38 Burst results for "Britain"

Fresh update on "britain" discussed on Queer as Fact

Queer as Fact

00:36 min | 25 min ago

Fresh update on "britain" discussed on Queer as Fact

"Unlike, she moved to the US like. They've. Got Her pay in the US and spent much of her life teaching in the states, she was a sociologist by training at another like Black Caravan American feminist Audrey Gloria Cross pods a number of times, because by spike, the same conventions and went to the same conferences did nineteen eighty-one Gloria contacted to invite to speak at a women writers symposium. She was organizing in the Virgin Islands. Following this. The tree became close through work together on anti-apartheid activists, and as Gloria said a spark ignited. On. October Twenty Fifth Nineteen ninety-three United States invited order as family homeland of Granada. I can. I didn't even cash that data. So it's not like it's country Golden, and it does become its own country again after that I came in nineteen, seventy, four Granada became independent from Britain in Nineteen, seventy, nine like a local Communist Party seized power which have close ties with Cuba I see in nineteen ninety-three, that was some internal tensions in the ominous party between the like later and his deputy Minnesota, so they have arrangement similar to Ustralia this time. They had a prime minister under Governor General. Was, the representative for rid and the governor. General contacted the United. States for help united. States took help as what's invade. End came in basically. Margaret Thatcher was angry at Ronald.

United States Audrey Gloria Cross Granada Margaret Thatcher Communist Party Virgin Islands Prime Minister Spike Minnesota Representative Cuba Britain Ustralia
UK to exclude Huawei from role in high-speed phone network

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 9 hrs ago

UK to exclude Huawei from role in high-speed phone network

"Britain's government has backtracked on plans to give Chinese telecommunications company Huawei a limited role in the new high speed mobile phone network in a decision with broad implications for relations between London and Beijing Britain says the plans in place off to U. S. sanctions made it impossible to ensure the security of wall way a quick mind forcing it to start turning to other suppliers for components the U. S. threatened to sever and intelligence sharing arrangement with Britain because of concerns the equipment could allow the Chinese government to infiltrate which networks kind of a secretary Oliver Dowden says the decision would delay the five G. rollout on cost millions of pounds but incision gives British telecoms operators until twenty twenty seven to remove what way apartment already into Britain's network Charles

Huawei London Beijing Britain Chinese Government Oliver Dowden Secretary Telecoms
Fresh "Britain" from Lee Mathews

Lee Mathews

00:39 sec | 41 min ago

Fresh "Britain" from Lee Mathews

"The nation is handling this and how Oklahoma's handling it too. All on NewsRadio 1000 Katie Okay, It's Leigh Matthews and the drive. This report is sponsored by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Again, he's bound for the East Abductor still wrapping up new injury accident Westminster in Britain Road eastbound memorial pennies bound to 40 Service Road, Santa Fe Memorial Rodent, Kelly wrote King total traffic with the onset of the covert 19 pandemic. You might be tempted to leave your child in the car alone to avoid exposure. But if left in a hot car, this could result in death in a matter of minutes. Always look before you lock a message from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Gotta be a breezy, muggy evening temperature running around 95 degrees in the metro right now. Still 85 at 10 o'clock. No chance of rain through 10. But later tonight after about 2 to 3.

Leigh Matthews Santa Fe Memorial Rodent Oklahoma Britain Road Kelly
UK to exclude Huawei from role in high-speed phone network

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 9 hrs ago

UK to exclude Huawei from role in high-speed phone network

"Britain's government has backtracked on plans to give Chinese telecommunications company Huawei a limited role in the new high speed mobile phone network in a decision with broad implications for relations between London and Beijing Britain says the plans in place off to U. S. sanctions made it impossible to ensure the security of wall way a quick mind forcing it to start turning to other suppliers for components the U. S. threatened to sever and intelligence sharing arrangement with Britain because of concerns the equipment could allow the Chinese government to infiltrate which networks kind of a secretary Oliver Dowden says the decision would delay the five G. rollout on cost millions of pounds but incision gives British telecoms operators until twenty twenty seven to remove what way apartment already into Britain's network Charles the last month London

Huawei London Beijing Britain Chinese Government Oliver Dowden Secretary Telecoms Charles
Fresh update on "britain" discussed on 10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:21 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "britain" discussed on 10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

"Kind. You pushed through the store like long supermarket lines, Amazon has unveiled what it calls a smart shopping cart. It uses cameras, sensors and a scale to automatically detect what shoppers drop in. It keeps a tally and then charges there. Amazon account when they leave the store a screen there. The handle list. What's being charged and the cart can detect when something is taken out and have it removed from the bill. What will be called Amazon Dash CART will first show up with a new Los Angeles supermarket. Amazon is opening later this year. I've Shelly Adler wins these time, 6 50 for the British government has backtracked on plans to Of Chinese telecommunications company will weigh a limited role in a new mobile phone network says the bounds in place after US sanctions made it impossible to ensure the security of wild way equipment, forcing it to start turning to other suppliers for components. The U. S threatened to sever an intelligent sharing arrangement We Britain because of concerns the equipment could allow the Chinese government to infiltrate British networks. Culliver Secretary Oliver Down, says the decision would delay the five G rollout and cost millions of pounds. Decision gives British Telecom's operators until 2027 to remove one way equipment already in Britain's network. Charles the Lede asthma London 84 degrees Now Clear sky.

Amazon British Telecom Britain British Government Shelly Adler Oliver Down Los Angeles Chinese Government Secretary Charles United States
UK demands the public wear face coverings in shops

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:23 sec | 12 hrs ago

UK demands the public wear face coverings in shops

"Britain is looking to clarify its message on masks. The government there will now demand people wear face coverings in shops. Anyone failing to comply with the order could face a fine. It goes into effect July 24th. Many European nations, including Germany, Spain, Italy and Greece, already require masks to be worn in enclosed spaces. Britain had been recommending masks but not requiring them. The ex

Britain Spain Greece Germany Italy
UK reportedly poised to backtrack on Huawei inclusion in 5G

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 13 hrs ago

UK reportedly poised to backtrack on Huawei inclusion in 5G

"The British government is preparing to change course on plans to give Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei a limited role in Britain's new high speed mobile phone network the government's likely decision comes after the U. S. threatened to sever unintelligent sharing arrangement because it concerns while way a quick mind because a lot of the Beijing government to infiltrate British networks in January British prime minister Boris Johnson had sold to balance economic and security pressures by agreeing to give away a limited role in the so called five G. network one excluding the company feel cool components of the system but the move set up a diplomatic clash with the U. S. with implications for security cooperation unless Britain dumped away Charles the live as well London

British Government Britain Prime Minister Boris Johnson Charles London Huawei Beijing
Serbia-Kosovo talks 'back on track

Monocle 24: The Globalist

06:22 min | 16 hrs ago

Serbia-Kosovo talks 'back on track

"Now Serbia has refused to recognize Kosovo's statehood since Kosovo unilaterally declared independence from Serbia in two thousand and eight, nearly a decade after a very bloody war dialogue between Belgrade and Prishtina began in two thousand eleven, producing some thirty agreements most of them, though a not observed, but after talks broke down a couple of years ago, the parties are communicating again with both the EU and the US weighing in well for more I'm joined by James, Kara Lindsay who's visiting professor at the NFC and author of the politics of recognition and engagement, e you, member-state relations with Kosovo James Let's begin with the US involvement. Where do we stand with this? Well. There was a lot of excitement that the united. States was getting involved in this process a couple of years ago. There was a sense Washington really wants it's gets are. Big International Agreement. This was going to be one of trump's moments of glory. That was going to get reelected. And so there was a lot of activity that was going on. By the United States role, the separate from the e U process switch continuing as you've noted since two thousand eleven. But recently it's basically collapsed in this collapse for number of reasons one because they would charges brought against the presidents of Kosovo. For War Crimes but also I think that we just up against the clock in the United States Rick. Grenell the US ambassador to Germany, who was handling this? It looks like he's going to be very involved in trump's reelection campaign, and as we know it less than four months to go before the US election. I, think the latest sellings way hand over to Europe is saying look I've. Got To be dealing with now, so the ball is very very certainly back in the European court now and there was a video summit on Friday chaired by the the the Cherry double-act Merckel macron. What what transpired? The the problem as Well. There's a whole range of problems. As again as you noted as being a range of agreements have been put in place over the past, a number of years most which haven't really been observed, but there's also been deep divisions within the European Union about what they want. Now there's been a number of proposals being coming forward a nice been suggestions that the President Sukasto vote and Serbia. Actually at one point very close to a deal, but controversially that would include some so the territorial swap and we know that Germany in actual fact Britain as well a very very opposed to this. The. Americans on the other hand seem to be open to the idea although they seem to be a rowing buckle now now. I'm so the probably essentially have is that we need a big picture secondments here and the Europeans have been pressing so small normalization agreements, which is all very well and good boots. As I'm saying I worked Cypress pathetic years, and these small agreements, a justice difficult to get into place, and even more typical in many ways to implement than actually spending time focusing on a big picture final deal, and so I think this is the real question about half now. Is it going to be back to try to get these piecemeal agreements that don't really work or all week in the focus on the big picture? Final settlements. Will really put this issue behind both Kosovo. and Serbia and of course that question becomes very urgent, because it looks as if the leaders of Serbia in Kosovo will meet face to face in Brussels later this week. Yes I'm I mean to be honest with you? I don't think anyone's really expecting that. We can see any big breakthroughs now. and I again. I'm I'm very very skeptical that you're really even knows what it wants. the IT could be a return to these sort of. These small bitsy talks which you don't get me wrong. These are important things that needs to be doubts which will make long foot for people in costumes survey much better. But like a Lotta people a my view is the you sold. If they were the big picture deal, anyway and so what you're doing is many ways wasting time on energy block treasurer on all these trying to get these small agreements, which in the end don't really get implemented because that fundamental big picture agreement so. I I think the big problem here is that it's it's. Europe's coming at the wrong way. I mean Europe officials as saying that resolution is the only way that Serbia and Kosovo seek to become members of the EU. Do you think that that's a big enough incentive? Well. I mean I. Get sent certainly in Kosovo there is. A growing realization something needs to be done so often. Votes Clayton dependency. The was that we go from. There was a we've got. The Americans behind US rebuilt the British the French recalled Germans. They're going to go out and tell. The world recognized Kosovo and in the first few years. That seems to be what was happening and we got to a point where about one, hundred ten or hundred thirteen of the one hundred ninety three members of the UN recognized. Kosovo But Russia and China refuse to recognize it, so that prevents full you and membership, but what we've seen in the past couple of years is Serbia's lobbied countries to withdraw that recognition of Kosovo is now recognized about ninety seven countries so I think in Prishtina this realization if we want to join the UN if we want to be a normal, fully accepted country on the world stage, we've got to reach a final deal with Belgrade. What is it that we? We can offer Belgrade. The Belgrade might be willing to accept. The trump is what it sink. President Sanctuary was willing to offer Belgrade's. The German said No. We're not willing to allow it to go that far because if you stop changing borders between Serbian, Kosovo. Even if this is consensual, you'll not problems north Macedonia and Bosnia so we we have a fundamental problem here of how we're going to deal with something that frankly speaking could be dealt with sally easily. If, there was sort of coincidence abuse amongst the Americans, the Europeans, subs and the Kosovo Albanians James. Thank you very much? Indeed, that's James Collins.

Kosovo Serbia United States Belgrade European Union Europe Donald Trump Prishtina James Collins Germany NFC European Court Washington Kara Lindsay UN Visiting Professor Rowing President Sanctuary President Trump
A Tech Cold War Looms

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:52 min | 1 d ago

A Tech Cold War Looms

"This week Britain's minister, Boris Johnson is expected to reverse a decision. He made in January to allow the Chinese telecom giant hallway to build part of the country's five gene at work. The British public deserve to have access to the best possible. Now if people oppose one brand or not. To tell us what's the alternative. Britain has come under enormous pressure from its biggest America which sees while way as a security threat. It's not the only Chinese firm that America views with suspicion. Last week Secretary of State Mike. Pompeo told Fox. News the government was considering banning the social media. APP TIKTOK. Owned by the Chinese firm by dense. We're certainly looking at it I. Don't want to get in front of the president, but it's something we're looking at. What would you recommend that people download that APP on their phones tonight tomorrow anytime. currently Boley if you want your private information in the hands of the Chinese Communist Party. and American firms are caught to the geopolitical tensions between the world's two biggest economies. Google Microsoft and twitter all said they would stop cooperating with Hong Kong's authorities for the time being because of a sweeping new security law there imposed by Beijing. It all adds up to what's being called. A new Cold War fought on a digital battleground. For the last three or four years, people have talked about the tech. Cold War. Patrick Fouls is the economists business affairs editor. This strange thing is it's been hard to see evidence of much damage on the ground, and in fact, the companies like apple and Hallway in China. It's really been a golden era in some ways with record sales and profits over the last couple. Couple of years was become clear however in the last few weeks. Is The tech cold? War is really beginning to bite. And why is that? Why is that split becoming so much more certain now? Well I think what you can do is look at it at two speeds. The world of software and the Internet was never particularly linked up in the first place so. Chinese consumers can't use most American Internet companies and vice versa, and what we're seeing, there is the final tentacles are beginning to unwind really very quickly, and that's that's example. The TIKTOK BAN THE REFUSAL US tech companies to play ball with the new Chinese law in Hong Kong so that. World really splitting quickly. The thing that's taking more time is the heart where supply chains which are much much more rigid structures is many many hundreds of billions of dollars of equipment in the grand huge numbers of people being employed, and it's really very hard to untangle those quickly, but that does not seem to be happening as well partly, because of the American actions against Hallway, but also because China seems to be deciding okay, we're GONNA have to go alone here which means we're going to have to really ramp up investment, and so, how how prepared are the country's respective? Tech Industries to to make that split complete. Will in the wall, the softwares already in effect pretty much happened in the world of hauled where the answer is, people are beginning to get plans up and running so smick this Chinese semiconductor company not take that seriously in the past by its Western and Asian competitors, but now it's really raising very big box the ideas to supersize the production capacity and sophistication of semiconductors in China. That's a process that's underway. Similarly Wall Way in China is scrambling around to find alternative sources for the key components that it purchases from the West particularly American companies and over the next I think eighteen months will see a sense of whether that's possible. The one thing to make clear is there are some companies. Companies here which are just left in very uncomfortable positions. Apple in China makes over one hundred million dollars a day there on the simply no easy way for it to pick sides in. You know it depends on the US Amazon China similarly. TSMC, which is the huge Taiwanese semiconductor company that really dominates the industry to some degree. It depends on Chinese customers and American ones, and for those companies that are caught in the middle. There really is no simple answer to this, but if the big picture here is that each country has to build up its own set of software and hardware champions, that sounds expensive redundant I mean. How easy will it be for these countries to make those parallel systems? Well I think you can look at it in two ways. One is sort of finances of it almost an and just that you're going to have to duplicate. Supply chains to some degree and I think that could easily cost. Hundreds of billions of dollars to do is not impossible, and arguably within the scale of the overall economy is a super tolerable inefficiency. I think the other call St-, which is much harder to get to grips with is just the risk of this process spiraling out of control. And to give you two ways in which could happen, it could easily for example move from the world of tech to the world of finance with western Chinese banks subject to sudden private. BANS FREEZES OF ACTIVITY. A night could be much more destabilizing because the financial system is very sensitive to changes like that the other risk is just that this becomes the thin end of the wedge, and sooner or later we find out that suddenly American calls or Chinese toys, or a growing list of things deem to be of strategic importance I and instead of this really being an argument bat security, it just becomes an indiscriminate path of protectionism, the house, a huge economic cost, but on technology end of things that is inherently a global business. How do you think other countries are going to deal with this split as it happened? Well the assumption I think of many American policy makers is the world's default is to use Silicon Valley and one of the things that will happen is that assumption is tested a pretty painful way? It's clear that some very close American allies. Japan Australia possibly Burton will. Ultimately vast choose go with America, but I think we'll see. First of all. China's tech industry now has a very big sphere of influence that includes a lot of Asia where people will continue to use Chinese tech, and secondly that some big economies India's the obvious one may take a third off, and you know be equally hostile, friendly to America and shine. And really seek to play both sides off while developing their own indigenous capacity, so the end of the day. You're heading towards a world where America. Controls most of the world's technology, and then there's this Galapagos of China with its own systems. I think instead your heading to world, which is very fractured with the bulk of the world's population living in countries that use both systems and probably mistrust both to some degree. So. Is it sensible to ask who's likely to win the technical door? I. Think will see both superpowers do probably just find because they are huge. Sophisticated markets and the real losers will be the node countries that are sort of stuck between the two places like Taiwan Hall Sibley Career, where really it's impossible for them to pick sides, and where the own technology industry as a result is going to face a very difficult Erie. Patrick thank you very much time. Jason thanks for having me.

China America United States Patrick Chinese Communist Party. Britain Boris Johnson Tech Industries Apple Hong Kong Tsmc Boley Taiwan Hall Sibley Career President Trump Galapagos Pompeo
UK-China ties freeze with debate over Huawei, Hong Kong

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 2 d ago

UK-China ties freeze with debate over Huawei, Hong Kong

"Britain and China ties a cooling swiftly with debate over wallowing on Hong Kong only five years ago then British prime minister David Cameron was celebrating a golden era in Britain Sino relations bonding with president xi jin ping over a pint of beer and signing of trade deals worth billions those friendly scenes now seem like a distant memory hostile rhetoric has ratcheted up in recent days the Beijing's new security law Hong Kong Britain's decision to offer refuge to millions in the former colony was met with a stern telling off and Chinese officials have threatened consequences if Britain decides to cut Chinese technology giant one way out of its critical telecoms infrastructure Charles the law does not London

Hong Kong David Cameron Beijing Hong Kong Britain Britain China Prime Minister President Trump Telecoms London
Summer getaway can begin: New UK quarantine rules in place

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 4 d ago

Summer getaway can begin: New UK quarantine rules in place

"The traditional British summer getaway to the Mediterranean is set to pick up steam as Britain quarantine restrictions are removed from dozens of countries including France Greece and Italy now anyone arriving back in England from around seventy five countries and territories what have to self isolate for fourteen days but with many flights still canceled holiday results are still working on ensuring that they are coded safe and many potential holidaymakers reluctant to make a trip abroad in light of the pandemic the aviation and travel industry is hoping that the new rules will help them salvage part of the summer holiday booking season it's been so battered by the restrictions imposed during the pandemic Charles the last month London

Mediterranean Greece Italy England London Britain France
Venus Williams - Game Changer

The Tennis Podcast

04:55 min | 5 d ago

Venus Williams - Game Changer

"Hello everyone can t the tennis podcast day. Eleven of Wimbledon relived would have been women's Semifinals Day Wimbledon and would probably have been under the reef because looking out of my window in Putney, which is a? Mile and a half ish down the road from us, W nineteen is in miserable. Say That's great. Thank you, British weather for making some twenty twenty. Just that little bit extra great. But not to worry because. David Matt to talk tennis with. Seven hundred episodes David you just told me. We actually can mark a milestone because we've remembered it before recording rather than fully seconds off the recording. Yeah, we! We've celebrated five hundred, six, hundred one in the past. So yeah I'm fin quite proud. You know it. It draws me when you say it's women's semifinal state today because I'd kind of I'd forgotten that in as much as I'm so used to now talking about classic matches with you both watching them. We've just watched another one to the BBC of. Matches on every day that they're showing Wimbledon doing their own stuff online streaming matches, which is the one good thing I take from this whole period is the suddenly. The vast archive is just being. Put out there for everybody to enjoy, but I had forgotten. That is still Wimbledon and today would have been women's semifinals, and that makes me quite sad, yeah. I, wish I wish I could forget I get the impression that perhaps you haven't forgotten in the optimistic. Every cloud silver lining way that David. I Dunno, I kind of have in a way, I'm just so so invested in what we're doing. The the usual schedule of Wimbledon isn't isn't really in my mind so much. Just me then okay. Trip back to two thousand and five when. Storm strong was winning his seventh consecutive Tour de France title. Yup? The three hundred eighty made its first flight at the live eight concerts. Good friend of mine went to live eight in Hyde Park and she says it was mostly great until sting came on early evening when everyone was pissed in party made and some new material. Juno live eight is when I discovered pink Floyd and realized I two thousand. David Luiz discovered. It's. Matt's now. Sort of got me to to realize that I actually need to listen to albums full of Bruce springsteen and not just judge. We. Born in the USA. Correct. Correct get on that David's It was also the year that Britain implemented. The civil partnerships axe to include same-sex partnerships. It was the year that London won the rights to host the twenty twelve Olympics. And the xbox three sixty was released Oh and Pope John Paul the second died. There's a few. We've already done it two thousand and five much at the French. Open say these are these events that we didn't mention I around, so that was T-, thousand five I was working. My First Wimbledon as an employee I was a bull store assistant. Under the employees of one Derek Dimmer? Who was the head of the bull store at Wimbledon in done that job with his wife? Centuries I think. It was it was a job. which largely comprised heavy lifting and I loved it I couldn't believe my luck that I was working Wimbledon, even they. My primary job was lifting boxes of tennis balls and wandering around the orange practice with bin bag, asking players and coaches. If I could collect, they used balls of the practice, so they could be resolved to charity. I thought that was the best job in the world and I could not believe my luck and I went back the next year as as head bull. Store Assistant I was GONNA. Say You assumed to be promoted? Yeah, that was my first promotion and that I was GONNA. Ask You if you did a good job with whether you got a good review. Turns ends. It did I mean there's not? Much that can go wrong with putting balls and have been bank. But it didn't go wrong, and honestly I just. I thought asking asking. Tim Henman if he was finished with these tennis. Balls are just so. That was the coolest thing in the world. I thought I was the coolest person in the world getting to do that job.

Wimbledon David Tennis David Matt David Luiz Tim Henman Juno Putney Pope John Paul Hyde Park Bruce Springsteen Derek Dimmer London Olympics Usa. Floyd Britain
Johnny Depp Says Amber Heard POOPED In Their Bed!!!

Donna and Steve

01:49 min | 6 d ago

Johnny Depp Says Amber Heard POOPED In Their Bed!!!

"You know, when you turn 30 it's a great time. You have a party. You might drink a little bit like what's happening. The end of my twenties. I want to feel free. Want to poop in a bed? I wantto shots. No, go back to the second thing. I want to poop in a bed in this trial, the Johnny Depp is having in Britain, Johnny Depp and Amber heard because of his accusations that the Sun tabloid said he was a wife beater, and he doesn't agree with it. We're hearing all kinds of things. Like the fact that he divorced Amber heard it all came to a head. Not on the head or a horse's head in bed. Yes, because he claims that Amber heard after her 30th birthday party in their Los Angeles penthouse in meat made 2016. After a fight, mind you. Defecated in their bet, Knowingly. Yes, My God, also possibly one of her friends now, so he he finds the poop. In the shared marital bed as he called, um, and she claims that it was just a harmless prank. She also blamed it on their two teacup Yorkies. Which you my sister as the tiniest runt of the teacup Yorkies on And the poop is like a jelly being made. Okay? I mean, it really is. I hate to describe that I won't get into the blame it on a master. But you can say that's from a teacup. You're well and they can't jump on the bed either Know that someone has put them there? Yeah, He's like the dogs couldn't get up there. No way. So that come out your

Johnny Depp Amber Los Angeles Britain
Hollywood comes to UK High Court as Depp takes on The Sun

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | Last week

Hollywood comes to UK High Court as Depp takes on The Sun

"American actor Johnny Depp who's really did Britain's High Court in a claim against a prominent newspaper group over a story alleging he was abusive to his ex wife amber heard the pirates of the Caribbean Star Wars suit sunglasses and a face covering as he arrived at the neo gothic High Court on the first day of this claim against the sun is suing the tabloid's publisher news group newspapers over the twenty eighteen story alleging he was violent and abusive then wife amber heard kept strongly denies the claim in turn hurt alleges that that had subjected her to a three day ordeal the physical cels off drinking and taking drugs branding him a wife beater Charles the last month London

Johnny Depp Britain High Court Neo Gothic High Court Amber Charles London Publisher
Covid Science: Test, Track, Trace

The Naked Scientists

04:13 min | Last week

Covid Science: Test, Track, Trace

"First up this week, the city of Leicester has been making the headlines now unlike the rest of the UK that celebrated super. Saturday as the lockdown eased, was grand reopening for the pubs in Leicester Schools have been restricted to children essential workers again. A non essential shops have had to pull down the shutters because surge corona virus cases. The lockdown has been extended there. Nobody seems to be able to think on precisely why Lester has come top of the League for Corona. Virus cases this last month. The Department for Health and social care said there were multiple factors causing the spike, and there were no quote. Cat Homes, hospital settings or industrial processes that would immediately explain the apparent rise in new diagnoses. BA- scientists say that infections might reflect social inequalities in places where there are more white collar jobs, employees can work from home, and they can isolate from others a deprived areas on the other hand. People are more likely to have to go to work and to use public transport to do that, and that raises their risk of becoming infected. Cambridge University's Jeff Studies disease outbreaks. So, what does she make of the longer lockdown approach? That's being used to control the outbreak in Leicester I think in general terms were already on the right track. It's really about sort of empowering local authorities now when we do see sort of increase transmission in specific areas to act in a way that they know is locally appropriate, also locally effective to contain it because the way outbreak spread is obviously determined by the population. It's spreading in sort of density of the housing arrangement, the kind of industries they rely on for. For the economy there do we actually know what is the right way forward? In terms of when you have these sorts of combinations of factors, what the right thing to do is, or is it going to be a learning exercise? In different cities with different formats, different population groups are going to have to learn the hard way, and then they'll know for next time. Absolutely especially with such an unfamiliar in new virus, there is going to be a lot of trial and error a lot of trying to learn from each other and author trying to look. To see what's going to help, there is not going to be a one-size-fits-all and I think that the fact that nothing is certain should be a bit reassuring in that there is discussion and research, and that's really what's required at present. Given it is. We know that viruses spread much less will in turn. More people are out and about we're also in the immediate aftermath of lockdown when arguably the amount of virus circulating should be extremely low. Is it not rather worrying that? We've got lester happening right now? It's obviously concerning sure whether we should see it as entirely surprising. There are few features over city like Lester. That would leave little more susceptible to kind of ongoing transmission. What encourages me is that it was detected and that there is this discussion now of maybe some kind of local interventions that could come into control. There is something to be said for the fact that is. And the does seem to be less transmission because when you're in sort of orphan spaces, so maybe there is some kind of happy middle ground of opening up. The is possible with something. That sort of leverage is the the fact that we can be outside right now and not rained on chilly. For we've now got plans being laid for opening up the hospitality industry more opening up air bridges to other European countries. What your feelings on the direction of travel? As it too much too soon or do you think this is about right? I think it's important in answering this question that I make it clear that my background is very much coming from the sort of epidemiology anthropology side I'm not an economist. I'm not a public policymakers rule, but from my perspective it is worrying I'm through are ways that we can support hospitality industries to open up in a way that sort of mitigates the risk and so I'm hopeful. But the issues around international spreads do concern me, not just the idea of importing cases into Britain, if we transmission even loa, which could trigger new ongoing transmission, but also the fact that we might be exporting cases to vulnerable places. We've not only got to think about risks to our country, but the role we might play in sort of proliferating this outbreak globally to

Lester Leicester Leicester Schools Department For Health Corona Cat Homes Cambridge University UK Jeff Studies Britain
UK sanctions Russians, Saudis under new Magnitsky powers

WBBM Late Morning News

00:23 sec | Last week

UK sanctions Russians, Saudis under new Magnitsky powers

"Britain has announced an economic sanctions against individuals and organizations from Russia, Saudi Arabia, Myanmar in North Korea under new powers to punish human rights offenders. Country's foreign secretary says they target those behind some of the notorious violations in recent years. They include Saudi intelligence officials accused of involvement in the murder of journalist Jamal Cash. O G and Russian authorities implicated in the death of an anti corruption

Saudi Arabia Jamal Cash Russia Secretary North Korea Myanmar Murder Britain
Britain pays tribute to National Health Service on 72nd Birthday.

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:48 min | Last week

Britain pays tribute to National Health Service on 72nd Birthday.

"People across the UK joined in a round of applause on Sunday to mark the seventy second anniversary of the free to use National Health Service one of the country's most cherished institutions, the reverence with which it is held has been bolstered this year during what is being Europe's deadliest corona virus outbreaks though the UK as a whole has a confirmed virus death toll of forty, four, thousand, two, hundred, twenty, the third highest in the world behind the United States and Brazil the chess and everyone who works within it in whatever capacity have been lauded for their work and care. Created by the Labor government after World War Two, in nineteen, forty, eight by bringing together the nation's disparate health institutions, the NHS's founding principles have never changed funded by everyone through the tax system. It provides free healthcare to any UK resident when needed. Prince Charles said the NHS that been through the most testing time in its history, and it was right for the whole country to come together to pay tribute to everyone who works within it after coming down with corona virus himself and spending three nights in intensive care Prime Minister Boris. Johnson credited NHS workers with saving his life, and his insisted it get whatever resources it needs. The main Labour Party opposition said the NHS has been starved of funding for the past decade during the government's austerity drive. Overnight many of the country's major sites, including the houses of parliament and the arch at Wembley, stadium England's National Soccer Stadium lit up in blue to remember all those who died during the pandemic. And before the weekend, soccer matches, players joined in with a round of applause.

NHS UK Labor Government National Soccer Stadium National Health Service Soccer Prince Charles Europe Prime Minister Johnson United States England Labour Party Brazil
Vincent Brown discusses his new book, ‘Tacky’s Revolt’

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

05:58 min | Last week

Vincent Brown discusses his new book, ‘Tacky’s Revolt’

"Vincent Brown welcome to meet the rices. Slavery is war. Tell me what that means. Well. In the book. I tend to think of slavery itself as a state of war, and in that I'm following the enslaved themselves who often discuss slavery as a state of warfare amongst themselves, most famously allowed Equiano who we know as one of the most famous formerly enslaved abolitionists of the late eighteenth century British Atlantic. said in his autobiography that when you make people slaves. Them to live with you in a state of war. Now in that he was echoing the philosopher John Locke. Who said that what is slavery? But the state of war continued between what he thought was a lawful conqueror and the concord now John Locke was trying to legitimate slavery. He was an investor in the Royal African company, and he actually helped to write the constitution for the colony of south. Carolina, which became a slave state. State, but equiano was doing something a little bit different than John Locke. He was actually commenting upon the conditions of slavery, the violence that was required to maintain people in slavery and the kind of response that was bound to come by those people who had been subjected so violently so for him, slavery was a state of war, and there were other enslaved people who echoed. Seeing slavery that way helped me frame the slave revolt in Jamaica. In seventeen, sixty, seven, sixty, one, which was the largest in the eighteenth century, British Empire as a war itself right as one of a series of wars, all around the Atlantic world that then ed up in this conflict in seventeen sixty Jamaica I'd like to look at your own life, and where that intersects with war, because you grew up in San Diego, and in fact, it was very early on that. You became aware of conflicts. I did well. I'm an American citizen. I grew up in the United States. I was born in the late sixties at the height of the Vietnam War and I I'm sorry to say that I can't name a five year period when the US military hasn't been abroad somewhere engaged in conflict with somebody over the course of my entire life, which seems to me like a half century of war having. Having grown up in San Diego I grew up in one of the largest terry garrison towns really in the history of the world the US Navy is as a major base in San Diego. The US Marines just north of San Diego have a major base and so coming through high school. A lot of my friends would join the military because it was the big industry in town, right. And of course, you know, my family had been had served in the army. My father served in the army. My Uncle A. Brother had done three combat tours I. Believe one in Korea and two in Vietnam, so the history of the military, the engagement overseas abroad in military campaigns was very much a part of my thinking growing up, and so when I thought about the history of slavery. It just jumped out at me that this history was itself a history that was embroiled embedded in a world of warfare, especially in the eighteenth century win. You have got Great Britain struggling in a century long campaign against its its greatest global enemy France, and all of those European wars then topped onto. The wars of enslavement that sent people out across the Atlantic into the European colonies in America, and what you have is a world of wars within wars, which looked very familiar to me like the campaigns at the US was fighting within the larger ambit- of the Cold War so by the time I grew to adulthood in the late eighty S. I was seeing these these late cold war campaigns in these post colonial states as as part of the larger Cold War, and then you see these proxy wars between the US and the Soviet Union fought out in places like Afghanistan right, and then of course by two thousand one, you see those kind of proxy campaigns between the US and Soviet Union growing into something else what we now call the terror wars, the war on. On Terror in Afghanistan and elsewhere I didn't see those things as continuous. I didn't see the terror war something uniquely different from most proxy wars of the late. Cold War period and my thinking historically has been to ask the question. How is it that one connects these longer histories of warfare together? And I do think that I was inspired to think that partly by having grown up in San Diego in a military town. And what about your, your family's personal history with war and with slavery? Well an african-american! My parents grew up in Virginia, and so they are descended from people who are enslaved probably as far back as the eighteenth century the Chesapeake Bay area. What's now? Virginia and Maryland was one of the largest importers of slaves in North America now I say north. America because the British empire imported the vast majority of its enslaved peoples into the Caribbean but for North America the territories that became the United States, the Chesapeake and South Carolina with a major importers of enslaved African peoples, and my family is descended from. Those people probably brought to North America in the eighteenth century. History was big in your life obviously, but also the arch. Yeah well. When I was in high school I I became very involved in theater and went to college thinking that I was actually going to do a theater degree. But at some point I thought well, you know I could probably do theater without a theater degree, but maybe I should have a backup plan and my second love in college was history, and that ended up being my career.

United States San Diego John Locke Equiano North America America Vincent Brown Soviet Union Afghanistan Jamaica Atlantic Virginia Carolina Chesapeake South Carolina Chesapeake Bay Caribbean
WHO Halts Trials of Hydroxychloroquine, Lopinavir/Ritonavir for COVID-19 Treatment

Love, Death, and Money

00:28 sec | Last week

WHO Halts Trials of Hydroxychloroquine, Lopinavir/Ritonavir for COVID-19 Treatment

"The World Health Organization has announced its holding its trials of the malaria drug hydroxy, Clara Quinn and HIV treatment will pin a veer and Britain ofher in patients hospitalized with Corona virus after results show the drugs did not reduce mortality rates. The agency said it was ending the tests tests on on on the the the recommendation recommendation recommendation of of of the the the Drug Drug Drug Trials Trials Trials International International International Steering Steering Steering Committee. Committee. Committee. The The The W. W. W. H H H O O O is is is also also also examining examining examining the the the potential potential potential effect effect effect of of of the the the anti anti anti viral viral viral drug drug drug Graham Graham Graham Desert Desert Desert Beer Beer Beer on on on covert 19.

Trials Trials International In Graham Graham Graham Clara Quinn World Health Organization HIV Britain The W. W. W. H H H O O
Travel to Devon and Cornwall, England

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

04:57 min | Last week

Travel to Devon and Cornwall, England

"Welcome to amateur traveler I'm your host Chris Christensen. Let's talk about Devon and Cornwall. I'd like to welcome to the show. Ryan Duffield from Devon who has come to talk to us about the city of Plymouth in southern England and also the surrounding area, including Devon and Cornwall. Ryan welcome to the show. Thank you very much. Thank you for having me Howie. Good well, you know and it's funny because we just talked about the English coast, but we've moved a little further to the West and talk. Talk about a different region of the coast than we did on the show recently when we talked about Suffolk and the the downs. Why should someone go to Plymouth Plymouth? Actually it's a fantastic city. It's a city that goes amazing maritime history and tradition that dates right back to the medieval times, but actress quite often overloaded when people think of cities in England. They think oh of Lunden Bama again. Manchester Liverpool perhaps. I think Plymouth is just as much. Interest is end if those cities, but it's just north of us so much, and I think particular twenty American. Listeners interested is also the city where the pilgrim father set sail on the mayflower. Sixteen twenty associated with the traditional thanksgiving. S Pre interesting point. Is also surrounded by beautiful coastline. It's right on the border of the county's of Devon and Cornwall these are two of the most popular tourist destinations in the UK down in the South West of England, said Scott lost offer. Willing we're looking for dividend cornwall if we go down to the English map and you go far bottom left. That's where we are, and if you go further bottom further left from there, you end up in the ocean. So we're. Right on the south coast of Devon Oklahoma so are literally facing out to the Atlantic okay well and facing out towards the south. Yes, excellent well, what? Are. You GonNa. Recommend Fourth Festival is obviously starting in the city centre, so the city is actually pretty much based around the coast and its large harbours, so I would say starting day Sutton Haba, which is the main harbor in the city and that so where the city spreads out from I'm from around the. You've all sorts of things to say side. You've got things like the mayflower steps. Steps, which is where there's the pilgrim fathers actually set sail from and this museum dedicated to that you've also got what's the Barbican? which is this old coupled street state specs, medieval periods, which is full of these is correct, slim pubs and bars, restaurants shops things like that, and it's one of the few passes cities. The city was actually bombed June. Sacramento War by the Nazis and the. The city was destroyed, and this is one of the well preserved areas of that city out, also recommend site just basically following the coastline of the city's known as Britain's Ocean City for good reason, because it will revolve around that and overlooking the area. What looks like is huge, fool trust, but what actually is actively operating? Royal Marines and Royal Navy base. That's right in the heart of. Of the city and they still have people that you can save people, training and things, and they actually do tours of that interestingly and I'm not sure how many military basis you can know many Abitur tour during the middle of the day. You can't do that well and it seems like one of the reasons they do that, too. Is You mentioned? This is not a new military base. Quite historical, so this is where the ships sailed out to fight the Spanish Armada for absolutely, and the city is very synonymous with Francis Drake. Who is the man who led the defeating of the Spanish the? He was from Plymouth. Things like the main shopping center in the city named optimus could drake circus, and you'll find lots of other places around the city named after him. You also have along. Along the Bob sell them this coupled medieval street. You have the Plymouth Gin distillery, which is actually the oldest gin distillery in the country, and of course you can go in then you can have tools that you can find out how the GIN is made. You can find out the botanic WHO's they use? Jin's at the end of that. So if you're GIN, Fan Pathak place to go we'll. Get into more detail on all these things. So in terms of the BARBICAN. For instance you mentioned the Plymouth Gin distillery. There are different pubs and things. Do you have a favorite pub? Is there someplace that we ought to check out? There is a place I feel bad commending it, but there's a web spins now Weber spins is a national chain across the country. If you live in the UK, you know about web of Spain's. They've actually got really nice bar that down on the Babacan. Babacan, which is right by the Plymouth Gin Distiller Selfish Nickel Jin from that, but they've got huge selection of our genes of a drinks there, but all the buildings there because they're all medieval style buildings that is then become ingrained within the actual itself garnered sovereignty. Highly recommend that this is places down the thyroid record. Think of any off the top of my head. Okay mix over a new kind of places and very traditional old pubs as well which great.

Plymouth Plymouth Gin Cornwall Plymouth Plymouth Plymouth Gin Distiller Devon England Ryan Duffield Ocean City Chris Christensen Devon Oklahoma Howie Royal Navy Babacan Francis Drake Sutton Haba Manchester
A New Declaration of Dependence On God

The BreakPoint Podcast

03:50 min | Last week

A New Declaration of Dependence On God

"This, fourth of July we find our nation more divided than perhaps at any other time since the civil war. That's what happens when a nation abandoned God and Rejects Truth Colson Center I'm John Stonestreet. This break point. On July Fourth, two thousand and four Chuck Colson breakpoint commentary was entitled a New Declaration of dependence reading through it again recently I was struck by just how prophetic his words were as a student of history chuck not only understood the founding principles of our nation, as expressed in the declaration of independence, but he understood on what those principles were grounded. So what happens chuck ass when the foundations are rejected? What happens when religion? Truth and public virtue are all made non essential. What happens when citizens want the benefits of the American experiment without taking seriously what it requires of us will here's Jet Colson from July second, two thousand four. Fourth Celebrates our liberty and national independence. I get through every time I hear. The cannons blast that rousing finale of the eighteen twelve overture, and I got a lump in my throat whenever I join in singing America America. God shed His grace on the. Indeed God has blessed America this nation dedicated to the proposition that all men are endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights has endured two hundred twenty eight years. America's the oldest constitutional republic on Earth. But all is not well in our land. When Thomas Jefferson Penn, the immortal words of the Declaration of Independence, he deliberately appealed the creator, or he acknowledged an overriding obligation to nature and nature's got, and he understood that ordered. Liberty is not just a subjective preference, but a divinely ordained condition for which human beings are designed. But. Over the last few decades, legions of skeptics have mounted a massive assault on these self evident Ruth's in prestigious schools in the halls of government, and especially in the Supreme Court. God is banished from public compensation. If a public schoolteacher introduce Jefferson's ideas and language into the classroom today, she likely be called on the carpet, possibly disciplined. This assault on God in public cultures severely damages our democracy. If God is thrown out of our history, we lose our basis for believing that individuals have rights and dignity in an empty universe. We have no meaning no value without God. There are no inalienable rights and no certain proof that liberty is better than tyranny or that life better than death. Everything's a matter of opinion and power. The references to God, the Declaration of Independence provide a foundation for moral argument within civil society and moral truths pervade our founding documents from beginning to end without God is the source of all these moral principles. The Public Square would quickly revert to the law of the jungle. Brutish power would prevail the week. The unborn, the elderly, the gravely ill could be quietly terminated. Much as I enjoy the anthems and fireworks more than that is called for on this July fourth. We need to confess our moral failures in our national sins, repenting of allies of. Killing innocent babies and the elderly. Renewal begins on our knees. It's there. We hear soul searching questions from God himself asking how long will you defend the unjust and show partiality to the wicked rescue the weekend needy deliver them from the hand of the wicked. Our nation's founding document declared independence from Britain. But with equal fervor declared dependence upon God expressing firm reliance on the protection of Divine Providence. The signers committed the American experiment. Do their maker the spirit of seventeen seventy six was reverence and trust. So as we mark this solemn occasion, let us seek a rebirth of true liberty, which is possible, only when governed by divine law for without God, we could never have liberty and justice for

Chuck Colson America Thomas Jefferson Penn Assault Declaration Of Independence Jet Colson Public Square John Stonestreet Providence Britain Supreme Court Ruth
"britain" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

04:03 min | 5 months ago

"britain" Discussed on Today in Focus

"This outside from the government is going to mark one of the biggest shakeups for the UK's migration regime for at least half a century the government describes this as a points based system but it could also be reframed a no low skilled migration system or unknown non-english speaking system the way that the government is envisaging. The system working is that you have to get a minimum of seventy points in order to come into the country to work the our number of different ways that that can be achieved. These include the offer of a job from an approved sponsor a job at an appropriate skill level. Jobs can be from an area where there is a shortage of skilled workers. Speaking English at a required level salaries government has set a cap of at least twenty five thousand six hundred pounds or above and then also PhD qualifications will also get people quicker access to the workforce the type of impact. Does this policy could have differ in different sectors of the UK economy? There are concerns that this will have an effect on companies in retail construction manufacturing whether high proportions of unskilled workers from you at this moment in time the Migration Advisory Committee in analysis published earlier. This month also looked at the pressures on public services in the UK. Their assessment was that there would be a lessening of pressure on the NHS on schools and social housing from a reduction in the numbers of migrants. That are in the UK who also utilize those services as well as working in them but the one area where they fought the would be greater pressure on public services would be adult social care. There are not enough people that are working in that sector though they can seize of more than one hundred thousand on around seventeen percent of adult social care workers currently come from outside of the UK. So that is one area where there will be clear pressure for the future. One of the key ideas in this policy as home secretary. Pretty Patel's thought that around eight million people in the UK a currently economically inactive. That means they're not currently in work not currently looking for work however she believes that those people could enter the workforce with greater support from either the government or from private sector employers. Who she believes need to step up and pay higher wages or to train people to enter the workforce in order to replace those people that might not be an employment any longer. Who would have come from overseas? There are large proportion of economically inactive people but not all of these people are going to be able to enter the workforce or may not want to. There are plenty of people that have taken early retirement or they have long term health issues themselves or they need to care for their children or elderly relatives. So it's going to be a bit of a struggle that unemployment level in the UK is actually the lowest since the mid nineteen seventies? We only have around one million people actively looking for work at this moment in time. We've not really seen this type of thing from conservative governments. Before for several several decades they are usually favoring of movement in order to help businesses to access the skills that they require but this is an interventionist policy with one key aim and that is to boost the wages of the UK economy after a incredibly lackluster performance over the past decade. Only one pound better off in terms of our pay packets them. We were twelve years ago. The gamble of this policy will be whether Britain can become a high skilled high wage and highly productive economy as outlined by Boris Johnson or alternatively the could be a difficulty for companies in attracting the types of workers that they need in order to fulfill the roles that are currently occupied by migrant workers. We could also see prices rising or people finding it more difficult to come by the goods and services that we have come to depend on it affordable prices. The question is whether the economy will be able to adapt..

UK Patel Migration Advisory Committee NHS Boris Johnson secretary Britain
"britain" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

07:34 min | 5 months ago

"britain" Discussed on Today in Focus

"Just. How severe have these latest flood? Spain and where has been worst affected where we seen all parts of Britain really affected by storm? Denison care in one way or another whether it's travel disruption heavy winds are strong rain. Josh holiday is the Guardian north of England correspondent for the worst affected areas of being from South Wales into Worcestershire Hertfordshire and Shropshire and is in those parts of the countries. Where we've seen a handful of deaths and as we have from caroline many of these places have never seen this sort of flooding before with us. What's remarkable about storm? Dennis is that it seems to have affected really badly areas that haven't seen but for at least ten years a lot of time you talking about the first bad flood in generation. It's the worst. Flooding Hertford has ever seen the river. Wye has hit record levels consuming entire streets. You know you're talking about river levels. I haven't been seen since records began two hundred years ago. How have towns in in south Wales benefit to particularly by this one of those areas it's been affected is the town of Pontypridd which is just north of Cardiff in south Wales and on Sunday? We saw the entire town centre underwater shops completely submerged stock alone in years. Probably were two three four hundred thousand worth of jewelry and the people don't understand and appreciate we've built this business for a very very long time and one of the only independent and we've seen six hundred people displaced there and and being bees in hotels. There's apparently modern thousand homes and properties. They've been severely damaged. Spoke to the Welsh Lebron pay for pontypridd Alex Davies Jones. Who was out helping the clearer? Peifer over what she told me was the. It's just been absolutely heartbreaking to see the effects on people's lives what seems to have happened in. This area is that it's deprived communities that have been quite badly hit so people who couldn't afford the insure owns C can afford a four thousand pound flood insurance. So there's a lot of people on the street who have gotta a gun and in the cleanup operation as well. We've seen the authorities bringing dehumidifiers to people's homes but people can't afford to look these because it selectively they can't afford to use the dehumidifiers. So what would already be a difficult situation for? A lot of people is just made whole worse. How effective do you think the response to storm than has been in the worst affected areas do residents feel? It's been adequate. It's a mixed picture actually. In some of the areas affected the Environment Agency would say that the flipped barriers have saved forty thousand properties and that only six hundred properties of flooded around England. But that's a that's expected to rise but what a lot of people in these areas are saying is that while the forecast might have said. It is going to be heavy rain in our areas. They didn't necessarily realize or weren't told to prepare for their own houses flooding. So what we saw in some parts of south Wales was some dogs being dragged through floodwater Sunday. Morning when the worst of the damage horrid been done. And what is the government's response bane the government? Spain defensive from the very of the new Environment Secretary George Eustis was Open York on the someday immediately facing questions whether flip defenses had failed the flood infrastructure that we have in place the flip defense infrastructure has worked as expected and has put there is concern in some of these areas especially in south Wales. The you know the government doesn't seem to have responded to the scale of the disaster and I think it's fair to call disaster in these areas of infected as quickly as it should have done. There's been no Cobra meeting which is an emergency committee that meets in the Cabinet Office. We should of it. The the Welsh government also have responsibility in this. What have they been doing with the Welsh? Government have been praised for quickly responding to what happened but this morning I met with senior minister. Democtratic foot was out on the streets of Pontypridd the money now that we want to be able to make available to those families who were directly affected by flooding in Wales over last weekend on the weekend before what has angered people is that there's been no direct sign yet from the UK government the dealing with this. This being an absence of Boris Johnson. Who you might remember was quite quick to get to parts of these midland's that were flooded during the election campaign. There have been questions raised. About how useful. Boris Johnson vague video in the floods before Christmas when he was sort of very poorly mopping-up flooded spec savers muffin overflow. That was already dry and then there was a cafe over the road. That was really badly flooded. Didn't bother go into that one and the conservative he. Marconi actually said that the prime minister's presence this time might not be that helpful is great. Having Prime Minister looks good on telly. But do you know what I'd rather? He kept out of the way while the While the Environment Agency did that. Should he convened Cobra given how some people think? Cobra meetings often over show but they do at a reassurance to communities I think the is concerned from some experts not just locals and not just politicians that there isn't an overarching body. That's directing the emergency response for is an emergency across three countries is Wales Scotland and England. To deal with what is still a really difficult situation for low of thousands of homes and businesses. It feels like more and more. We're seeing these images in our papers and on the news of people being rescued on dinghies across the country is becoming more frequent in recent years. It does feel like there's been an increase in frequency and increasing severity to the floodlit. We've seen there's an awful lot going on with the weather over the next few days. Let's break it down and take a look at each element first and foremost storm Carolina. Some people say because the mets office started naming storm so they make headlines more easily Kayla's Desmond has claimed a second victim. Here is a rival. Lived up to the forecasters warnings. But it's not argued by any experts that the climate emergency as other parts of play bracing temperatures across the globe that means the air carries more moisture and results in sometimes extremely severe rainfall. Unt is incredibly unpredictable as well. This is a massive wakeup call in terms of climate. Change One of those people who's been very vocal about this is the local. Mp for Pontypridd Alex Davies Jones. And this is a big sign that the UK government needs to wake and tackle climate.

South Wales Wales Pontypridd Spain Environment Agency Alex Davies Jones UK Boris Johnson Welsh government England prime minister Denison Hertford caroline Dennis Josh Cabinet Office Britain mets Worcestershire Hertfordshire
"britain" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

01:43 min | 7 months ago

"britain" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Orange juice it's true. The back-and-forth enforce continued throughout the day. This bill is somewhat different from the one. Johnson tried and failed to get through parliament. Only a couple of months ago. There's no possibility the of extending negotiations with the EU beyond the end of next year. Some say this is a tactic by Johnson to show voters and European leaders. That he means business. Oh this fear. It has old negotiation cards over to Europe. Opposition politicians like Labour's Henry. Ben Worry it could all end up in a no deal. BREXIT scenario. The negotiations are anything but simple. They become extremely complicated. And that's why I said that I thought the government is taking a big gamble with the future the economy because if they don't achieve this deal by December next year then we're looking once again at no deal. The new bill also drops a promise to align worker's rights with the EU lows and there's abandon vow to protect child refugees seeking to unite with their families. In Britain Lord dubs another Labour politician who himself arrived in the UK. As a young boy fleeing from Nazi Germany says the change could be devastation for child migrants in Europe. These children who are sleeping in different dangerous conditions nations in Calais along the collins particular lesbos that children who are vulnerable the vulnerable to trafficking vulnerable to criminality to prostitution saw and they were finally here and they've set their sights on joining a member of the family who's in the UK. Surely what more sensible inhumane than that Scottish. MP APIECE OR UNHAPPY TO IN BLACKFORD is one of the leaders of the Scottish National Party. He says Johnson's Brexit -til will be harmful to Scotland.

Johnson EU Europe UK Scottish National Party Labour BLACKFORD Ben Worry Calais prostitution Scotland collins Germany
"britain" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

10:31 min | 7 months ago

"britain" Discussed on The Daily

"So if you think about it. The warehouse really didn't offer anything like what the mind used to offer for the town of the mind a job for life whereas the warehouse basically offers temporary work from which you could get fired at any point at very short notice and the mind provided pride to the community it provided the coal pow the nation whereas the warehouse just stores mostly Polyester tracksuits get sipped around the country. So it sounds like everything about this. Work is just shallower unless meaningful exactly and because of that. Local residents in shock and indeed from across Britain didn't fancy doing this kind of work because it was humiliating for Britain. Quite badly paid fun. There were plenty of people elsewhere in the European Union who because they were members of European Union were able to come and work in Britain and what they they believed was actually quite good money and conditions that they didn't feel were particularly humiliating as a result. So you had lots of people from Poland and Romania coming coming to places like Shire Brook and indeed across England and working. In warehouses like sports direct and as a result they changed the social fabric of of shamrock. And what does that change. Look like on the ground you can go run every absolutely not non-point KNOBS and people say to poetry with tech jobs and that big the create a little resentment residents start to believe that town is being quote unquote invaded by foreigners. These factors fats is supposed to be for the locals. But if you I mean to me if you live in the area that your local you've eastern Europeans around their ship people but when I actually spoke to people I said. Did you want to do these jobs. Have you ever done these jobs. They would actually say no. We wouldn't want to do something like that. And the English people know mm-hmm about post people taking the jobs plays not the easiest thing. Mish people are lazy. The David Jobs but now the job to take that want to buy it. So what you're hearing is. A group of people mourning their past the kind of work. That's no longer available in this town. Yes you're right. They are mourning the passing of a way of life and mourning the passing of us more secure form of employment and when suddenly no one had any secure secure work any longer and their instinctive reaction is. The town started coming APO- primarily because of the arrival of these European immigrants who are taking bronze sounds jobs. Three years ago I committed to the British people that I would renegotiate our position in the European Union and hold an in out referendum. And that's why in two thousand sixteen when a referendum arrives on the horizon on Monday I will go to parliament and proposed that the British people apple decide off future in Europe. The Joyce is in your hands that gives people in Britain the choice. Do you want to stay pot of Europe. Would you want to leverage the people in Schaumburg and into the surrounding constituency vote by one of the highest proportions in the country to leave the European Union. And what makes interesting is that you have a very strongly labor town. Voting in accordance with a measure that is supported voted by the majority of the Conservative Party. Right so for the first time. In the town's history the population of the town kind of drifting away. Okay from the political moorings that they had been tied to full older than twentieth century. And what are the people in our Brooke See. Brexit is suddenly giving them given the situation. They're in I think the people in Schaumburg first and foremost it's something that will stop all these immigration and by proxy it'd be something coming but my restore pride and G to a once. Bustling town has seen better days right. Because one of the things that brexit promises this is an end to this open borders system by which anyone in Europe can come into Britain and work in Britain in a place like sports direct in Sherbrooke exactly and of course brexit passes by a margin but it passes right and so for the first time in a generation people in Atomic Shaibah have experienced a win and we know that that win didn't last very long because three years go by and Brexit doesn't happen despite the fact that it's supposed to have happened and still hasn't happened exactions action and as a result in places like Shyam Brooke Mode. I was hearing when I went up. There was deep deep frustration for the last three and a half years. I've been watching in the the mess that is brexit. I'm just livid the this vote hasn't been delivered. which brings us to last this week? Good evening and welcome to another nights in which the future about country hangs in the balance. We've we had JIM reelection in Britain and that was basically equates second referendum but instead of voting on the question of whether to leave Europe you had to vote for a political party this is the most important. UK general election in a generation. Britain is heading to the polls to elect a government in the hope of finding a solution to that brexit crisis. Boris Johnson's Conservative Party. Have a simple message get brexit done in two thousand seventeen labor did unexpectedly well but they still ended up the minority party not that brexit policy is less clear cut than others and so that gave vote Shabbir this very difficult choice between voting for a party not that their parents had voted for their grandparents had voted for that was very closely tied to the history of town to whose candidate Dennis skinner. The beasts of Boll all sober is this local hero line is by basically every household as far as I could see and on the other side. The party that had in the local consciousness destroyed shabbir destroyed the mind destroyed. The unions destroyed the social fabric. But which which was resolutely pro brexit and people had to decide do they go with the party they always voted for or do they go the pot that supported Brexit In in a sense did they vote their heritage or do they vote their future. Exactly here we go. I Serra Sternberg. The deputy returning officer suit this election give you the following results. And once the votes were tallied we know that conservatives and by extension brexit won a huge each percentage of the vote. So what did the local results look like in Sherbrooke. For the first time ever the local constituency he returned a conservative lawmaker and I do hereby declare. Mark Peter Fletcher is elected to serve as member of parliament for the constituency. CONC- of Bolsover. Anthony Skinner. The Monday called the beast of Bolsover. The man who nobody could remember without that constituency. Dennis skinner. They're pushed into second. Place is out of parliament for the first time in forty nine years. So it's that kind of moment when you forgot all the rest of the detail from these sorts of nights it's the moments bolsover that you'll remember. It was an extraordinary change range. Huge swathes of the country for years for decades supported. Labor have suddenly voted conservative. And that's how the Conservatives won last week's election because essentially a brexit because it breaks it but also because of all the things that led to breaks it because of the destruction of the main center of employment in the town because of the loss of the pride in the pub is in the community that it came hand in hand with that place of employment and because of the warehouse that came to replace it and the people who came to work in that warehouse came to Patrick. I spoke with our colleague. Mark Lender ahead of the general election and he predicted that this political realignment would happen in towns like this that Labour strongholds would fall to the Conservative Party and he said the great danger for voters who completed pleaded this election with a vote on Brexit is brexit may not mean over time. Would they think it will. It might not bring the restoration of a life that many people are still mourning in Britain so with that in mind. What does this election outcome seem to mean for Sherbrooke and its economy? When you take an optimistic position on breaks that you believe that there will be a bit of turbulence? Britain comes Out of Europe but that will spark kind of national revival that regenerates British trade and British Industry and Britain alone on its own will be forced forced to come up with credit solutions. To many problems have just been allowed to fester during Britain's membership of the European Union But the pessimistic take on Brexit. Is that once. Britain leaves the European Union. It becomes less attractive Alexa proposition. For Foreign companies to base their factories in that business is and so in order to keep foreign investors coming into Britain at in order to attract new ones. The government is going to have to slash regulations. Make it even easier to hire and fire people and in the process make it easier to set up a warehouse like sports direct and so there is a scenario in which post Brexit Brittian looks a lot more like shower in two thousand nineteen rather than like it. which would not of course with the outcome that the people in Sherbrooke are looking for absolutely.

Britain Brexit European Union Conservative Party Sherbrooke Europe Bolsover Dennis skinner Schaumburg shamrock Brexit Brittian Shire Brook David Jobs Poland England Shabbir Boris Johnson UK Romania
"britain" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

09:13 min | 7 months ago

"britain" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Amazing and pretty much beyond our expectations On that level does stories more today here on the world. I'm Marco Werman. This is the world. Great Britain remains is in the hands of prime minister. Boris Johnson but with a stronger grip than before Johnson's Conservative Party notched a landslide victory with a simple message get brexit done and so it will get done probably next month but leaving the European Union actually leaving for real more than three years after voting to do it. It's GonNa take time and and there are still many many unknowns for the British people on the road ahead. The world's ORLA Berry has been covering this election for us and she joins us from London the day after ORLA. What is this election can result and the massive victory for bars Johnson's conservatives mean for brexit itself it feels a little like for a lot of us here the BREXIT referendum for random result of twenty? Sixteen that sense. The people got and how divided people were in terms of brexit terms of leave and remain and I guess it's a reminder kind from any in the US of how you felt in twenty sixteen when you woke up in that November morning unsold the results of the trump Clinton election. It's a thumping victory for Boris Johnson. Ada Devastating defeat for Jeremy Corbyn and the Labor Party is so what does it mean for Brexit. It means Brexit will happen unless the sky falls. Britain will believe in the European Union at the end of January. Boris Johnson has his majority now. The three Semaine never had he can get his deal through parliament. He did make an effort to sound a note of unity in his speech to the nation at ten Downing Street today and he appealed for both sides to try and put these three and a half years of real polarization real bitterness behind us everyone to find closure and to let the healing begin. Well we'll see if that's possible or a Briton. Leaves on January thirty first leaves the EU does that mean that Then we will stop talking about Brexit. If only Marco you should know better than that as someone said to me. It's like a TV series where it goes on for so long. You can't actually remember who the original characters were January. Thirty first is the end of phase one of BR exist and we move into phase two and this is figuring out future relationship between the UK and the EU. He has until the end of December twenty twenty to reach an agreement with the EU. On what that's supposed to look like he has said he won't ask for another extension. Then again you remember what he said the last time round. He said he would prefer to be dead in a ditch. Then ask for an extension so we will see the ask for an extension next year. We'll still be talking about brexit then Marco for a whole `nother year exactly at the very least European leaders have also been reacting to the news of Johnson's landslide victory. What have they been saying? Well I guess for many of them they never wanted to see. Brexit happened but I think today the soundings from many of them seemed to be just a widespread sigh of relief. The Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutter probably put it most succinctly he. He was asked at a news conference in Brussels whether he felt sadness or relief after British result and he said that during the hill so essentially neither just a factual observation. This can help to settle this. I think everyone will find that positive because we do need to move on otherwise this could carry Arjan for years. anglo-american was also out today. She was asked about the German chancellor and she said we now have a competitor on our doorstep so she's already moved down the road into the future to look at the relationship between both sides but there were some general positive soundings as well from the EU this this is ours lavender line. She's the European Commission president and probably the most upbeat voice from Europe. Today this is not the end of something. This is the beginning of excellent future relations between good neighbors. It is a new chapter in history or Donald Trump tweeted today congratulating. Boris Johnson and saying Britain and the United States will now be free to strike a massive new trade deal after brexit. This deal has a potential to be far bigger and more lucrative live than any deal that could be made with the EU. Is that true ORLA. First of all not so fast because before Britain begins any trade deals with the US it first of all has to sort out its exit from the EU. So at the moment everything is speculation. Also it's important to point out that the issue of the Irish border hasn't hasn't been clarified. Yes and Nancy Pelosi in particular had said there is no chance the. US Congress will approve a trade pact with Britain if brexit closes the Irish border that's it the US ambassador to the UK. Woody Johnson he was out today. He's spinning more positive. Knows on all of this. And he's been in reassuring people in Britain that there's a very bryce and prosperous future ahead you've been in the U. and subject to all this for the last forty years and now oh you can be very creative and look forward to a new world and that he respects. That's one way of putting it and another positive note. By the way Marco the pound. Did they'd go up last night at the announcement of Boris Johnson's victory and the victory of the Conservative Party. So at least there is that the rules ORLA Berry in London Orla till the next time. Maybe we won't talk Brexit for a few weeks Well anyway do you promise no no. I don't thanks very much thanks marco. It's not the end but today could be the beginning of the end of the U. S. China trade war. It started in one thousand nine months ago. And it's been sending tremors through the global economy ever since but now. US and Chinese officials say they've worked out. What an initial deal? Jake parkers with the US. China Business Council in Washington. I asked him for the highlights. What we're hearing so far? Is that the phase one agreement will cover. Ip He protection technology transfer. We'll have some movement on the structural concerns companies facing agriculture imports to the China market covers financial services liberalisation in currency as well as expanding trade. which is some of the numbers that they've talked about today? In terms of new Chinese purchases also note very importantly doesn't include a dispute resolution mechanism that will also ensure that both sides are able to enforce the agreement. I mean there's a big categories kind of stuff. They've been talking about all along. If you had to do the ledger edger. Who would you say are the winners or losers here will look so? Nobody wins in trade worth so I think that both sides are going to win by De Escalating. The conflict in the last several years say that winner is businesses who've been doing trade with China. This should also liberalize some sectors for investment so moving forward lowered putting a base to the deterioration of the bilateral relationship is very positive and what about. US farmers who've been hit pretty hard. We'll have to wait and see what the final details are but it does sound like China is going to be removing some of the impediments to selling certain US products to the China market meat poultry. We're hopeful for ethanol will have greater market access in China and it should increase the sales of US farmers products to China going forward. What details do we still not have about the trade deal like what you most want answers to at this point? I think what we're looking forward to seeing as the text around intellectual property rights protection as well as technology transfer also. The devil is in the detail on many of these issues so we'd also like to see what's in the text of the agreement. We understand from the Chinese press conference today is that the text is agreed between the two parties. But it hasn't undergone legal review or translation. So that'll be key stage for understanding the full details. There's been so much back and forth on trade relations with China under the trump administration You said the devil's in the details. Are you concerned. The deal might not stick well. I think that's why. The enforcement mechanism is so critical. Look we've encouraged the administration to take this step understand. It will be a process where concerns raised bilaterally laterally and then each side they feel the other side is not implemented appropriately will have the opportunity to enforce and bring either tariffs or other penalties to bear. Sounds sounds like you're hopeful. I think that we would applaud the administration for de escalating the conflict and many of the issues that have been raised in phase one therefore than just window dressing. We're GONNA have to see the details in the text but I think we're cautiously optimistic that this is the right way forward. You know a lot of people say trump created this conflict. Inflict in the first place. Are we back to where we started. No I think we're beyond where we started attorney. The financial markets were not open. And indeed they were not planning to be open until twenty twenty two so we have seen acceleration of that for two years. If we're able to tackle many of these longstanding agricultural areas that will open China's market more fully us the US agricultural products. Something we haven't seen in the past any new commitments on currency hopefully dispel the concerns around China being a currency manipulator. The future so so we have to resolve all the issues.

Boris Johnson United States China European Union Brexit Marco Werman Britain ORLA Berry Conservative Party prime minister Woody Johnson BREXIT Donald Trump UK US Congress London Jeremy Corbyn Nancy Pelosi
"britain" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

Radio Atlantic

09:15 min | 7 months ago

"britain" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

"Is that is not so stable There's a lot of infighting There's what happened with Prince Andrew and his relationship relationship with Jeffrey Epstein and interview that he gave to the BBC at Buckingham Palace in which he confused almost everybody buddy by how he thought what he was saying was a good idea. Or Okay to say your piece on that interview as worth reading for anybody who hasn't read it yet and pull it up. Helm Lewis and Prince Andrew. But where we are is the Queen is ninety three years old. She has been queen a very long. Time Ah I was thinking. The third season of the crown is is out and it's got her doing things it's three seasons in and it's still fifty years ago. Come and look. She may live for another ten years for Mother did right But It presents the Royal Family at a juncture point at a moment when Britain overall is and it seems like that inevitably will end up influencing what the future of the monarchy in the royal family. Looks like this story if if the crime is an interesting one because the kind of Meta story behind it is how do you take an institution that is essentially many evil. It's like magic blood allowed to pass his down from parent to child and that's why these people should be in charge. And how does that work. In an era of first televisions You know and then in an aggressive tabloid newspapers and then now social media and times when everybody's got a camera on them all the time you know it's something that relies on a sentiment of mystique nick to make it work and there isn't this is not a world in which mystique is in huge supply But you know it comes to. The young girls are quite popular but but again chafing. Hey I use restrictions that are placed on them I also write about Meghan Markle in her voguish. You hide you. Try and be both a social justice activist and adult chess. It doesn't really things that naturally champion the underdog and person who spends a lot of their time in castles. It's not to things that naturally fit together quite well so the Rosa definitely constantly trying to fit this very old template onto modern life. Would you guess them in twenty years and I do think it's fair to say in Twenty Twenty Years Queen. Elizabeth won't be alive and Queen Anymore. She'd have to be one hundred thirteen That the royal family will be a major major institution in British life. I think they will enjoy because a bit like you know they say. The Conservative Party is the most successful political force ever the British Conservative Party because it constantly renews itself and it is quite ruthless trimming it sales to fit the time and the same thing is true of the the royal family. It does change and adapt. I can't really see the mechanism season by which I mean the idea of having referendums or more. Things is fairly alienating to anybody in Britain at the moment so I don't I certainly don't think we're going to take the French option and send them to the Guillotine so I don't really see the mechanism by which that ends. I think it's more likely that we'll do the very British thing of complaining endlessly about changing them. So let's close with this Helen. In the states we talk constantly happened talking constantly since two thousand sixteen about what is trump's election election mean. What does it mean about our politics? And what the country actually is a but it is part of a connected a pattern a connected movement and politics all over the world That in some ways was sparked at first by Brexit And and when the Brexit vote happen trump promised that he was going to be Brexit plus plus and and certainly. That's what happened. He did end end up winning. Nobody thought the referendum would end with leave and nobody thought the twenty sixteen election would and with trump winning. When I say nobody almost nobody And sure enough. That's what happened. And we see that in other places around the world and apple Ma'am. Our new colleague was on the podcast couple of weeks ago and she had written ahead of the Brexit vote. Something that I called her out on what. She said that she felt like we were. Maybe two or three elections away from the collapse of of democracy and I said so then there was the Brexit vote and then there was translation or was that what you're talking about and she he said well it was the the French presidential election of marine. Le Pen had one. Then that would have that would have been what pushed over the edge. What do you think wh Whoa? Where do you think we are in this? Are we really on the brink or is this just an adjustment process maybe Ah figuring out something new about democracy or or Sort of rebooting it into its next stage that maybe maybe will include some of this populism and native ism in ways that we had not expected or maybe move beyond it. There's a book let's really influenced my thinking which is by a political historian. Heckled David Runciman at his Cambridge University which is called high democracy ends in which he says we might well end up with holiday democracy's things that look like entirely democracy but but aren't really functioning as an easier. He says within that he thinks Mark Zuckerberg is more dangerous than Donald Trump and. I think it's the point is worth taking a focus for me one of the big themes of modern politics and the scary thing is is not just the emergence of the far right although populism but it's polarization cassation. It's the fact that Obama was out there warning about the Democratic primary. Right to say that you know. The votes have thousands of thousands of for example relatively center left maybe even slightly conceptually conservative Black Democratic voters in the prime someone like South Carolina warring they. They can't less than one very high profile extremely. left-wing a twitter can help by you know White College graduate and I think that is a real worry. Loria see when I look at American politics that the candidates in the primary have to go so far out that can they tack to the Center and actually what happened. He was the Labour leadership collection. Is that you know the the the furthest left candidate one and then you know. Boris Johnson has no sensually crush. Niger Garages Brexit Party. Because there's no space to the right of him on on these kind of authoritarian approach to policing and things like that or on the Brexit Dina the harness the As you walk out and sever absolutely every relationship. There's there's no harder brexit deal available so that's my my worries that particularly driven by social media the politics that becomes popular is the one that is incredibly emotional. It's about about values it's about identity it's about tribalism and the fact that you need. Don't just think that people who disagree with you have another opinion. You think that they're wrong. Maybe the bad people so that is what really worries me because if you end up with very polarized parties you know they're very entrench then actually that licenses a lot more bad behavior from politicians and I think that's what you've seen with both Boris. I Johnson and Jeremy Corbyn actually is that they've kind of got away with scandals that might have tanked a leader. Who Will you know if they were gonNA worry about swing voters but their memberships are kinda clinging onto them because if you if you see an inch of ground to the other side then the bad people were not just people disagree with bad people? So that's what kind of worries this May as well as the the rise. You Know Liberalism in Eastern Europe. But there's not time to go into that because that's a whole I couldn't have to worry about covering in my own country without you. You've got these British elections until probably an exponential actions as you say could happen Several Times over by the time five years five years we could get a gap or we could get another. You know there have been years. Nineteen seventy four. There were. There were two elections in a single year. So you know we could get another two elections next year. Well I mean the good news By comparison maybe is that that no matter what happens in the twenty twenty election. I have a feeling that Ah The speculation about twenty. Two thousand. Four election will begin early in the morning after in November fourth would be the morning after the election. So we will Will will be to at least the punditry part of it. Okay that makes me feel alright. Helen Louis thank you for being here on on radio. It's been a pleasure That'll do it for this week. Radio alantic thanks to Kevin Townsend for producing and editing this episode and to Catherine Wells the executive producer for Atlantic podcasts. Our theme music is the Battle Hymn of the republic as interpreted by GIANBATTISTA. And if you want to support the show and all the work we do here at the Atlantic the best way is with a subscription just go to the Atlantic dot com slash radio subscribe. Thanks for listening.

Royal Family Donald Trump Britain Twenty Twenty Years Queen British Conservative Party Boris Johnson Helen Louis Prince Andrew Meghan Markle Jeffrey Epstein Buckingham Palace BBC Helm Lewis David Runciman South Carolina Mark Zuckerberg
"britain" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

Radio Atlantic

08:29 min | 7 months ago

"britain" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

"Okay. We're back with Louis. Staff writer the Atlantic so Helen. We've talked through Brexit. But that's not the only issue playing out in the election. You've got the you leaders. Jeremy Corbyn Labour and Boris Johnson. Course currently the Prime Minister of the Tories and one of the things that has become a major issue. You is whether Corbin is anti-semitic but also whether Johnson is an Islamic job and those are kind of running up against each other in this campaign. What does that look like as playing out? Yeah I've been writing about this for the Atlantic and it's been a very depressing thing to cover because as you say it's become a kind of partisan back and forth right where you raise one issue and the answer is yes but Dermot Corbin and on the other side. It's yes this but Boris Johnson and that means that neither of them really can be taken quite seriously as they could be. Because it's you know it's been sucked into the into the more of a kind of and parties and slanging match the thing about Boris. Johnson is that there are many people. Even on the right even in the conservatism. Now left the Conservative Party who have said said explicitly. He's unfit to be prime minister. His old boss Max Hastings said you know you wouldn't trust him with your checkbook or with your wife She's a classic conservative thing to say about someone You know he got sacked from the times for lying. He made up a quote that he attributed to his Godfather. He got sacked from the shadow cabinet by the Tour de Michael Howard not for having having an effect but for lying about having an affair by saying that it was an inverted pyramid of piffle. There's been a recurrent theme British and expressions. I think in America miracle here right. There's been a position question and during this election campaign because we don't know how many children he has. I mean who knows. He may not know how many children he has say his personal personal character You know has has been a subject of intense scrutiny and then you come to. His career is kind of newspaper columnists. He was editor of The Spectator magazine. and then a columnist for the Daily Telegraph and in that capacity he. He wrote lots of deliberately provocative articles and the one that comes up Aloisi rooted defense as he says it liberalism about people should be allowed to do stupid things and one of his citations for this. was you know I don't like women wearing Burqa but INNOVA letterboxes but nonetheless. They shouldn't be bound from doing it. in so he says it's always taken out of context that remark because actually I was defending their right to do it and the other side say we'll let you're still in your encouraging other rising this whole group of women who are at higher risk of being attacked for the way they dress. So that's that's right. Equally depressing learn in different ways is Jeremy Cubans history. Because he was on the benches for thirty years. He comes from the The hard left of the party for whom Palestinian rights are one of the great foreign policy causes. He's personally much more passionate about foreign policy than absolutely anything else. In his passionate anti-imperialist he's very hostile towards America. And unfortunately the way that tips over or is into repeated suggestions that Zionism is inherently illegitimate. That Israel doesn't really have a right to exist that there's something different by he said A couple of years ago that Zionists British scientists quotes don't understand English irony which touch a lot of Jewish people. I know because it. It products that idea of divided. Oh I did loyalties or you'll never really be assimilation. Never really be accepted. So this is consistent thread running through where anti-colonialist politics tips into anti not just Israeli any particular Israeli government kind of concept of Israel itself and then one of the worst incidents was there was a mural on a wall in east London that had hook nosed bankers on a table. It was on the back of black Africans and it was a kind of absolutely stone cold classic anti Semitic trope about you know roster bankers and Shadowy World Cup governments in cabals and he left a comment on it saying you know basically like why is this why you know. Why is this even being taken down a now says we'll I didn't look at it very carefully? Will the the problem is you. Don't have to look at it very carefully to very fleetingly to go. Gold is that and it. Unfortunately anti-racism plays into a lot of things are very topical right now particularly Bakili Conspiracy theories on things like social media about the one percent About the idea that the world's run by elites and they're perfectly innocent ways of phrasing that but there are also ways that do seem extremely dog. Wesley and that has not been a line. He's walked very successfully at all so as Britain at a breaking point. Here I feel like Britain's been a breaking point for three years so my colleague. tomek take a rope. He's saying you know. Britain's constitution is is being stretched to the limits and that's a good sign which is why I like carrying tomorrow because he's relentless optimist about these things you know but it it is the same thing as what's revealed by PAPP's the impeachment inquiry in America Right which is the people who built democracies and the way that they've grown up. Have there are checks and balances built into them. So the idea that you know. It's all seems to be slightly. Chaotic is kind of a function of trying to sort out. Something really really messy through a series of overlapping sets of mandates and prerogatives and rules. So I'm I'M GONNA go along with Tom's assessment that means that everything is ultimately okay because the alternative tiffin too horrible to contemplate. There was the attack on the on London Bridge last week. That caught a lot of attention people trying to sort out. What exactly was going on and whether the would be something that played into the British election? It's been a week now since it happened happened Obviously the attacker was subdued. Does that seem like it is shaping where things are put people just more on edge with everybody everybody pretty much as far out on just could be already. The funny thing was invited after initial kind of horror of it. Everybody got quite patriotic because as it turned out that this man had been a conference in London Bridge and started attacking people with a knife at which point lots and lots of people had started to fight him off off including one man with a fire extinguisher. Another with a novel Tusk that he'd He'd snatched off the wall but the interesting thing is that was a much higher death toll from a terror attack twenty seventeen in the same area and Jeremy Coubanou is still labor leader then running. It's Theresa may do something very unusual. which is everyone thought he was going to be really in trouble about it because of his His perceived dovish nurse on national security issues. But he said you know first of all. I think that Islamised terrorists are attacking Britain because foreign policy our invasion of Iraq Legacy interfering in the Middle East and Iraq war although a majority of Britain's support at the time has now become very unpopular particularly on on the left so that was reasonably well received and the second thing he said was an anti-us therapy message which was that the Conservatives in that the time in office have caught police numbers and it is unfair to expect our police to a defenders from such serious threats. This when there. Are you know that they're understaffed. And overstretched and so what looked on the surface like it was going to be a big problem for him actually was neutral if not positive in terms of his his reaction to it. I'm sorta think similar similar things happened here. It hasn't really played enormously one favor of one politician of the other. Boris Johnson already had quite draconian populist authoritarian harian approach to criminal justice issues. Very much of the kind of lock up school. And he's used the opportunity to reiterate that which has been in itself quite controversial because the conference that the knifeman started I was about prisoner education and rehabilitation in the two people that he killed both worked in prison rehabilitation and the father author of the man who died said. Well don't decide my son's death to say you know no one can ever change because that's not the experience that you know that my son Jack had so it hasn't it hasn't played to the kind of law and order thing in in the way that you might've straightforwardly expected that it would so through all of this. The the constant rock of stability in British politics British life is supposed to be the royal family and these days.

Boris Johnson Britain America Atlantic London Bridge Dermot Corbin Jeremy Corbyn Labour Israel Conservative Party Brexit Max Hastings Louis Jeremy Cubans Michael Howard Iraq Daily Telegraph
"britain" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

07:54 min | 11 months ago

"britain" Discussed on The Daily

"Episode is supported by Capital Group home of American funds an investment firm that has helped change your clients can I into I can visit capital group DOT com today. Talk to your adviser or consultant Alton for Investment Risks and information so more Boris Johnson calls for a special election but it turns out. He needs a two-thirds vote from parliament to make that happen so what actually happens. Opposition leaders have roundly rejected his call for a general election next month. He doesn't get his two-thirds majority for an election. It's Johnson had never known an opposition in the history of democracy. That's refused to have an election so in effect he stuck he's boxed in on his big goal of pulling Britain out of the EU and he's not able to move ahead with the election. The thing he was hoping would break the logjam ugh jam would give him the mandate so basically this all backfires it all backfires he loses more votes than any incoming prime minister in recent in British history and he finds himself in far worse shape than he was before all this started and that leaves the brexit situation where where exactly well it leaves frankly everything in a state of paralysis and confusion by the end of the week and London one of the questions on people's minds were would Boris Johnson simply have to resign really well. If you take the prime minister at his word word. Can you make a promise today to the British public that you will not go back to Brussels and ask for another delay Brexit and so average. I'd rather be dead ditch but hate by Brexit he has said he would rather die in a ditch then have to go to Brussels and and ask for an extension of Britain's departure yet as things stand today. That's exactly what Boris Johnson will have to do. Who and if all of this were not enough this week of back to back defeats? Boris Johnson had to endure the indignity of his own brother Joe uh-huh Johnson who is also a member of parliament and a minister in the government <hes> announcing that he too was going to resign because as he put it he he was torn between family loyalty and the national interest when you planning to resign for comment to say it's been an honor to be roping minister under the three governments but it's time to move on sorry. This is a very tight knit family so the fact that Joe Johnson felt obliged to take this step really says something about the depth of his concern about a no deal brexit about the course that his brother Boris Johnson has the country going on right. If your own kin a member Conservative Party your brother quits then. What does that say? That's right so just to be clear. Those people opposed to Johnson right now in parliament they are insisting on going back to the European Union to negotiate some kind of an accent and so if Johnson is unwilling to do that he might might be out of office but I guess the question is is the EU willing to actually enter these kinds of negotiations. Aren't they pretty fed up with Britain. At this point. The is completely fed up with Britain at this point. They believe that they had months of good faith negotiations associations with Boris Johnson's predecessor Theresa May. They offered her an agreement. She brought that agreement back to parliament it was overwhelmingly defeated defeated not once but several times and there's absolutely no indication from European officials that Boris Johnson is going to get a better or different outcome than Theresa may did and whether or not he holds an election is being largely dismissed in Europe. Their view is we have have given Britain the best deal it's going to get and if Britain doesn't want that deal. It's time for them to simply leave. <hes> what do you make of this remarkable remarkable sequence of events your your first full week as London bureau chief well. There's a couple of ways to look at it. One is is that this is just a situation of overwhelming chaos confusion paralysis finger-pointing so on one level level. It looks like dysfunction you know on a on a grand scale but if you dig beyond that if you sort of look a little closer what you see is that this this was really a week in which the checks and balances in the British political system really worked you have the prime minister coming in with this this hard line even reckless approach to brexit embodied in his decision to suspend debate in parliament to sort of circumvent <hes> the normal functioning of parliament by sending the MP's home and then you've got this coalition of members of his own party and the opposition coming coming together to put a brake on the prime minister to head off some of these most extreme outcomes and that's kind of what makes British democracy so unique that there is this set of conventions of folk ways that impose a level of of moderation on these proceedings and we really did see a victory for that in parliament victory that was not at all clear when the House House of Commons convened at the beginning of the week so mark you're saying that even though this all looked especially chaotic that actually what we just saw was is democratic institutions holding functioning and succeeding but of course the other way of looking at this and the way Boris Johnson I assume looks at it is that the will of the people has just been subverted that they want brexit with or without a deal and that parliament what what you described as the kind of assertive functioning of democracy in Britain just stood in their way yeah that's right Boris. Johnson's argument will be I want to go to the people to to put this to the people and these. MP's Britain's politically elite is standing in the way of popular sentiment and and that will be the core of the message that he brings to the British public as he attempts to turn this situation around and how are the British system is holding up compared to the American system that you know so well if we put these two democracies side-by-side. How does it stack up well. One thing that is very striking to me in covering this rebellion in the Conservative Party is to compare it to the Republican Party in the United United States and they're of course UC barely a handful of Republicans who have stood up to president trump. This is a Republican publican party. That is one hundred percent under his control. He has engineered a total takeover of the Republican Party. I think Boris Johnson tried ride in the past two weeks to do the same thing over here. I think this rebellion shows that the party wasn't going to stand for it. I think it's also fair to say that Boris Johnson's having a tougher time in his populist crusade paid than Donald Trump is in the United States.

Boris Johnson Britain prime minister Republican Party Conservative Party European Union London Capital Group Theresa May United States Brussels Brexit consultant Alton Donald Trump DOT Europe House House of Commons
"britain" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"britain" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Britain is getting a new prime minister I'm Dave Anthony fox news we are going to unite this amazing country Boris Johnson chosen to take over fox's Simon known as live in London Daystar is Johnson elected leader of Britain's ruling Conservative Party flamboyant former marriage London he's a prominent supporter of brexit and is pledging to take breaks and out of the E. U. by the end of October even if that means leaving without a divorce deal we are going to energize the country we're going to get it done okay with that he was gonna take advantage of all the opportunities that will bring Johnson is set to take over as prime minister tomorrow toted set already vowing to block or so cold no deal brexit Dave Simon president trump tweeted events Johnson will be great the president also wrote Democrats have trump derangement syndrome ahead of tomorrow's testimony for special counsel Robert Muller the president says a barely watch it again claiming no collusion no obstruction Muller will be questioned by two house committees in the justice department wrote him a letter should you testify the department understand the testimony regarding the work in the special counsel's office will be governed by the terms you outlined on may twenty nine specifically that the information you discuss during her testimony appears in and does not go beyond the public version of March twenty two twenty nineteen report fox's grip Jenkins the trump administration as a new policy to speed up the process of deporting immigrants here illegally this would cover those who have been in the U. S. less than two years anywhere in the country in a previous rule said it had to be within a hundred miles of the border and this could affect a significant number of people in fact in the first three months of this year thirty nine percent of illegal immigrants who came in contact with ice had been in the U. S. for less than two years as fox's trees Gallagher the ACLU's says it'll take legal action to block.

Britain prime minister Boris Johnson fox London Daystar London E. U. president Robert Muller special counsel Jenkins ACLU Dave Anthony Conservative Party Dave Simon two years thirty nine percent three months
"britain" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Menu

Monocle 24: The Menu

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"britain" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Menu

"Gonna cook that weekend and also mission for this book. I think the mission this book is a number of things. One is to try and explain the transformation. There's really happened in Britain. We've deliberately tried to tell a story through the book that starts with the Mazdas and explains how there are different elements of rich food. As the reinvention of the pob there is the celebration of European cuisine is going much much further afield. There is also, you know, journeys into, you know what modern virtuous cuisine means, and then there's also a new wave that's that. So we tried to tell the different facets of British cuisine because clearly it's evolving. And this really is a book that looks at Britain's food today, but looks back and also Ford in terms of some of the classic dishes. Come along the way. So really are I'm Bishen is too fine, wool foodies who love what we do and macbook they can cook from. And in this book you have recipes from sixty shifts from Britain. And I think what's what's striking you actually made this point before we even started this interview that we have a very international crowd of face Soviet. Yeah. I mean, what's interesting is that people do and have come to my father's American. My mother's partners eat into British, you know, actually, I think most of us are, you know, from multiple places and actually nowhere is that more true in some ways in the world of chefs, we have amazing Japanese chefs and not an amazing Indian amazing, Sri Lankan, you know, French, Spanish, Italian. I mean, the list is endless and I think what is exciting about we always said, we set up with a chefs. It was not about that. You were from Britain. It was the cooking in Britain. So it was the most inclusive definition of what Britishness could ever mean and how much have, for example. Vs sixty ships change. The definition of water. British food is I think they've totally transformed it. I mean, you know, if you look at what the British public cooked today, they cook more Indian and Chinese food than they do French. Now, you know, we're not very far from FRANZ, and yet we have somehow embraced, you know, everything from stir fry through to Moroccan touchy means, and I think will chefs have pushed around and made us feel comfortable. I'm by serving incredible things in their restaurants that tweak our interest, you return home. Ooh, I wonder how you do that and there's not so Johnny where you try and recreate some kind of memory that you got from restaurants, and we did some research while ago to look at, you know, wed, two people get recipe ideas from look. It comes from TV. So people watching travel programs about dishes, people eat, but also it's, we've all got on holiday and said, while that muscle dish was amazing while how did they do that? Kopat show a new. Then Khan come back and recreate. Waited. Do you have any favorite recipes on this book? By the way? I mean, I I worked really hard with with the team and attitude who put this recipe book together because I suppose I felt it was really important that the recipes that we had were not intimidating. Now, it's been on fat recipe. You have opened in front of you. He's a stuffed pigs. Now that is the one recipe in the book that I would say is you need to be kind of bold to cook it. But it was funny I, she one of our community cooked that recipe the other day and they will look. I didn't know how to burn the road the Trotter, but I just went with it. I went with the principle of the recipe. The flavoring ingredients had. It was amazing. I only because my she said, my son asked me to cook it, but I think that's the thing is that all of the recipes in this book all cook abo-. And as long as you follow the steps, you don't have any crazy equipment. Yes, some of them take time, but the reality is if you'll slow cooking alarm shank, it takes three hours. If you're cooking, you know, you know a source down, it's going to take forty minutes. So therefore I think that the processes by.

Britain Khan Bishen Ford Johnny forty minutes three hours
"britain" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

05:17 min | 2 years ago

"britain" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Britain pity i want to i educate i can i got you drugs real nice guys club because we're john red carb to combat gang if she did conceived over grid five gone and i think i just want to make your move all right john measure t and i'm sure you life i'm sure he won federal his calling to save you my stomach to say started our can't small tract going stomach we another one money.

Britain john
"britain" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"britain" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"Britain and the brand is my are you.

Britain
"britain" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"britain" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Britain on every smashes and trashes bring people pinning gets three amanda mike agreed vile to friend just voice people back no seven for school this will be doing prayer.

Britain amanda mike
"britain" Discussed on WHCP Community Radio 101.5 FM

WHCP Community Radio 101.5 FM

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"britain" Discussed on WHCP Community Radio 101.5 FM

"Britain's z paul on the girl to be power from you let's me me your parents with me undefined here with you who and so all she dresses torso suits of nuns called two she down the team he knew twas brownies daughters she went back to hard we have no time to stay top sales and hara i'm the way the ocean hero when her father how he vince he for his cop my bowl hers she was.

Britain vince
"britain" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"britain" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Britain mm mm uh laura window of say he a day roll norte he the lina bolanos miami who huawei day may day event now rural node pay loria the leaving gorazde remains low i love easy on day god the and ooh when there rates may are a live tell me that i feel lee then soon though then lauded please.

Britain gorazde lee miami huawei
"britain" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"britain" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Britain and the the ding down along with her babies born in dictate to drugs has increased three hundred eighty three percent you can volunteer to cuddle to help them he'll volunteers nationwide are lining up for what could be the most rewarding and adorable volunteer position available cuddling brave newborn babies who are busy fighting for their lives with the climbing rates of drug addiction in the united states an increasing number of babies are being born addicted to drugs interestingly enough it also turns out that snuggle may be key to their healing according to the centers for disease control and prevention neonatal abstinence syndrome the diagnosis for babies born addicted to op a drugs such as heroin excite content and morphine has increased by a disturbing three hundred eighty three percent in the past eighteen years when these babies are born addicted they reportedly suffer tremors muscle spasms shrill crying irritability sweating in digest.

Britain united states neonatal abstinence syndrome muscle spasms heroin morphine three hundred eighty three per eighteen years
"britain" Discussed on The Noise Pop Podcast

The Noise Pop Podcast

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"britain" Discussed on The Noise Pop Podcast

"Britain the difference clean water no gal gadot throw two two two two tim curley the hope the new through the new please dillon laura deeply the new deep eric dill in the room thanks for joining us for another episode of the noise podcast looking for to bring you more new music and special feature sprinkle then throughout two thousand eighteen check out the noise pop festival lineup if you haven't duggan yet as noise pop vest dot com and get ready for the annual event from february nineteen to february 25th throughout san francisco in oakland we'll be back next month the new podcast episode for yes nor is pop out gases produced by colin peadon and myself it's mixed in engineered by calling our executive producer is dasa mud wig and i'm your host adrian spinelli cheers indeed ubuntu koepka.

Britain tim curley eric dill oakland colin peadon executive producer adrian spinelli duggan san francisco ubuntu