40 Burst results for "British"

Fresh update on "british" discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak Asia

Bloomberg Daybreak Asia

00:26 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "british" discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak Asia

"We check the markets every 15 minutes here on Bloomberg daybreak, Asia. Let's start with the currency moves because we have seen once again the PBOC sit as stronger than expected yuan fix for a 27th day, the reference rate at 7 spot zero 9 9 8 against the dollar with the one, the onshore yuan at those GFC lows, the offshore yuan still weaker 7 spot one one 5 one, it is the weakest on record. We are seeing bank of Japan announced a plans to boost bond purchases at its regular operation. We know that the BOJ has been moving to try and stem that weakness in the yen as well and meanwhile the pound is rebounding still in those still on track for its biggest monthly loss since 2016. British prime minister Liz truss saying that the economic policy is still the right plan for the UK. The pound though now is at a dollar 11, so certainly off the earlier lows of the week where we're around one O 5. When it comes to equity markets another day of selling at New Zealand is one of the laggards down almost 2% Taiwan and Japan's markets off by about one and a half percent and the regional benchmark index still at these April 2020 lows and it is on track for a 7th weekly decline. We've only seen a streak that long three times so far since the year 2000. So this century we're also looking ahead to China's PMI data with expectations for conditions to remain in contradictory on contractionary territory, excuse me, a bit contradictory as well. And that is going to come back in about ten minutes time. Oil heading for its first quarterly loss since March 2020 and we are seeing WTI crude holding around always jumps off my screen. It loves doing this to me. Brent crew meanwhile $88 51. Let's get over to the newsroom now for a check of the global news as we see wi WTI trade at $81 a barrel, Denise Pellegrini joins us Denise. Thank you, Juliet and

Liz Truss Pboc BOJ Japan Asia Taiwan New Zealand UK China Brent Denise Pellegrini Denise Juliet
Dinesh Introduces the Whimsical Philosophy of G.K. Chesterton

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:40 min | 9 hrs ago

Dinesh Introduces the Whimsical Philosophy of G.K. Chesterton

"I'm continuing my, well, all too brief introduction to the writing and the witticisms and the insight of the British SAS and writer of the early part of the first half of the 20th century G.K. Chesterton. Chesterton best known both for his literary essays and his Christian apologetics. He has a very interesting book called orthodoxy. He also wrote a very short book on Thomas Aquinas that I read a long time ago. But here are all I want to do is talk about some of Chesterton's lines and how they make us think about things that are important to us now. Here's Justin. In the upper world, hell once rebelled against heaven. But in this world, heaven is rebelling against hell. So what's gesture been saying here? He's like, well, if you look at the beginning of things, there was a kind of revolt of Satan and his angels. In heaven, but see heaven is the good place. And so the revolt comes from the bad guys. And but then Chester and ads and this is the surprising turn on the way he writes, but in this world, heaven is rebelling against hell. In other words, but in this world, the bad guys have an extraordinary amount of sway and power. I mean, we can look at that politically in terms of Biden. But I think he's talking more broadly that there's just an awful lot of evil in the world.

British Sas Chesterton G.K. Chesterton Thomas Aquinas Justin Satan Chester Biden
Fresh update on "british" discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

00:18 sec | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "british" discussed on All Things Considered

"I want a summer spin I melt the Chang after a car accident a young woman went to urgent care to get checked out. My car was on its side and the back end was crushed up into a tree. She was sent to the ER instead and wasn't seriously injured, but the big hospital bill surprised her family, and later anti government protests continue in Iran and authorities there have a history of shutting them down. We can assume this protest will be met with overwhelming violence. And they have 43 years of succeeding and stuffing our protests. Plus a look at a disastrous week for the British economy, now news. Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm Jack spear

Chang Iran Npr News Washington Jack Spear
Why the U.K.'s "trickle down" tax cut plan terrifies investors

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 1 d ago

Why the U.K.'s "trickle down" tax cut plan terrifies investors

"The Bank of England has taken emergency action to stabilize British financial markets after the government spooked investors with a program of unfunded tax cuts I'm Ben Thomas with the latest With the British pound tumbling in the cost of government debt soaring the Central Bank warned crumbling confidence in the economy posed a material risk to UK financial stability in a less Susan streeter of hargreeves lansdowne in London What the Bank of England is doing is stepping in to try and calm down the market But it does smack of a bit of panic and frustration that the government isn't doing more to retreat away from these promises The Bank of England's plan to buy government debt helped stabilize the bond market after ten year yield spiked more than a full percentage point to just over four and a half percent after the tax cuts were announced but analyst Muhammad el Arian with Allianz says it's all having a global impact This is a UK fueling

Bank Of England Susan Streeter Ben Thomas Hargreeves Lansdowne Central Bank UK London Muhammad El Arian Allianz
Fresh update on "british" discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

00:42 min | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "british" discussed on All Things Considered

"Listen, no, really? Listen to the opening bars of clear's biggest hit gangster Paradise and it's the darkest, most nihilistic dejected thing you've ever heard. As I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I take a look at my life and realize there's nothing left. Yes, it was released as part of the soundtrack to the Michelle Pfeiffer movie dangerous minds, and yes, it got even more famous after "Weird Al" Yankovic gave it the peri treatment, and yes, it won a Grammy Award. But besides all of that, the song still stands on its own as a piece of hip hop history. In my hand and agreeing my heart I'm a low doubt thanks to set tripping bank and my homies is down so don't arouse my anger for CLIA was born artist ivy junior in 1963. His mom moved him and his sister to Compton when they were kids. By his 20s, he used his focus on music to help him get over an addiction to crack. While he became known as a progenitor to the hard West Coast LA gangster rap sound, his music did have some wistful warmth to it. His platinum selling album gangsta's Paradise, for instance, had a song dedicated to his kids, who he wished he saw more often. It's gone through thinking saying I'm your friend till the end of time. I make sure you get your props. You can call me pops and anything you need a bullet. His career never again really breached the highs of gangsta's Paradise, but he did use his fame to appear on reality TV shows from celebrity big brother to celebrity wife swap. In 1995, he told the British music magazine the face that he knew his fame was a Hollywood fantasy and would end soon. But in order to make sure his kids were set, quote, till then, I'm gonna play it for everything I can. Andrew limbong and her news. At four 18, it's all things considered on 90.1 W ABE. I'm Jim burris, the uncovering a private information about an individual. It's known as doxxing, has become rampant on the secure messaging app telegram. It's being used by activist worldwide, but also by government actors. When it's used in the other direction, by security forces and their supporters, they have additional tools to

Weird Al" Yankovic Michelle Pfeiffer Grammy Award Clia Compton British Music Magazine West Coast Andrew Limbong Jim Burris Hollywood
Russia conducts referendum to annex parts of Ukraine

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 2 d ago

Russia conducts referendum to annex parts of Ukraine

"Say a planned speech later this week by Russian president Vladimir Putin may see him declare four occupied territories of Ukraine as parts of Russia In a daily intelligence briefing the British defense ministry says Putin will address both houses of the Russian parliament on Friday and could declare the annexation of the regions The internationally criticized vote is ending Tuesday the ministry adds Russia will almost certainly hope that any accession announcement will be seen as a vindication of the special military operation

British Defense Ministry Russian Parliament Vladimir Putin Russia Ukraine Putin
Fresh update on "british" discussed on Balance of Power

Balance of Power

00:37 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh update on "british" discussed on Balance of Power

"A number of fed officials today continued to stress the need to keep raising interest rates to battle inflation, especially after some fresh data show, the economy is able to withstand some more tightening the readings on second quarter core PCE and personal consumption were both stronger than expected and then on top of that the number on weekly jobless claims now had the lowest level that we have seen since April. Today, we heard from noted hawk, the head of the St. Louis fed, Jim bullard, he said additional tightening is coming in the months ahead. I think we can agree that yesterday's shocking intervention from the BOE when it came to trying to bring calm to the British sovereign debt market, that is pretty much in the rearview mirror at this point. We've got yields across the US Treasury curve moving higher at the short and a two year treasury at 4.18% with a gain of something greater than 5 basis points at the longer and a ten year treasury 3.76% were up just about four basis points in yield. If you look at the broader market, it's consumer discretionary, utility, and information tech, leading the S&P to a loss of something greater than 4.3% have to discuss Apple the stock is off more than 5% a day after Morgan's I checked that. This is Bank of America with the downgrade V of a warning that weak consumer to command will take a have a negative impact on apple's popular smartphones and laptops. Dow industrial average right now off 1.9% and in the NASDAQ market the composite index is weaker by just about 3.3%. Some dollar weakness today with a Bloomberg dollar spot index down two tenths of 1%. We are seeing a recovery in the Euro 97 80 U.S. cents a gain of around a half of 1% against the greenback and the offshore Chinese yuan strengthening by nearly 1% 7 spot one zero two 5 against the dollar. I'm Doug prisoner that your

St. Louis Fed Jim Bullard Us Treasury FED BOE Treasury Apple Bank Of America Morgan S U.S. Doug
Markets Calm Down After Recession Fears Drive Steep Drops

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 3 d ago

Markets Calm Down After Recession Fears Drive Steep Drops

"Recession fears continued to chip away at markets on Norman hall The Dow has become the last of the major U.S. stock indexes to fall into what's known as a bear market amid growing fears of a global recession The blue chip index fell 1.1% while the S&P close 1% lower and the NASDAQ dropped .6% as the index's extended their losing streak to a 5th day The fed also released a forecast suggesting its benchmark rate could be 4.4% by the year's end a full point higher than envision in June In Europe the British pound dropped an all time low against the dollar

Norman Hall U.S. S FED Europe
Fresh update on "british" discussed on Balance of Power

Balance of Power

02:30 min | 10 hrs ago

Fresh update on "british" discussed on Balance of Power

"The UK can not afford to look this ridiculous, ridiculous. That's a pretty strong word. Yes, but I think that's where we are. When you reach a point of ridicule, it's not survivable. Unless you're Donald Trump, I suppose, who is an exception to very many political rules, but generally when you've been made to look ridiculous, that's that. One very clear example from British history which I was talking about not so long ago is black Wednesday, 30 years ago when the Bank of England tried and failed to prop up the pound and ended up having to let it leave the European monetary system. So at this point, my suspicion is that this has been so badly handled that both with the global financial markets and with the electric back home, it's probably not salvageable. So what does that mean not salvageable? Does that mean the government falls? Does that mean there's a change in leadership? Does it mean there's a change in the Chancellor of the exchequer? I mean, what is that? I think it could mean the first options you offered. I don't see any reason why the government would fall because the conservatives still have a pretty comfortable majority and it would be in the interests of conservative MPs to vote to leave. I think it's a matter of days until quasi cutting has to go as Chancellor. And depending on how well Liz truss, the prime minister, handles offering his head on a spike to the markets and to the electorate, she may be able to carry on. She does have very much working in her favor that conservatives really don't want to inflict yet another new prime minister on the country. That makes them possibly look even more ridiculous. But if she is as shot as I fear she might be and given that there is Rishi sunak as an obvious alternative candidate to calm the markets. If things get worse, it's conceivable. They'll find a way to jettison him. But there's one thing is the person or the face where there's the Chancellor of the prime minister, another is the policy. The understanding is Liz truss ran on a campaign platform of big tax cuts. In fact, people including Rishi sunak said didn't make much sense at the time. She got elected that way. She can't very well say we're going to do in one 80, can she? She could conceivably. She's pretty good at doing new turns. She voted to remain in Europe 6 years ago. And when this was brought up in a debate by Rishi sunak, who had voted to leave, she said, yes, and I learned from it. And she's now a passionate Brexit here. So conceivably she can say I've learned from what the markets did that when anxiety is high, rates are rising. It's an incredibly bad time to announce that you're going to need to borrow a huge amount more money. Which is in essence, what's happened? I have learned and I will move on. It's conceivable because she's good at this that she can that she can execute a uten, difficult but conceivable. But you are our senior markets editor. So let me ask you about the markets. How long a memory does the market have as a practical matter? Because obviously there's some credibility loss. Loss of credibility here on behalf of the British government. Time will tell about the Bank of England actually about whether it's lost a bit of credibility. But certainly the government has, how long will we remember that? Or does it turn around right away if they get the right people in? This is going to be very difficult to live down. Not to reopen the Brexit scab, but international capital markets have never thought that Brexit was a good idea, particularly not in the way it was handled, I don't see certainly a new Chancellor who clearly represented a different point of view and if trust ends sunak can agree to that conceivably that would be rich soon act. Would help a lot sooner himself would because he had so explicitly argued that exactly this would go wrong. So he doesn't need to say I told you so because everybody is looking at all the clips on YouTube in which he told us. It would be an unbelievable humiliation for this trust to invite him back, she presumably have to give him even more power than Tony Blair gave to Gordon Brown. So a humiliation for it, but she's been humiliated already. That I can see is the way Britain can get through the next two years. It's very painful, I must say to watch. Thank you so much, John for being here. That's John authors. Our senior markets editor. You can read more on this and other stories from Bloomberg opinion at Bloomberg dot com slash opinion and on the terminal by typing in opi and go. Coming up leadership in crisis being tested in the United States in the face of a hurricane in a Britain in the face of a market hurricane we've just been talking about it. We're going to talk

Rishi Sunak Liz Truss Bank Of England Donald Trump UK Brexit Government British Government Europe Tony Blair Gordon Brown Youtube Britain John Bloomberg Hurricane United States
 Buckingham Palace releases picture of King Charles at work

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 5 d ago

Buckingham Palace releases picture of King Charles at work

"King Charles the third has been pictured taking up his new state duties in Buckingham Palace for the first time in the image of the monarchy looking into his official red box which contains documents from the British government and the common wealth In a sign of royal continuity the pictures taken in front of a photo of his late parents Elizabeth and Philip which the pair had gifted to king George 6 in 1951 the year before Elizabeth became queen During her own reign Queen Elizabeth II was also regularly pictured with her official red box which each monarch receives from their private secretary

King Charles Buckingham Palace British Government Elizabeth King George Philip Queen Elizabeth Ii
 UK scraps corporate tax hike, lifts cap on banker bonuses

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 6 d ago

UK scraps corporate tax hike, lifts cap on banker bonuses

"The British government is scrapping a corporate tax hike and lifting the cap on bankers bonuses in a bid to boost a faltering economy Treasury chief kwasi Kwame has told lawmakers there are too many barriers for enterprise as he puts lower taxes top of the government's agenda In his mini budget that he was reversing a hike in national insurance taxes that was introduced by the previous government to help pay for health and social care He said the basic rate of income tax will fall from 20 to 19% next year The top rate will go from 45 to 40% in the House of Commons kwa Tang said we need a new approach for a new era focused on growth

Kwasi Kwame British Government Treasury Government Kwa Tang House Of Commons
Ted Lasso Video Game-Lasso intro and wrap

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | Last week

Ted Lasso Video Game-Lasso intro and wrap

"There is a new format to watch Ted Lasso The series starring Jason Sudeikis about an American football coach coaching British football soccer has won a lot of awards The show is about family the show is about mentors and teachers the show is about teammates Now Ted Lasso and his fictional AFC Richmond team are included in the new FIFA 23 video game He's someone you just can't help but root for He's a great manager and an even better man And if you tell him I said that I will brain you All the fictional players on the show including Roy Kent and Sam Elba Sanya are feature E a sport I'm in the game Oh did I sound like a guy Yeah you sounded like the guy Ted Gave for 23 which also includes real soccer clubs is available next week I'm Ed Donahue

Ted Lasso Jason Sudeikis Football Soccer Roy Kent Sam Elba Sanya Fifa Richmond Ted Gave Ed Donahue
 With ceremonies over, King Charles III faces biggest task

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | Last week

With ceremonies over, King Charles III faces biggest task

"With the funeral ceremonies now over King Charles the third faces challenges The canons of sounded the bells have rung and the monarch of paid their respects Now King Charles faces the task of preserving a 1000 year old monarchy that his mother nurtured for 7 decades but that faces an uncertain future that challenges immense personal affection for the queen meant that the monarch's role in British society was really debated in recent years but now she's gone for royal family faces Christians about whether it's still relevant in a modern multicultural

King Charles British Society
'I didn't want to miss it': Royal funeral on global live TV

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | Last week

'I didn't want to miss it': Royal funeral on global live TV

"People around the world have been watching Queen Elizabeth's funeral on TV In Hong Kong British citizen Tom fell remembered being at the queen mother's funeral hand Princess Diana's So hard not to not to be there So he and others around the globe watched from a South African amphitheater She showed us courage She showed us Judy To British pubs in Paris It's a historical moment in English history and I didn't want to miss it And here in Washington Didn't feel right It is watching my own home Saw Germain Washington

Tom Fell Queen Elizabeth Princess Diana Hong Kong Judy Paris Washington Germain Washington
'Friends forever': Last two mourners in line to see Queen Elizabeth II lie in state

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | Last week

'Friends forever': Last two mourners in line to see Queen Elizabeth II lie in state

"Thousands of people in London have continued to line up around the clock to file past the queen's coffin as it lies in states Warner's determined to pay their respects to the queen got in line overnight in anticipation of a 16 hour long queue British actor Michael Howe said Britain's moment in history feels special And this is like a pilgrimage It's quite extraordinary Morning Armed with tents and sleeping bags some mourners like Sheeran Thorpe have started camping out along the funeral procession route to make sure they get a glimpse of the ceremony And we didn't want to miss the chance of not being able to see the queen passing us in the royal family and we can mourn and pay our respects alongside them While security is tight Thorpe says everyone has been quite supportive The public and the police have all been supporting us well wishing

Michael Howe Sheeran Thorpe Warner London Britain Thorpe
Queen Elizabeth Funeral 2022 | King Charles Joins Queen Elizabeth's Coffin Procession - India Today

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | Last week

Queen Elizabeth Funeral 2022 | King Charles Joins Queen Elizabeth's Coffin Procession - India Today

"On his way to Great Britain for the queen's funeral President Joe Biden and First Lady Jill Biden departed joint base Andrew Saturday morning for the flight to London to attend the funeral for Queen Elizabeth II Biden was set to meet with new British prime minister Liz truss on Sunday But the prime minister's office said Saturday they will not need in London and will instead have a meeting at the UN General Assembly on Wednesday in New York The White House confirmed the UN meeting just as the president boarded Air Force One Mike Gracia Washington

Queen Elizabeth Ii Biden Jill Biden Liz Truss Joe Biden Great Britain London Andrew Un General Assembly White House New York UN Air Force Mike Gracia Washington
King stands vigil; Wait to see queen's coffin hits 24 hours

AP News Radio

01:17 min | Last week

King stands vigil; Wait to see queen's coffin hits 24 hours

"Throngs of people continue to line up and file past Queen Elizabeth II's coffin as it lies in state at parliament Today some of them witnessing a vigil by her children I'm Ben Thomas with the latest Mourners have ranged from young children to London retirees to former England soccer captain David Beckham To have someone that has led us the way her majesty has led us for the amount of time with kindness with caring and always reassurance I think that's the one thing that we all felt safe Inside Westminster hall the atmosphere has been somber reverential Friday a few witness King Charles the third and his siblings princess Anne Prince Andrew and Prince Edward arrive and stand vigil for 15 minutes Backs to the flag draped coffin heads bowed Saturday the queen's 8 grandchildren including princes William and Harry will hold a similar vigil Meantime the British government has warned those wanting to come pay their respects that the waiting time has climbed to more than 24 hours The Q stretching 5 miles I'm Ben Thomas

Ben Thomas Queen Elizabeth Ii Inside Westminster Hall Anne Prince Andrew David Beckham Soccer King Charles England London Princes William Prince Edward British Government Harry
 Report: Chinese delegation barred from queen's coffin

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | Last week

Report: Chinese delegation barred from queen's coffin

"A delegation of Chinese officials have reportedly been barred from visiting the hall where the late queen's coffin lies in state geopolitics has cast a shadow over the pageantry of the monarch's death The ban was reported by American news outlet Politico saying the Chinese delegation would not be allowed into Westminster hall China's foreign ministry spokesperson Mao ning rebuked the British government for not following normal procedure As the host the UK should follow diplomatic protocols and proper manners to receive guests The Chinese ambassador to the UK has been banned from parliament for a year after China sanctioned 7 British legislators last year

Mao Ning Westminster Hall Politico British Government China UK Parliament
Queen Elizabeth II moved to Westminster Hall to lie in state

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 2 weeks ago

Queen Elizabeth II moved to Westminster Hall to lie in state

"The public are viewing Queen Elizabeth II's coffin in Westminster hall Former British prime minister Theresa May was among the thousands of mourners paying their respects to the queen whose coffins lying in state in London The casket of Britain's longest serving monarch will remain at the 900 year old Westminster hall until her funeral on Monday hundreds of thousands of people are expected to file past the coffins draped in the royal standard and topped with the Imperial State Crown encrusted with almost 3000 diamonds and a bouquet of flowers and plants including pine from the balmoral estate where Elizabeth died on September 8th at the age of 96 Charles De Ledesma

Westminster Hall Theresa May Queen Elizabeth Ii Britain London Elizabeth Charles De Ledesma
Queen Elizabeth II lies in state as throngs pay respects

AP News Radio

01:39 min | 2 weeks ago

Queen Elizabeth II lies in state as throngs pay respects

"Queen Elizabeth II inherited millions of subjects around the world upon taking the throne in 1952 but many were unwilling and her death is stirring complicated feelings in Commonwealth countries like Kenya I'm Ben Thomas with a closer look On behalf of the people of Kenya On behalf of the government of Kenya and on my own behalf we commiserate with the people of the UK Kenya's new president William Ruto signing a condolence book for the queen at the residence of the British high commissioner In London I love the queen Kenyan Esther Raven or joined the crowds playing their respects She's a true role model She loved us all but in the foothills of mount Kenya Matthew Y Reggie says he can not mourn Queen Elizabeth saying up the British Those people they took our land 90 year old took part in the mau mau rebellion of the 1950s I was there For three years and he says conditions were harsh I did naked for about the month of June July when Kenya is very cold Over 100,000 canyons were rounded up and it wasn't until 2013 that the British government apologized paying millions in and out of court settlement to those who were tortured Kenya declared its independence from Britain in 1963 and joined the Commonwealth of Nations many credit Queen Elizabeth for embracing the wave of independence in Africa in championing the Commonwealth President Ruto notes Elizabeth learned she had become queen while visiting Kenya and for many of his countrymen he says That is very sentimental I'm Ben Thomas

Kenya William Ruto Esther Raven Ben Thomas Matthew Y Reggie Queen Elizabeth Ii Mount Kenya Queen Elizabeth UK London Commonwealth Of Nations Many C British Government Ruto Britain Africa Elizabeth
Hope Springs Eternal From the Ashes of History

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:06 min | 2 weeks ago

Hope Springs Eternal From the Ashes of History

"Now I want to go back to the very beginning of the book and probably the greatest insight for us looking forward to the competition with China, which is underway on page 83. This is set in 1939. And then 41. The gigantic struggle for the United States that began with the Attack on Pearl Harbor and ended with the dropping of the atomic bomb was different from any other major war in history. Different in its dimensions and topography, different in the weapon systems and support systems, carry air power, landing craft, fleet trains, then emerged to be war winning ones, different even in the sort of fighting units, the Marine Corps, the seabees, that would have to be put together. It was geography that the country emerging bacteria here would have to become a special sort of maritime power. The combatant that understood that first and better would be the Victor. So everything had changed from World War II to 1941, doctor Kenny, have they changed again from 1945 to 2022. Yes, indeed. First of all, the basic the basic strategic position that the United States is the is still despite deficiencies in the center of the western military economic order remains, but the it changes because of newer technology, which may be coming so fast that nowadays we don't really realize the dimensions of it or how we have to respond to it. It changes because we are probably not going to think again over huge, huge American military reinforcement of 2 million plus men to the European theater and 3 million plus men to the Pacific theater. It may have gone up into the sky to the ESA and yet we still need to be have the basic ship systems and weapon systems growing across the Atlantic and the Pacific for this for this year of 2022 onwards into the middle of the century.

Pearl Harbor United States Marine Corps China Victor Kenny European Theater Pacific Theater ESA Atlantic Pacific
Don't Mess With the Numbers

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:36 min | 2 weeks ago

Don't Mess With the Numbers

"United States had a choice. They could have made Japan starve. They could have done firebombing. Both of those would have resulted in horrific casualties among the Japanese and of course fleets of kamikazes headed towards our fleet. Here are the Okinawa death tolls that doctor Kennedy puts in victory at sea, which I was unfamiliar with. 77,000 Japanese troops died on Okinawa, a 110,000 if you add in the Okinawa conscripts. Another take and another 10,000 died in the mopping up. A 149,000 civilians died in Okinawa and 12,000 U.S. servicemen were killed. Can you imagine my father was in the flotilla off of Japan for the southern island first faint? I'm glad he didn't have to go aboard her. I would not be talking to you today. Doctor Kennedy, can you imagine what the casualty counts would have been if Japan had to be invaded? So the U.S. Army and the Department of Defense were doing some calculations some estimates about what the potential total number of casualties would be in, say, the first three months or so of struggling onshore and fighting their way through the mountains in lower Japan against fanatically organized resistance and the numbers were not pretty. Some people thought that the numbers calculated were just far too large at the Japanese would fall early after the first strikes on land, but they couldn't be sure about that. And

Okinawa Japan Southern Island Doctor Kennedy U.S. Kennedy U.S. Army Department Of Defense
The Power of the Flotilla

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:27 min | 2 weeks ago

The Power of the Flotilla

"Want to underscore that because right now the United States Navy has about 280 surface combatants at sea. This comes from page three 88 a victory at sea. The sheer size of the American naval armada surrounding Okinawa was a retelling of the story of the Pacific war, as 1200 landing vessels commenced their Easter Sunday, April 1 assault on the central beaches of Okinawa, they were screened by 200 destroyers 18 battleships and over 40 carriers. You know, that's bigger than the entire U.S. Navy today. It is doctor Kennedy. Yes. Now, the defenders of what's going on in our size and power of E today would say, well, a nuclear powered aircraft carrier of the GL four class of the retiring Nimitz class is so much more powerful than those carriers surrounding Okinawa in 1944. But we had so many more of them out there. And so one of the questions about present power is a possible vulnerability of the limited number of warships, including limited number of aircraft carriers, which we have across stress across the globe today for our commitments from the Houston Mediterranean through the Indian Ocean to the far Pacific. Not to mention, giving an eye enlisted children.

Okinawa United States Navy Kennedy Mediterranean Houston Indian Ocean Pacific
"british" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

07:53 min | 2 months ago

"british" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Book, legacy of violence, a history of the British Empire. That empire became the largest empire in history, and by 1920 included 24% of the earth's land mass. Elkin spoke with guest interviewer Arun vinegar Paul, who's a senior reporter and the race and justice unit at public radio station WNYC in New York. They spoke before Johnson's resignation announcement, here's a rune with more. This year marked the platinum jubilee of Elizabeth II her 70th year as the Queen of England. It's the first time any British monarch has celebrated a platinum jubilee. When Queen Elizabeth II took the throne in 1952, the British Empire encompassed parts of Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and the Pacific, and included 700 million people. In our new book, our guests Caroline Elkins looks at how the use of violence was central to the spread and maintenance of the British Empire, even as it portrayed itself, self serving as a benevolent force. The book is called legacy of violence, a history of the British Empire. And it explores how colonial officials from India to Malaya to South Africa hid evidence of their violent practices while building the largest empire in human history. In the 1990s, Caroline Elkins began to write her dissertation about Britain's civilizing mission during the last years of colonial rule in Kenya. But then she discovered British officials had created a vast network of secret detention camps that housed as many as one and a half million members of Kenya's kikuyu community. In those camps, officials practiced unimaginably sadistic forms of torture upon tiku men and women, along with sexual violence. Her revelations were published in her first book, imperial reckoning, the untold story of Britain's gulag in Kenya, for which she won the Pulitzer Prize in 2006. Caroline Elkins is Professor of history and African and African American studies at Harvard University. And the founding director of Harvard center for African studies. And she joins us now. Caroline Elkins, welcome to fresh air. Thank you so much for having me, ruin. Much of your book deals with the idea of liberal imperialism. What does that mean? Yeah, number one imperialism is Britain's civilizing mission, right? It's white man's burden. This idea that it was going to bring democracy and rule of law and free market to 700 million subjects across a quarter of the world's land mass. And you know, all empires are violent, but it takes a particular form in the British Empire, because coercion isn't just about establishing and maintaining authority over subject populations. It's actually part of reform, this idea that you have to have local populations feel suffering to feel pain to experience forced labor that these in fact bring about a kind of developmentalism, a kind of movement into if you will adulthood and eventually into independence. As Britain begins to expand its empire overseas and confronts distant places with so called backward people with these strange religions and dependent relationships, the question becomes can these people with different skin colors become like us. And skin color becomes demark of difference. Let's talk about the moral effect that you referred to earlier, a leading British military theorist he quote, colonel Charles calwell said the anime must be made to feel a moral superiority throughout. You see, his approach was embraced across the empire that it helped fuse battlefield strategies with the white man's burden, but what does it mean in practice? You know, in practice, it means untold suffering. It means that gloves are off, and that any kind of sort of coercive tactic, whether it be the use of detention camps, whether it's torture, whether it's scorched earth policy, the level of violence is extraordinary. And what it means for somebody like Caldwell is that you can explain the violence by the fact that it has a moral quality to it. It has a moral if you will redemptive effect. Battlefields, soldiers, corneal administrators, missionaries. They, many of them believed in the sort of the nature of coercion and the ways in which it was part and parcel of the civilizing mission. British legal experts wrestled with distinctions between civilized and uncivilized, some went so far as to create categories of civilized, barbarian and savage, these categories, I guess, relied on all the western anthropologists and other academics who were criss-crossing the empire, measuring skull sizes and whatnot of natives and deciding how civilized a tribe was. Scholarship was quite critical to the imperial project, wasn't it? Yeah, it absolutely was. And I think that the nature by which, if you will, academics, people who are, as you're saying, scholars at the time were complicit in the corneal project, lending credence, lending sort of scholarly heft. And it's also important to bear in mind that this is an era in the 19th century of the upswing of scientific racism. And what becomes the marker of difference is skin color. Whites are at one end and the Brits at the top of that of that sort of top of the pile on the far end of the other spectrum are blacks from Africa with all other shades in between. And of course, Brits and others are capable of racializing subjects such that afrikaners in South Africa and the Irish also become racialized such that they are seen as being sort of a lesser breed, if you will, than Anglo saxons in Britain. One economist, utsa patnaik, who received her doctorate from Oxford. Estimated that over the course of 200 years, the British siphoned off an amount of around $45 trillion from India. How did they do this? You know, look, it's a rather extraordinary arc, right? When we think about the nature of the East India Company is set up back in the early 17th century, and endures all the way into the Raj in 1857 and endures until 1947. So you have a very long period of time. And there's all sorts of ways in which this takes place. And some of which is by establishing taxation policies, squeezing local peasants, we see the, frankly, some of the diamonds that are sitting in that are part of the monarchy's crown jewels, as you well know, are being demanded to have them return. And these are we're talking massive sums of money. And then of course, you know, the East India Company then eventually the Raj is a huge enormous cash cow for the British Empire. And a whole range of ways, whether it's from exports, whether certainly during the Second World War, many would argue that the contribution to the war effort in the Second World War by India really tipped the scales for Britain holding back the Japanese coming into the region. And again, costing dearly. And in fact, Britain becomes a borrower from India during wartime. And so it is of no surprise to me that we see that kind of number. And the question, of course, that it raises is what accounting has to take place in the here and now for that. And arguments are made from other parts of the empire and in a similar fashion. It's not unusual even these days to hear about, I guess the benefits of empire upon a place like India oh, we gave them the railroads, the gift of English, when in fact the British are rather the Indian economy with something like 25%, I think of the world's GDP. And in the 18th century, and then about 3% when the Brits left, it's

Caroline Elkins Britain Queen Elizabeth II Arun vinegar Paul Kenya Harvard center for African stu Elkin WNYC colonel Charles calwell Queen of England Malaya South Africa Pulitzer Prize India Africa Harvard University Middle East Johnson Pacific
"british" Discussed on The Autosport Podcast

The Autosport Podcast

04:31 min | 3 months ago

"british" Discussed on The Autosport Podcast

"It's not going to cause global warming. And I'm the person saying that anyway I disagree with me if you want to feel free to email podcast to auto sport dot com and say you're an idiot. I'll write straight away, yeah, why not? This topic is definitely a whole podcast in itself. And I appreciate we've been babbling on for far too long already, but I definitely think that the discussion is there. This is the thing. Ironically, F one literally launched its synthetic and renewable fuels from 2026. Last week, gave an update on its progress. Renewables are literally in the pipeline. And Formula One is looking to promote these things. It's not as if they're ignoring this. Now, granted it is not the greenest of sports. But it's not ignoring these issues, and there is action as well as words coming. So yeah, I feel like you can't make NASCAR green. NASCAR's always going to be loud. But I think event Bernie, otherwise there's no NASCAR. But I think eventually those things will die. Like they will become increasingly unacceptable. So if we want to have motor sport, which obviously I'm assuming that everyone both on and listening to this podcast does. Otherwise, you've made it well into this debate and you've done well. But I think it's got to be it's got to respond. But the thing that is kind of great about motor sport is that we can test out all lots of different solutions. The only thing the only thing better for pushing technology forward than sport is war. And obviously that's got some other rather nasty side effects. So sport is a great place to develop these. I remember speaking to an engineer and saying, look, what do you feel a couple of engineers actually saying? What do you think the solution is? And they said, we need to push an all fronts. We need to be doing electric. We need to be doing hybrid. We need to be doing synthetic fields. There's hydrogen coming to LeMond because we don't know which of these will be the solutions for various things in the future. There are absolutely millions and millions of cars around the world that do burn fossil fuel. You're not just going to suddenly turn them into electric cars overnight. So you need to put something else in them. And that's where synthetic fields comes in and paddy Lowe has been part of developing synthetic fuel. And I think Formula One can be very much part of that solution. And then it's not only is it something that we all can enjoy, it also is part of the it is part of the answer. So it's a win win, I think, to be it's much better than just sticking your head in the sand, which is why it is a bit frustrating to get the protesters, Hayden says the same week that they've would announce something. A couple of cracking races back to back. British Grand Prix Silverstone and Hayden, we head off to Austria in just a few days time looking forward to that one. Oh, thrilled. Who doesn't love the Red Bull ring? No, she should be a good race. Okay, we're very excited. It did sound cool. That's sarcastic. I honestly didn't mean that at all. Don't come for me, people. That's a great track. Yeah, it's good tracks, exciting, obviously Red Bulls, home race. We've had a few good encounters there in the past. So yeah, I'm sure Red Bull and matched it up in particular we're looking to strike back. They did they have previously run very well there. So yeah, I put them favorites already. Yeah, leclerc and Ferraris target for next weekend will be get that car into second between Verstappen and Perez. And damage limitation. Unless, of course, you get a crazy wet race and all sorts of shenanigans happen, but I think that's got to be there. It's got to be the target is to minimize the points loss. Stay tuned to autosport dot com, which is Hayden territory. And all the latest breaking news, nothing's really broken while we've been recording this podcast the last hour. I think it's been confirmed. It was a front wing end plate from one of the AlphaTauri's that scuppered Max Verstappen to be the specific on the part that got him. And make sure if you are not subscribed to auto sport magazine, you can do and it'll drop through your letter box and if not you can grab it in the shops and you can read all about it and see some of them. I'm sure I was going to be some amazing images from the British Grand Prix auto sport magazine out next week. Thank you very much for listening. If you want to leave us a review on Apple podcasts, if you are on iTunes or your phone or your Android or iPad rather, you can jump into iTunes, leave a few words, little star rating, always helps the show. You can contact us podcast at autosport dot com any questions you want the team to answer about.

NASCAR paddy Lowe Hayden Bernie LeMond Verstappen Red Bulls leclerc Austria Ferraris Max Verstappen Perez British Grand Prix auto sport Apple
"british" Discussed on The Media Show

The Media Show

04:46 min | 11 months ago

"british" Discussed on The Media Show

"Do you believe that britishness needs to be protected that there need to be interventions in order to help British TV remain distinct? Look, I don't completely agree with the kind of the government prescribing what stories we can and can't tell. I mean, the great joy of being British, isn't it? Is free speech hearing different voices. I mean, you know, that would rule out things like normal people, which was the big success of lockdown. We wouldn't have seen war and peace on the BBC. You can name hundreds and hundreds of programs. The government's not suggesting those shouldn't be made. It's just saying it wants to make sure that stories rooted in the UK are told. I just think it's a little bit of a slippery slope to some sort of nationalistic entrapment because we have to let the creatives tell the stories they want to tell. That's our job as producers. And surely the imagination of storytelling, isn't it? That's it anywhere. Anytime in any space Chris Curtis from broadcast, if you look at the performance of ITV recently doing very, very well in its last figures, it would suggest that a commercial operation like ITV can make lots of programs, many of them rooted in British stories and make a good profit, given the current situation. Yeah, I mean, look, I think the single most important thing that the government can do to protect British programming is ensure a healthy robust future for public service broadcasting in the UK. If it creates the market circumstances, if it sorts out prominence so that the PSPs can make sure that their programs are easily found as more and more people are watching through Apple or Amazon or other platforms. If it gives the BBC a license fee, look, we're not naive. I don't think they're going to suddenly get a huge surge. But if it can avoid cutting the legs off the BBC with some sort of crippling license fee settlement. And if it can find an outcome for channel four that doesn't turn channel four into just another broadcaster, which is the threat, the danger through privatization. Then it will have created the circumstances in which we can have a healthy.

Chris Curtis ITV BBC UK Amazon Apple
"british" Discussed on The Media Show

The Media Show

03:25 min | 11 months ago

"british" Discussed on The Media Show

"Let me bring you in here. Can you help us understand the scale of the impact Amazon and Netflix in particular have had on the UK industry? Sure. I mean, from a UK at UK PLC point of view, you'd have to say that in an investment is great news. And actually, from a UK production community perspective, though it brings with it headaches that the guys have just been talking about. It's fantastic news, because these guys have got budgets that far exceed many of the domestic players. And that means that the creative ambitions at their shows have no limits. The inflation everyone's talked about. I mean, anecdotally, drama producers talk about anything from say 10% to about 30% of additional cost at the moment. Now COVID costs are played into that a little bit. So you've got the extra cost, particularly in the last 18 months of getting people tested in the various different protocols that everyone had to observe coupled with the scarcity of top level talent. Yeah, ten to 30%. But. It is a byproduct of the excellence in the sector. And it's a short to medium term headache. It's the only thing producers want to talk to me about at the moment. But I just met in there. Of course, again. You know, I don't know whether I would just like to tell everybody how much a drama costs to make high end drama. It's anything between 1.5 million and 3 million an hour. What do you think Tony? That's a pretty good per hour of television. Absolutely. When we're talking about this idea of britishness, when we go to a British broadcaster, any of the terrestrials, they will only give us 30 to 40% of the budget. So then it's down on the individual producers to go out in the open marketplace to go to America to go to France to go to Spain. And try and get partners on board for sometimes up to 60% of the budget. So in one way we all want to be the very best of British, but we have to partner with people outside Britain to get those shows made. And Chris, if I could just join the throng and asking you nonstop about the streamers for people listening, just give us an idea of some of the big shows they've made in the UK recently. Well, the big one that's yet to come, but it's going to amplify everything to the power of ten is when Amazon brings Lord of the Rings to the UK. But even things which don't necessarily feel that British or kind of created out the states being Bridgerton was shot in the west of England and was absolute gangbuster success for Netflix, lots of British crew, lots of British acting talent. In British district speaking, a kind of American production and a Shonda Rhimes production, but look, these thing it's incredibly common to have the co production model that Sarah referenced. What I would say is because of the strength of British creativity, British writing, in particular, I wouldn't want to underestimate the hard work that producers have to do in terms of finding co production partners..

UK headaches UK PLC Netflix Amazon Bridgerton Tony Spain France Britain America Chris Shonda Rhimes Sarah
"british" Discussed on The Media Show

The Media Show

03:39 min | 11 months ago

"british" Discussed on The Media Show

"So you're guaranteed some training or skill expertise in production because you've got curry M Adele, hollyoaks and, you know, you've got you've got big long running shows that people can learn their skills on and then transfer onto other programs. Can I just throw something else into that on the skills thing? Because again, once you reach a critical mass of production, you're absolutely right. You need to retain all that kind of the level of disciplines of actually that across the industry. But also you do is raise the skill level within the community. And you also raise the skin level and understanding how technology works. You become more innovative with technology more creative with technology. And one of the things I think on this later. But one thing I really astonishes me have started back in the business in the 1980s on the edge the cost of new technology. I just do not understand the way it's called the inflation's going to be industry. By now, it automated technology with AI driving software. The cost of production should actually be quite easily managed. And that's a problem again, because all the time, if you haven't got this critical mass, when Netflix and Amazon are coming in all the time, that's what they're actually doing is what we used to call start again productions, you know. And so we're going to talk about the issue. It's absolutely fine. But we can talk about the issue of price inflation in just a moment, but Tony wood, I want to just come back to the practicalities of establishing these production hubs. Sarah dolls already given us a list of things that she would want when you look at a potential location to work in. What are the things that you need and what support do you want either from national or regional government for that to be in place? Well, to start with, we 9 times out of ten, we look for something that's appropriate to the idea. And often, the idea is that we generate our specific locations. So we tend to go there. I think the second factor for us is, is there any soft money? Is there any government or local film agency money that can support the budget? And then, of course, you're absolutely right. From there onwards, you need the skill set in the crew. We recently finished a show in Scotland where we were working in Glasgow and Edinburgh. And because it was straight after whichever lockdown it was, at that point, then the whole marketplace was flooded. And it was flooded with global productions, massive streamer productions. And so to Phil's point for making a point in a slightly different way. The inflation, the crew great inflation, location based location inflation meant that our show was it was almost impossible to produce it really. So I think there's a double edged sword here as well, which is that because we've been so successful in the creation of our incentives, particularly the high end film and television tax incentive. Then we're flooded with other programming from elsewhere commissions from elsewhere that Hoover up our crews. So a production base has got to be what fills just described and Sarah's just described, which is that you have to keep growing skills within it. And that takes years. So that's what you want from a production base. You've all made reference to the streamers several times already Chris Curtis from broadcast..

curry M Adele Tony wood Sarah dolls Netflix Amazon Glasgow Edinburgh Scotland Phil Hoover Sarah Chris Curtis
"british" Discussed on The Media Show

The Media Show

05:43 min | 11 months ago

"british" Discussed on The Media Show

"Programs feel. And as the industry expands, should the UK aim to have more production hubs outside of London. Would that help to make our TV more British? No shortage of questions, and I have just the people to answer them. Let me introduce them to you, starting with Sarah Doyle, who's the chief executive at red production company. It's behind last tango in Halifax. It's a sin, and many, many other successes. Sarah welcome to the media show. What's next? I wonder, you've had such a long run of hits. I wonder what you've got up your sleeve next. Well, we've got we've been really busy in production this year. We've got a big show for Netflix coming out the beginning of next year. Another show that we've just filmed no returns that ITV, which interestingly we had to recreate a 5 star resort in Bolton. Sounds like you could spend a whole edition just talking about that. Yes, yes. And we've also just about we're just about to start a huge show for Amazon based on a Neil Gaiman at novel. So we're really, really busy. And we've got lots of stuff in the pipeline. So it's a really exciting time, actually. And we'll unpack more the impact the streamers have had on the way that you do business. But next, let's bring in Tony wood chief executive at Buccaneer media. The man who created the only way is Essex and Tony as we talk about britishness with certain to talk about drama, I just wonder if you consider the only way is Essex to be a drama series. Maybe maybe I think what's certainly true is that all of my training was in drama. And I was the only person on that team who had no idea. I had absolutely no idea how to make a reality show. So consequently, I kind of pulled as much of it into my skill set as possible. So in my head, it was a drama. And I spent all of that time referring to it as a reality drama. So maybe. Very interesting. Well, a man who knows lots about drama as well is to fill Redman. He was knighted last year for services to broadcasting. He's a legendary figure in TV, having created green chill, hollyoaks and brookside and Phil, I wonder what britishness means to you.

Sarah Doyle red production company Tony wood Buccaneer media Halifax ITV Netflix Neil Gaiman Bolton Sarah London UK Amazon Essex Tony Redman hollyoaks brookside Phil
"british" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"british" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

"Rams that were quote illegal. They didn't make the full curl or mature criteria For and that was for region seven slash seven be alone so i'm hearing about twelve. Rams at this point that they know of that have been harvested that were legal so You know obviously a very serious thing that these these are illegal animals. That are being shot. It's like shooting at three point nine. Four point season and You know obviously has long term effects on their while she population so something that we're very concerned about the absolute having seen that through a post up to sort of tell that story a little bit share it and asked the folks out there who be talking to you about this issue. And what's driving the wire wire a number of sheep coming in at her illegal and both your names came up from from the social media world. Have on here. So i was. I was great great with with an hour. Both of you guys had committed to coming on the podcast in a couple of days. So thank you for that. And i appreciate having this conversation. So so what. I'd like to get to is really like you know just to dive a little bit into you. Know how do we get to a place where you on an average year. There is three to five illegal sheep harvested in british columbia and in this year. I'm i've heard similar numbers cal. Twelve sheep have come in a illegal sheep and and that's well let's over double that we typically see and then obviously that's concerning and and i think a few numbers that are important here as we're talking about an average annual harvest of about two hundred sheep in british columbia and and this year and most of us being thin horn that You know if you're talking about twelve twelve animals as that's that's a huge percentage of the population that are being a incorrectly harvested. Maybe i'll ask you adam adam. Did you see any legal rams on your sheep on.

Rams british columbia adam adam rams
"british" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

04:42 min | 1 year ago

"british" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

"But i'd love to hear anyone's feedback on some great polls. Nox obviously disagree job on pools as well. But i've never run them so Of to hear your feedback on that if you're listening to have some comments force okay. So couple of things to talk about steve. What's the wildfire situation. British columbia man still region Last time we talked abo- to help lytton and monte lake have been hit and now it sounds like sixty seventy structures in the west. Side of colona okinawan indian band been nailed the crews still fighting hard. There's been orders. Logan late was told to get out a little spots. Kamloops loops were on alert. And did they say the word unprecedented been thrown a lot the last year or so and this is another great description for it. It's unprecedented we've never seen a wildfire season like this and goes back to what we keep touching on of liquidity john davies in previous podcast lack of forest management and managing for for-profit versus bound diversity. And it's it's scary. Oh they're in. Our heart goes out to those that are affected and will be affected. And yeah just it's tragic. That really truly is absolutely well. Said steve soya Definitely thinking about our friends out there in the struggles. People are going through and there's nothing worse than worrying about the security of your home rate. I just can't imagine in your family's welfare health and safety and and then next thing loss of personal property so just a horrible year and hopefully we can get some cooler cooler weather and get some rain and see some of this stuff abated for sure Okay let's look some of those parts of rain over the last week but while you're you're throwing a bucket into the ocean right foot as you said absolutely okay. So segue now This past weekend we had our while cheap drastic classic chiloe Another fantastic events Raising money for wild sheep in british columbia this year..

monte lake steve soya john davies British columbia Logan steve british columbia
"british" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"british" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

"This is talk is cheap. A podcast by wild sheep society british columbia come along as we take conversations that matter to you into the high album still buddy. How's it going that you're kinda airy what's going on. Also people can't see you or see us and So that's a couple of things first of all for our listeners. If you're listening and you're interested let us know how you feel about this on youtube format. We're gonna continue to the podcast. 'cause you guys told us you wanted that but as we're growing the platform we have the option now to do a youtube based scenario so offer both and you can see live video. I can see the benefits as an example that last one with josh hamilton. A couple of weeks ago. He had a powerpoint doubted in great for to use the video. Portion inhabit on youtube I think too like You know some of the taxidermy ones. That's another great opportunity Just the total segue lot of feedback. We've got is that podcast with trevor carruthers Rack master taxidermy. Audio quality was really poor but the content was fantastic. So we're going to record that one i've talked to. He's pretty upset that the quality was so poor. We are to As you know we switched into this new format which feedback we got us. Much better so We're gonna record that session down the road here in the next few weeks as well so yes the only downside to go into a youtube format as they have to stare at us right through a lot of people. 'cause we faces for radio right. Yeah fair enough. Yeah absolutely So anyway this is a cool episode. we sit down with the hunting partner. Mike kirk and i were fresh off the mountain from northern bc. We did a fly in trip to unnamed lake in the northwest region six And had a great hunt. You're gonna hear all about it We had some highs and lows. And some failures successes. I think it's just a great episode. Mike is so knowledgeable He taught me everything. I've known now about mountain hunting. Which probably isn't a lot. Sorry did everything i know. super knowledgeable guy One of those guys that researches everything he does to almost to a fault really so knowledgeable so real cool podcast. Enjoy this one. It was fun and we talked about our high way. A lot of great memories on on And you know like any to. There's there's those downtimes right where you're just dragon and Just trying to get through and fight to live to fight another day but anyway real cool podcast episode Forty one with the myself. Mike kirk on the northern northwest mountain. British columbia yeah it was..

youtube trevor carruthers josh hamilton Mike kirk columbia Mike northern northwest mountain British columbia
"british" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

08:17 min | 1 year ago

"british" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

"That's that's inspiring all of us in the ministry staff and everyone included on this project relates. Okay we need to. We need to get the ball rolling on this. We need to get serious about this. We need to do this. This entire hundred fifty kilometer corridor along the fraser because we can get. We can get rid of movie. We believe that no one. We know that it's happening down in the states as well in there and they're seeing similar results. So yeah i mean moving forward. I'm so excited about You know it's it's a big project it's gonna take us another seven eight years probably to do that and you know it's gonna. We're looking at probably one hundred fifty k. per year. Something like that for that. It's big it's not a it's not a small thing but Those sheep populations right now in that entire area are sitting around six hundred fifty animals where traditionally they were twenty five hundred so you know if we can get back to that that is that is a hell of conservation story. As far as i'm concerned. I think what it does. Pete is it. It's our legacy right. This is our opportunity to leave a legacy for the future of while cheap in british columbia. We can actually transform the landscape Like you said they went from that twenty five hundred down to these all time. Low numbers not recovered. We know movies the issue that's been proven now. Scientists know this violence. No this With this new Basically test remove you know approach to it which has been proven very well proven in hell's canyon and to a lesser extent here in bc now. Recently with the fraser. We can change the face of wild sheep in british columbia. These bighorns can come back to those traditional numbers and we can do our part so i. I'm really excited about it. The the downside is is it comes at an eight year cost one point one million is what you know chris. Brockman telling us that we're going to need to invest in it. So we got some heavy lifting over the next seven or eight years to do. But i can tell you people are passionate about. Our members are passionate about step up. they're getting involved and there's another of other organizations that have stepped up as at well. We seen the wild she foundation contributed this project obviously. atf no-brainer even cabela's shaw. They donated five thousand dollars. A few years back But we have abbotsford fish and game club stepped up this year. Seventeen thousand five hundred dollars towards this project midwest while cheap foundation as contributed so a lot of benefactors. There that want to be involved in this. And i'm really encourage you know we're we're seeing some chris. Proctor said a best amigos. I never get the tell success stories in in my job because it's always doom and gloom you know wildlife and bc. It's so challenging. There's so many struggles loss of habitat all these disease issues. And he goes. You know i wake up in the morning. I think about the sheep because we're actually doing something that benefits while cheap and it's a success story in my job. And so he's he's jacked the butter. I'm shocked about it. I know you are. And i think that you know as an organization. We can really leave a legacy for wild sheep in the province. I think we're gonna make a difference so we we already have made a small difference. But i think we could leave a legacy behind the step. People will talk about one hundred years from now so pretty encouraging stuff and i thank you for all your commitment work that you do in the field. All the time with that fall it was You know it was a it was the die off of that heard. That was kind of the the beginnings of welsh sheep society bc. It's it's data her dying off in the mid mid nineties. That concerned concerned the the original guys that started this up And i wasn't around at that time. So i can't speak for them but they were worried about you. Know about the california bighorns all along the fraser river. And you know now. Science has caught up to things. We you know back then. We didn't know what the heck it was and now we do and now we know how to solve that problem and so a man. I'm just honored to be a car. A small tiny part of of this project. And i'm gonna continue to. Everything i can and i'm going to continue to tell everybody i know about it and promote it and and encourage people to continue to you know whether that's a step up in whatever form you can if that's monetary that's awesome if that's volunteerism your time that's awesome if it's if it's likes and shares of post on on social media that's also awesome like everything else right now so you know we're just gonna continue doing what we do and There's gonna be new people step in at all times you know. It's going to just continue where we're showing that that good work can be done and and will continue to do so out right on man and and you're kind of our poster boy You know you're out on the ground you're doing the heavy lifting but then on top of it You're You're advocating You stepped up your monarch silver member. Which means that you've donated a bunch your personal money to this 'cause And just can't thank you enough for for your commitment to wild This past week in although the media outreach you've done just fantastic and really really grateful for everything that you've been doing that So with that any last thoughts or parting words anything anything we need to think about or anything. We missed on the podcast. Otherwise i'll let you get back to you know you've got a busy day planned again with this with this. Grand forks the buckle. So yeah no. I mean i think we've already hit. Most of it is just you gotta. I don't know i. i like to stay positive right. This is this is crappy. What's happening in in grand forks right now. There's there's no denying that but But we're also seeing successes were also contributing to positive habitat enhancement throughout the province. Were pushing for burns up north or pushing for burns down south where you know. We're in we're in the weeds everywhere right now and man. That's that's everyone on our board. That's we're having members. Come up to us suggesting new projects that we should be looking at It's inspiring it continues to fire me every day. i sit here in you know. Forget a new email from chris barker from josh hamilton. Up north. or whatever robin rutledge. Like we're all everyone's pulling their weight. Everyone's doing what they can Just we all continue to inspire each other and and new members come and reach out to us all the time and they're inspired and you know it it's like this just i gotta get away gushy about it like it's it's it's really special to to be a part of this and i'm truly excited for the future as much as you know. We are seeing some some bad disease stuff. Go on like we're doing so much good right now and and it's not just a tutor on horns we we truly are making a difference on the landscape For well sheep and it's just incredible to be small part of it while said man and you know. I think you know you talk about the positive. He's you know there's still some great property there and yet we have had to stay off this blue tongue. Virus is gonna go away. We know that it's not a perpetual thing. Mobis a much bigger thing as we alluded to already. So you know there's more work to be done there but The cool thing is is through our partnership and working and supporting silt southern interior land. Trust we've set that landside so that land there is there for perpetuity. So it's really encouraging. So what we really need to do. Now is focused on that habitat component makes sure that land is healthy and protected so that those wild sheep can come back and have healthy populations in thrive for generations to come so yet absolutely one hundred percent agree. Yeah this a bit of a dark cloud with the blue tongue thing but the cool thing is it's not permanent is going to go away. Hopefully this is a flash in the pan that will never see again and we'll build the backup See healthy sheep on the landscape back in grand forks for centuries to come so My friend i want to thank you for all you do for the society. Thank you for taking the time to meet with us today. I know you know. Just trying to coordinate. This was really challenging. You like oh. I meet with. Cbc today to meet with the gazette here so You know thanks for making it a priority for us. I know that you're in high demand now and just fantastic working. Thank you.

abbotsford fish and game club midwest while cheap foundation british columbia chris Brockman cabela atf Pete Proctor fraser river chris barker robin rutledge grand forks josh hamilton california Mobis
"british" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"british" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

"This is talk is cheap. A podcast by wild sheep society british columbia come along as we take conversations that matter to you into the high album.

"british" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"british" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

"Gt process You it's controversial controversial at times right but that there's a case where conservation and wildlife for winning because of an for those that don't know g g g is government government negotiations But yeah it's it's great That that burn a couple of years ago crater mountain. I think it was that there was some new technology. Wasn't it about their. They're dropping like little foil balls or something fireballs airballs. Yeah yeah. I remember seeing that in the pictures and just the the the look of a on the face of everybody participating almost a sigh of relief of finally this is getting burnt in work controlling type thing and is is. We're seeing around the province right now and in some spots across canada and we know californian austrailia the all get hit rate. It's fire is going to happen. And if if we manage it properly. It doesn't have to be anywhere near as devastating as it is right now to communities while said okay before we go off the episode here a couple of things. We got to new raffles out. Jurassic classic raffle It's fully donated by Rifles in steiner scopes They they've donated a sack. Eighty five fin light absolutely beautiful rifle topped with a steiner scope I think is around six grand atmos. Rpi on it And our goal is to sell it out We have the opportunity to make twenty thousand dollars on that raffle in every penny. Going to go on the ground in the fraser river. The fraser river project Bighorns that we've been working on the last two years. One hundred thousand dollars of our money's gone there so far and last night at a board of directors meeting. I think we've proved sixty thousand dollars for that. So this is a flagship project for the wild sheep. society be seen. It's a flagship project for wild sheep in bc The the fraser river bighorns of dropped off dramatically in the nineties do disease event and they've never recovered and this is the steps that are going to get us to that next level that we can see those numbers starting to come back with actually seen Some very early evidence of a great success in that in that in a river project. So we're really. I think the budget for this coming years. One hundred eighty thousand dollars a big chunk modeling said while chiefs put in sixty grand in. And we've got a bunch of funny parts are going to be twenty thousand from that rifle so you can see the importance of it right. It's really critical Of and you know if if you wanna get a chance to win a sweet rife okay. Yeah that's part of it but really like look what you're doing for wildlife conservation of wild sheep in british columbia when you're supporting raffle right and it takes only twenty five bucks. I ask me can can grab a couple of eight. So yeah exactly and then we just launched another one. it's a very very cool raffle It's the explain it. Because i don't think i'm going to do a very good job. What what it is. It's a trailer would. It doesn't sound great. It's a trailer. It's it's it's a gen to doghouse with. Badlands series digital camera roughneck edition tent. Basically it's a tent trailer. That.

crater mountain fraser river californian austrailia canada chiefs british columbia
"british" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

02:53 min | 1 year ago

"british" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

"Is once in a lifetime. This is a draw that you're to get a chance to win super exciting. So yeah ben reached out he goes. I gonna personally guide the hunt. And i'm going to get while wildlife captured to donate it so this is a fully donated hunt from canadian. Wildlife capture guided by banbury cough with coastal inlet adventures of a lifetime. There's only thousand tickets available. Odds are very good on it. Tickets are fifty dollars a piece and we're going to run this through Until august it'll be drawn in august is season. And it's this exactly i attempt Twenty twenty one and this is really appealing for british. Columbia's out you know. A lot of these hunts guided hunt sir appealing to foreigners but bbc. How tough is it to get a roosevelt draw and and certainly wanted a coveted area. Like this you can't get it. It's the odds are so slim. I've been putting in for roosevelt for ever since i've been hunting here bbc and i've never got drawn right. I put in for areas known for better on spy or lower odds but fantastic And yet definitely want to get tickets on that. So that's available saturday Go to our website and it'll be under a raffle stab and you get Get tickets on that hunt so fantastic. Oh yeh just like just like everything else. Every single dollar stays rate here in bc and goes on the ground projects. What was our total dollars in two thousand twenty. That went on the ground from from raffles. Like this. Two hundred seventy thousand is what through actively we did. You know that's a lot and again you say it all the time. It just doesn't help the sheep. It helps feeling all the all the species right Stuff we hunt stuff. We don't hide everything benefits from it. So yeah it's across. The board absolutely caused could be better yet. Pretty exciting raffles on the badgers to butterflies and mule deer stone cheap rate. It's just because it says cheat society doesn't mean everything else doesn't benefit when we do projects like this so stoked stoke for this one and I i can't wait to get mine tickets right on. Okay episode twenty four. I believe we're up to it is hard to believe it's It's been a a wicked ride. Lots of great feedback from you guys. Keep the ideas common. We want to hear who you want to see on the show But this was really cool Were sitting down with. Tanner banished from frontiers men gear They're doing some fantastic work in custom knife world in british columbia We've partnered with them on the stony which we talk about on the show and Tanner brings up a lot of really cool aspects the knife making world a some really good relevant.

two thousand Two hundred seventy thousand saturday Columbia thousand tickets Tanner fifty dollars a piece twenty a lot august Twenty twenty one canadian episode twenty four once columbia single dollar british bc
"british" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"british" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

"So that's gonna be twenty yards okay. I think it's about twenty two yards. And then i have a range viner. Check to see how close i was to that. Just do that. A few few few days a week to make sure. I was getting my distances right because it it definitely does play into your success of the shots odds. If you're wrong on every target yard up gonna shoot very well right absolutely so do you have. What would be your best score like. what like. What's a good score in the system. What would be your best score. Yeah to be honest. I never the totally changes right. It's it's totally dependent on the course that you could get a really hard course whereas all the targets are from twenty five to thirty yards and their small targets. So you could get really. You could be shooting fives all day but half other people miss the dark so then that could be a really great score that day or it could be all. The targets are ten yards and there are a large animals and you could be getting tens all day and then that's a great score that day so if there's not like a baseline gauge of what i'm trying to shoot. Yeah and i. Even if i had a number of what my best day shooting was. It's kind of irrelevant based on what the course was set up like that day or or what the conditions were so. It's hard to say what a good scores in. Actually don't i can't even think of what my stats for for for that for scoring scoring-wise. Sure yeah absolutely. So let's talk about technique i guess really so obviously with the longbow sightless And it's basically on instinct really. So so what's your skillset when you're Let's not talk about whether other factors just the basic shot Some of the things that you're considering when you're when you're making your shots and and Some of the skills that you've made you successful. Yeah so..

twenty yards thirty yards ten yards twenty five about twenty two yards fives tens days target yard
"british" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

04:59 min | 1 year ago

"british" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

"Catching. This is bending samples from harvested animals whether they're harpist in british colombia or harvested and alberto and transported into british columbia. And there are rules about what you can bring into the province and where those tissues and so that just has to be closely adhered to you. Know we don't want infective meets or tissues to be brought into british columbia and left on the landscape because this is a disease that can you know. The effect of the prions can laugh in soil. And then you know that causes a local problem and a potential for spreads so just Yeah sample submissions initiative heads and tracking that information. It's absolutely the best thing. Okay sounds great. So i think i read it correct if you give me that. Latest information on it but he can literally la- last in the soil for years can it. It's it's not like a. It's gone in a week or month or it lasts for literally. Years doesn't yes that's correct. Yeah and depending on the climatic conditions but it does persist for a long time. Something aware of very good. Okay so if somebody wants more information on. Cw wd just go to the mystery. Flynn website google search on not. Is that the best resource for them on us. Yes that is and or talk to kate nelson. She's happy to talk to anyone. That has questions or once more information. I know there's concern right now about Whether the that make us healthy to eat and what needs to be done about that and kate can answer those kind of questions. She's very up on the the matter but Just you know where and cape particularly is doing her best to communicate this information so that we can collect the best samples and keep providing opportunity for hunters because we want everyone to be up to harvest to what they're interested in and consume what they harvest case for. Sure yeah we Case contact info in the show notes here so people can reach out for any anything they see your for any more information and not just you know after say hats off to the staff that have been involved in this. They've done a great job. I think cates done an excellent job sitting fat Getting constant updates from the ministry on this in from kate specifically in helen. So it's been a great resource. I think you guys have done a great job of getting the word out as well and working with other User groups that in particular You get to denigrate job of communicating. That so hats off to you guys on that. So i think i don go so. Let's let's took jump back to sheep here kylie so You know you talked about sort of the overall health of thin horns nbc Are you able to talk a little bit about you..

kate nelson kylie kate helen british colombia google Flynn british columbia cape
"british" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

American Revolution Podcast

03:30 min | 1 year ago

"british" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

"Hello thank you for joining the american revolution today. Episode one eighty two occupied philadelphia. As i mentioned back in episode one sixty general house. British army entered philadelphia on september. Twenty sixth seventeen seventy seven a prior to the occupation philadelphia had been not only the seat of the continental congress. It was also the largest city in british north america. It had a population of about forty thousand compared to twenty five thousand for new york city and fifteen thousand four boston general had hoped that its capture would finally bring the rebels to their senses or at least win him. Some praise back in london in the end. The capture accomplished not much of anything beyond being a career. Ender for the british commander of north america. The army found itself surrounded by hostile enemy with a great deal of difficulty keeping its own army properly supplied. Benjamin franklin's comment about philadelphia having captured general. How must've run. True for many british leader's having occupied the city. The british began setting up defenses. The burnish had slipped past the continental army to enter the city without having a major battle after brandy. Wine the continentals. However we're still in the field. An attack on the city was not out of the question. Captain mantra sewer house. Engineer took responsibility for the defenses. He proposed building a series of ten redoubts along a line. North of the city connected by defensive lines which stretched from the delaware river on the east to the schuylkill river on the west hatred. Out sat along a road that lead into the city modulus or later added two additional redoubts. Just north of the main defensive line to serve as outposts which could alert the main body in the event of an attack watchers surveyed. The proposed defensive line with general cornwallis who gave final approval. The next problem was actually building. These defenses the soldiers had to be ready for combat so the work fell on the civilian population. The call for laborers led to almost no volunteers. Most of the city's remaining population was quaker. Which had religious prescriptions against working on military projects beyond that the work was hard and the pay was terrible. General cornwallis had to threaten to conscripts locals before he could finally get about two hundred men to work on the project that was about half of the amount that they wanted as a result. The construction took many weeks before any of the defenses. Were even close to ready for garrison. Further slowing the project was that captain madrazo was also tasked with to open up the delaware river for weeks after the british occupation. The americans still held the forts below philadelphia. This prevented the british navy from reaching the city. How could not bring any supplies up the river until the british took control so in addition to defending against a land attack from the north the british still had to assist the navy to the south in removing the forts along the delaware..

philadelphia General cornwallis Captain mantra british north america British army Ender continental army Benjamin franklin delaware river schuylkill river new york city congress boston north america army london captain madrazo british navy navy delaware
"british" Discussed on The Media Show

The Media Show

06:01 min | 1 year ago

"british" Discussed on The Media Show

"How this week off. Calm the media regulator put out a pretty stark warning traditional. Uk broadcasting is at risk without radical shake-up but at risk of what and. What kind of shakeup are they talking about already. This ofcom is given the go-ahead to two new tv channels including one from rupert murdoch's news. Uk and ofcom is reportedly about to take on the massive task of regulating online harm including social media platforms like youtube an instagram but is a uk regulator really able to police the world wide web. While i'm joined by the person best able to answer those questions day. Melanie does is the newish chief. Executive of com a job. She started in february this year. And she's giving her first major interview to the media. Show elanie welcome to the media. Show thank you very much. Let's start with a quickfire round what you listen to this morning. Gosh i was listening to bbc. Radio news radio four today program. Which is what i often do in the mornings. I'm also these days increasing times radio well but that's how often wake up in the morning. I watched your perm new source. That you i heard two in the mornings day program. So it's a mix of the traditional newspapers. We got quite a lot in our household during the day. I i look at sky news up quite a lot. also bbc news and i'm a fan of bbc. Radio and things like newscast is one of my favorites as well. What was the best thing you've seen on. Tv recently <hes>. This time of year for me and my family is definitely strictly is just that time of year. Isn't it so. We're addicted to that. Every saturday night and sunday night for the results. Show georgia tech news most evenings. Some evenings are sometimes. Watch the bbc news. Sometimes i tv but to be honest increasingly like a lot of people. I'm i'm watching things on ketchup or doing things on the radio. Lord by the world catch up shortly in terms of online video. Subscriptions huge choices as disney plus amazon. Prime video netflix. Do you have. We've got two three disney but we've got net flicks and prime and some of the others so so we watch a real bletchley of traditional british tv alongside some of the new streaming services and we'll come onto kind of that balance and what it should look like in the future life for those who don't know huge amount about your background your career. You very distinguished career seven. Have you have actually worked in the arts or media or on a film set. Tv newsroom any of that stuff. No i never have myself. But of course what what i what i do bring is inadequate. Lot of understanding. You're kind of public policy. And how you make decisions in that context and i am also an avid viewer and listener. Tv and radio. Why would come appoint someone who's a massive public policy but it hasn't got a background in media and communications. I mean sharon. What was she went to the treasury for many is what does that say about the thinking behind that your appointment what. I'm not so much sure about my own appointment but the important thing in off comments that we have got a lot of experience from all sorts of different walks of life. We've got people who are radio engineers. He knew everything about managing spectrum. Which is one of the jobs we do. We've also got a lot of people with a background in the broadcasting industry. So might my job is to leave the organization and pull that together now. This is the show. We talk a lot about off. Komo news programming media regulator. This may not realize quite how broad you'll remain is. Could you just give us a quick run through of the cost of various that. Come under your purview. The communications regulator. So we look at things like how we get broadband improved across the country and mobile phone services making sure that the consumers valley served. But we also gonna come onto you today. We oversee the broadcasting costing sector and some of the rules and regulations that were that just says of come does a content regulator. Can you talk us through this week's ruling you made over i tv. What did you find what happens next. We found that. I had broken our rules. This is about how they were running on their competitions and some viewers who who wrote in and we're in that competition didn't have their votes counted. So what was great with a really good engagement with tv. The moment they spotted this they told us about it and they've they've really taken steps to address it so we won't be taking any further action but they did break the rules the rules. Should they be punished including facing fines. Well in this case it was human error it was just about putting the data on a spreadsheet incorrectly. And also i. Tv did engage with us really well. I'm really constructively right from the beginning. So we take that kind of thing into account and that's why we'll be taking further action of comes authority outfit. Come from the fact that it can hurt people financially. There's a bit of social stigma opprobrium attached to the fact that you might be found against by off calm but is your power ultimately that you can hurt people in their pocket. Well i mean. I think when you a regulator you've got a range of things that you're you're able to do one of them. Yes is to is to sanction people and find things but ideally is a last resort. An awful of ofcom does and we've been. We've done this in the report. We publish this week is actually bring research and evidence bear on on important questions and to make sure this transparency about what's going on let's focus a little bit on euro as a content regulator and look at some of the other big media stories around this week so all of a doubt in the culture sector. You must speak to you. On a regular basis. as written to netflix's asking them to make clear their drama series. The crown is fictionalized. Now if the crown with broadcast on bbc one and therefore fell under of comes burkas code which you guys make. The bbc put a disclaimer on it. Well i think it's a really interesting question. I mean you know as as you hinting out. There are different rules for different kinds of streams that we can now crtv so if you watching a program on bbc warn itv's for pretty much on sky virgin then you'll again you're watching programs are regulated by off. Commander are broadcasting code. If you're watching netflix six then it's a much narrower so regulations. In fact the regulator there is in holland because net flicks headquartered there for the whole of europe and actually you're watching on on youtube. Then there's no regulation at all so it is quite confusing sometimes for the viewer. Things

netflix disney sharon treasury Komo