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"britain bauer" Discussed on The EntreLeadership Podcast

The EntreLeadership Podcast

06:18 min | Last month

"britain bauer" Discussed on The EntreLeadership Podcast

"Heared Entree leadership we believe that leaders teams and businesses win when they create an execute on an effective plan. It's one of our six core drivers of business growth, and it's absolutely essential for you to scale and succeed as a business. But, here's the deal. You and I both know that even the best plans don't accommodate for things like a global worldwide pandemic. What happens when things don't go according to plan what happens when the unpredictable like corona virus inevitably occurs from the Ramsey network. This is the entree leadership podcast where we help business leaders screw themselves their teams and their prophets. I'm your host. Alex Jones in today's conversation is with the founder and business. Business owner that had an exceptional plan only to see her world rocked by something. She could have never expected Ginny Britain. Bauer started Jimmy's ice cream in two thousand and two with a vision to bring world-class an-and ice cream to cities and stores across. America and here's what's crazy. Her plan was working. Of course it wasn't perfect, but her small business was rapidly expanding launching new locations getting into retail. She even hired a CEO. Things were absolutely up into the right. Until Twenty fifteen win, Jenny's team received a call that almost brought the entire thing to a halt. I did not take the phone. Call our CEO John Load the phone call, but I'm so close to him. I could see his expression and I've never seen it before, so I knew something was up. We were in a meeting that was a fairly fun meeting about packaging. And I just like my heart dropped when I saw that, because I just could hell on his face that something was wrong. So! He got this call in two thousand, fifteen that some a an inspector had found just a random test in Lincoln Nebraska. Pulled some ice cream, some artisan ice creams, and so on off the shelf and tested positive for Listeria and that's not the call you WanNa get of course you work really hard as a company to keep customers safe and to prevent any kind of anything like that, of course that just kicked off our whole response to that, which was which was pretty epic I think and really our goal was to prevent an outbreak and at the time I. Think we. We weren't sure if. If we could, but that was our first goal within fifteen hours. We did a or you know I say fifteen hours in some you know. We were up all night and the next day we decided to do it entire total recall recall of every ice cream that we had out there. Put all back in. Make sure we get test it just to make sure that nobody would get sick and we prevented an outbreak in doing that, so that was a pretty amazing and epic. Herculean effort! But it works. I think now we're sort of the example of what to do in that situation, but at the same time we. You know we did everything right when you're hit with that kind of a big moment. And then we woke up a couple of weeks later and realize that we had nothing. You know our company. was really worth nothing and we had salesman away of making sales are kitchen needed to be shut down because we really had to get to the bottom of that, and that took a while two weeks and weeks, and so you know. We brought in experts from around the world, literally the top six experts in. In in this in the world, and so we had them sort of working on a kitchen, and we figured it out over, but you know it was a very hard I think a lot of companies wouldn't have survived it, and I think part of the reason we did is because we're friends, because we love our customers so much, and because we have this like extra worldly. Will I think in a way? It's almost felt magical. Honest. I don't know why Al Samir was literally. We were going to work everyday. thinking it doesn't were. We can't survive us, and then we did my word. It's it's such a roller coaster because I know you started. Genie's in two thousand and two, and you had been in the ice cream previous to that, but started Jimmy's in two thousand two, and it seems like at least from the outside, looking in I've been familiar with. With genie's the brand for a long time. It just seems like everything was up into the right multiple locations. You were growing. You're expanding. It seems like there was a lot of buzz around your brand, and then like your CEO. Gets that phone call in two thousand fifteen. He tells you this information. What was your initial feeling? What was your initial thought whenever he tells you? We had a pint test positive for Listeria Ginny. My goodness I don't know what my initial thought was. It was fear it was. I'm positive. It was fear and and John's probably too, and I think in those moments or you know fear may not even be the right thing. 'cause you know when you get that kind of a call. It's hard to explain what that actual emotion a whole bunch of things at once you can either in that moment be paralyzed, or you can stop and face it and I think John and I are both the kind of people and we've proven that now. Who Stop? Stop Stopping face it and face into the challenge. Look out it. Don't let our fear get the best of us, and then make a plan and go forward and I think both of us did that are very unique ways, and that is you know he put a plan into place immediately to keep people safe to work with the FDA into to get back on our feet as best we could. Money had to come from somewhere, and it wasn't gonNA come from sales. And I got to work. Reformulating are as Crimson figuring out. How can we? Who are we as a company? When we emerge from this? What has to stay and what can we let go of? And that was a really interesting exercise that I actually think we had to go through. To be who we are today, and so it's really weird. How crisis is not something? You'd wish on your worst enemy, not even your worst competitor enemy. You know or anyone. But it can be the best thing that ever happens to you and I. think that that's true and I think a lot of people I've talked to who've had a personal crisis. Even have said that so the idea now that we're in another crisis sort of just knowing after you've been through it that there's a light at the end of the tunnel that you have to just keep. You have to find your one step forward. That's so good and I love that you say fine. You're one step forward because it seems like. Like. There's a challenge in this season that I'm sure is a parallel to the challenge that Y'all faced in that information doesn't come to us all at once, and it seems like we get new information on how the market is unfolding, and how the pandemic is unfolding and I'm sure you were getting details, not all at once, but as they were unfolding in that situation..

CEO John Load Jimmy Business owner Ramsey network Ginny Britain Alex Jones Listeria Lincoln Nebraska founder America Jenny Al Samir Bauer salesman FDA
"britain bauer" Discussed on The Mojo Radio Show

The Mojo Radio Show

07:05 min | 2 months ago

"britain bauer" Discussed on The Mojo Radio Show

"Jenny? Oh Gosh so many A. Navy Brown Butter Almond Brittle. That one was inspired by role doll. And his favorite flavor, growing up, and he wrote about it and so I read it, and then I threw his writing. His description created a flavor based on that, and I've always said that I go I went to the role. Doll School of Entrepreneurship that. You know it's just very different, so I think that I think that that flavor probably was that is is the best one described me. This isn't a great that when you have a Belk store to a flava to me, cycle richness. Authenticity to something. When you a backstory. Well, you know I I. Heard and I it one hundred percent believe this I read a book about it, actually that pleasure is derived from what you believe about something, and so if someone gives you a glass of wine in there a high level, some a and they tell you you know all of the wonderful things you'll taste in it, you'll you'll find. You'll taste all of that. You'll love the wine, and then you might find out if you take the you know what your blinders off. Off that it's a cheap glass of wine. You Know I. Mean It, you you. Your perception of the world is really based on what you believe, and so it's really interesting for us. It's really so much a part of our service at the counter just to give you a little tidbit about the vanilla that we're using or the whatever it is because it slows you down just a little bit to find that and to experience it, and then that expands your memory of it, and it's a really all part of this How we serve people. talk to you. About this I find your story what you've done absolutely fascinating. You mentioned g grandmother. And you Talk Grandmother Lot. Who was an art teacher? Just very quickly one final thing when you think about your grandmother. What was the greatest lesson? She taught you. You've today. Go your own way I mean. She said it over and over again they both did my grandfather and her, and and she believed it. She really really believed it. Go your own way. Do Your own thing does make discoveries for yourself? Don't take anything at face value. Discover for yourself. Try It, and and that's hard to do because everybody wants to. Really they want to protect you and keep you safe, and they don't want you to make mistakes, but so everybody in your life will say you can't do that, but you have to find out for yourself, because then then then you have the time. The other people are wrong anyway. So yeah, up Ginny for those people did the packaging of your product how you put it together? Your website is absolutely beautiful. Which I suspect comes from the history. You have the interest you have in. Your grandmother influence it's it really is something it's. It's just a great lesson in. Putting an idea to practice, and then iterating as you go for people find out for themselves. See stuff was the hub for genie's. It's Jenny's DOT com. It's J., e., NIS. Dot Com, and you can see all of our story and flavors what we've got going on right now. And and even see how reacting to the crisis in the pandemic at this moment. Speaking of which before we let you go al.. Breathe voiced either guy. I pay has been drooling for the entire hour that we've been chatting He's just slipped me a note under the door and asked if he could have twelve of rum and raisin go easy on the ice cream in the bryson's. Yeah? I love it I. Wish I could get you ice cream. Yeah, well, hi! I these on the floor, but anyway he'll be okay. Well. You know I will say right now on my at Jenny I'm Jenny Britain Bauer on Instagram but I'm putting up videos of my recipes, so you can make them at home I've got an ice cream. My method is different, but it works. It's very. The end result is very close to what I can create in my professional kitchens with all of the amazing ingredients that I have so yes, so you can actually make it. We'll have to give that crack I've I've got five kids and. Yeah and I love to cook and my favorite ice cream. I make for the kids passion fruit. In fact when I make it with five kids I rarely get any so. Maybe we'll have to. Crash in and and see what happens. You could be the the Robo Challenge. Sticks and rum in the sleep like a baby. Yes. Absolutely. Jenny. Just terrific I came into contact through a mutual friend avows. Ryan hoke and I loved you on his show. We need to do in front of a live audience. This. Splendid I've got loads more stuff that I told you back because I find your story what you do absolutely fascinating you definitely the top game. Thank you so much for sharing. It was such a lot. Well thank you so much. Please stay in touch and Yeah, take care of yourself and your family. On. Nine as the fleet. I help pay will get a great night late. And often when Paykel, struggling plate I suggest that they may soon to the mortgage I right here. When I do. I fall asleep. Pop Quiz Hotshot. Do you know why it's cold and Ice Cream Sunday. Now I could fake why it's gotta be something to do with the days of the week. Show here is there's actually a little bit of ingenuity behind it. As well back in the nineteen fifties in the United States in a little town called. Evanston in Wyoming. They made it illegal to sell ice cream. Cream, sodas on a Sunday because it offended many churchgoers so to get around the new laws, shopowners invented the ice cream Sunday that replaced the soda with Syrup to get around the Soda Law and then replaced the Y. in Sunday, with a so they could avoid offending the religious leaders, which is pretty clever I thought. Gee, that's remarkable fact. It's pretty cool. Isn't it isn't a typical. Everyone's looking for an angle. Everybody's looking for work around and it's no different. What's going on right now? Globally with this pandemic? Everyone's looking for a little work around. That's right. Yes Sunday. Radio show. While it's been a great show I. Think it's a pretty easy close pretty easy. Play out song this week. Do you recall when I asked Jenny the lesson, the lesson that had grandmother toward her when she was a little girl. Do you recall what was coming word for way? But it was something about going your own way, wasn't it? And I think we should play little fleet with..

Jenny Britain Bauer Belk Doll School of Entrepreneurshi drooling United States Ginny Ryan hoke Wyoming Soda Law Evanston Paykel bryson
"britain bauer" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:57 min | 3 months ago

"britain bauer" Discussed on How I Built This

"We have one product right now. That's on delay until June is one of our top products right It's actually our T. Blade that connects with our trimmer. We're finding ways to kind of get it to our consumers more quickly but again this goes back to being transparent with your consumers about what's going on. Unfortunately we're in a position where everybody can understand. Yeah but there are lessons to be learned out of this right. You gotTA manage demand better. You GotTa diversify your production right you got to hoard. More cash in the future So you know I think of everything as an opportunity for learning as opposed to the potential issues that you're dealing with the president. Yeah I was talking to Jenny. Britain Bauer Jenny. Splendid ICE cream a couple of weeks ago on the show and she said we're so busy where we're always like rushing around. You know this better than anyone. Running a company That there's very rarely time to stop and innovate and to just think deeply to come up with new ideas. New Product just requires time and like heads base rate like. Are You finding that you actually have some space right now to to do some of that thinking real choice right innovation really happens sitting in a kitchen and hoping for the best the way I think about it requires some physical activity right? I walk around kind of the block around my house multiple times without any phones without any music and things may or may not pop up right you know it took Walker and company thirty years to get the idea to do from from the time that I was born until it happened right But you know that was a result of kind of living life and having things kind of fall into my lap and understanding that there was an opportunity. It's different today. You have to just afford yourself time to be able to look out work. Yeah so much of what your brand is about. Is Cuban connection like people touching their faces and people kind of showing people how to use your products and I mean to some of that change does does that human touch and human connection change. I hope not. I'm still going to be going my barber right getting my haircut because I sure they'll need it but I think those norms have thought of on both sides right and you know there's a principle client relationship right That my Barbara has with me as I have. A principal inclined relationship with our consumers. We need to be thoughtful about how package things right and you know she might need. My Barbara might need to be thoughtful about the sanitizing stuff right all that jazz but we just need to think about the second dairy tertiary impacts of how we interact with our clients which is good for everybody anyway. So I'm hopeful that it does change for the better but assures that will change This question from Vincent Braithwaite out of all the books that you've read one which one influenced the way you do business and which one influenced your personal life interesting. It's only one business book that really helped me think about how to be a better just CEO Today and it's high output management my anti-growth. He's very good at distilling y you need quantitative and qualitative metrics in the assessment of your people or output etcetera. I think personally you know one of the best books that I read was Race against the machine. And you have this one percent ninety nine percent issue going on and the idea. Is that folks at the top or leveraging technology and ways to make the hell of a lot more productive right while folks in the ninety nine percent are not so how can actually help to close that gap to ensure that we're all participating in this new innovation economy and the reason you know one would think that that's like impactful as a business leader but it really does change the way. I think about everything right. the types of businesses. I WanNa create into whom the respect of diversity around the world right and its impacts on consumerism. Among other things it is fundamentally changed the way my world view is now it's it's It has impacted other things that and I'm more choice fooling purposeful in the things that I do recognizing this very important issue which I think is one of the most important in the world right now. Yeah for sure This is a question from a Taraji. Mosey What about productivity tips? I mean obviously we're all balancing different. You know different situations. You've got kids at home. And you've got to look after them and run a business and stay productive. I have to say the IFP and a lot more productive lately every moment of the day's work and being with my family it's kind of intertwined but like for you. How are you able to kind of stay productive? You remember when I was in high school. There's exercise that was given to us. And you know the exercise was very simple. It had a sheet. It had every hour of the day from midnight to midnight. And then you just block out what you're doing during those times right so eight hours of time sleep. Let's say four hours. Five hours of that time was class Another let's say three hours of that time studying right. There's still leftover something like six seven hours of the day that can actually be used productively and you realize how much time is wasted doing things that you don't necessarily need to do you know about this time. I have my son's at home. I have to do their continuous learning that sort of thing but also had to realize for myself. I am not a trained pre K. Teacher I do and we make best efforts my wife and I to do as well as we can. But during the Times those six seven hours of free time that you don't really recognize it's taking care of yourself right forget about productivity and work because that's already accounted for in those hours. We had talked about. Say Time for yourself. What is the hobby? I read a lot and I make time for myself right When I mentioned a little earlier how we you know you'd have to model the way and block out time so the other team members can actually see that. I think that applies across the board whether that be at work family friends etcetera. But if you just do that very simple exercise you'll surprised by how much time you have to do the things that you didn't have the time to really really quickly before we wrap up. Tristan in five years from now when you look back on this time. What is the thing that you that you do today? The change you make. That makes your business more resilient in five years from now. I don't think that there's a change in so much as my reflecting back on the fact that I was consistent and talk a lot about values as you know. And we've been through a lot you know layoffs in the past right down rounds up around all that stuff. Now we're going through this kind of cove in nineteen crisis and it's important that our people know that I am consistent in my judgment right consistent in my courage consistent in my loyalty to our people and we're doing things and make everybody else realize that that consistency is there because they'll be another one of these in the future whether it's going in one thousand nine or something else right and you've got to really make decisions and clearly and I'm most proud when I recognize that I did things that are in line with my values and I was consistent throughout and that's really the most important message that I would give to anybody but I would be most proud in five years if I reflect back on it and not only. I felt that I was consisted. But the people who supported me through this know that I was being so in so much as their willingness to continue to be led Into the future I love it tristen so great to see you. Thank you so much for doing this Tristan Walker. Thank you thank you. That's an excerpt from my conversation with Tristen Walker.

Times Tristan Walker Tristen Walker TA Bauer Jenny president IFP Barbara Britain Vincent Braithwaite Taraji principal CEO
"britain bauer" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

12:48 min | 3 months ago

"britain bauer" Discussed on How I Built This

"Britain Bauer founder of Jenny's splendid ice creams. She joined me from her kitchen in Columbus Ohio. This is yeah. This is the owner of Medication. I went and got my professional ice cream. Sheena and some other equipments are of our H Hugh Test Kitchen. And this is where I spend half my day. I'm actually making videos to boost in asking people for ideas that just started this week at China. A LOT OF FUN. I really do think that ice cream. It's comforting and is a distraction so we've been having fun here Jimmy one of the reasons. Why we're we're we really wanted. Us Our first death And we're so excited to have you is because you dealt with a huge crisis back in two thousand fifteen. I think it was You had a situation where you found in one plant or one like tiny bit of Syria. You had to shut down your whole operation for weeks. I think it was you guys were hemorrhaging. Money With the business was going to survive but the so the response to that was incredible. I mean you you are transparent and open with your customers. You had blog post. You talked about what you were doing. Closed down all the Jenny's shops. I mean this was was could've killed your whole business And Not only. Did you recover? But you're you thrive. You're much bigger company today and this is a different crisis. It's a it's a different ballgame So there is no playbook but talk a little bit about. I don't know. Are there lessons from that experience for you to that? You're kind of able to apply creatively right now. I definitely think so. I mean in Twenty fifteen. What was looking back at time between seeing they were do now. Just doing the best we had at the time. And so we were when you can't make necessarily make sense of some sort of fall back on your values you let lead. You went and so in doing that in two thousand fifteen with Close down brought everything back. The recall prevented any kind of outbreak. Which was really awesome and.

Jenny Britain Bauer Columbus Ohio Sheena founder Jimmy Syria China
"britain bauer" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

08:10 min | 4 months ago

"britain bauer" Discussed on How I Built This

"In there. That's really high quality stuff I mean. Presumably you your company can make a lot more money. If the pints were two dollars cheaper Yeah but I think that for us. That passionate isn't growing as a community. That sort of community spirited business and making something truly beautiful that we're all really proud of I mean in our stores. We have thirty nine stores. And we have the Pete. The summer we had eighteen hundred team members in the stores. And I think it's because mostly because those people who work in our stores are so proud of what we do that over the counter. It's of a natural naturally. Good at Service. Because they're just proud of all of these back details that we will never probably be able to convey all of them over the counter but they know that like it's that detail and the and the intention behind it that everyone feels and it's this crazy magic I mean do you think that there is a an argument to be made that you should pursue perfection that you should pursue an uncompromising just absolutely no cutting corners at all. I mean or it's like having a garden I mean sometimes you're GonNa have a very lush beautiful area and these going to get a little bit Withered hopefully nothing dies. But that's what you're doing. You're moving your resources around me. Ultimately we only have a limited amount of resources that we get to do this with and so you're constantly shifting. Yeah I mean you are in an entered a crowded space lotte ice cream makers a lot of people here working on baby clothes and different products. Where there's you know. There's a lot of competition I mean. How do you really breakthrough in a in a crowded market time? I mean it's one person at a time. It's all on street level. It's time and that starts to build sort of mentality of business because you get to create. I didn't know how to make ice cream. I know now when we were younger. And let's say we have taken a whole bunch of money early and I don't think anybody would have given it to a but let's just say we have done that. I wouldn't have had the time to work out these details and the things that I now know about ice cream. I need it all this time. I spent at least eight years boots on the ground just making ice cream and serving it before ever started growing and that time is everything for me because I learned all of that the art. I didn't study Acecomm Chemistry and honestly I failed every class I took and Matt Ice Cream is math so I had to learn all that stuff and for us. That's that's what's worked and I think in ice cream when we look at what's happening in American ice cream for the last one hundred years there was like a new sort of great American ice cream concept every like ten years and then it kind of stopped at Ben and Jerry's I mean there's been a couple of other things that sort of were okay but not great and now we're in another ice cream moment and I think it's because we've really devoted this lake time to to building it into a real. I mean a community that means something and it doesn't just mean something on paper. It feels a certain way and I think that like Ben and Jerry's. I think that they did that it was. It was a moment in American history. Every industry and every business is so different. But I just don't think that you can just create an ice cream shop and just bounce under the market. It's just too complex of of an industry and we've seen so many come and go over the years. It's very hard. Dairy is a complex industry. Of course we always think everybody else's businesses are so much easier than ours. I'm like I'm not doing dairy again. It's been amazing and it's been a joy and I'm an absolute evangelist for dairy farmers. I'm curious to get your your take on growth right because we we sort of. Were Fed this mantra? That growth is good and growth is important but there are also consequences when it comes to growth and challenges so for a company like yours. It means you've got a source more stuff. It means you got to build more shops. It could mean that you lose control the quality as you have more stores and more shops I think most of your sales are still online and in stores right. Beat people buying pints at whole foods and other places rather than the scoop shops. But I mean. How important is explosive? Growth I mean. Do you want to be like Baskin Robbins? I mean I love growing so much. I like the challenge of of business and I love that. I don't think that my company would ever grow just because of growth. I don't think anyone in our company is motivated by that. I think it's been really fun to grow where people are buying our ice cream and then be able to offer them servicemen various service driven as a person. It's very personal to me. And so being able to open shops this really important to me in places even when we're selling a lot of ice cream in whole foods for instance to be able to open shop in that community where we know people know about us and loves them then. We can offer that sort of service in that moment and do that. Ice Cream is a really lovely moment. A place that you can get to know somebody else better and it's just a special thing. So Gosh I have so many thoughts on this because I think that you can get better as you grow and that's been my experience when we were really small and there's this sort of glow around the sort of mom and pop sort of thing. I think especially in ice cream but when we were small we were. We were really limited by what we could buy. I mean we had to do an ice cream makes you couldn't get a company to help us. We couldn't get the dairy that we wanted to. We couldn't get the milk that we we wanted and we knew we were surrounded by these farms. We couldn't get them outside of the system co mingled with other milk. Even our strawberry grower now gross fields for us. And he's got his brother involved in the other guy down the street you know it was like what flats at a time or whatever and so we really couldn't do much planning and then sometimes you wouldn't have enough or whatever so you actually like up to this point we've gotten so much better as we've grown in terms of ice cream quality indefinitely in terms of service and we have so much more to do and it takes resources to do it as you know. The theme of the summit this year is kindness and clever. I love that so much and I know that there's been many examples of that on your journey. Can you share just just one example of of somebody who is kind or collaborative or just? Who helped you when you started and how that enabled you to get here. I don't know how many of you are from smaller cities like me. I'm from Columbus Ohio Columbus Ohio. Yeah I love I love Columbus very much and my whole story is about asking for help my whole story. I mean I started with. I always say no research from nothing. We all have our brain baron buds and that's literally like how we started the company But that community came out. I think once I started to prove myself so it wasn't immediate but once I started to prove that I was in it and that I would care it and that I was going to do this and it was going to be for a long time. The community came out in a big way. And at that point you know it becomes this love fest like now. I'm super committed. I want to get back to the community. They're supporting me. And I in a way love these sort of smaller cities and other cities as well where the whole city can kind of rally around a few businesses and companies that they love whereas sometimes you get lost in a bigger size other advantages of being in a big city with a with a new company that that has been amazing. And I just put that credit back on Columbus and I love it to this day and we'll never leave for that reason. I mean I travel a lot but I always come back home because that's my place on. Earth Jeni Bauer founder of Ginny. Thank you thank you. That's Jenny. Britain Bauer founder of Jenny. Splendid Ice Creams Ginny. Join me live on stage at the how I built this summit which happened in October at Yearbook Buena Center for the Arts and San Francisco will have more of my conversations from the summit over the next few weeks. Keep CHECKING FOR UPDATES. Thanks TO CANDICE LAMB. Who Produce this episode and Ramtane Air Blue? Who wrote the Music Guy? Roz and listening to how I built this this is NPR..

Columbus founder Ben Jerry Yearbook Buena Center Jeni Bauer Britain Bauer Baskin Robbins CANDICE LAMB Roz Ginny Columbus Ohio NPR San Francisco Ohio
"britain bauer" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

08:07 min | 4 months ago

"britain bauer" Discussed on How I Built This

"So before we start the show I wanna tell you about to live episodes. I'll be recording in just a few weeks and how you can come see them in person. If you are a fan of ninety s alternative music you will not want to miss my live conversation with the founders of sub pop the legendary recording label behind bands like Nirvana soundgarden. The Shins and many many others that show is happening on March twenty sixth in Seattle at Benaroya Hall. And then the very next night. March twenty seventh. I'll be in San Francisco interviewing. Ken Grossman founder of one of the biggest craft beer makers in America Sierra Nevada brewing company. That's happening at the Sydney Goldstein Theater in San Francisco. Now if you haven't been to a live recording of the show they are Super Fun. Come on down. Meet your fellow listeners. Be a part of the show. Laugh cry grab some how I built this swag and come say hi to me and the team so I really hope to see you in either or maybe both San Francisco and Seattle March Twenty sixth and twenty seventh for tickets visit. Npr PRESENTS DOT Org. Hey everyone so today. We've got another one of my conversations from the how I built this summit. That happened last October in San Francisco. Jedi Britain Bauer has spent the past eight years perfecting her signature line of ice cream flavors which include fluffer nutter pie goat cheese and Cherry and my personal favorites bramble very crisp and biscuits and peaches and these are just a few of the unusual flavors. You'll find Jenny. Splendid ice creams all began at a Columbus Ohio. Farmers Market Back in two thousand two today. Jenny's is a staple at whole foods and there are nearly forty scoop shops across the United States in my life conversation onstage. I asked Jenny about staying true to herself. And how her ice cream can be that amazingly good without any egg yolks. I WanNa talk to you about a word. That comes up a lot and I have really mixed feelings about this word and I and I hope some of you do too which is authenticity. We hear this word a lot. Be Authentic Bureau authentic self your true self and one of the really cool things about your story that are members that in the early days when you had your first version of. What would become Jenny? Splendid later on you used to wear like torn jeans and you had green and purple hair and at a certain point you realize that actually wasn't working that something about your look and the aesthetic of what you were selling wasn't right and you decided to change. You took the diet of your hair. You started wearing all white. You sort of looked like a like a pharmacist. And your ice cream shop here. It became kind of reflected that clean aesthetic. And I'm wondering I mean you know you could say well Jenny. You know you weren't being your authentic self at that time. But of course I absolutely was it absolutely was I realized that I was communicating through what I was wearing and it was it was. It was goof you restore outfits. I mean. They're really cute. I had pink hair for a long time but I wasn't conveying. That sort of who I think I felt like on the inside honestly and and what. I thought that I wanted from my ice cream maker. You know the other thing was that it scream my first day scream shop. I thought that I could be this ice cream artiste and like everybody would be so excited about whatever. I was doing today that they would. Just you know. Come down and figure and stand in line and you know what's the. Great Jenny have today and I was really thinking more like an artist or a wannabe artist. So I quit art school to make ice cream then and when I got to Jenny's in two thousand into when I open Jenny's I I took all emphasis off of me on purpose. I had learned the lesson that no one comes to a business for whatever I'm making today. I don't go to businesses for that. I go to a business for what I had the last time I was there. Not for some new thing. I might change my mind when I get there. And so once I learned that I knew that I had to create this signature line that everybody knew about. And that was like credible in the middle of the night and you had to have it the next day and then I could play around with other stuff and then those could move onto the signature list if they were good enough if people loved them enough and so that was part of that. Take the emphasis off me. Ron Customers still add my passion to this but not make it about me anymore. Make it about other people and I knew what people love because they knew what they loved it. Scream when Miami. I shop but I didn't always have that so that constant disappointment is not a very good way to run a business. Do you do sort of agree with me? This idea of authenticity is being complicated. Because you know we get is be your yourself your authentic self and not. All of us know how to do that or what that actually means. Yeah it is. It's a complex thing right now especially when you talk about companies and brands building authenticity and starting with into though. Because what does that actually mean? That's something that you can't make you have to do. And it takes a long time and I think that so many times for me anyway often to city. It's a trust for yourself. And it's not trusting that you'll never make mistakes as trusting that you will but you'll get yourself out of trouble and I think the authenticity almost from that place of trust for yourself. You know because the people in the company that we find the most authentic are the ones that are making mistakes sometimes or that are trying things that are pushing themselves so I want to own a sort of a shift gears. A little bit and ask you about perfectionism because for those who know about your company in about you. You're a perfectionist. I mean you obsess over ice cream. In a way that few people obsess over any products right. I mean we start with what the cows eat and that every year. Our ice cream recipes change. I mean right. Now we're talking about extended hold times for pasteurization and how that will impact stability. We don't use stabilizes modifiers corn Syrup high-fructose Corn Zip and a whole bunch of other ingredients. That are very typical and ice cream or even a yolks. But we figured out that that that there's various ways to make milk proteins. Act that way and it's really fun and it's extremely delicious but it's all still an experiment and it's a big challenge. I think it's one of the reasons that twenty four years in. I'm still extremely excited about what we can do this year. And what we're going to try this year is going to impact what we're GONNA DO. Next year started to interrupt. I can get like really excited about this. I know me too cheap because I've noticed that there are no egg yolks. Oh the sort of I guess unless you want it to be unless you want there to be lake an Eggnog or something like that but I mean even like the peaches you buy for the Peach Cobbler or the cherries you use for the goat cheese you source it in an obsessive way. The cows are raised on well. And we're patient so for me. I always serve the people and so it starts building a relationship with a with a grower or producer and then we can work out quality together because we know that that's the way I mean. That's how you get the best stuff so sometimes it can take years to figure out how you know which. Which kind of strawberries grow in Ohio? And how can we extend that season by a few weeks so we have time to process them all as they come in? There's all sorts of cool stuff that you can do. But you really have to have a good relationship with your farmers and growers and your producers like Whiskey. You know there's too much alcohol and the whiskey. We couldn't add enough to ice cream. You know and still abide by the law. So we work with our whiskey distiller to create a lower alcohol whisky so we can add a Lotta whiskey to those kinds of things. All are based on relationships. I mean but with that level of obsessive nece right. You're paying a premium for really high quality products. Also means that your ice cream's more expensive pine of Jennings's expensive compared to pine another brand right. It's a very dense. There's a lot of ice cream. It's packed.

Jenny San Francisco Seattle soundgarden Benaroya Hall Shins Sydney Goldstein Theater Ken Grossman Npr America Sierra Nevada brewing United States founder Columbus Ohio Bauer Jennings Ron Customers Cherry Miami Ohio
"britain bauer" Discussed on Your Last Meal With Rachel Belle

Your Last Meal With Rachel Belle

05:28 min | 10 months ago

"britain bauer" Discussed on Your Last Meal With Rachel Belle

"I'm Rachel Bell and this is your last meal a show about famous people and the stories behind the foods. They love most today on the program John John oates as in Hallo- notes as in the one who had the big fuzzy caterpillars living on his lip for most of the nineteen seventies and eighties thinks change differ. I showed my mustache. I I was like kind of freed from my shackle of my facial. Hair is the kind of ban that you go see live and you realize that you know every single song and every single song ahead. We're talking man eater. We're talking. I can't go for that. We're talking over a rich girl. which do you remember that song had a bad word in it that they would play? Klay on the radio the B word and not just felt like that snuck through like I always was stoked on that as a kid hala notes have sold forty million records they they are in the rock and Roll Hall of fame and the Songwriters Hall of fame and they are the best selling music duo in history so I started thinking about famous food duos how's ketchup and mustard peanut butter and jelly and the ultimate arranged marriage salt and pepper. They're always together but why when and why did they become the standard table seasonings. I console with Professor Ken. al-Balah who teaches food history at the University of the Pacific in Stockton California salt-and-pepper were not originally a couple and Jenny's funded ice creams has been churning out funky flavored ice creams years before charcoal ash honey Tahini lavender became a mainstream flavor that even your grandma likes to order with the Paul and on top in fact founder Jenny Britain Bauer single handedly started the salted caramel ice cream craze or is it Carmo Carmo Carmo but Jenny is here to talk about how music music influences her ice cream flavors. I would say that music was almost everything that we do but first my conversation with John oates the one with the Moustache so sorry I hung up on you when I tried to take you off the speakerphone. That's okay. I'm used to being on. That's that's right. John OATES and Daryl Hall shared songwriting duty but it was John who came up with the lyrics to one of their most famous songs man eater. I remember being a kid and and just like losing myself man-eater being at my neighbor's house and dancing all over the living room. I think we were four years old. What this okay. This is crazy. Man Eater is the first song that I remember liking. Oh a kid and I was so into it and my strongest memory is being at my neighbor's house and watching trees like pine trees through the window sort of in the dark and it looked kind of like a monster and I thought the song was about a monster that is so funny. Wow you're so scary mindless joyful we still unite on Wikipedia. It says man eater is a metaphor for New York City. She'll she'll spit you out but in John's memoir change of seasons he he says the song is based on one actual woman sitting in a hangout in Greenwich village where we all used to hang out with very kind of hip place and and this gal came in and she was absolutely drop dead gorgeous and she had a foul mouth and her beauty and her vulgarity kind of was inspiring hiring. Let's put it that way and that's very she would chew you up and spit you out came from exactly I I walked away from that night and awesome man. That's that girl is he's on a whole other level and she would chew you up and spit you out any clicked and when she of course and then went boom and that was it. This woman woman is just walking around living her life. She doesn't have any idea that this number one song is about her. She may I at this point. I haven't spoken to her near so I wouldn't would know Oh. It's somebody that you knew. It wasn't just like somebody you met when you never know. I knew her you know she was she was a very top model at the time in New York famous person John John was born in New York City into a multi generational Italian American family was eating like growing up my grandmother ran the kitchen knows allowed in there except for me because I was the young the firstborn son in an Italian family and that's an exalted position so I was allowed to be in there she would always give give me the first meatball she would speak to me in Italian which I didn't really understand understand anything she said but I kind of did you know I was a little prince so to speak and she made lasagna she used to make her own LASAGNA flats and lay it out on the on the bid on a on a sheet to dry and our holiday dinners were always always Italian. They were lasagna Spaghetti or re you know usually macaroni rigatoni with meatballs and sausage real basic southern Italian in present food and do you keep any of those traditions alive with your own holidays having italian-american who we actually absolutely we don't have a lot of traditions with our family. You know we what we have. A Son who's twenty three and every Christmas we make was on you together. That's what we do. We make a point of it. Yeah I love that and so do you make the noodles from scratch to grandma. No no no. I'm not that hard-core. I know no we we by the noodles but we we make everything else nice. I didn't mean to LASAGNA. Shame you there by the way I know you do. It's ruined my day. Thank I'm so sorry.

John OATES John John New York City Jenny Britain Bauer Rachel Bell Carmo Carmo Carmo Daryl Hall Klay University of Professor Ken. al-Balah hala founder Greenwich village Stockton California Paul four years
"britain bauer" Discussed on Eat This, Not That!

Eat This, Not That!

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"britain bauer" Discussed on Eat This, Not That!

"All right. Just like our tips to bring the perfect ice tea a couple episodes back. Eat this not that editor, Cheyenne Buckingham tells us how to nail the perfect scoop with this two step tip. She tracked down from Jenny Britain Bauer. She's the founder of Jenny splendid ice creams, and the author of the James beard award winning cookbook, Jenny splendid ice creams, at home for anyone who knows how to how to deliver perfect scrutiny, and she's really sweet woman. I mean, pun intended, I guess if she is creative ice creams, I've met her before, she's, she's lovely anyway, she explains that there are two very common mistakes, most people make when they're trying to scoop ice cream not waiting for the ice cream to be the right temperature and fiddling with the temperature of the scooping utensils. So there's definitely, you know a one two punch and how to do it. Right. She says. Depending on how cold your freezer is you may need to give your eyes cream time to warm up a little before. Scooping. She likes to let it sit out on the counter between five to ten minutes or just until the size aren't as rock-solid anymore allowing for gentle squeeze and her second trick is to always use a dry room temperature ice cream scoop. It'll just melt a little bit of the ice cream as you run it over the surface, giving the scoop enough slide scenario. So counterintuitive right. I imagine most people are scratching their heads at this because there's probably two camps. Right. It's probably run under hot water or use use a warmed up scooper to kinda like get that melty kind of just like hot knife through butter kind of vibe, or I know people that use a cold, but it is great surfer because they think the cold cold like it makes it makes a difference. I actually tried this the last time I scoop myself to my screen in preparation for to make sure that it works. It works permanent do I I mean. mean was it Instagram your scoops, John? If if it had if it had lasted long enough for me to take photo of it. Absolutely would happen. But I took the ice cream out of the freezer, and it was frozen like rock solid. I I took dog for a little walk now. It was like we do want this ice cream back in the freedom like no, no, no, I wanted. I wanted to sit out like I'm going to I'm walking around the block, and like, you know, give them some skim, some air, give my eyes cream some room to breathe. I came back little squeeze on the sides like loosen up from there, grabbed the grab the scooper off the countertop not warm, not cold, not wet bang, and it's delicious, perfectly round, scoops Gol. So, and I would have taken a photo of time. There wasn't any time. I had a divan because the ice cream had been sitting out more time. So look, there you have it. I mean I can't I guess I'd like I, I can't wait to hear. I'm sure we're going to hear from people about how perfectly this works in them, right? They're gonna wanna see photos to send the female emails, going to be.

Jenny Britain Bauer Cheyenne Buckingham James beard award editor Instagram Jenny John ten minutes
"britain bauer" Discussed on Earn Your Happy

Earn Your Happy

11:16 min | 1 year ago

"britain bauer" Discussed on Earn Your Happy

"Sell the products doing it. Yes. Actually doing it. So that's a needle moving thing. Like us. Sitting down and recording right now is needle moving. We're actually doing the thing that if you you know, if you wanna start a podcast or you want to be consistent, you can talk about it. You can you know, you can plan it all you want. But until you actually sit down and record. It's not an actual needle moving thing. Right. You have to do you have to do it. Yeah. Totally can't talk about it. No. So how about you? What are your needle movers? That you do were. You were talking before we started this. You're talking about relationships. Yeah. And I'd say with Adam a needle moving thing is actually setting dates because we both miss. He works far away. So nighttime were like, oh, let's be tired together. They so this is a great relationship this awesome. And then you're like, oh my gosh. It's been like two weeks. And we haven't done anything together as it down and to plan something. So it's planning those things in doing them and making reservations and just went, especially if you make a reservation, it makes you go. It does we just made a reservation. Vatian tomorrow, even though everything book for true food. Because of course, you guys is not recorded like totally real time. So tomorrow's Valentine's Day true food though like for real, but still I think it's on. Let's all I feel like tomorrow like I don't feel like getting all 'cause I bliss project is coming up. So the last thing I want to do is like go out and get all dressed up in whatever pasta. Yeah. No, not feeling post. Oh, yeah. That's what I had a mastro's is helps and pasta. Forgot talk about that. It's too busy talking about her pick. Beautiful dancing white. Yeah. Some haste Recht things. Hey, do you want another question? Let's do it up. Okay. Who's this one from this from Atlanta, Al Alexandra? That's a beautiful name is really pretty name. And she was wondering what was your pivot point where you changed over from fitness to coaching masterminds things like that. You know, I wanna talk about pivots because it's like I think that it's important to recognize in your life. All pivots. Whether you're done with a workout. Whether you're like, you know, what this yoga and Josh Mel not filling my soul anymore. Yeah. Like at one point. He was now he's not now he's not there by so that's the pivot point for real though there. There was a point in fitness where I was doing all these competitions. And I was very excited and I loved it. And it was like empowering me. And then the last year I so the last year, I I was like, okay. The same competitions aren't doing it for me. Like, I'm not getting as lit up. This is feeling more like a chore. It's feeling really challenging. And I was like, okay. Well, I'll switch I'll do the routine portion where it's a huge challenge. So then I did that for a year in that really let me up and then at the end of that year, I could start at feeling coming to a close. I was like I think this chapter is done for me. Like, I'm gonna if felt really sad and super scary. Because I didn't know what was next. But I knew that the only way to know what was next was to stop. What was comfortable? And like what at that point had been like six seven years of like doing the same thing in like. Yeah, I felt comfortable with the women. I felt comfortable again that industry, and what scared me the most was going into like personal development and really starting to use my voice in a different way. And I was like oh dang. And I knew that's what I needed to pivot because I just was not happy anymore. Like not like I was like, oh, this is miserable. Wasn't filling my soul anymore. You can just feel it in your guy. I just knew it. Yeah. Like, I just literally knew it. I was just like I need you have to do something else. And it's just how life is like sometimes, you know, that with a workout. Sometimes you know, that with where you live some you know, that I mean with anything a relationship. Yeah. Shoutout to your mom, mom and your dog. Yeah. All the listeners. Yeah. How is your mom? My mom's. Great. She. Oh, she actually just started listening to Oprah's or she's always listen to Oprah so personal. Yeah. What she's doing this series with Eckhart tola right now is a good. She loves it. She said, and I quote, it's changed my life. Oh my gosh. What does it change to Geno? I wearing sleeveless stuff. She's wearing stuff now. No, more turtlenecks. Carts, like the talks so slow you should wear. Sleeveless bliss now. She was just talking about your thoughts. And 'cause she I were both very high strung people. I think. Yeah. And she was saying like, oh if you have a negative thought. Just come through. And just say, I'm realizing I'm having this thought, and this is thought and this is not me. Oh my God. I love that so much because I've been you'll love this one can share it with mom and a cart. If you see him probably will. And you up for sure he'll be like doing down dog and you'll like Eckhart? Oh. Oh my gosh. Okay. But this is what you can share with them. What I heard on a podcast, and they they were talking about. Wow. That's a great sense. I heard on podcast. I listen to podcast now. Oh my God. Ooh. Hieroglyphics on wall. I heard podcast now teach wisdom. Okay. So they said that feelings are just visitors like they come and go like they're just visiting new. But they have a message for you. It's like, oh, you're they are this is what I'm bringing you. Yeah. Like if you're like, oh, I feel like crap. Feel like crap. You just let that feeling like crap visitor. Get out of my house. You're not welcome here. Not for you. Toilet. If you want to exit that way. Yeah. If you wanna get out of my house by. So let them visit. Yeah. Let them visit. And then let them leave. Yeah. By came. So is that our last question on that was so any last sentiments people are still out sediments? That's bottom of a wine glass. Right. And you don't want that right now. I think that if like sediments, I think they're okay because time to sign a good wine. I think it is like a very old wine, right? Like or a very, right. I know nothing about wine either. I'm so sorry. Everyone. We're sorry. I I don't know. I think it's like, I don't know fermented grape juice. I'm not sure. Yeah. Hey, what are you excited about right now? Thanks for turning that around. I felt like I was really floundering. What am I bliss project? I you're going to say that I'm getting so excited me too. And it doesn't feel crazy right now. It really doesn't crazy. Don't know on your end. I feel excited. Okay. And just excited because I'm like watching all these women starting to get excited on social media. So that's exciting me. They're like a lot of them have been there before. And some of them are like, oh my God. I've never been here hearing. I'm so nervous. And I'm like, of course, you are so normal. We're nervous. I'm nervous. Yeah. But we know it's awesome. Wouldn't I know they're going to be great people there, and I'm gonna learn a lot. Yeah. It's going to be amazing like, and it's so different than last year, so different. And can we just talk about what's going to go on there like this or not even wants to go on? I just want to talk about what it's gonna look like because I'm so excited about the stage. He's going to be absolutely beautiful. I nine. Oh, yeah. Just like fun like fun guy. And I feel like it's a really shows you expressing yourself in stepping into the who Lori is. And I love that you're doing that wearing a cone bra. Laurie's cone brought this year express yourself. It's going to be Madonna. You want to you do one? I know you're doing it. I'm doing has your name all over it. Watch out over a turncoat is going to be. Is going to be ice cream. Maybe maybe I am confusing that with an ice cream cone shirt. Yes. Ice cream a little little cartoon ice cream. Her Jenny sweatshirt right now. It says please take me to Jenny's, right, please. Take me to Jenny's tell me about Jenny's just real quick because I need to know. Okay. Jenny's is the most amazing ice cream place. And it started in Columbus, Ohio by a woman named Jenny Britain Bauer and Jamie is an amazing female entrepreneur men. She had a she went through. She started this business, and then it failed and then she brought back to life. And she uses amazing ingredients and comes up with all these fascinating flavors, and she's all about an incredible company culture. And how do you not work for them? I don't know. This is so weird. Like, I feel like I literally need to send this to them. And be like you're missing you're like top executive right now. They're just great. I just love. I love everything. She does that whoever wants to send that little clip to Jenny. I mean, I would I would die for that full. Okay. What's your favorite flavor? Oh, I really like Bramble berry, Chris or salty caramel or. Milk chocolate in the world. Oh, my I know God. And all you, can you can order it online. It's a little expensive. But this is not an ad, and I will tell you that we. That we just had it together. Who's a main? And it was ridiculous. I was actually a little angry about it. Because I was I didn't think I would like it because I'm not really that much of an ice cream person. And I was angry that I liked it. So while I was angry because as good. Yeah. And I don't want to want that ice cream on the time. And it was like, oh, it was like brownie delight in. I don't know. Although I haven't been like, oh my God take me to Jenny's right now. Like, I'm not going to get the sweatshirt yet. But maybe soon just wait like your fan. I am like sweatshirt on. Right. It is a she's a fan. I'm a member of the pint club like you go in front of the ice cream. And you're just like. Yes. I love it. And I I love it so fees with it. I like this. He should do their social media. I know maybe they could just call me. They will five five five five five that's jails on movies because yellow to Kim. Number Jennifer Lopez can't be like, here's a number. Call me. I mean, I wouldn't leave her alone. She'd be yoga with us. You know, I did recently watch monster in law which jaylo stars in clubs that again truth watch this lake last weekend weekend, like Jane, Fonda, her laughing movies. Incredible. Choose the best. This is sponsored.

Jenny Britain Bauer Eckhart tola Adam mastro Oprah Jennifer Lopez Josh Mel Atlanta Geno Al Alexandra Kim executive Columbus Ohio Lori Laurie Jane Bramble berry
"britain bauer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:36 min | 2 years ago

"britain bauer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And from listeners like you who donate to this NPR station. It's how I built this from NPR guy rise. So pretty much everyone. We'd had on the show had a passion for a product that they needed to put out into the world lower American believed the world needed Lara bars. Jenny Britain Bauer was convinced that her ice cream was gonna change. How people thought about ice cream even Jimmy Wales founder of Wikipedia thought, everyone should have access to free knowledge. But I'm here to tell you that that is not always the case. In fact, sometimes the product isn't what drives the founders what really drives them is the challenge rather solving the challenge. And that's basically the story behind Wayfair neither Steve Konae nor near and shop felt bad strongly about home furnishings, but they did feel like people should have choices. No matter where they lift. Because there was a time. When if you lived in say, Evansville, Indiana, you couldn't easily get the same type of. Cool copy table or sofa that someone in San Francisco or New York could get now today, this concept isn't particularly radical or new but back in the early two thousands. It was a revolution. And today Wayfair sells almost five billion dollars worth of this stuff. Every year. Wayfair was actually the third company. Steve inured started together they met as teenagers at a summer camp for math and engineering nerds in the early nineteen nineties they quickly lost touch. But then almost a year later as if fate herself was watching over these guys they both ended up is first years at Cornell assigned to dorm rooms on the scene corridor. Did you know both of you know, the the other one was going to Cornell? No, we hadn't really kept in touch. So I think it was a it was a surprise every much like, hey, what's up? This past year. So were you friends like right away? Yeah. We were part of a, you know, I think when you're freshman near you sort of have a small group of friends that you sort of connect with and spend a lot of your time with and we were in that group together, and then junior year near tonight started we've got to be a lot closer together that year junior and senior year we actually live together as well with it with a few other people up at Cornell. Yeah. Did you guys did you did you Steve used to talk about starting a business when you were in college? I don't know that we ever talked about it per se, but our last semester at Cornell. We took an entrepreneurship course is one of our elective courses. And in this entrepreneurship course, one of the things you had to do was credit business plan, and what really happened is through the process of doing the project, which is creating the business plan. We basically started our first business. Yeah. It was ninety five and it was very early on the internet the Netscape browser and come out that year, our idea was actually to develop some internet directory services, and we will go downtown New York and try to pitch companies. On pingers five bucks outta listing in our internet directory. Of course, most look at us like we're nuts. A few would say, hey, that's interesting. But I I don't even have a homepage. I call it the time. Could you help me build a website, and you maybe at least give present on the internet? And what would that cost me? And so the business turned into kind of an internet consulting business that built sites for companies, and you kind of knew how to do the basics because you were engineering students. Exactly. So you'd go from project to project companies were trying to move very quickly. You know, different..

Cornell Wayfair Steve NPR Jenny Britain Bauer Jimmy Wales Evansville Indiana Netscape founder New York San Francisco Wikipedia five billion dollars
"britain bauer" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"britain bauer" Discussed on How I Built This

"So pretty much everyone we'd had on the show had a passion for a product that they needed to put out into the world lower american believe the world needed lara bars jenny britain bauer was convinced that her ice cream was gonna change how people thought about ice cream even jimmy wales founder of wikipedia thought everyone should have access to free knowledge but i'm here to tell you that that is not always the case in fact sometimes the product isn't what drives the founders what really drives them is the challenge rather solving the challenge and that's basically the story behind wayfair neither steve konae nor near shop felt bad strongly about home furnishings but they did feel like people should have choices no matter where they lived because there was a time when if you lived in say evansville indiana you couldn't easily get the same type of cool coffee take able or sofa that someone in san francisco or new york could get now today this concept isn't particularly radical or new but back in the early two thousands it was a revolution and today wayfair sells almost five billion dollars worth of this stuff every year wayfair was actually the third company steve in neeraj started together they met as teenagers at a summer camp for math and engineering nerds in the early nineteen ninety s they quickly lost touch but then almost a year later as if fate herself was watching over these guys they both ended up as first years at cornell assigned to dorm rooms on the same corridor.

founder steve konae indiana san francisco new york wayfair cornell jenny britain bauer jimmy wales evansville five billion dollars
"britain bauer" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"britain bauer" Discussed on How I Built This

"Rahman are it's how i built this show aback innovators entrepreneurs idealists and the stories behind the movement's they built i'm guy rise and on today's special live episode how a college dropout from columbus mixed hot pepperoni oil in the chocolate icecream from that built jennings at growing icecream empire was more than thirty stores across america so interesting little fact about the columbus ohio area it's actually one of the major food incubators in america wendy's started their soda bob evans buffalo wild wings max in burma z yes in columbus and one of the theories about why that is is because for a long time the population of columbus was a pretty good proxy for the general population of the united states so if people in columbus liked it there was a good chance that the rest of america would to sip you know this it kinda makes sense that icecream flavors like juniper and lemon kurd or host meant this and blackberry crackle effort at is have also come out of columbus because that is the city were jenny britain bauer invents and then tests oliver weird and wonderful icecream flavors and it's an icecream brand that could only have come from the mind of a perfumemaker which as you will here.

Rahman columbus jennings america united states oliver ohio burma jenny britain
"britain bauer" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"britain bauer" Discussed on How I Built This

"Hey just a quick thing before we get to the show i have some amazing news which is that we are doing another live show it's coming up it's happening on february eight in columbus ohio and i'll be talking with jenny britain bauer the founder of ginny splendid ice creams it's porter by american express open and tickets will go on sale in just a few days you can get them at npr presents dot org and because were gearing up for that we're gonna reach into the archives today to play one of our very favorite episodes for un hoist say that every time but really this one is incredible to story of how kate spade turned her name into one of the most popular handbags in the world enjoy we were still not making any money nobody was making a salary we were anti was funding everything i just wear thinking i then we need to shut it down i said it's weird run through our four one k bunny and in all of our savings at that point we steward seeing progression that was good pay as a salary the next year in the near future so we thought we'd a good run addeds we think we've had it from npr please how i built this show of that innovators entrepreneurs its and the stories behind the movement's need them i am guy rise and i'm they show hella in western kid named kate brosnahan took the role of burlap sorted into handbags and launched and i i brand concrete speight.

ohio founder ginny npr kate brosnahan columbus jenny britain kate spade four one k