land at the end and the second World War in the beginning of independence, really felt that the Naga should be given some kind of autonomy and the Nagas had helped the British through the siege. And through the wall, and it's possible that the Japanese defeat would not have been achieved without them. So they felt it had a responsibility to give to the Nagas and partition happened independence partition happened. So quickly and messages were sent up to the govern- assign daily Il London, and nobody really paid any attention to the fate of the Nagas and so Naro gallon was incorporated into India, and the Nagas were classified as Sedgwick tribes long with other very other indigenous groups of people in India, and they were not given a positions a separate state, and they started their warlike people anyway. So it's. Agency began in nineteen forty seven. The still was at some points, really quite bloody and is still continuing in a small way today, and there were rebels actually just outside the borders of India in the in the hills in Burma who will come in and terrorist instance, still inaugural now as they fight for independence. Writing about the Jungo, and we talked in the vast about is the contrast between the flattened bleak north Norfolk landscape, which is where this book is set. And the contrast of the vertical jungle running joke through the book that, you know, people when they talk about the jungle of India -posibly, it's hot and steamy and their Tigers. And yeah, this is a mountainous cold region despite being heavily forested, tell me something about how you approved writing about the jungle in contrast to the north at landscape because the two sanctions they read very definitely the description in the jungles really pops off the page where it's it's more restrained is to me in the in the Norfolk section. I found this jungle landscapes total exciting to travel through..

India Tigers Nakal Jungo grand Naga Indian government Burma Il London Naro
"british administration" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

04:17 min | 3 years ago

"british administration" Discussed on Little Atoms

"And it was also at the beginning of the reins of the monsoons. It was like a tiny little piece of the song. And what's fascinating is that the man who was district Commissioner who was a rather fine. Character Posey had actually fought the psalm and he finds himself in the in in in a repeat battle. And I did meet an old soldier who lived in the next village to me in Essex who was there during the siege. And said that this district. Commissioner would come every morning and say Hello to the mall, which was fine. Let's talk a bit more about about researching. Yeah. So obviously if she said, you visited he might use out we can talk about talionis second. But to let some of the something else about about the research into the battle is I was searched the sort of standard military volumes about the battle. But I actually got waylaid distracted by two things by the Nagas themselves. Who was so interesting and also but only little bit of that comes out in the book by the stories of the of the British colonial officials there some of whom who were actually rather sympathetic locker colonial officials who were really interested in the Naga who spent their free time doing a lot of f Noga Fyvie studying Naga art and writing a lot of letters to each other, which I could go and find in the Bishop museum suit. So I got I got distracted by them. There's a character in the book Causey billions based on that he sort of derived from from all of them. Yeah. And he did he sort of embodies towards the end of the. Oh, we're not gonna talk too much about what what happened in the book in terms of in times of the plot. But in the end of the book visits, Charlie on the farm, and he's represents this sort of colonial guilds of the futility of what those functionaries all little Cadeau, basically, as as ministers, I think it was very strange moment that moment of the the the end of the empire and also the winning the wall, and I don't think Britain's quite used to deal with that yet. Versions of that is taking place as we as we speak in Brexit ethic. It is I mean, I hate to think about it. But I feel that Hus that my character that the return colonial administrator with this huge sensitive utility of his work. I think the would whoever's going to be returning from Brussels next year. We'll see the Naga people tell us something or about them. And coach Charlie is basically he's injured and rescued would be the word and spend some time months living in a Naga village recuperating, I guess really sort of have mixed feelings about whether he wants to leave in some respects, tell us something about those people in that coach at this time. The Nagas Charlie meets that. I think they offer him really a haven from the war. And yet, they're warriors. There were like people. So those are some interesting contradictions there that he has to work at he meets them as individuals, not as a particular tribe. Always an anthropologist would be studying them working at what tribe. They were. I have spent spent a little bit of time with two different dog traits. But there are dozens of them and really the people my book, I think of behaving as individuals rather than according to particular tribal customs the area where they live is so extraordinarily remote. And so so top graphically impenetrable that is never been conquered by anybody. It's never been was never ruled by India. It was never ruled by Burma the tribes with quite independent of each other. Speaking different dialects, I'm rather like people in the Amazon or pappy NEW GUINEA and actually have a lot of a lot in common with some of the tribes in pappy, New Guinean Milanesi. So nobody really knows. Where they would you from and they were culture of head hunting since as far as we know. And during the period of British administration, though is a number of Baptist missionaries have been conversant. Christianity. The British were trying to civilize them at the politics was studying them. But as yet some chives have been entirely on contacted by white people at that point. And as you said you've been there, and you spend time with some of those people..

Charlie Posey Commissioner Noga Fyvie Essex Bishop museum Causey Burma Brexit administrator India Brussels Amazon GUINEA Britain
Britain is enabling money laundering of Russian cash

All Things Considered

02:16 min | 4 years ago

Britain is enabling money laundering of Russian cash

"Their money in our country a welcome but belated stand as far as some observers are concerned and applebaum pulitzer prize winning expert on russia is a longstanding critic of britain's toleration of putin's cronies russians keep their money their wives their children their property in this country and western europe ending the the money laundering that russia does through here enforcing our own laws all of that could make an enormous difference critics say britain has been shameless in courting russian cash the london stock exchange recently accepted a listing from oleg their pasqua an close to putin some of the proceeds from the share sale went to a russian bank subject to sanctions british into media is made millions out of deals like this former polish foreign minister vladeck sikorsky thinks that such financial links may have been a factor in the decision to authorize the nerve agent attack i think president putin is wagering that britain is so hooked on russian money in london the response will be muted the british government says it's learned its lesson it will crackdown security minister ben wallace makes a startling admission about successive british administrations we have allowed the city of london's reputation as a center for weld finance to be exploited by some pretty nasty individuals who've used illicit money flares to clean it or invested but where should britain draw the line the theme song the chelsea soccer club owned by roman abramovich another oligarch close to putin russian money is embedded in britain and vice versa the giant uk oil company bp as a huge stake in russia deriving a third of its production from their philip woman is a political risk analyst companies in russia bp are possibly vulnerable to counter sanctions and we know that the russian parliament is preparing what it calls meera measures this crisis comes at a difficult time for britain's financiers thanks to brexit and the possible loss of access to the european union they will be eager to keep their markets wide open to the rest of the world shutting up shop even to dodgy.

London Analyst UK Nerve Agent Applebaum European Union Russian Parliament BP Roman Abramovich Pulitzer Prize Ben Wallace British Government President Putin Vladeck Sikorsky Europe Britain