35 Burst results for "Brin"

"brin" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Scribes

Sci-Fi Talk Scribes

05:03 min | 2 weeks ago

"brin" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Scribes

"Baseball, if he plays it sort of more field of dreams and less waterworld, and you'll probably have pretty close to the vision that you had when you first wrote the novel. Bloody have is is something that very deeply moves people. But my opinion is meaningless, they they don't. They don't ask the original writer. Anything right is the fate of the author to offer the the book up to be a movie, and then stand back and watch look I'm lucky they're making a movie. Even if it's a even if it's lousy, they'll sell more books, and then people will write me letters saying. Why don't they make a movie out of this? Yeah, you're absolutely right that the postman is great book to give to people who may not have read science fiction. US early Mike Copies dog-eared from that adventure. Is there any chance that you're going to write a return to the Postman? Well, I, don't know Mostly finished, but you know I do have the sequel rights and Lordy. Lordy, if the movie is a huge success and I and I sell a gazillion more copies of the book. You know I I. Don't consider it selling out if I were to do a sequel to book. So. It's possible, but I you know. I have limited lifespan. Do you know that mice and elephants gets the same number of heartbeats race through there because they have a faster metabolism, elephants are speed slowly, but they wind up getting the same number. We humans get three and a half times as many heartbeats as other mammals. And it's not enough. Aren't we working on bending the odds of it though I like? My point is that in this wonderful century of machines, and all the video games, and the Internet and the Web, and all that sort of thing. There's a real simple way to decide which. Innovation is good, and which technical innovation is bad. Actually you touched upon something that was interesting there your view of the web is very different from your cyberpunk novelists that are out absolutely in my opinion, anything that the web offers or the computers offer that. Tries to suck lifespan out of you. And waste lifespan, precious lifespan is bad, but anything that the web or the computers do that. Enable you to do more with your lifespan. Good. But yeah, people have been I've been doing a lot of public speaking lately. because people think of the novel. Earth predicted the worldwide web. I think they're being very generous personally. I'd much rather get credit for what's happening in Switzerland right now. Any of you who've read the Earth no that I predicted that eventually. Thank records would have to be open. But. That's as to whether or not they're doing it now. Because of me, I. Leave that to the judgment of some. Austerity, those of US involved in the electronic community I think found a very familiar chord, only red earth, and all of the people sharing information and being able to access old records and things so. I guess the next book in the uplift, trilogy is a UPOLU Sagas. You have coming up anything beyond. That would try another medium like perhaps write screenplays or anything like that. They're all sorts of wonderful exciting possibilities I. You know I've I've I've been thinking of that the best I've got. I've got a great new take on Hamlet. I've I've I've I I'd love to do it showing showing that Shakespeare must have met him to be twelve years old..

US UPOLU Sagas Baseball writer Mike Copies Shakespeare Switzerland
How do pirates retire?

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

03:25 min | 2 months ago

How do pirates retire?

"And all next week. I'm investigating the myths and mysteries of the pirates that sailed the seven seas during the golden age of piracy. Yesterday I debunked the idea that pirates never had treasure chests full of gold blooms and pieces of eight and cited the discovery of the pirate ship wide up by BERRY CLIFFORD CHESTER TREASURE. That he hold from the remains of that ship and yeah it was a treasure map that led into that site today. I'll detail how pirates were able to repair their ships despite being unable to pull in any protocol and where they ended up when they go to old from the coast of wealth leak Massachusetts where Clifford found that pirate ship. Wider will travel eight thousand miles across the Atlantic cross the continent of Africa to an island in the Indian Ocean in the seventeenth century. A thirty one mile stretch of land was called Ile Sainte Marie. Just a short sale as the seagull flies. For in the seventeen and eighteenth century was home to more than a thousand pirates but it was no mere coincidence that the colony was set up on seemingly remote island this particular stretch of land in the Indian Ocean was chosen specifically for location from here. The pirates could easily intercept and plunders ships. Traveling from the East indies laden with valuable cargo. So associated was island with piracy that gone to Madagascar for Limes. Was a message often left at pirate meeting places. It is believed that feared Brin Adam Baldrige realized that the bays and inlets of the island would provide safety for ships as well as affording about a full supply of fresh food water and women. It is also thought that the ample supplies of fruit were used for making that infamously favorite drink of these. See Ferry Marauders. Rum was the many inlets. The provided a defensible harbor for careening. This ship was pulled ashore and much of its whole. Planking was either scraped clean or replaced because this process placed ships and their crew in a vulnerable situation change were pulled across the entrance to the inland just below the surface. In the event of the pirate harbour was discovered in an English or Spanish ship attempted to enter the chain would rip out there Keel but more than a pirate harbour. I all Sainte. Marie became last stop for aging pirates. To this day you can go. To The island of find hundreds of stone markers at with names dates and the skull and crossbones on some many times entire crew would end up on the island and bury their treasure often in fear of having it taken by another pirate truth. Tunnels were dug containing all kinds of traps. Should an attempt be made to steal their booty? One of the most notorious Captain Kidd suffered at the hands of his crew burned his ship to the water that was the adventure galley and then sank after the remains of the ship were discovered so many tourists came to what was commonly called. Pirates island. This would be about nineteen eighties. They were injured when they descended into those ancient pirate tunnels so many were injured that the local government had the entrances cemented over. Well Monday. I'll describe what life on a pirate ship was like. And how many pirate cans couldn't fire a cannonball more than one hundred feet and what the battle between ships was really

Ile Sainte Marie Indian Ocean Marie RUM Massachusetts Madagascar Captain Kidd Africa Adam Baldrige Clifford Planking East Indies Keel
Tech businesses wary of moves to bar brainy immigrants

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:20 min | 3 months ago

Tech businesses wary of moves to bar brainy immigrants

"An executive order last month temporarily suspending the approval of some green cards many in the tech industry pushed back hard. The sixty days suspension does not apply to h. One B. B.'s. `As the visas for high skilled workers that tech companies often used to bring in engineers and other employees but this ETA the big lobbying and Trade Association for the Tech Industry says immigrants have founded some of the country's biggest tech companies. They've contributed to the startup innovation economy in the US and said that if these restrictions go on or get expanded it will hurt the country's ability to compete. Michael Patrick own is the senior vice president of government relations for the CPA. It's huge issue for us. Immigrants and their children have founded forty five percent of the US fortune five hundred companies and that includes tech companies like Intel Amazon. Google and Apple Steve Jobs as father came from Syria. Andy Grove of Intel came from Hungary and Sergey Brin came from Russia. Jeff Bezos is father came from Cuba. Imagine how different our country would be. We'd closed our doors to those immigrants the order it doesn't affect workers who enter the US on H. One B. Visa which is used by many tech companies to bring in workers. But you're still worried just across the board. We have heard rumors that the administration is going to be addressing and putting limitations on h. One B. Visas next. That may something they're considering the near future and we think that would be a mistake. Got It and so the concern not is not just about this existing order which is for sixty days but the idea that down the road the tech sector could be actively hurt by ongoing restrictions will. Yeah I mean it is and also bear in mind. This is a competitive marketplace the the marketplace for the world's smartest people as competitive so of. Immigrants. Don't come here. You're going to go someplace else. They're going to go someplace like Canada. I mean for a long time there was a billboard highway one and it said something like immigration problems. Come TO CANADA. We have a new STARTUP VISA. You've got these. Other countries that are embracing skilled emigrants like programmers and engineers entrepreneurs at the same time the US tightening its borders and these countries these workers create businesses and generate jobs for locals. These immigrants that ends up another country is a win for that country at a loss for us. Is there any argument for the restriction? I mean I know that you know there probably will be people who agree with the president and say America should be first in line for jobs if we have thirty percent unemployment. Well the point is that immigrants. Come here and they create jobs right. It's not like there's a fixed number of jobs to be. Had they come here. They create companies. They create jobs and they hire Americans so immigrants are there a crucial part of our nation's economy and the tech industry. And that's especially true today. Right look around. Immigrants are helping respond to the pan-demic in research. It in AI. In Food Supply. And then as as we come out of the pandemic we're going to need to innovate as never before. We need immigrants and the world's best minds to be part of the process.

United States Steve Jobs Canada Jeff Bezos America Executive Sergey Brin Senior Vice President Intel Amazon Trade Association Michael Patrick Intel Andy Grove B. B. CPA Google Hungary Russia President Trump
Small business emergency lending program expands fintechs portfolios

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:23 min | 3 months ago

Small business emergency lending program expands fintechs portfolios

"The paycheck protection program is a weekend to its second round of hopefully funding small businesses through the corona virus outbreak. Some financial tech companies also known as Syntax got permission from Congress to offer those loans. They include pay pal into it cabbage and others. The hope is that they can get loans to people and businesses who haven't worked with traditional banks in the past and the Fintech say they're tack is also an advantage but so is that true. Let's dig into it and quality assurance the segment where we take a second look at Big Tech Story Felix. Salmon is chief financial correspondent for the tech site axios. The banks were a bit slow to be able to set up websites that customers found it impossible to get to a to a human being or to find out where they stood whether their applications were going through and there was a general feeling that given that all of this was being done on the Internet the Internet companies might be better doing it than the banks were so relatively quickly. This program was opened up so that the eligible lenders included not only banks but also Internet companies Lake Pay Pal and quicken and square. Gotcha I mean. I feel like one of the questions about these lenders. And FINTECH companies and neo banks in particular is that in some ways they serve. Replace this idea of the Community Bank. Like do we have any evidence that they are or could be more inclusive than established lenders. I think they are in the if you applied for P. P. Loan from pay pal. Then your chances of guessing it. We're probably the same no matter who you were given that many of the people applying if not most of the businesses applying had no particular relationship with these Fintech to begin with now doesn't mean they're going to get that loans. It's far from clear that the ability of pay pal to get loans through the SBA system and get people. Funded is any greater than any other bank. But at least you can feel that you're on a level playing field if that's any. Solis which you probably isn't to be honest. Who is applying through? Let's say pay pal or square or into it. Who are these small businesses to a first Brooks mission? Everyone who didn't get a loan or wasn't able to get through when applying through that bank. Whatever the reason was if you haven't got your money it's not give up on your bank entirely but you say well. Maybe I can't get a loan through my bank. I should try a getting along with someone else and given the it's not difficult to apply through pay pal. Oh quicken intuit it. You May as well try if they come back to you and say hey you've been funded. Brin and you can take the money and if they don't it's no harm no foul and is there any evidence or will there ever be a way to tell you think whether they claim that these kind of like tech driven platforms are more nimble and better able to get your application through than a big bank the banks and the Fintech have all been extremely unhelpful? When people like you and me have been asking them for details about how many people try to apply. How many of those people who try to apply actually got their money those ratios on not public information than the information that the SBA has see you need to get that information directly from each one. And I don't think any of them are going to be releasing that data on the kind of apples to apples basis that we'll be able to make that determination. Is this an opportunity for these companies like if they are able to establish themselves as this type of lender or just do good by some small businesses is an opportunity for them to build a customer base down the road I think for about twenty four rows an opportunity to get some goodwill? I think the small business owners actually went to those places putting their applications and then didn't receive any money that some of that goodwill did evaporate. What's more of these companies? Aunt actually lenders at heart companies like paypal and square a much more based on payments on loans. And so. It's not clear that even if this did give them a foot in the door when it came to small business lending that something that they would really want to be right and it feels like certainly some of them have provided loans like cabbage are into it but the others haven't to think they're likely to discover that in fact. This is a terrible morass that they would like to back out of slowly. Small business loans were horrible thing to be in in general because small businesses so many things can go wrong is so difficult to really get under the hood and find out how credit worthy they are for. P. It's different because it's all guaranteed by the government so you don't need to spend too much time really underwriting the loan and understanding the business before extending the credit but if you want to actually lend money to small businesses as part of your business especially if you're doing unsecured and you're not you don't have access to cash flows which you can just S- ts to pay back the loan. Then yeah it's really Nali business where lots of lenders have become unstuck. And it's not clear that very many investors want these companies to get into that line of

Lake Pay Pal SBA Fintech P. P. Loan Community Bank Congress Nali Salmon Solis Brin Quicken Brooks
Neural Architecture Search and Googles New AutoML Zero with Quoc Le

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

09:02 min | 3 months ago

Neural Architecture Search and Googles New AutoML Zero with Quoc Le

"Welcome to the PODCAST. Hi Everyone. It's great to have you on the show I've followed research for Your work for quite some time and I'm looking forward to digging into some of the new things that you're working on but before we do that I'd love to have you share a little bit about your background and how you got started working in machine learning okay so I was born in Vietnam. I did my Undergrad in Australia. And in my second year. My undergrad I started some project doing machine London with Alex. Mola a back in Australia and back. Then I was played with. Kodo methods Then I Did my PhD AT STANFORD. A on a lot of deep learning back in the day when deployed in whispers or very cool. And that's the route two thousand seven and around two thousand eleven I did a summer internship at Google and that was when Google Brin project was founded so when I was there that was a long and Jackie Naan Greco data was there and I. It was the sun so we started out small. That sounds cool. Yeah and then I did some of the Scaling Up Neuro networks with Google Britain folks and then You know at the end Up to two years did some work on machine translation with the media and Oreo VR. He's now did mine. Owner of Ilya is now at opening I and we develop sold end to end. Solution methods and Around two thousand sixteen. I started looking into more like You Know Auto. Mau Architecture search and more recently are looking to Malacca together with Otto may also look into Sent me supervised learning and it's awesome awesome now. You mentioned early on doing work with Alex. Mullah was he was this before he was at Carnegie Mellon was visiting in Australia. He was a professor in Australia. Yeah I I went to a university. In a small air. In the capital city Austrailia go Kendra. He was yeah camera and he was Professor Edward Research. So I thought I had. I have along Very interested in AI and machine learning and took me for that. I took a class data mining and so on and talk a little bit boring but the ability to actually learn. It's actually a super fascinating so I contacted him and he was moonlight co methods machine learning and we worked together for maybe a few years before he went to he went to America then. Cmu and Amazon. Okay okay so a lot of your. Recent work has been focused on this idea of You know automating machine learning and neural architecture surge to allow machines to find the best deep learning architectures in like. It's a little bit about how you arrived at working in that area. What some of the motivations were for getting started digging into that problem so I've been Along interested in this idea of self improvement machine should be self improving itself a machine learning and even and when I started doing co methods with Alex. I always ask him. You know how the Dakota bandwith and so on how some of the HYPOC Ramat does include methods decided and apparently they decided by using things like Cross validation on then where I work on. Koroma two narrow networks. My hope is to make the hype. Affirmative go away. But that's how is the opposite so if you look at the a Kabul Lucien neural networks at has a lot of hype privatised right like how many how many layers you want it to be and how many channels you wanted to be. And what are the some of the high assize apprentice since on a Coulda with all the training parameters? Yeah all learning. Dry and as researcher develop more and more techniques FAW EURONET. There's more decisions that you have to make. That feel like. This is like a problem that can be helped by a little bit of automation so So I I observe a lot of my colleagues who will when designing networks and I asked him about the principles of design. Your neural networks. And you started are having some really solid principles like Skip CONNECTION SO. The gradient can flow through the network concern. But as you tune the network Karen Hata do no longer have the principal is around. You know trial and error right you you try this a little bit and simply with better so you try that more so. I think that that is something that may be ready for automation so even during my Grad School. I already talked about trying this but I thought you know. Maybe we didn't have enough compute because training net already takes took me days so when I saw that new control. Units are are in thirty minutes. Something like that on on safer I thought. Oh maybe this is the right time to try this. So that's when I started doing this. Newer architecture search in two thousand sixteen. It's interesting that you know. Even with all of the compute resources of Google. You had to wait until the time was compressed. Enough in order to be able to tackle the problem. Yeah to get really good results. You want the networks will be really big and that will take a long time to train. Yeah and it's it's It's funny coming from me that we have so much resources that will go train in EURONET still taking a long time And so maybe talk about the the first steps in In that area. Did you jump right into neural architecture? Search or was that the you know a a an end stage or end result of this work where I I on some of the related ideas on and off since two thousand twelve like playing around with how to do. Better hyper profitable tuning and none of that. It's really published. Because I didn't have good results have pugh and so on so so I tried it on and off over the time you know every year I would set out some time to try this idea for a few months and you know and it didn't work very well because like a procurement song and then Two Thousand Sixteen. I met Barrett's off would as my colleague now at Google and he's very talented. So we say oh. Let's let's try at the idea of Jews in like a reinforcement learning to generate and network like a little layer in an network for for a ceasefire model. Seafoam motto. Is already at the time you could say that you know enough of you depends on how where you want to be but you from thirty minutes to a few hours and the seems like about the right amount of time to get this going and my prediction is that you have to train. Maybe either between from one thousand to ten thousand bottles and I did a backup our calculation and thought. Oh this might be the right time to do it but you know I have tried this some of these related ideas in much before

Google Austrailia Alex Mola Vietnam Stanford London Mau Architecture CMU Jackie Naan Greco Carnegie Mellon Faw Euronet Professor Edward Research Ilya Hypoc Ramat America Euronet Professor Mullah
Hollywood Studios Halt Film And TV Production

The Frame

06:18 min | 4 months ago

Hollywood Studios Halt Film And TV Production

"All production shutdown in Hollywood so for the people who are supposed to be working including those with contracts. The question now is will they get paid agents? Managers and lawyers are trying to figure that out but as the global pandemic continues to take us into uncharted territory. Answers might be difficult brin. Sandberg is a senior writer at the Hollywood reporter and she's been looking into what the covert nineteen shutdown means for people who work in the entertainment Industry Bryn. Welcome back to the show. Hi John Thanks for having me so. Let's first talk about a legal term. It's called force majeure and as I understand it. It essentially relates to unforeseeable circumstances that prevent a contract from being enforced. How might it apply here? Well John that definitely applies here when we typically see force majeure events. It's it's in relation to Labor strikes. Which is what happened in the two thousand seven to two thousand eight writers strike or is related to a natural disaster like a wild fire or an earthquake but those are usually local so the fact that this is a a global pandemic. It means that it's triggering simultaneous industry-wide shutdowns that kind of force majeure event is sort of without precedent in Hollywood. So a couple of weeks ago. Was that something that companies were really thinking about that. It gave them the option of shutting down a production and not having to worry about being on the hook to pay people. Yeah I think these studios of course know that they have this power if you will In in an event like this and there was a period of time where You know I think people didn't know was it? Was it safe to be around people? Could we stay in production and so and then when it became increasingly clear that that wasn't going to be safe that's of course when when the studios started taking these steps to suspend and again they? A lot of them will reassess. I know Netflix. For example there shutdowns where they said for two weeks before though you know reconsider and so when that when that two week. Marquette's will we'll start to see what some of these two years are going to do with their major projects. How long they can keep them on. Hold and how we all move forward. Does that mean that for some companies. During that two week window they are continuing to pay their cast and crew. And then they'll reassess that decision right so this is this is the interesting question. And this is what of course many actors writers directors producers. You know they all want to know. Okay what about my pay? My still going to get paid during this time. And that's really a big question mark. I spoke with a lot of these. These wraps managers agents lawyers and it seems like in a force majeure event like this. The studio's really like I said they have a tremendous amount of latitude and they do not necessarily have to fulfil contracts but that being said it doesn't mean that That certain companies are not still paying people. So you know. Nbc suspended SNL for the next three shows but they've still committed to paying their employees for those three weeks as though they were working Netflix as well on NBC Universal. You know I heard where we're continuing to pay some of their crew that we're going to be working on those shows for these two weeks during the shutdown so once that period of time is up and these companies do reassess And should they hold these productions indefinitely then it becomes much less likely that they will continue pay people and hold people in their contracts. We're talking with Brin Sandberg a senior writer at the Hollywood reporter about pay during production shutdowns. One of the things that's critical. I think to a lot of people. In the business they are essentially freelancers. Their GIG WORKERS. They have sporadic work. And if they're laid off for a long period of time they might not qualify for unemployment or health insurance. Have there been conversations about how those people might be protected. Even on a federal level there have been calls for you know the government to step in and help given how unprecedented this you know. The situation is I do not know that there's been any resolution yet or any consensus about what is going to happen. I think we're in this murky period of time where we're waiting to see what does happen on top of all of this. There are labor negotiations and contracts. That were happening before. The Corona Virus Pandemic the alliance of Motion Picture and television producers was starting talks with the Writers Guild of America. How might collective bargaining be affected by all of this and might actually benefit one side on the bargaining table? That's a great question. This is a this is a subject that came up a lot when I was talking to these wraps because you know this has been their life for really the past year because the writers have fired their their agents. And then we're about to enter these contract negotiations with the studios. One lawyer told me that you know it now feels like all the time that we spent talking about the wgn in the in the potential strike issues was just rearranging deckchairs on the titanic. You know it's now put into this This whole other perspective and and really it's depending on who you talk to. You will hear different things about who might benefit from this. The most in terms of those those negotiations some managers lawyers and agents will say you know. The writers have less leverage now. Because what are they gonNA go on on strike about and then you have talked to writers you said? I think this helps us. Because any plans that studios had to rush development script production you know before the May deadline which is what they were doing to prepare themselves. If a writer strike were to happen you know those. Those plans have been shattered and now they need writers. You know working more than ever to to create content and so In terms of you know win the actual contract negotiations will happen now That's another big question mark because they were supposed to kick off those talks officially on March twenty third Which is Monday and it seems unlikely that that's going to to move forward on that date now.

Hollywood Writer Brin Sandberg Netflix Alliance Of Motion Picture And Reporter John Writers Guild Of America NBC WGN Marquette SNL
Voice Is the Next Form of a Company with Project Voice Founder Bradley Metrock

Paul Hickey's Data Driven Daily Tips

10:22 min | 5 months ago

Voice Is the Next Form of a Company with Project Voice Founder Bradley Metrock

"What's up everybody? I'm Paul Hickey here. With Bradley met rock he is the CEO of score publishing but he is also many many other things Bradley. Thanks for joining us today. Why don't you give everybody kind of an overview In a little bit of a bio of yourself. I think you're probably going to do yourself justice here. Paul I appreciate it. I appreciate You give me some of your time this morning in Jumping on with the yeah. My name is Bradley. Met Rackham CEO Score publishing which is based in Nashville Tennessee. We are not a normal publisher. So we We do a lot of things that have caused us to be around the center of the conversation on voice technology in the underlying a machine learning that supports it Two and a half three years ago we started a podcast network of voice first. Fm Which is now listened to across fifty six countries by hundreds of thousands of people predominantly technology professionals One of the flat. You know the flagship show voice. I at them has called this weekend voice. I host that myself That show concluded last year with mark. Cuban is the season. Finale guest were in the middle of season. Four right now We produce the voice. I events series which is a well known and enjoyed a series of events leading the discourse on voice technology in a culminating project voice which is number one dead for voice technology in a in America in the week after. Cas So yeah we do. A number of things and We enjoy shining a light on interesting people doing interesting work in the space. And all of the pioneering that's going on and so here we are and thank you fanatic and you and I have Have become really good friends through the work that that we both done in. I'm just kind of educating people and particularly businesses about how they can use a Alexa and Google assistant and the other the other voice assistance in smart speakers out there and I WanNa thank you for all the work that you've done with myself with data driven design team at Jumping a little more of that but I One area that I'm really passionate about is really explaining in. Educating how businesses can benefit from Voice Technology. How many businesses? How familiar do you believe? Businesses currently are with voice APPs Alexa skills and Google actions. Yeah I mean I think it varies but in general it's pretty low and I don't necessarily view it as I view it as defense of in nature rather than offensive in nature. I think a business Really almost any size Almost including mom and pop gas stations. You know but certainly on up from there As you get into the enterprise needs to be working with voice or working with groups like data driven design who are working with voice on their behalf so that they are accumulating knowledge and they're getting acclimated to the space There's plenty you can do with Alexa. Twenty new with Google assistant some of these other voice assistants have interesting functionalities company law like Samsung Bixby. And things like that. But The bottom line is that if you're not Delving into those waters that you're falling behind. You're not understanding You have no hope of understanding how voice search is working now. It will work in the future. You have no hope of understanding sonic branding and how you need to be thinking about that with regards to voice experience You have no hope of understanding. Accessibility related issues. That currently keep a lot of your customers from interacting with you like they might want to and voice would open those doors so I don't view it anymore. I think the time has gone where it's offensive you know. Hey let's get out in front of this thing now. I do it as its defensive. And you're you're behind and you need to get caught up I think business owners and marketers have a tendency to think of voice as just one more thing that they have to learn how to do and one more thing to their long to do list but a good friend of Mine Brin Plumber. Who's over at the National Entrepreneur Center? And she's involved with the national voice. Conference said to me that she was surprised. Coming out of last year's national voice conference at what a low lift boys can be for businesses and how turnkey it can be to actually pluguin to help them be more efficient effective and not be just one more thing to add to their list of things to do. Do you think businesses know that they can build custom applications for Alexa? Google assistant disliked. They can with websites or mobile absent. And how those can actually help them be more efficient and effective. I think some of that knowledge is there. I think They probably don't know you know the reason that it's not that hard to do They just Like a lot of other things they They WANNA turn to professionals. You know and and really You know 'cause there representing their company I I I don't think it's part of the the mental calculus for a lot of companies like do the tools exist. I think it's I think it really boils down to Understanding what the use cases are and understanding what the capabilities are and You know and and for many I just gave a talk last week in San Francisco And to to a room. That should have been on the cutting edge of all this and and Crazy enough. It was a former Amazon employee. Telling him coming up at the end of the show. The talk telling me My God I had no idea about any of that and so you know. It's there's a what you and I have seen. Paul is that The velocity of change with voice technology is so high that there's so many features being added on a weekly basis Because it's all in the cloud to ship anything. All you're doing is changing stuff on the back end and all the user ever noses there's still interacting with Alexa. I don't know about that. New Feature quietly rolled out two days ago. This velocity of change has caused the whole business world to have a lot of catching up to do. I mean it's only the first step to understand. Okay there's people interacting with the LEXIN. Google assistant like these smart speakers are the next form of a once. You realize that you got a long. You're not even close to done. You got a long way to go into in terms of understanding the full scope of what's going on so you know we're all behind in a way because even with a show called this week in voice I constantly joke that You know when I came out with a show I didn't think we would ever have enough lose to fill a week like I thought we would just end up talking about the same stories week after week after week for a while. Now we can't possibly cover everything It it's a joke like we either so much going out and we can't. We have to really be selective so Yeah I mean. It's easy to get overwhelmed. And that's why you have groups like data driven design. That can help you. You need to start getting in there and and learning a thing or two and making mistakes. And and sort of accumulating experience. Because if you don't your competitor is yeah. I think that's well put You're absolutely right about use cases. I I totally agree with you. I think that that's where businesses have gotten hung up recently in my experience investing invoices. They don't totally understand yet. What the use cases potentially be for their audiences whether internal or external how It doesn't necessarily have to be a marketing or a content. Based of boys APP. It can be something internal it can be Alexa for business. Private skill for example. That can just Kinda help. Help me get things done and I think another thing you hit on a really resonates with me that I've tried to talk to business owners marketers recently about that. I'm working with is the concept of a minimum viable product and just getting started and to your point whether we're all behind or whether we're all head You know it. Kinda doesn't matter. It's all about getting started trying something and then building on top of that because you're right. Things are changing so constantly. I sent a proposal out to client To do an Alexa skill for them and then literally like two months later. I had emailed the client and say look. I found much faster ways doing this. That are now available and you know I I can get you this or like you know one tenth of the price now because we had the custom code three months ago now. There's a tool for that. Now you know for example Alexa presentation language. Allow us to do this thing that it didn't allow us to do before and so now we can. We can make these things happen and so I have the same business owners. They kind of get. It are now wanting to wait to see like well. What's going to change next? Maybe something will be a little bit lower

Alexa Voice Technology Google Paul Hickey Bradley CEO Rackham Tennessee Publisher Nashville Mine Brin Plumber Samsung Cuban National Entrepreneur Center America Amazon San Francisco Lexin
Alphabet gives up on ambitious energy-generating kite project

KCBS Radio Midday News

00:28 sec | 5 months ago

Alphabet gives up on ambitious energy-generating kite project

"One of alphabets blue sky projects is no longer flying company announced it's pulling the plug on its Makani wind energy cut project saying that while the company has made advancements in demonstrating utility scale energy kites the business model has been a challenge and the road to commercialization is longer and riskier than hoped for it's the first project from alpha bits experimental X. labs to be terminated since Google co founders Larry page and Sergey Brin stepped aside as leaders at the end of twenty

Larry Page Sergey Brin Google
YouTube ad revenue hit $15 billion in 2019, Google reveals

Daily Tech Headlines

00:41 sec | 6 months ago

YouTube ad revenue hit $15 billion in 2019, Google reveals

"Youtube generated nearly five billion dollars in AD revenue. In the last three months this is alphabets. I report was to try out the helm who took over as CEO of the entire company late last year after co founders Larry Page Sergei Brin step down from day to day duties. Google oh by Youtube in two thousand six for one point six five billion dollars but this is the first time that the company has broken out YouTube AD. Revenue numbers specifically Google says that Youtube has more or than twenty million subscribers across its premium and music premium offerings and more than two million subscribers to youtube. TV alphabet. Bundles those numbers into its others category. which which made up five point three billion dollars last quarter and also includes pixel phones and Google home

Youtube Google Larry Page Sergei Brin CEO
Doomsday

Thank God I'm Atheist

09:19 min | 6 months ago

Doomsday

"Every buddy hug is well it from Beautiful Salt Lake City Utah. It's thank God. I made the the podcast frank film and I'm Dan Beecher and coming up today. Dan Do then. No but kind of Real Dum Dum Zday the doomsday clock. That's that's what we're GONNA get to talk about And it. Just you know if we're talking about it. It must have moved it. must it must have tipped one indirection or the other. Yeah and it has only ever tipped in one direction. No it's not true back in the end of the Cold Award Dan back it moved back like twenty seconds. Wow it was like back to like the the past the eight on the face of those twenty minutes seconds tick. It's not a second hand. It's a minute hand. It's a minute hand. Yeah they moved seconds this time. But it's a minute hand. Don't worry about it. We'll get to at the end of the show. Are you sure not the only people who have been confused by this. I don't think Jerry Brown governor former California governor. Jerry Brown was very competed. They moved it minutes. Yeah they used to move at minutes. They just can't move any closer. The problem is they've got no more minutes to move it. That's the problem they have to move. Its second month. Well that's just stupid. Of course it's you even tell that it's the whole concept stupid. Oh my God. Why are we going to talk about stick around guys? You'll find out. We got things to say all right. Well Dan I'm sure you're going to be very very excited to hear I already am That the LDS Church church the church. Jesus Christ of Latter Day saints as they want to be known right as They have issued a statement about the fact that they are going to be changing their temple. We'll clothing their ceremonial clothing. Oh Yeah I if if you're a mormon it's important for the rest of us it's it's just it's one of those big. What the fuck well here okay? So here's what people need to know talking about the magic underwear. No which is which which is what they call the temple garment so one could be forgiven for being confused. And that's the stuff that Mormons walk around and every day. It's under their clothes. Yeah if they've been through the temple they're wearing these tremendously stupid underwear. It's also not the clothing building that you change into when you first go into the temple when you walk into the temple and you show your your card and your yes right you gotTa have your membership card. Yeah it's gotta be up to date and you go in go into a locker room and you have costco basically and you have. You can either their rent your sermon clothing right or actually can rent all of it. You can rent you can also rent your your temple clothing And but you get that you go you. May maybe you you brought your own in so you have a little suitcase backpack. That's got got it all in there. And he in change into all white like white pants and White Little Little Booty Shoe thing gentlemen have a suit usually. It's a it's a well. No no no if you're well to do or like high up in the Church leadership then you'd have a white soon otherwise I'll it has to be as white pants in a white shirt. You don't have to have like a suit coat. I'm not saying you have to thank you. It's a whole Colonel Sanders. Look it's true but it's literally white on white on white it's everything your socks Shoes White nightime bought white. o- could one go with the White House. Scott Scott I don't Know Oh cheerio gentlemen anyway. So there's that and then that's what you just sort of walk around the temple right right. Everybody's in all white ladies in white draft but in the ceremony in the endowment ceremony. Right right there. You have this little pouch of the ceremonial clothes and you put them on at certain points. You're instructed put this on put bad on. There's like a little apron thing to call. I think they call them apron. It's Kinda like a Toga over your clothes right Over your shirt and tie the rope. I'm sorry that's what they call that apron actually is like this little green. The only splash of color right green and have that. There's a hat for the men little veil for the ladies right anyway. It's all very fiddly right right. There's there's like there's a point the ceremony where there's a string that's hanging off of your and it looks like a Baker's hat maybe And there's like a little loop on your shoulder and you're supposed to tie that little string onto your shoulder as just such. Oh my God. It's just such it's A. It's all just a mess. It's the weirdest looking thing you can google. It and their image. Yeah and it's it's not very becoming. I will not unless they have decided to change To simplify and make more comfortable. Oh the clothing. How bad it's GONNA be easier to put on care for and apparently to afford making it cheaper for the masses? Okay good you. Don't I have to be a a well-to-do Mormon no anymore to to to not have some shabby old Temple clothing Let's let's see they are so the they're getting rid of the dangling. String from the hat the hat had. How will the hat be tethered to one's body? Not sure how that's GONNA work. Also the men's hat. I mentioned that kind of looks like a Baker's hat or something it looks is like a goofy chef's hat from some yeah strange cartoons like this plastic disk in it. Oh really that sort of gives it its shape shape and four all right That's going away. Oh I'm not sure I think it's more of a beret. Oh a little jonty beret. Hey John and Let's see more durable fabric. I think I mentioned that And says sash will be easier to care for the apron will not change okay right highly symbolic the pro very important. Everything is simple cannot mess with the Apron Brin and this this came out and as always with all these because the LDS church. They've been working rickman the temple ceremony for time. Yeah it's not something. That's that static. The brethren make every so often make little changes and and because it's like behind closed doors and it's all a big secret and memories last only so long the People I think just kind of end up forgetting what it used to be yeah right And one would surprise out. It's not important it's because again. It's all symbolism. Yeah right but Yeah the never ending you know never changing changing and Omni whatever God. Yeah exactly as has yesterday's again David and other administrative change and the clothing this guy this the current president has been shaking things up ever since he took over. Oh I mean I thought nothing could happen happened. The Dude was like ninety three when he took over. I thought you know from now on you. Know little changes in nothing important because they're all just waiting to die. This guy changed. Change the flavor of the Mints Right and Bowl you know. Are there minutes now. I wish they were just kind of made that up. I kind of channeled Reagan and Jelly Beans. Yeah exactly there should be snacks. Well there's a cafeteria oh did you know that no I didn't you didn't know that there's a cafeteria the larger ones the new mini express temple. Right they just You can get some coffee to go. They don't have like food services and they they don't have laundries in the small ones but the big ones have laundries and and cafeterias and so. Yeah like between sessions. I could be doing two sessions. You can just go slip into the cafeteria. Some really bad like mashed potatoes and gravy and all right

Jerry Brown Baker White House Dan Beecher Dan Do Beautiful Salt Lake City Utah Apron Brin Costco Colonel Sanders Dan I California Jonty Beret Church Google Scott Scott Lds Church Reagan Rickman Omni
How To Talk To Children About Sex

Parenting: Difficult Conversations

08:29 min | 8 months ago

How To Talk To Children About Sex

"In this episode the birds and the bees for a new decade. And we should say we're going to deal here with the younger guys say for to the doorstep of puberty because once the pubic hair and the body odor start to kick in. You're GonNa need a whole nother light ship it heading your way. Thank you for that Mental Image Corey So without further ado are I take away of the day take away number one up. Aquinas is not who yeah and a Volva is not a front. We're just GONNA go out on a limb here and say that most of you listening like us might struggle a bit finding and using the accurate words for our private parts. Because it's not what you got when you were a kid inequality. I grew up in the deep South House and my mom would definitely consider as a feminist but she was also a southerner and she used to tell me things like that's dirty or that's your PCP and and so when I had my own daughters and they started asking me questions about their bodies. I thought it'd be a good idea to make up a word. So here's my daughter. Lv She's three three. What do we call the thing that you have in your underwear? What part of your body is that? What's his Nudie Do Boys snooty. No fee has Palma Madera series. I love you taught her the proper term for penis. You're halfway there halfway there that's true. And here's the present. Here's the thing. We don't want anyone to feel badly. I I don't want you to feel badly because the fact is you're not alone so Bonnie rough is the author of the book beyond birds and bees. One thing I never thought I would do is write a book about Sex let alone kids insects but that changed for Bonnie when she moved with her two young daughters from Minneapolis to a place where things pretty differently Amsterdam in the Netherlands so she says it was pretty shocking at first for example at her daughter's Dutch preschool. Teachers were using accurate terms for body body parts and body functions. The children were being helped with their toilet eating in a little bathroom were. They were parties in a row and Children of different genders were really just kind of Able to see and experience the presence of one another's bodies and their body differences as something that is a normal part of everyday the daily life. Wow what a concept and a related idea that struck her about life in Amsterdam was the total nigger kids. Teachers used when they talked about bodies. Instead of a diaper. APOR being Yucky or dirty or stinky it might just be full or empty or wet or dry so giving those body body functions at kind of normalcy. It's so much bigger than just sex. Bonnie saw how all of this openness about bodies lead to happier more or confident kids especially girls yeah and partly as a result. The Netherlands has lower teen pregnancy and abortion rates fewer. She is more gender equal society. The the more we know about our bodies the healthy and happier we are so Dr Core Brunner says the data in the US backs Bonnie refs point up more and better and more pensive. Sex Sex Ed leads to better outcomes kits. Dr Brunner is a pediatrician. And she actually wrote the American Academy of Pediatrics Sex ED guidelines in my poor kids they hung condoms on Christmas trees as ornaments. I mean they have been exposed to all of this for a long time happy holidays. He's with little children. Dr Brin suggests they learn the correct names for penis and Vulva just like you would any other part of the body. You just say it in a way. That's the way you would say. Brush your teeth as opposed to saying that you're female parts or that's down there. You don't say that or Schutte you don't say that and luckily luckily for me and for you if you haven't done this yet it's never too late to start using the right words. My older daughter Lewis eight a promise. She knows the word I get it but I still don't know if I can say the word penis in front of my kit. That is from a series of educational cartoon videos called Amazed Junior here in their intended especially for parents like us who want help talking to our kids about these issues. Yes in this one. A counselor is trying to reassure parents. You're clearly feeling a little awkward. Embarrassment is one of those catchy feelings and most of us caught embarrassment about sexual things from people around us when we were very young long so we never get to find out that these words are just words and that it's really healthy and okay to say them out loud cure right. Why should I be embarrassed to say testicles or erections nipples masturbation Vova Clitoris ejaculation? Screwed up Jonah. Being and if you need them they're two more reasons to get over this embarrassment. Experts say number one the doctor. Yeah if your child is is in pain they can tell the pediatrician or you might testicle. Hurts or my Labia itches. Clear baletic invasion also. Dr Brunner says it's possible that a child who lives in a house house where they feel comfortable and open discussing their private parts will be less vulnerable to sexual predators. And if you're up for it. Bonnie rough has one more concrete suggestion suggestion around normalizing bodies yet. Let your kid be naked when they wanna be even if grandma's visiting if we stay child centered. This isn't about about grandma. Thinks before we move on up. We need a quick acknowledgment. Here we know for some of you may be many of you. This is GonNa be challenging where we're headed and in some cases are guidance may actually conflict with your family's beliefs. We put this kit together based on the best research we could find but but this isn't all an exact science and so what we're really asking you to do is listen and think about what is going to be best for your family So take away number to answer your kids questions. What we've learned is the kids are never too young for you to tell them about their bodies ladies and sex clearly simply honestly and let's not forget briefly or as Dr Brenner puts it? It's important to be factual and concise Jason Loving now. If that's hard for you because you're not yet comfortable. Here's some advice to get their practice in the mirror. got a monitor your facial expressions and your tone own practice before you do it. That's Britney McBride. She's a sex educator with advocates for youth and she's one of the people behind that amazed junior video we heard earlier yeah and Brittany says she benefited from her own family's determination to get this stuff rate. My parents were actually teenagers when they had me and went the complete eight opposite from what they received from their parents. So we started talking about sacs from as early as I can remember. So Britney is based in New Orleans and she has worked with forty of the largest school district in the country to improve sex ED and she says keeping our cool makes us more approachable as parents. And that's really important. Do it in a way that makes them feel safe in that. You are a trusted person to come and talk to about those things. Britney gives the pros approach to the classic classic question. Where did I come from which her own daughter asked when she was maybe five or six years old really? When kid is that young the question is not so much about about sex but instead of space and time? And where was I before I got here. And how did I get here as opposed to the actual act of sex in in how they were created so for young children and this may be familiar from our episodes on race and on death. Find out why they're asking and then answer exactly what they're asking. No more no less so in other words keep things very simple very quick talking about the facts around like anatomy explaining that he grew in in your mom's uterus and that's where a baby lives and grows until they are born and then you were born and you joined family and we've loved you you can cover the rest next time. And that's part of the big point here. The birds and the bees should not be one talk. Your kids need to feel comfortable coming to you with their questions. Time and time again Dan so there is a next time and especially when their questions start getting

Bonnie Rough Dr Core Brunner American Academy Of Pediatrics Britney Mcbride Pubic Hair South House Aquinas Amsterdam Palma Madera Dr Brin Jonah Netherlands Dr Brenner Schutte Grandma United States The Netherlands Lewis
"brin" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

02:24 min | 8 months ago

"brin" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Brian shook legal experts are slamming president trump for what they call impeachable offenses during the house Judiciary Committee hearing today a Stanford law professor said the founding fathers would be horrified Harvard law professor said trump corruptly abused his power when he pursued personal political interest by pressuring Ukraine to investigate Democrats president trump's personal attorney is back in Ukraine seeking to shift attention off the impeachment inquiry and on two political rivals The New York Times reports on Tuesday Rudy Giuliani met with a former Ukrainian prosecutor and is a key figure in the impeachment inquiry in Budapest he's now in Kiev meeting with other former Ukrainian prosecutors all three of the former prosecutors have been accused of corruption in the past the times says guiliani's talking to them for documentary series that will to bump the case for impeachment Tom Roberts NBC news radio democratic presidential hopeful Joe Biden says he'd consider senator Kamilla Harris as a running mate Harris dropped her campaign for the democratic nomination this week Biden told reporters in Iowa that she has the capacity to be anything she wants to be he added that one day she could be president herself for even a Supreme Court justice former president Jimmy Carter is out of the hospital after being treated for a urinary tract infection the Carter center said the ninety five year old is resting and recovering at his home in plains Georgia Carter and former First Lady Rosalynn wish everyone peace and joy this holiday season senator Martha make Sally says many of the private companies that provide military housing are slumlords during a Senate hearing on a G. A. O. report on privatized housing the Arizona Republican and former Air Force pilot had a suggestion for executives of the housing companies maybe some of the CEOs need to move into some military housing over the holidays were you guys think about that and I see how they feel the report found the flawed information had been used to gauge the success of the privatized housing program your listening to the latest from NBC news radio the co founders of Google are stepping down from their roles that Google's parent company alphabet Phil Hewlett reports in a letter CEO Larry page and president Sergei brand say they are stepping down noting that alphabet and Google no longer need to C. E. O.'s as well as a president Google CEO sandhar peach I will take over as Elphaba CEO the two founders say they will remain active in the company as board members page and Brin have increasingly taken a.

Tom Roberts Google Phil Hewlett Sergei brand C. E. O. CEO house Judiciary Committee Harvard corruptly Kiev Sally NBC Supreme Court Lady Rosalynn Senate Arizona Air Force Larry Brin
Co-founders hand over the reins at Alphabet

Daily Tech Headlines

00:21 sec | 8 months ago

Co-founders hand over the reins at Alphabet

"Alphabet announced that Google Co founders Larry Page pagent Sergey Brin will step away from their duties as CEO and president and Google CEO Soon Pichai we'll take on the additional role of CEO of Alphabet Page and Brin will retain in their board seats and controlling stock ownership and in their statement page and Brin said they will quote continue talking with Dr Regularly especially on topics.

Sergey Brin CEO Alphabet Page Google Larry Page President Trump
Larry Page and Sergey Brin step down as leaders of Alphabet

All Things Considered

03:06 min | 8 months ago

Larry Page and Sergey Brin step down as leaders of Alphabet

"Kelley it is a historic moment for one of the most influential companies of our time Google it's two co founders are stepping down here to talk about Larry page and Sergey Brin and their move it is in Paris technology correspondent chan and bond patient and family so tell me more what happened today yeah well it's the end of an era at Google Larry and Sergey founded the cook the company in nineteen ninety eight when they were Stanford University students I love the on a first name basis by the by the people in the valley are and if you think about in that with that way they you know they need Google it into one of the largest companies in the world it dominates online search and digital advertising in video just a few moments ago they announced their leading leaving their leadership roles now they they had already been playing less of an active role in the past few years Larry page in particular hasn't really been publicly at being present at Google okay but they say they'll still be active board members but no longer calling the shots that's going to be Google's current CEO send our Pichai he will be CEO of both Google and its parent company alphabets so why why would they step away from this company that's their baby well this is a company that they found it and that they have seen through a lot I think in part of it is the company's really changed over time it's not that sort of idealistic place that they started they've made a lot of money they've been focusing on other things and I think they say it say it's now time for new management to reflect where the company currently is where where is the current state of Google and what kind of shape will they be leaving it in as they stepped away well this is a very turbulent time right now it Google maybe the most turbulent in its short history you know Google is of course extremely profitable but it's facing a lot of challenges including from within their employees are really really unhappy there's been a lot of protests over range of issues contracts with the military contracts with immigration agencies one day in November last your twenty thousand cool workers walked out over sexual harassment and bad behavior by executives that they said was tolerated Google's always been known for this very open free wheeling culture employees were encouraged to speak out that that's been really cracked down on lately just last week for employees who were involved in protests were fired there's also external pressure from regulators who have been looking into just how dominant Google is in search and advertising some people even want to come from the broken up now there's no indication that they're stepping down is related to those issues but I think it's just another sign just how far Google has come from nineteen ninety eight when they started it right I mean it it sounds like a fascinating moment for a company that was famous for wasn't a motto don't be evil yeah I mean the this for very idealistic guys know they founded this company in their dorm room at Stanford it was built on this vision of helping people find information but it's grown it's not just the biggest search engine with the ninety percent market share it's an advertising behemoth it's a melting artificial intelligence there are self driving Google cars on the streets in Phoenix and they've knowledge this change in a letter to employees they said it's involved in matured and time to turn the page that is NPR Shannon bond

Kelley Google Ninety Percent One Day
"brin" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

10 10 WINS

01:55 min | 8 months ago

"brin" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

"Page and Sergey Brin say their company has evolved and matured in the twenty years since they began their enterprise in the Silicon Valley garage so send our P. try who's been leading Google is CEO for more than four years will also become the CEO of alphabet and the president's role that alphabet is not being filled both founders promised to stay actively involved as board members and shareholders saying in a statement that if the company was a person it would be a young adult of twenty one and it would be time to leave the roost I'm Jan Johnson the department of homeland security is considering a proposal to require that all travelers including U. S. citizens be photographed as they enter or leave the United States it would be part of an identification system using facial recognition facial recognition technology when news time eleven fifty six now Bloomberg money watch on ten ten wins it was another down day for stocks is trade worries continued to swell the Dow Jones industrial average sank two hundred eighty the S. and P. five hundred lost twenty one the nasdaq composite tumbled forty seven a change at the top for Google parrot alphabet who will co founders Larry page and Sergey Brin stepping down from their roles as alphabet CEO and president but will remain on the board Google C. E. O. soon doctor chart will also be alphabet C. E. L. destination maternity stores are closer liquidation the retailer has one bankruptcy court approval to sell itself to marquee brands it would close the chain stores but keep the brand alive online Connecticut's public employee pensions will divest their holdings in gun manufacturers pensions hold thirty million dollars in firearms company assets the state will also ask banks with which it does business to disclose their relationships the gun makers Bloomberg money watch at twenty six.

Google CEO president Jan Johnson United States Larry page Sergey Brin Connecticut U. S. Bloomberg thirty million dollars twenty years four years
"brin" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:32 min | 8 months ago

"brin" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Larry page and Sergey Brin or stepping down from the roles within the parent company alphabet the search giant not needing to search far for a replacement sandhar per child the current CEO of Google and long time executive of the company will take over as CEO of alphabet in addition to his current role page and Brin announcing their departure into Google blog post today saying the company has involved in matured since its founding in nineteen ninety eight and if the company was a person it will be a young adult of twenty one and it would be time to leave the roost page and Brin will remain on alphabets board three bar ski fox news that apartment homeland security considering requiring that all travelers including American citizens be photographed as they enter or leave the country as part of an identification system using a facial recognition technology Massachusetts senator ed Markey already saying that he will introduce legislation to block the plan a new study finds people spend a lot of time in front of the television would you be lost without your T. V. A. what your family struggle to get by with only one the findings of a new survey commissioned by LG electronics finds that the average home has at least two TV's which are replaced on average every six years a Paul one research finds you spend about three and a half hours each day watching a recent survey of British adults finds they'll invest nearly seventy nine thousand hours of their lives watching movies sports news and their favorite TV shows fifteen percent claiming they have too many options and that they actually fight with their partners.

Sergey Brin CEO Google LG electronics Larry executive Massachusetts senator ed Markey Paul seventy nine thousand hours fifteen percent six years three bar
Larry Page and Sergey Brin step down as leaders of Alphabet

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:18 sec | 8 months ago

Larry Page and Sergey Brin step down as leaders of Alphabet

"Big change of the top four alphabets co founder Larry page revealed he will step down as CEO but remain on the board send our Pichai C. E. O. of alphabet division Google will take the top spot at the parent company as well page and Sergey Brin who started Google in nineteen ninety eight say the company has evolved and matured since

CEO Pichai C. E. O. Google Sergey Brin Co Founder Larry Page
Larry Page and Sergey Brin step down as leaders of Alphabet

Pat Thurston

00:18 sec | 8 months ago

Larry Page and Sergey Brin step down as leaders of Alphabet

"Google co founders Larry page and Sergey Brin are stepping down from their roles within the parent company alphabet Google C. R. send our patrol I will stay in his role and also become CEO of alphabet page had been serving a CEO of alphabet and brand who I've been president of alphabet will remain on the board of the

Google Larry Page Sergey Brin CEO President Trump
Airbnb's Belinda Johnson to step down as COO, join board

The Information's 411

05:57 min | 9 months ago

Airbnb's Belinda Johnson to step down as COO, join board

"Now I've independently. They confirmed that that Belinda Johnson has been telling people for a few months now that family sort of sort of reasons to pile up for her to have a good rhythm district of want to spend more time away from the airbnb sort of executive team. She is at being added to the board. I should add. Add the board of directors. So she staying sort of within the trump which which I guess would be. Well I don't know I guess you can speculate one way or the other but at the very least it wasn't any sort of falling out that precluded certainly not release certainly not a falling out between her and Brian Jet Ski. I think he would sort of burn the place down before getting rid of her. It's that tight of a bond however I will say that. It's very clear if you just look at what we've reported sort of around around the sort of a large number of losses. The company has been taking on in the first half of this year. It went from a company in the first half of last year. Where was losing about one hundred hundred and fifty million to now losing about four hundred million in the first half of this year some of that is planned losses asses but I think it's also becoming clearer that the companies getting bigger more complicated and will need to sort of really figure out how to get? Its spending Dang under control if it's going to go into public offering with the story of you know we are a rare example of a money-making he making we. We've seen the markets react unfavourably to companies like we work and others that are just losing massive amounts of cash. I'll be Uber Brin lift. Haven't had a great time in the market so airbnb struck me as the one that could tell a slightly different narrative if you want to back a tech company. That isn't just an money. Inferno were were your guys girls totally and I think it's what investors I think will be trying to understand is will airbnb will be able to level up and be a company that was more than just one that had a great business model great you know sort of customer demand and you know in the first decade of its life and be able to sort of add to that efficiently and add more business lines execute dude on sort of policy goals execute on experiences and China and all the other kind of things they wanna add onto the core business. That just means that this is getting more complicated. And there's just going to continue to be I think Sort of a question of of the right leadership going forward right so so. You mentioned a couple of initiatives and I do want to circle back to that at the end of of this chat because firstly you did mention policy stuff so that's been like you know Ongoing Stumbling Block AIRBNB. It seems to flare up every every couple of months when when certain politicians and cities yeah work to regulate them ban and whatever it is. What's what's the latest on the AIRBNB Policy Front? Yeah you're right. This is something they've they've been you know. Number one or number two risk for AIRBNB for years is nothing new I think what investors and other folks are getting antsy about as airbnb gets closer to going the public is where is it. How's IT faring? In New York. That's one of the biggest tourist destinations in the world can make their if you can make get in New York Concrete really made it. That's how they say it you make it here. You've done it boy. Yeah and I think one worrying sign was the fact that it lost the AIRBNB spent big to try to win sort of ballot referendum in Jersey City earlier this month and lost in a pretty significant landslide slide and and that loss essentially restricts their business in a key market you know adjacent to New York and New York itself is long been in sort word of this regulatory gray area in Airbnb hasn't been able to win over hotel unions and other sort of sort of opponents in New York so you know it's all it's going to be an issue for AIRBNB. They have wins. They have losses. I think right now what I think people are going to want to understand is are they winning more than they're losing or are they losing more than they're winning and that was a blend of Johnson Sort of place you oversaw. She oversaw the policy team. I haven't I've been able to independently. Say that. You know if she sort of any kind of policy related losses. Wait her way in her. Her but I think the question we we should raise the question and we should be watching this going forward and I imagine it'll be interesting to see the effect that the presidential title campaign has next year and the kind of rhetoric coming out of I would imagine mostly the democratic side depending on who the nominee is about the relationship between government and tech. And if we're seeing being what we've seen in the past couple of months which is a lot of people kind of on the left taking a very adversarial approach tech companies. You know taking pride. In the fact that Amazon John pulled out of going to New York and You know the fact that Amazon loss to kind of embarrassing battle in in Seattle for a town council position or city council position You know that could affect airbnb to write. You know like if we're seeing a climate that's very pro regulation and an anti tack than Airbnb is kind of line to the street that they've got this regulation poses a figure it out just seems kind of weak it could you know they benefit from the fact that their relationship with the labor force if you will is not as contested as like an uber you know they the people that they rely on to has sort of put their homes on AIRBNB are like a little bit more middle

Airbnb New York Belinda Johnson Brian Jet Ski Executive Amazon China Seattle Jersey City
Can 'Hypoallergenic' Dogs Still Trigger Allergies?

BrainStuff

04:37 min | 9 months ago

Can 'Hypoallergenic' Dogs Still Trigger Allergies?

"With the appeal of all cuddles and no allergic reactions. HYPOALLERGENIC allergenic dogs. Seem like the obvious choice for animal lovers who are somehow sensitive to those wet noses and wagging tails but are these hypoallergenic dogs. Too good to be true. Do the truth is many specific breeds of pups. Touted as hypoallergenic. Don't shed for. And because of this trait some breeders promise. These dogs won't trigger or any allergies at all except they can so what gives. It's not actually a dogs for that's responsible for humans allergic reactions. It's what stuck on on. The further causes our sneezing. Asthma attacks people who are allergic to dogs and cats too. For that matter are triggered by protein in the animal's saliva and urine brin that sticks to the animals for and skin when a dog sheds fur and Dander or dry skin flakes. That allergy inducing protein is released into the air. That's why nonshedding breeds tend to lessen allergic reactions in humans. No shedding means fewer of those allergy. Inducing proteins are released but no dog breed entirely hypoallergenic. It's marketing term more than a medical term but while hypoallergenic may be fluff term. Having a nonshedding breed is totally helpful for people that have allergies. And who want a dog to the American Kennel Club reports that many less allergenic breeds do produce less dander this paired with the fact that these dogs don't shed make several breeds a good fit for people prone to allergies including Afghan hounds. Irish Water Spaniels Maltese poodles Portuguese water dogs Schnauzers and mixes of the above on the other hand. Some breeds can produce more of that protein and shed more Labrador Labrador retrievers for example can quote wreak havoc on your allergies according to the American Kennel Club. That said it's not a one-size-fits-all solution. We we spoke with Melanie. CARVER vice president of community health for the asthma and Allergy Foundation of America. She said some people with a dog. Dander allergy may be less reactive live or have less symptoms to Dander from certain breeds. Allergy testing cannot determine which breeds may work better for you than others the only way to determine if you can tolerate being around a certain breed is to have direct repeated exposure to a dog and see how your body reacts while the typical signs of pet allergies may seem obvious confusing scratchy throat or itchy eyes several lesser known symptoms can also appear. If you're doing a test with pup be on the lookout for facial pressure and pain seen a swollen blue tinted skin beneath your eyes and excessive coughing. These symptoms are similar to allergies caused by hay fever. There caused by inflammation of nasal passages other allergic reactions can affect the skin resulting in hives. EXA and general itchiness. In the most serious cases pet allergies she's can also contribute to asthmatic reactions like chest tightness wheezing difficulty breathing and trouble sleeping. Many pet allergy warning signs resemble symptoms of a regular cold symptoms last beyond two weeks are likely allergies and therefore a red flag in some severe cases. It's impossible to find a dog. UGH that doesn't trigger allergies but more often than not a few trials can lead to the perfect up. Breed plays the biggest role but several other factors such as dogs size can help help or hurt. Allergy prone owners big dogs produced more Dander and Saliva for instance in small dogs are simply easier to bathe and groom frequent in grooming which is required for any nonshedding. Dog is one way to stay ahead of allergies. Another recommendation is setting ground rules when it comes to lounge time. The American Kennel clubs suggests keeping pets off the bed and washing their pet beds regularly. It also recommends ditching heavy carpets and drapes. That are known to trap and hold onto Dander carver also suggests brushing and grooming your pet outside vacuuming regularly and washing your hands and changing clothes after playing with your pup it's not All Doom and gloom for those who have pet allergies several types of medicines can help owners further manage their allergy symptoms over the counter in a histamine. Help relieve itching sneezing and runny nose news. While nasal sprays can help reduce inflammation doctors may also prescribe stronger medications for patients who have both asthma and allergies and other allergy the treatment options including immunotherapy which is a series of allergy shots and nasal irrigation like an anti pot. But hey humans aren't the only ones who have have dander allergies. Dogs can to Human Dander to

Allergies American Kennel Clubs Asthma Allergy Foundation Of America Dander Carver Dry Skin Melanie Labrador Labrador Chest Tightness Histamine Itchy Eyes Carver Vice President Two Weeks
Imitators of God (Ephesians 5:1)

Pray the Word with David Platt

04:49 min | 9 months ago

Imitators of God (Ephesians 5:1)

"Brin simple verse and today for you for me to imitate right now thinking about what does that mean like the character of God his love sexual immorality and impurity or covetousness not even be named way you just think about the fruit of the spirit even that Galatian five gives us love here at living in us so let's imitate God so how do we do that and I love the this is who you are this is who I am a child not as our father we love God as our father reminds on God our father like I think about my kids he's just a reflection of you looks like you is mannerisms or like you why because there's a closeness of relationship with me and this is it this a we're talking God here who calls you and to US Imitating Him Oh God may be said of us that we are many have patients like your patience kindness like your kindness Oh God for listening to this in the morning during the day we think of the different those are lives to be a walking reflection of you out of the overflow of not to shine from us that people may see our lives are good deeds matthew five supernatural out of the overflow of your spirit in us over the out of the overflow of WBT children Thank you for the privilege of even.

United States Brin
Be Careful What You Teach... It Might Interfere With What They Are Learning

Janet Lansbury Podcast

08:29 min | 11 months ago

Be Careful What You Teach... It Might Interfere With What They Are Learning

"Hi Janet Senate I'm wondering is there a respectful approach to teaching children say their ABC's or doing any learning activities. I work as a nanny and the family I'm currently currently with is very interested in their son's learning and development sometimes he's happy to go along with loosely structured learning activities and some days he's disinterested interested. I'm wondering is it best to end activity if he's not showing interest slash refusing to participate or come back to it later or what I wouldn't want to teach him to give up on things or that. He just needs simply to offer a little resistance and then he gets what he wants. I really liked the respectful approach coach and use this approach as much as possible any words of wisdom for those of us who use this approach a nanny would be very much appreciated. Thank you for any advice. Okay so what I'm going to suggest would apply to a nanny in this situation or to other kinds of caregivers of children Gordon and two parents. What I'm going to suggest is an alternative while there may be a respectful way to do these learning activities vidale children. I'm sure there is the question I want to pose in. Return is our learning activities the best way to help children learn you can probably probably guests. I believe they are not and I'm going to talk about why in this podcast but mostly I want to offer her on alternate to teaching children their ABC's and directing them in learning activities so at this nanny says is the family is very interested in their son's learning development most of us as parents or nannies or early childhood teachers are very interested in learning and development and then she says sometimes this boy is happy to go along with loosely structured learning activities and some days he's disinterested so what this Nana's Nana's asking about his what to do when she can't Garner interest from the child she's working with and she doesn't say how old this child is but some some days he's disinterested and sometimes he's even refusing to participate. She's concerned that he's going to teach them to give up on things or that. He just needs needs to simply offer resistance and then he gets what he wants. The problem here is that the activities she's doing are actually not aligned and with and complementary to early child development and that's why she's getting the sometimes frustrating results that she's getting children. Brin are born with these amazing learning abilities and they're actually able to stay with their are interest for a very long time but when we try to impose our interests in their learning what we believe they should be learning. It's often a mismatch natch. It's similar to trying to put up curtains on windows of a house. That hasn't been built yet. They're still working on the foundation skills skills and knowledge that involve rote memorization are actually the easiest thing for children to learn when they're ready but in these early years ears they're developing a very important foundation that will serve them throughout life. It's foundation of higher order learning skills sales that go way beyond memorization. They're learning how to learn and they're learning about themselves. As learners. The best message sewage they can receive is that they are trusted that we understand and research shows this that they are the learning experts. It's it is an innate ability that they have and it is all done through play and that isn't to say that this means we now have have to find fun playful activities that are teaching our child these little specific details these symbols for ideas like amount wait for letters. The foundation of learning is about using all of our senses to explore amount wait gravity comparisons to analyze have theories and so much more the children need to focus on what those symbols represent and they will naturally do this through play through play that might not even look like anything anything to US might look like they're just messing around or sitting there staring into space but this is actually the the important stuff so what I would propose to this. Nanny is to help these parents appreciate the incredible learning that their child is engaging in and every moment this learning that goes way beyond adult directed activities learning that goes deep because it is meaningful to that child just like for all of us when we take a course that we're very interested in. We learned quickly and we learned deeply. We can sustain Dana tension in that kind of learning. We don't refuse it or stop. We can be insatiable around it. Those are the experiences that young children need to have job in this crucial window of time their early years building the foundation for that house of learning so specifically I would encourage encourage this nanny to cultivate this child's self directed learning which is the same as cultivating his self directed play because to devise vise successful learning activities. We have to understand how children actually learned so our job can be setting up a safe play area where they a are free to be explorers and letting our child be the master of this one area of life and then letting go the results. It's young children have to conform to a lot of things that we decide but learning through play can be a territory that they owned own completely and they deserve to own it because they are the experts at this and they need to be active in their learning not passively receiving or or following along they need to be the ones that are creating designing initiating sustaining they can be trusted with his job and then when play is cultivated we can learn how to be an observer mode insensitive observation mode and we will learn everything we need to know about that child and the way to share that with someone else is to be the observer and to write down what that child is doing what we see and help the parent to appreciate the amazing things children do much more amazing than being gable to recite an alphabet or a succession of numbers so write down what you see. I noticed he was interested in the rug. There there was a flower that he was following with his finger and then he went over to the other side of the rug where there was a similar flour and he seemed to connect those two ideas or he had that ball. That's actually been in his play area since he was tiny and he never noticed before and today he was rolling rolling it and watching it and bouncing it off the floor and other objects. He seemed to be doing an intensive study of that ball. I noticed he used it in actually twenty different ways and enlisting those this is how children develop a long attention span this is how we give children the edge when they do enter a structured learning environment at age five or six they get to go into that with confidence in their active active learning and with a lot of experience with how to master concepts and ideas and a sense from the adults around them that they a are accepted and appreciated for who they are. Those are things that we can give children that last a lifetime

ABC Nanny Janet Senate United States Gordon Brin Dana
"brin" Discussed on Computer Talk with TAB

Computer Talk with TAB

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"brin" Discussed on Computer Talk with TAB

"I was driving in and put the button there. And I said, hey, you know, you should open the windows. It's beautiful out. But what Google actually texted to her was, you should die open the windows. It's beautiful out. I didn't say the word die anywhere my God, forty I don't know. Is it Google Freudian? I mean it's kind of bizarre in, I mean it just put the word die in there. Now with with Google, obviously, when you Google anything. Right. It's going to fill things, and it's due to like the most popular stuff that's out there when you're googling is are people telling their spouses and girlfriends, the dial the time, and that's why they pre filled die on me 'cause that was the pattern, right? Is that the pattern is that we should be all for. I mean it was bizarre. That word was not used while. I mean it's not like you should open. The windows would have the word die at all. And they're literally and says, you should die, and he put the work in the wrong place. Like I'm dying to go outside. Yeah. Weird Sergei Brin the developer of Google. Yeah. Russian. Okay. Okay. So you're goes the Russian word forgive is die. I should open diamond. We give me. Yeah. I wasn't speaking Russian Bob. Yeah. But you know he probably taught in rushing. It was, but it was freaky to anybody most likely that Google plex was down. Did you see that still SpaceX launch the last one from Vandenberg? You should watch the video. There was a heavy foggy morning like it is a lot on the west coast. So when the rocket went up, it burned a hole through the fog. Ascended up and the cameras shooting back down. You could see the cloud cover, but you could see the whole where they went through, well, when it went up, and after did the watch and the first stage did it spurn back in turn around the come back down and land. You could. If you look real close, you could see all the cloud cover. You could see the whole that they burned through coming up. And as it went back down it went back down, and it came down. And it went back down through the same hole. It's, it's Ripley the landings are need enough as it is. But the thing came back down through the through its own whole sounds like. Who believe in conspiracy theories, he just ran the video backwards because the odds of it not having any kind of wind up there. People have stopped now seems to work seems to work, right? Okay. Guys. Thanks a lot. I think it was a CGI computer generated image. Let's go on to lend in Deford. They what's up. Good morning on. I've been a follower of user for years, okay? Got a new computer a laptop. I'll say drive everything works great. I am stalled bird and it was working flying for about a week. And then one day open it up and all my emails, God, everything now. Fortunately, I didn't transfer anything over my other son to bear to my other computer. But yeah. Kind of freaking out because on the sound box, the inbox trash, right? All the emails were gone. Mailbox, you have one is you have a mailbox talks talks about that. Is it a pop or is it a good? Is that the sun an exchange one? Bob, what's the mixture? There you got pop and you've got a map..

Google Bob Sergei Brin Vandenberg Deford developer one day
"brin" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"brin" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"White guys these Democrats gonna run for president. Anyway, other white guy jumped into the race today. I know he's a white guy. Because in the late sentence of the Atlantic story announcing that Steve Bullock is he really Sandra Bullock posing as a man democrat, Steve Bullock, one in a red state in two thousand sixteen can he beat Trump and twenty twenty. No, I'll I'll answer that question for you. The answer as the governor of Montana. Thanks. There's still room for one more in the crowded democratic primary field. Yes. Sure. There is there. It's you know, it's a hot tub. The water is getting a little yellow at this point. And also were expecting de Blasio big bird to jump into the hot tub later this week. Helena, montana. Yes. Another democrat running for president. Another white guy. That's those are the first two sentences. They hate white guys. We're gonna start taking things away from you. We're gonna start with the modern medicine electro air travel instantaneous global communications modern medicine. We're just going to start taking things away wanted to. So this guy Sandra Bullock as running his the governor of Montana. How did that happen? And he's running for president to democrat. And nobody cares. Because who the hell is see go away, and you're white guy. So your own parties calling you white guy because they're racist. And misogynist, speaking of which Kirstin Jila Brin is being underestimated for twenty twenty democratic nod. She said, I think it's just gender bias because he's a white guy. And they just identified him as a white guy that's gender bias and race by about hang on. Here's Kirstin Jilib ram. She has dimples and white teeth. And those are the two most outstanding features that she has to offer. She said she's not getting a lot of attention. You know, the news media's ignoring her she said, I think it's just gender bias and the party. I think people are generally biased against women. She's victim and also biased against young women. You're not.

Sandra Bullock Steve Bullock Kirstin Jila Brin president Montana twenty twenty Kirstin Jilib Helena de Blasio Trump
"brin" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"brin" Discussed on KTOK

"I'm talking with Dr Robert zoo Brin, and he is. Really awakening the mind once again with all of his ideas, and being an advocate of Mars and space exploration and colonizing, and it's great to talk with you. Thank you for being here with me tonight. Robert. So here's a question. Yeah. Absolutely. I I'm having a ball here. Let me ask you this with its I don't know. Seems like to me as we move off the planet and move out there in ghetto the final frontier to me the just the beginning of it. All. Do you think humans because we're not we're getting dumber? Do I think we're getting dumber? No, not as individuals. I think as society becomes bureaucracy ties to society, collectively Stummer bureaucracy is a form of artificial stupidity. It was actually invented for that purpose by you. I think Frederick the great in other words when you first drilling soldiers all marks together. This fight that way. This do it all at the same time become a machine and then have his government broken down. So that this administrative just doing only, and you do it this way, and you don't make exceptions. And so everyone's motions predictable. And of course, the ultimate realization of that is holocaust where no one's really responsible. I just drive this train. I get people on the train. I just get people off the train has not, you know, don't play me. Me for for what happens. Take us. No one's responsible. And. And as government everywhere are in one way or another emulating this model, it does create a form of collective stupidity. I call it. Artificial people worried about artificial intelligence, I'm worried about artificial stupidity. Agreed. Agreed. I think, you know, somebody asked me about a recently, and and are you afraid of it? And I thought well, I mean, I don't think there's going to be any problems unless we program them incorrectly. Because it's all about we programming. We program that intelligence, correct. So she's the bad guy that would program that in a bad way. I don't know that. No, I just don't see them taking. I don't see them taking over the world. That's all they're not. But they're just a tool, you know, like. You know, we invented labor saving machinery to multiply the muscle power of people, and you know, into certain extent, we have these things called robots robots on the world today. Industrial robots that basically before Massembe line. And artificial intelligence is way to multiply the number of skills person hand with the addition of.

Dr Robert zoo Brin Frederick
"brin" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"brin" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"Also put on the poll, please do you feel bad for the juvenile mountain lion? Always a contrarian really weird. Look, I'm not happy for the man who was guest death. Yes. But I wish that they could have just mutually parted ways. Yeah. Hey. Hey. Disagree. You go your way my band. I didn't know you exercising my bed. I didn't know you were hunting. Let's just be done with it. Listen, you're lunging at me. And I'm telling you right now. I could snap your neck. All right. You wanna just you? Go your way, I go my way, you just wanted them to talk it out. The violence is never the answer. And so I just didn't want to juvenile mount line to be dead. Now, I understand that at this point. It was self defense, and I have to make a choice between human life and Lyon life, and I'm telling you, I will choose human life. But I have my remorse, and it kind of depends on the human. Brin Trump Trump tub time to read this creep for hat spot. So you want that mountain line to kill me? I just want you to be jogging. And I want them outline to appear and I want you to make yourself big and just say, hey lion. Hey lions. The way the way the way Ron McGill teachers don't jobs away from the line mixing, you know, juvenile line is dead for no good reason. Who's just thinking about lunch? How would you like it? You're sitting there having lunch. And then all of a sudden the line jumps out in each in has you for lunch. How would you like it? One eight hundred flowers you running out of time. I keep telling you you're running out of time Valentine's Day around the corner..

Brin Trump Trump Ron McGill Lyon
"brin" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"brin" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

"And I find that very intriguing there's still so much mystery despite how long chess has, you know, the history of people playing it and how many people play it. There's just so many mysteries that remain. And of course, you know, there's nothing new about the idea of a socio excellence in chess with general intellectual superiority is that a fair correlation. Is it overblown or is there a direct connection you think between chess excellence and mental excellence? This is a wonderful question. And it's something that Bobby Fisher tried to address themselves when people would say he was the greatest chess genius who ever lived. And he would correct it and say, I'm not chess genius. I'm a genius who happens to play chess. But the problem there is what else did he do even competently let alone at a genius level. He certainly had the I q of genius. I think in the. Hi hundred sixties. But if you look at him joining the world church and losing all his money, or is views as a Jew himself with raging anti severely, anti semitism denying the holocaust. He kept apprised book, which was mine cough from Adolf Hitler. This was a very disturbed trouble person. And some people who knew him closely said it wasn't even mental illness. He was fixed a rotten person with really awful judgment. So I think that that that verdict is still out about the correlation between chess at the highest levels and leading to what other applicable skills. These guys might have. I'm not saying that they don't have it. It's just not been demonstrated any scientific way what being great at chess also helps you to be great at which figure at Bryn Butler about his new book grandmaster in Magnus Carlsen is defending the world championship. Now what what's going on? What can you tell us at this point? We're speaking on on Wednesday. Day. What is this November thirteenth fourteenth fourteen? Well, he's he's competing against another Brooklyn kid Fabio. No car wanna who actually learned chess at an after after school synagogue lesson only a mile away from where Bobby Fisher learned in crown heights. So there's that connection that a lot of the media has been trying to push a strong narrative that far beyond could do with Bobby Fisher did and bringing chest back into popularity. It's struggling it's a hard game. And you're seeing these championships where you have four draws in a row the first one lasted over seven hours so in a attention deficit disorder country like ours. Asking people to watch seven hours that leads to draw is a is a big ask. So it's it's doing its best. But it's a it's a tough sell in this day and age, no doubt about it. However, this book should not be a tough sell. It's terrific. From one of our favorite guests and one of our favorite guests to discuss not only chess, but boxing Brin Jonathan Butler. His new book is the grandmaster Magnus Carlsen and the match that made chess which goes back to toilet paper about fourteen hundred years. Great again, Brin thank you so much for joining us. We hope to speak to you again soon here in the sporting life. Thank you..

Bobby Fisher Magnus Carlsen Jonathan Butler Adolf Hitler Brin Bryn Butler Brooklyn crown heights seven hours fourteen hundred years
"brin" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"brin" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

"Having me Brin. Tell us a little bit about Magnus Carlsen the defending world champion from Norway is the highest ranked player history of the game contains has been around since toilet paper was invented. And that is. I this digression, but why toilet paper all the things. You could have picked why toilet? Paper intuitively, people would think toilet papers been around for an awful long time. And it has it was invented in China a long long time ago along with chess in India. So what makes Carlson great in what made his victory in two thousand sixteen in the world championship as you put it the match that may chest. Great again. Well, the subtitle refers more to the backdrop of this match, which was Trump's election happened only thirty six hours before and it seemed like New York was going through a kind of collective nervous breakdown, or as if the Titanic it hit a great iceberg. And we in the chest community were in the games room of the Titanic where nobody was talking about chess, which was just a fantastically surreal and bizarre place to be here in New York. We're speaking with Brin Jonathan Butler about his new book. The grand master and for people. And that's that's been true of our listeners. Don't know a lot about the world of chess. What is it like penetrating the game at its highest levels where the very best grandmasters contenders for the world championship that world that they inhabit? Well, and I I really wanna make clear this was a book written for for anybody. Who's never played the game. This is an exploration of chess as a subculture the history of chess six hundred million people some of the mated play which is the same population as domestic cats globally. It's an incredibly popular game around the world. And I was trying to look at it as or are these people at the highest level, and who are the people who came before Magnus Carlsen a lot of people know chess with Bobby Fisher is somebody who's the sublime genius. That was on the front pages of the New York Times ahead of things like Watergate ahead of things like Vietnam coverage. So how does he capture the imagination? That way and how is chest trying to find its way back into especially the American consciousness as a really popular game. And so, you know, walking into the Fulton market with two thousand sixteen championships to place to me felt like almost an intersection between what I'm sure you're familiar with the Atlantic City greyhound bus station after a fight in that town. And then the another way like an illegal Russian oligarchs art auction. So if you can imagine walking into something that combines those two things, I think you find your way into the ethos of elite level chess. I'm trying to get their in my head was speaking gin with with Brin Jonathan Butler about his terrific new book, the grandmaster Magnus Carlsen in the match that made chest great again, what would makes Carlson, so proficient just an unbeliever. Eveb UIL intellect one of these supremely gifted prodigies, and there are a lot of them. But he's one of the rare ones that realize is potential. If not surpassed it he could play even as a teenager against ten different people with his back to the tables. He could just keep all of those boards in his head. So it's that kind of other worldly almost black magic like mental makeup that allows him to just make calculations that just it just looks like you're seeing something verging on the cult with with what he's capable of doing and many journalists who saw him including a sixty minutes. Profile watched him do some of these demonstrations and said, it's some of the most incredible stuff I'd ever seen not to do with chess, but of everything they'd ever covered. And he is on that level. I've covered a lot of very elite people in other sports and other realms of excellence, and he's he's right up there. It's just a lot. Lot less communicable with chess..

Magnus Carlsen Brin Jonathan Butler Carlson New York New York Times Norway Bobby Fisher Trump India UIL Atlantic City China Vietnam thirty six hours sixty minutes
"brin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:09 min | 1 year ago

"brin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Is content. See you guys. Wangling that, but but basically in Helm's deep there was this big argument, the two main sides of it one side was led by Eric Schmidt. Who at the time was the CEO. He was somebody who was in favor of of Google engaging globally, including in China. The other side was gay Bryn who was taking the other side of the position. Sergei Brin is from this was born in the Soviet Union had very strong feelings about censorship. And he his position ultimately went one out and Google left China, and that's kind of where things have stood for the last eight years or so so two thousand six they start two thousand ten they back out again two thousand sixteen from what I understand they start then trickling back in as Mark reports. There were lots of little attempts that were happening, you know, even before that. But, but but the real sort of big effort, which includes this this thing called Dragonfly started in two thousand sixteen the main player in in the story is Google's currency Dr Pichai from his previous job. He started doing this run. Android. So. Yeah. As we were poor even before this twenty sixteen thing. There had been of course, little there had been teams in China and one area that that send our child was involved in was Android. So Android is on phones are all around the world, including in China and a shift, according to Marx reporting was that basically started paying attention to the usage in China. And there was an effort known as Sidewinder to develop basically, a Chinese Android app store, which is something that apple has Google did not have and the hope internally was that this would be a way and kind of a side door into China, and it did not pan out. And there were a bunch of other efforts. There's a there's a really memorable anecdote in the story about Google trying to map do digital maps does here in the country. They met with the Chinese regulators. They said, hey, we're Google. We want to make these maps. The Chinese regulators said great, that's fine. Just one problem. You just don't map any politically sensitive areas. The Google said, okay, what are those areas? And the Chinese regulators said nothing so that also did not happen. So they had kind of this. As we say in the story Kafka ask experienced trying to find various ways to basically get into the country while not compromising too many of these kind of don't be evil ideals that Google glad you said that. That is really where that the crux of the story seems to be especially right now as so many of these big tech companies are wrestling with big existential questions, not the least of which is their founding principles, especially at Google. So how does that pan out? Yeah. So so famously Google is very idealistic. Don't be evil. It's something that was almost a motto for the company for years and years and right now, we're seeing that come to head and all sorts of ways not just with the with the news that they are potentially considering getting back in China and therefore censoring search results, but also reports about sexual harassment and failures to to deal with that in a normal fashion and also reports of sort of weapons programs where we're employees have learned that Google is working with the department of defense to provide the military and have also kind of raise the question of like, hey is this something ethically. That we should be doing and the China one. In some ways. This is like the big long-term question because China is a huge market. It will be very hard for Google continue to grow without making compromises in China or without doing business with China and yet China over the last ten years has really kind of crackdown on speech. So so whereas whereas ten years ago doing business in China. Maybe there are ways that that that Google could ca- justified internally it's got a little bit harder now. Well, unless I forget that China's making a big push when it comes to artificial intelligence. Yeah. So to Google, yeah. And they are kind of in some ways natural adversaries Google is the the day the only game in town. Terms of artificial intelligence as far as companies go China is making huge push as part of its new industrial policy to be a world leader in a so so that's putting them potentially in a conflict. Of course, Google like take, you know, hire some of those engineers and put them to work on Google search. Mark Burton kind of wraps it all up at the end. And he says, well, maybe Google, you know, they're not a young startup any any anymore. They've been around for a while, maybe they're acting like an older traditional company. Yeah. And I think one of the one of the fascinating things here is Marsh reporting shows that in the senior ranks, basically, they are they are comfortable with this. They decided, you know, China's big Google has to kind of grow up, but many of these very idealistic engineers that the sort of core workforce that makes Google Google. They haven't been even come around to it yet. Exactly. Next in terrific story. Thank you so much. You're listening to Bloomberg BusinessWeek coming up lobsters got caught in a trade war. This is Bloomberg. What would you say sarcoma? You've never heard.

Google China Sergei Brin Eric Schmidt Soviet Union Mark Burton CEO Bloomberg Kafka Sidewinder apple harassment Marx Marsh ten years eight years
"brin" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"brin" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"Because Brin we never met before we've communicated, and I only became familiar with your work this year, but became an enormous fan. You know, I get asked to blurbs all the time. And somehow this book showed up from your editor. And I know you're a little bit. And he he was like would you read this book, and I sat down, and I felt blown across the room, man. And I started telling everyone I knew about it and wrote you online and gave you a blurb and then invited Yuan. Because I thought I thought that the book the name of which is the grand master. That's not the whole name. I get uncomfortable. 'cause you don't have control over the title. Subtitles the grandmaster the the natch that made great again, and I'm not a chest guy. And also, right. This thing this is a book extensively about and it is about Magnus Carlsen who at a very young age became. Not only grandmaster, but the best chess player in the world in arguably the best chess player of all time. But would Brin is able to do in. This book is bring you into the way Brin sees the world through these other people, and man, you you took incredible risks in writing this book as an artist, and I felt inspired and awakened as an artist reading it. And and I think for any artist it has certain similarities to meet the Murakami book. When I talk about when we talk about running, even though you're not at all putting yourself in it that way. But your exploration of obsession and of commitment and discursive Wayne, which you write the book meaning the way in which you take us into all the different down down a many tributaries to come back to answering. This question of the value of this kind of obsession inspires me and my own obsession. So thanks for writing the book. Well, thank you. I appreciate your time with it often people who do right blurbs. I wonder if they actually read it including written blurbs as well. And it's a struggle sometimes. But you were somebody that actually sent me a passage near the end that told me you had read you read it closely, which I'm I'm always very proud of people's time and energy. I don't write in an easy way. I think I'm clumsy. What do you mean by that? Well, I just think the connections that I make sometimes take me a while to sort of unpack what they me I feel them. But I think intellectually I'm might tool kit wasn't sharpened in school. I sort of had to find my own way. And I think that leads to a certain kind of clumsiness in the abstract way that I may connections. So as you say the starting point for me with this was largely obsession, I connected to that with these people a kind of dark DNA about chess that it always since I was three years old really caught my attention dwindled dwindled is this Lorca term for that dark energy that all are specially Spanish art seems to offer from Goya to bullfighting like I've lately been thinking about Gloria because of the world thinking about Goya. Sure tights, he's come up a couple times on the podcast. And then thinking about billions to I've been. Wanting to go actually and look at some paintings in person. I haven't have you gone and looked at. I was just there recently. Yeah, it was just the pro..

Brin Wayne chess Magnus Carlsen editor Goya Murakami Gloria three years
"brin" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"brin" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Seven ten w. Good morning, everybody. Interesting storyline. It's just been picked up by the New York Times. So it does have some credibility here. There was a video of Google executives. Bemoaning the election of President Trump at a company meeting in two thousand sixteen somebody lead the video to Breitbart, which is a right wing site. Dave posted it, but the times has picked up the story. And of course, you know, a lot of conservatives question whether or not Google is keeping conservatives off the web and favoring liberals. Well, his name is Sergei Brin of the Google founder. Sure, he said he was deeply offended by the election of Mr. Trump. He said this to a whole group of Google employees in two thousand and sixteen. So there may be something to the conservative charge that Google favors the left over the right? Listen favor. Anybody that would be dead wrong? But they shouldn't. Yeah. So I've been making a big deal out of this. The fact that he said that to his employees's. Yes, they are. They aren't even you know, congress may look the Republicans in congress may have to look closely at just what Google is doing. Skew things in the left's favour. What do you think about that? Lynn take that. I don't listen. I'm sure there were executives of various companies didn't want. But obviously, this is a media, you know, an internet company, and we will be following the story focused. Indeed, the Google is punishing conservatives. That's wrong. It is wrong. Glad to hear you say that it is. Of course, it's wrong. What else is wrong is Harvey Weinstein in this new video that we have up on our website, seven ten W O, R dot com slash Lennon, Michael. So this young woman goes over to Harvey Weinstein's office, and she's trying to sell them on some new computer marketing technique. He can use to advertise his movies and very quickly. He doesn't even go for the handshake. He goes for a hug, and then starts making these slimy insinuations about what they should be doing together. Yeah. Here's some of the auto at some of it's hard to pick up. Some of it isn't. Is it? Alright. If I flirt with you. I think he said my allowed to flourish. Skis. Flirt with you. Furry..

Google Harvey Weinstein Mr. Trump New York Times Sergei Brin congress Breitbart Dave Lynn founder Lennon Michael Seven ten w seven ten W
"brin" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

03:50 min | 2 years ago

"brin" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"Donlevatar been watching this show about swords where they make sores out of like junk yard material on the history channel. I'm hoping there's some new episodes of that. I could see on demand that would be nice forged in fire. It's called stugatz that they give you like a random thing and you have three hours and you need to forge them piece of metal, whether it's like a spring from a truck, just a random piece of like tractor, and you need to get that into like part of a blade that they give you. So then after that, the eliminate the person that hasn't done that the best is four people when you start and then the next Brown you need to give it a handle, and then they eliminate someone from there. And then after five days you have three tests and they come back and it's more like strength tests and stuff, and then they choose the forged in fire champion, ten thousand dollars. This is our show with the stugotz on the ticket. Billy. Yes, Brin Diddy, dude. He is crushing it. I don't know what these like. I just don't understand. We saw this before. Everybody else saw this. That's Lewis Brinson by the way, everybody knows everyone knows Brinson guys. guys, a household name, Bryn Diddy Brindisi real sweet. Lou Brin daddy Brennan to win it. Yeah, sure. Dude, he owns owns the drama. Well, not him specifically, but the Marlins like they tee off on him. I don't know how he's he's has a one seventy one year. He's probably gonna win the Cy Young and they've won seven straight games against them or something. I'm kind of making that up, but I heard something like that. I don't know the exact number transparency with you. You're like seven straight games against him. I think that I heard that they've won. Yeah, and his oa-to I saw someone tweeted, so I don't know that it's real, but I'm going to tell you as if this is an actual stat. Oh, to count this is the first extra-base hit that he got off someone that someone got off of him and oh, to count, and it almost went out it hit the base of the law. So excited. I'm so happy for him. I'm so happy for Lewis Brinson. Two grams like the best pitcher in baseball. This season two yet. Yeah, Yeah, that's that's what what I'm saying. I'm saying is going to win the Cy Young. You guys aren't happy for Lewis Brinson I'm I like Lewis Brinson. I mean, he's your bashing him from the beginning. If we're going to be honest, you started this whole anti Brinson campaign in the city. I think everyone look. I'm not going to make this about me. I don't think people meet an apology. I don't think they will an apology. I think there were a bit unfair to us because we saw that this guy was an all before everyone else. So I think they owe him an apology. I think that the way they've covered him has been completely unfair this year. Oh, I think they owe you an apology. No, no, no. This the what. The data was despicable and we should hold them accountable. No, I'm not going to do that, but I will. I will challenge you local media if you would like to apologize for the wrongdoing against maybe us. But more importantly against Lewis Brinson I challenge you if you have it to vote for Lewis Brinson for MVP of the National League this year, is that a public vote? Oh, known as just media. Okay. Yeah, no, no, no, that's what I'm saying. If you know if you feel any arithmetic is has a vote. If I'm not talking about him, if you look if you feel any guilt about the way that you have unfairly covered Lewis Brinson this entire season. Then I would say, you know what? As a nice apology just vote for him for MVP the National League. And that's it very simple. I don't think that's a big deal about rookie of the year. No, that's not enough. Not enough for what they put him third and certainly more attainable. Nope. Nope, not enough for what they know what because who's gonna win MVP it's probably gonna be yelich. Right. Oh, man. Yelich VP. That's infuriating. Not necessarily, but he's going to be look. He's going to be taught in the MVP I think. Did you see yelich taking shots at daily said on Twitter? I feel like that was to bring up that interacts..

Lewis Brinson MVP Brin Diddy Lou Brin Donlevatar Marlins Twitter Billy Brown Bryn Diddy baseball National League VP one seventy one year ten thousand dollars three hours Two grams five days
"brin" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"brin" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

"Made in the sport for casual boxing fans for mainstream sports fans to care. And I think they're going to get something. That it doesn't require hype because both these guys are looking to make definitive statement for their careers. This is a a legacy fight for both guys and who knows it could be a third fight after something like this, but I mean, huge. Money's involved, big legacy for both of these guys. It's it's definitive fight as boxing has right now, and I think for good reason, it's it's, it's one you can feel good about other than these issues outside the ring with computer all and some of the vitriol that's been exchanged in both camps, but perhaps that can contribute to an even better fight. That's what I'm hoping we're speaking of boxing writer, Brin Butler. His new book has nothing to do with boxing. It's about chess grandmaster, Magnus Karlsson the match me. Great. Again, we'll have him on in the coming months when the book is out in November. But before we let you go Brin you did mention gianatti wilder, Anthony, Joshua, the super heavyweight matchup that people have been clamoring. For now for some time. Is it gonna happen? Is it going to happen when these guys are both forty? What your sense now to happen to undefeated guys in their prime with faster nominal amounts of money waiting in the wings seems like both camps are a little bit gun shy just because the loser, especially if he loses bad. That's a fight that's not gonna go to the judges scorecards. So I think there's just too much money for it not to happen and it would just be bad for the sport for it to be delayed too long. It seems like it's been protracted already, but I think you're gonna see two thousand nineteen very likely could could showcase that fight before a massive English audience at Wembley. You know, eighty thousand of these fans have been showing up for Joshua fighting you or me, but to fight undefeated American heavyweight like the day wilder who knows how to sell a fight, I think could be something special. That'd be something if it happens, Brin Butler is our resident, boxing, ex. For Brin. Thanks so much for joining us to talk about triple gene canal. My pleasure. Thanks for having me Jeremy. I'm Jeremy shop and you can listen to new editions of the sporting life every Saturday and Sunday morning on ESPN radio and ESPN app beginning at six AM eastern time..

Brin Butler boxing Magnus Karlsson Money gianatti wilder Joshua ESPN Jeremy shop writer Anthony
"brin" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

04:51 min | 2 years ago

"brin" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

"And I think people are hoping for a decisive victory one way or the other after the last one because it it seemed in many rounds that could have gone either way, and the log in isn't getting any younger. So my feeling is that Cannella might have the edge here along with youth youth and and canal trying to prove something and fighting with anger, which I don't know is present in the first fight. You mentioned that canal Alvarez was suspended for testing positive for performance enhancing drugs. It happened to be the steroid clenbuterol. He claimed he tested positive because he eight t. Into beef in Mexico. You know, we hear all kinds of excuses in the sports world for people testing positive. It's very rare to find someone just say, yeah, I did it. They caught me in boxing circles. What do people think about what canal? Oh, has had to say to excuse away this positive test. I think there's been a lot of suspicion he's been met with, you know, in his position economically that hard to find clean bee's. He's got a personal chef is not a personal trainer. You know, he's pushing thirty. It's not as though he's eating street me in his hometown. So I don't. You know, these guys were accountable for what they're putting into their bodies, and you'd think he'd be more careful given that change of meat has been an issue for some years. So I think he met a lot of suspicion rightfully but he's been adamant denial. It wasn't intentional. And as you say them, not readily. Admitting intentional usage hasn't really met with them meeting much disciplinary action. He was suspended for six months, but I mean, it didn't injure his box office raw, and it just seemed to more than anything aggravating his opponent, which maybe is a good thing from his point of view, maybe he thinks lockin would fight worse angry. So. It's, I think it's an unfortunate controversy. You hope that these guys are fighting clean unlike where there's cheating and other sports. This is this is affecting potentially injuring somebody permanently disabling them permanently. So I think it should be taken seriously, but it's certainly not going to happen in boxing anytime soon, especially not for a draw the caliber of canal in general, the rematch is taking place on September fifteenth a year after they fought to a controversial draw triple g versus Saul Cannella Alvarez it. We're speaking with Brin Butler in general Brin how much policing goes on to the world of boxing when it comes to performance enhancing drugs. I think many people are of the view that it's it can be the best in all sports and it can be the worst. That just depends wear because different states have different athletic commissions that can either be incredibly laxed or there. Other where it is some of the strictest that exist in sports. So Vegas has always been a place where there's a lot of dubiousness associated with people policing it. Mayweather is friends with a lot of these quote, anti aging clinics that are notorious for supplying athletes with performance enhancing drugs. So the cloud suspicion has sort of been with most of the great fighters over the last twenty years. Certainly Cannella looks like he's an absolutely incredible shape and it just seems strange that you're seeing people get into the best condition of their lives in their late twenties and mid thirties, it's not what we saw twenty or thirty years ago where it was routine to see these guys go downhill after thirty. Now routinely you're seeing guys into their mid thirties performed often at better levels than they did in their mid twenties. So it it task suspicion, rightly or wrongly, but enough people have been caught that. I think it's. You see an overhaul in a body in, you know, in their thirties, something seems to be up. 'cause it's not as if these guys weren't training seriously and their teams and their twenties. So it's hard to find an explanation like I'm really training better for this than I was ten years ago. What do you think we can expect when these guys actually touched gloves and get down to it? I mean, I, I don't necessarily think it's going to be kind of Hagler Hearns, but it's his closest boxing can offer right now too big names with incredible careers behind them. Glove, never lost. Cannella has one loss early in his career to Floyd Mayweather both of these guys like very fan, friendly style, and this side of the heavyweight division with Anthony, Joshua Deontay wilder. There's no better fight that can be.

Saul Cannella Alvarez boxing Floyd Mayweather Vegas clenbuterol Hagler Hearns Mexico Brin Butler lockin Cannella Joshua Deontay Anthony thirty years twenty years six months ten years
"brin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"brin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Google was created by larry page and sergey brin we talked to a couple of different people on like four people or something like that and all the people we talked to willing to give us money we met this guy he quickly you know he's quick look at our searchengine machado with all that we started talking about well he's at all you know i'd be interested investing you know so he said you know i don't want you guys have to you know take too low valuation or have to worry too much about money things right now why don't i just write you a check so he went back to his car came back checkbook can you wrote a check for one hundred thousand dollars and in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight was when bill clinton said that thing that has haunted him ever since about the meaning of is is here's the clip and the context it was in his debit we don't have it do we have it have it it was in his deputy now i guess we don't have it so well anyway it was in his deposition in the special prosecutor's investigation and he was asked in that deposition about his lawyer robert bennett saying there is no sexual relationship between monica and bill and he said basically depends on the meaning of is what the meaning of is is if by is you mean in the present no there is no sexual relationship if is means was there ever well then that's another matter so that's where the meaning of is is came from i'm gonna go right to another call far now yes in manhattan you're on wnyc high finance thanks for calling yeah i'm calling because i'm a little bit upset with the revisionist history of monica lewinsky she is no victim because she was very much aware of what she was getting into saving her dress starters but also the fact that you have an affair with the married man president or not but up the ante if it's a president and trump tower another to me she's no victim you step into that kind of a quagmire you need to live up to.

Google larry page machado bill clinton prosecutor robert bennett monica manhattan president sergey brin monica lewinsky trump tower one hundred thousand dollars