18 Burst results for "Bright Cove"

"bright cove" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

02:20 min | 2 d ago

"bright cove" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"I'm Seth Cantor. Jim Rome here. Hope you enjoy your weekend and I will see you in the jungle Monday noon Eastern nine, Pacific. Be afraid. Like us on Facebook at facebook dot com slash CBS Sports radio for breaking news updates and the latest from CBS Sports Radio. Novak is powering a new generation by providing renewable energy, including solar. Once new solar projects are completed in 2023, no vet will provide enough to power 100,000 homes. Members may also purchase solar panels now through Noveck solutions protecting the environment, providing reliable, safe, affordable electricity because future generations are depending on it. Novak keeping life bright Cove in 19 vaccines are starting to become available across the country. Now is the time to get informed. Get the latest information Get vaccine answers dot ord. It's up to you. Message brought to you by the Ad Council and the CDC. A Washington D. C. Spring's finally here, and there's no time to wait to get the loan of your dreams with true Green America's number one lawn care company. True green Science based approach and local expertise will help give your lawn the year round. Karen needs to be thick and weed free. Go to true green dot com slash radio. To save 50% on your first service. Just call 8774610681 or go to true green dot com slash radio today and get along You'll be proud. Out off. It's Jane and my favorite part about a Kiwi co create coming to the door is you instantly have a project you can do with your kids that doesn't involve a screen. I've done everything from painting to making handmade soap. They have robotics, innovative science and art projects for any agent interest, delivered monthly to your doorstep and making steam seriously fun. Get two key. We co dot com slash radio today to say 40% on your first month. That's K I w i c o dot com slash Video. You're climbing up a winding pine tree lined mountain pass when you hear it, That's snow capped mountain laughing at you, but deep down inside you're the one who's amused, But that mountain doesn't know is that.

"bright cove" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

The World of Phil Hendrie

05:20 min | 3 months ago

"bright cove" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

"Stream is back up and running and beautiful and thank you bright cove and thank you paul and thank you alex. Thank you john and thank all of everybody while lead. While that's the cat's name he does. He bought. I have no idea. I'm talking on the phone man just anyway. Thank you to all of those fine people for helping us. We got it together and it's a beautiful thing anyway. I showed you the picture there. And it was of sugar. Ray leonard who will be forthcoming guest on the new bobby duly podcast margaret. Have you been talking to bobby about that. I you know she asked me. And i said i've been talking. She said well. Who do you think i should have said. Look who do you have so far and she said well we've got Patio can't yes who's lovely. I love her. she's great. They've got sugar ray leonard. Who is marvelous. they have. Who's the one that is. Well they have joel mchale. Yes joel mchale. I love joe. But i was thinking of the other one. Oh i'm thinking of joma count never mind. So what did you ask her well. I wanted her to remind me of who she was having on. Because i can't remember. I still can't and she couldn't remember either so i don't know whether the review gotta have a podcast because she can't remember who she interviewed. Look i know. I think that they've got in the can right now. Four or five some of these some of the names. I don't want to roll out all the names here. Because i don't want to get her mad. And what do you mean you can't remember. I can't she can't remember so. I can't remember because i'm asking her. Okay great so. I'll call her up at some point nascar. I shouldn't ask her yes. He can't remember somebody around here. Better start remembered who the hell is going to be on this pop. This podcast said pop. Yeah you all said no. He didn't he said podcast. Said how you spell them at p. o. P. as in paul. Yeah he. I think he can you come on. No you said peo- b.'s. And boy. That's what i heard. I heard podcast. As if someone's name was pob you know like pob. Hope i said podcast pob well who was pob hope. It wasn't anyone bets who that's right because his name is bob. Hope not pob. Hope or could have been paul hope. I'm kidding phil. what did you relax. See if you can just moving tonight show with a better attitude that you did. Last night i had a bad attitude. Let me just explain something. We had people here and not only here but we had everywhere commenting on the beating. That you and robert gave to bud on these airwaves last night. Oh yeah. I forgot about that. The forgot about it. How bad could it be well. I mean it's suddenly kicking him. You were beating him. I saw it. You were kicked him in the ribs. You were kicking him in the gut. Then you roll them outside robert and throw a bucket of water on them. And there you are margaret saying telling me to stay out of it and give them another shot and you know all kinds of stuff. Yeah so far what you're describing. Isn't that bad now. Dip put them on the ground. I get a lot of love to have. You didn't get any love tap. you kick the band. What do mean he kicked it. You bed did he kick you solid or are not. Yeah no i did. I swear to god. I was all these fake kids. Was it a fait kick margaret. Nice going army guys go. I'm sorry nice going. We had him going. We hit him running with it. And all three you clowns or did they kick you or not will. You'll be happy to know. I had people who are sending emails and phone calls. And they were calling their their their priests in their in their local police. And everything saying that you guys basically just put a beating on him. That would be worthy of any. Just any alley thug you guys were kicking him and now you're telling me they were all little fake kicks now. I mean if you gonna call the cops see. That's the problem with the two of you. You get scared. You don't have any guts you got scared. And you turn the ele- turn bright yellow big yellow stripe right down your back your yellow when you haven't got the guts to do you got to call a police officer. You're not going to get arrested. You really got. It was getting kicked on. Yeah you would robert yeah. I'm the one you're hanging out to dry. I'm not hanging out to dry. You would have been fine that you keep your big mouth. Shut all come on. Let's grow up around here okay. That was very very scary to watch. You guys are doing fake kicks and you're playing into it but i you know what you ought to be ashamed of yourself your true all right. But in any event that was what people perceived. So you can say what you want about them being fake kicks but everybody calling this show last night and emailing and the thousands and billions in gazillions of people that i met on the street and the just everyone bothering me. I had to get security to make my way down the driveway to get the paper. They all said the same thing. Good show phil can you all right..

joel mchale robert alex Ray leonard paul Last night john five tonight two last night Four joe paul hope phil nascar bob three gazillions of people billions
"bright cove" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

06:31 min | 4 months ago

"bright cove" Discussed on The Daily

"The following message is brought to you by cove. Real businesses deserve a real video platform. That's where bright cove comes in. We're the leader in launching global brands. While the other guys are desperate for likes it's all business for your business video. That means business. Learn more at beer. I t. c. o. V. e. dot com. Ms spitzer was among the last to leave the camp alive. She was sent to the women's camp at ravensbruck and a subcamp in malkov before being evacuated in death march she and a friend escaped the march by removing the red stripe. She had painted on their uniforms allowing them to blend with the local population. That was fleeing as the red army advanced. And the nazis surrendered. Ms spitzer made her way to her. Childhood home in bratislava's slovakia. Her parents and siblings were gone. Save for one brother who just got married. She decided to leave him unburdened to start his new life. According to dr grossman the historian ms spitzer's account of her journey immediately. After the war was deliberately vague. She alluded to smuggling jews across borders through the break an underground movement that helped refugees move illegally across eastern europe and into palestine millions of survivors were displaced and europe was teeming with displaced persons camps. Some five hundred such camps materialized in germany amid the chaos ms spitzer made it to the first all jewish displaced persons camp in the american zone of occupied germany which in the spring of nineteen forty-five housed at least four thousand survivors. It was called fell f. ing the same camp that mr whiz nia would deliver supplies to the odds they would be in the same place or remarkable. I would drive over. There fell the thing. But i had no idea she was there. Mr whitney nia said soon after she arrived in fell the thing in september of nineteen. Forty-five ms spitzer married irwin. T shower the camps adding police chief and the united nations security officer roles that allowed him to work closely with the american military. Once again ms spitzer known as ms tisch our was in a privileged position although they too were displaced persons. The showers lived outside the camp. Ms tisch shower then. Twenty seven was among the oldest of the survivors and feld f. ing. Because of her husband's position she told dr grossman. She was considered top management at the camp as such she distributed food among the refugees particularly the booming population of pregnant women in the fall of nineteen forty five. She accompanied her husband when general. Dwight d eisenhower. And general george s patton came for a tour of the camp ms tisch shower and her husband devoted years of their lives to humanitarian causes. They went on missions through the united nations to peru and bolivia and indonesia in between dr t shower taunt bioengineering at the university of new south wales in sydney throughout their travels ms tisch our continued to learn new languages and use her design skills to help populations in need particularly pregnant women and new mothers. Her existence was not defined by her experience. As a holocaust. Survivor said dr matias. She had a much richer life. He said there was a law that she achieved with her husband. Eventually the t. showers. Move to america first to austin texas and then in nineteen sixty seven. They settled in new york. Where dr t shower became a bioengineering professor at new york university in their apartment surrounded by books about the holocaust ms t showers spoke regularly with historians. She never gave speeches and said she despised the concept of the holocaust as business. The historian she entrusted with her story became part of her family. Doctor queen who called her from australia. S friday saw ms t shower as a mother figure. Her duty was not to be a professional survivor said dr grossman. Her job was to be the historian's historian she was committed to this very sober. Almost technical rendition of what happened yet. Throughout the many hours she devoted to detailing the horrors of auschwitz to a number of historians. Ms t shower. Never once mentioned mr whitney off sometime after the war ended mr with mia heard from a former auschwitz inmate. That ms tisch our was alive by then. He was deeply enmeshed with the american army based in versailles france where he waited until he could finally emigrate to the united states when his aunt and uncle picked him up at the port in hoboken in february nineteen forty six. They couldn't believe the nineteen year old in gi uniform. Was the little david. They last saw in warsaw in a rush to make up for lost time. Mr whis nia plunged into new york city life going to dances and parties. He rode the subway from his aunt's house in the bronx. To anywhere around manhattan. He answered an ad in a local paper and got a job selling encyclopedias. In one thousand nine hundred forty seven at a wedding. He met his future wife. Hope five years later the couple moved to philadelphia. He became a vice president of sales for wonderland of knowledge corporation. The encyclopedia company until his career as a cantor took off years after he'd settled down with his wife and levittown. A friend of the lovers told mr whis nia. That sippy was in new york city. Mister with nia who had told his wife his former girlfriend thought this would be an opportunity to reconnect. And he could finally ask how he had managed to survive auschwitz. Their friend arranged a meeting. Mr wis nia drove the two hours from levittown to manhattan and waited at a hotel lobby across from central park. She never showed up. Said mr with nia. I found out after that she decided it.

ms spitzer Ms spitzer dr grossman malkov ms tisch mr whiz nia Mr whitney nia Ms tisch ing Dwight d eisenhower george s patton germany red army europe united nations bratislava dr matias slovakia palestine irwin
"bright cove" Discussed on Wild Business Growth Podcast

Wild Business Growth Podcast

03:29 min | 4 months ago

"bright cove" Discussed on Wild Business Growth Podcast

"Everybody. Go crazy whenever you played it. Oh gosh meditate. For a long time. It's hard to say. Oh man maybe a little john usher. Yeah oh yeah. Oh my god. Yeah that was I was touring at that time internationally and it was like sonic play anywhere always worked but it got played out kind of fast to in. So it'll have. Its you know its renaissance again. I'm sure but let's just that you know failsafe. Yeah yeah. I can't stop saying yeah. I don't know what you did to me. I'm the content monster note. What is your favorite monster in movie. History jeeze maybe the cracking goodwin. Oh okay. I thought you were talking about the a- the rump commercial for a second but that that applies as well and then what is a tip that you have for d. jiang find your personality and style and whether that's a country accents like i said you know we content. You know you have to realize you're playing the same record. Everybody else has quick story. I was on tour in germany. And there's a sting the dj's have when your house tj and that's your club and you're the resident dj. You're always kind of envious of the guy who comes in as a special guest because the special guests has the billboard all the excitement and you're just a house. Dj so here. I am coming in as the the guy on the billboard. With all of the whole towns pass with my with my face and everything and my Roadmender warming said look. Now this guy. Who's the house. Dj he he chides to shit on every dj comes in because he hates that he's not a tour dj so expect he's gonna try to burn you before you come on and that means play all the hits the hour before i come on. I've heard avi with levels. I heard that happened to him everywhere. Yeah yeah his own song right so this is part of an accident. Gave a presentation at Bright cove a year or two ago one of my presentations and i parallel in the dj thing with with the With content creation. And i said look here. I am playing the exact same music this other guy did. Why do different will the came down to me. No music better than anybody else. I knew down to the senate's down to the count. Every record i had so i could cut records together and literally put a sentence from one song into sentence of another song. I could use the acapella from one song. Over the beat of another song. I would do live studio. Remixes live in the deejay booth during a show so the songs you heard me play. You can't hear they were never recorded so you can't hear anywhere else. So that was my way of taking that content and presenting it in a way so unique the no one else can duplicate it and that same flavor to creating any kind of content for business. Hey you said way back at the start that google loves unique and so even though it wasn't specifically for google at the start you had that unique aspect in mind and creating that unique sound and it's so cool to hear about how that start in the music world and then transition and you know there's an overlap there into the business world as well lee thank you so much this has been fantastic and really cool hearing about your story and all the cool and unique things that you're up to and in that you've seen out out and about as well..

john usher goodwin jiang germany senate google
"bright cove" Discussed on The Tech Guy

The Tech Guy

04:38 min | 11 months ago

"bright cove" Discussed on The Tech Guy

"You can make it harder. But it's impossible to stop and I'll tell you why you know. If somebody's really determined they can set up a camcorder. Play your video on their computer. Record it and distribute that right. You can't stop. That isn't technological. Means to stop that you could sue them. I guess but trust me yet and I think you probably anybody's ever gone to court over. Anything knows is the last thing you WANNA do. So last resort so there there are ways to do protected a video password protected there are but if you if you Google for instance the very first things you're going to is how to remove protection. I mean there's literally before you find how to protect your videos. You find a video how to remove protection. So that's going to give you some idea. There are companies that do this like bright cove. There's a star force player star Dash Force sprout video. There are lots of ways to do it. But you're always gonNA have this. I mean you probably already figured this out your but you're always gonNa have people who are just GonNa say fine that's great. I'm glad I paid one hundred dollars and now I'm going to give it to everybody in my office or whatever or everybody. I know or I'M GONNA put it on Youtube so everybody can enjoy it. You just Kinda have to live with. This is this. Is the Internet era. Unfortunately same thing for photographers. I get the question used to get the question that they've given up. How do I protect my photos? People keep stealing my photos and yeah know you could watermark do all sorts of things but but the criminals are always going to be more smart than the other folk so recently we did a few town hall meetings over Zoom. It couldn't record the video and send people with the password but again like you say they can share that way I can't really stop them You know even Youtube I mean the the easiest probably the best way to do it is to have a PRI- Youtube makes us very easy. We'd have a private you are L. No one can see and then People can pay to get the URL and you just GonNa live with you you. I don't know any other way round. This is GonNa live with the fact that that that that people will share it You know you can move it around. That'll slow it down But it's just kind of the way it is and you know so that by the way is why I chose in fact I've done this my whole career to give away everything and just put ads in it. That's the other thing people skip adds to. There's all sorts of ways you know you can't force somebody because it's digital that it can get people just to watch the video once and after that is disappears into kind of accent anymore. Sure sure absolutely their ways to do that. Look at Look at those that I mentioned like bright kover sprout video There's all sorts of ways to do it and that's probably the best single best way to do. It would be to do it once. Live only and and have a paid stream like pay per view. Boxing Right Yeah. So you say okay. We're going to do it Tuesday. Three three o'clock in the afternoon pay fifty bucks and you can watch it. The reason is it's not then somebody has to really dedicated criminal. They they have to say. Okay I'm going to record this. Of course they take some effort because it doesn't easily record. I'm going to record this and share it and so that'll really cut way down the you know if it's easy if they get a you are only goal here. Let me email this to my hundred friends. That's easy but if you do. It live only tape review. I think that's now admittedly that's less convenient for people so you're going to reduce your audience that way but it does. That's why pay per view. Boxing works they know. People can record it. They understand that the the people who are paying for it are going to see it first. And they're gonNA want it. I and so. That's it's gotTa do tricks like that you know or incentivize or say if you subscribe will also send you a t shirt something you can't share you know if you pay the problem is there's just no way you can stop somebody from shooting the screen saying good. I'm going to record this. Set up a camera record the whole thing and then give it to their friends. You just can't. There's no technological way to stop that. So you've got to think of kind of social ways to encourage payment Leo LaPorte the Teke..

Youtube Boxing Leo LaPorte PRI- Youtube Google Teke
"bright cove" Discussed on Messari's Unqualified Opinions

Messari's Unqualified Opinions

12:31 min | 1 year ago

"bright cove" Discussed on Messari's Unqualified Opinions

"I told you we have an excellent season kicking off twenty twenty and I'm joined today by none other then the CO founder and CEO Circle. Jeremy Allaire Fun facts about Jeremy and his team. I believe one of the earliest applicants. The whole this was back in late. Two thousand thirteen at actually made through one of their board members and As fate would have a gentleman up name unders That I was considering starting a stable coin project with Way Back in two thousand thirteen hundred fourteen interviewed around the same time as I did and basically we came at around the same time and and I told him while they're gonNA make off wrong spot he said No. No no and sure enough. You guys made an offer unders left left and recently that he'll draw sorry recently he recently joined the sorry and you are now now focused on stable coins pretty much exclusively. So the the intersection there. over the course of the last six years of course there's there's been some uh some work in between between Baltimore with DC G. and some of the were yet while I was coined us It's been fascinating to watch circles evolution over time and data and I think the you're in a very good position right now on the US DC front triggered talk a bit about as it is emerging as as you know one of the leading contenders unders for what's going to be the dominant stable especially in the US dollar pegged a stable income to cover a lot of territory right now Or of course the next hour fled Germany. For for starters loved to get the quick background on you. I think some people industry no a little bit about your background Previous to to digital currency. But but let's talk about that just to to start and then the evolution of circle in your own is And then I'll maybe jumping with with a little bit of my thesis as as to where certainly goes from here and then we can talk about that around you can. You can tell me off. I am very often. It sounds fun but number you were you. Were a a a a very sharp early speculator about what we were going to be doing doing good when we were stealth back in twenty thirteen and early twenty fourteen. Yeah that's yeah yeah and You no I I think you even knew some of the internal code names. We had for different things which sort of talked aspirational about where we saw digital currency going and Yeah and we'll get to all that conversation insurance so kind of where things are today but yeah my yeah my background just for for people who aren't aware I've been working being in Internet platforms for a long time since the early nineteen nineties and I I had a background in kind of studying political economy global political economy And that's what actually drew me into the Internet in nineteen ninety and became kind of very very obsessed about what you could what you do with it and worked on multiple companies over the next. You know fifteen twenty years I think what animated those companies was excitement about the promise of open open platforms open networks permission lists access to open protocols what you could do with that information. Communication software software delivery media all these kinds of things. which were you know? I think critical kind of infrastructures built up on on the layers to the Internet from the early nineties through obviously still today And so I you know first. Business was really enabling programmers grammars to build software applications for web browsers which was quite novel in Nineteen Ninety Four nineteen ninety five Really empowering a new generation of developers to create software for new kind of model and to build kind of content applications as. We'd like to call them back Ben and that grew Into a public company and then eventually we merged with macro media one of the dominant Internet designing tools companies. And I was chief technology officer there and worked on FLASH PLATFORM BACK IN. This would have been in. You know. two thousand one two thousand two thousand three and at that time. Flash was the most ubiquitous piece of software on the Internet. Ninety eight percent computers had it. And you we could actually upgrade the runtime of the Internet in twelve of months because we could basically launch a new version of the player it was like a new almost like an operating system had a virtual machine. We were dancing programming language to do a lot more stuff than we had a set of ideas. He is that when you have broadband and Wi fi kind of lighting up which were just sort of happening end kind of user experience. The Internet could could be a lot more rich and we put underlying primitives into that platform for video and And that sort of sparked my my next like major ager passionate in which was in early two thousand and two sort of interested in you know how could you disrupt what is the television and and media distribution the newspapers coming online or magazines coming online but actually television on the Internet and started another company. Let's left macro media. Started another company called Bright Cove which is listed public company. Now J. Took public. I'm a little bit before starting circle and that was again a platform company so basically providing UH platforms for companies in developers. That wanted to you know use video do video distribution not just browsers mobile devices. TV sets all stuff. I'm and bypass the legacy system for media distribution kind of going over the top Which is the phrase that we used with a software in media communications and in a in those generations the Internet? Now you know I sort of think about things like stable coins is like we're doing an over the top Financial System by building it all on open open permission list network so it networks Protocols Deli platforms developers can build on And really trying to create a user experience money. That's really different different. But I'm the sort of a little bit of the thread that runs through it and I think in two thousand and twelve Had just taken breakoff public And like a lot of people around two thousand twelve became interested in and obsessed with cryptocurrency Not Not just you know bitcoin specifically but the broader kind of our that we could see back in early two thousand thirteen. Sean and I were batting around starting circle and Many many of the ideas that sort of animated the founding of the company on things that we imagined becoming possible are actually just just now becoming possible and so it's super exciting time in the industry. It's a super exciting time. I think also circle but it's a very exciting time for the industry where Yup many of the things that got us to found the company and belief systems about what could happen with the global financial system where you can actually start to awesome. That's emerging so that's a little background in a little bit on how I got to circle so we we glossed over Quite a bit of meet in the Middle Right in terms of Aware Circle started in where you've been last few years and when people see the focus today on Uscca the encircle pay is still integral to the wrecked it. Now so circle pay we We ended service on circle pay last year as a standalone service. So and I can talk to you the kind of which which which one of my thinking so so the the the the the current product suite includes USCC and Yes so right now we have the USD service which is available to individuals and institutions and businesses and then we have a whole new set of products that that were gearing up to launch guy. Soon Center all built around. US obviously you you sold Colonie ax you sold OTC business and those mind misunderstanding But the reason I thought that it might still be integrated was because you're one of the earlier companies to think about digital dollars moving back and forth using bitcoin right show. There was a buy sell functionality. Functionally early on with the circle. Walla and trading shirt. The looked a lot like when base in terms of its function by some simple functionality and go to the vials is credit cards but The there was a then moulay quality to a lot of what you built. Subsequently sharp using using crypto assets What was interesting was you had completely abstracted away the fact that the winner in cryptic News which is kind of a precursor if you had a digital dollar if you had a token is Stable coin it that would be the the the actual asset that you allow people to see in the early. So we've kind of gotten that point now but you got out of the direct to consumer phase. I guess With with zero. Oh Pay Yeah so so talking about that. Yeah I think I'm just for context in this is that you're right on and a lot of I think the context is so so when we started the company twenty thirteen there were sort of several fundamental premises that we had and believes that we had and and You know one of those was that Public blockchain's would be The fact that emerges like a new infrastructure layer for certainly for financial applications. You know the sort of a broader set of idea around like you share trust application second span not just your finances but fundamentally like public chains could be a new public structure layer on the Internet for financial applications and at the time. There were certainly multiple blockchain projects. Bitcoin you're really dominated and in early two thousand thirteen. I mean what brought me into the space was not just sort of where bitcoin was then but there were lot of really interesting projects that were going going on to think about. Okay where could you go with this public infrastructure. How could you issue assets on top of it so you wouldn't just have like like the native token of Bitcoin? You'd have issued assets you know people remember like colored coins early proposals. You know. Things like counter-party counter-party there were a lot of really interesting projects but the technical community was very interested in that. Like okay if we have this kind of Trust List Transaction Layer and ledger and it is highly secure like what happens when you layer things top of it so that was one thing we bisque. That's going to happen. I don't know exactly which which way that will happen but we actually hoped it would happen on Bitcoin and it did not and and maybe eventually will but And the other was is there was all this talk about how you expand from the very basic script that you could use for things like multi transactions are very simple kind of script with Bitcoin. And and actually Kinda blow that out so you could actually have a full liberal machine and you could Actually Write Code Aka smart contracts. That could not just you know interact with these issued assets but actually could allow you to codify economic relationships in code that early and have that running on this public infrastructure and those two ideas were what got us really excited that you know those things happened and got to an infrastructure. Sure where you could you scale it to like the same scale. We use the ATP recipe or other protocols on the Internet that that would be the building blocks that would allow how you to have the building blocks to actually recreate the financial system in the image of the Internet..

Jeremy Allaire US Baltimore Germany CO founder Bright Cove DC G. Public blockchain Wi chief technology officer Ben CEO
Stablecoins: The Big Picture with Circle CEO Jeremy Allaire

Messari's Unqualified Opinions

08:15 min | 1 year ago

Stablecoins: The Big Picture with Circle CEO Jeremy Allaire

"Joined today by none other then the CO founder and CEO Circle. Jeremy Allaire Fun facts about Jeremy and his team. I believe one of the earliest applicants. The whole this was back in late. Two thousand thirteen at actually made through one of their board members and As fate would have a gentleman up name unders That I was considering starting a stable coin project with Way Back in two thousand thirteen hundred fourteen interviewed around the same time as I did and basically we came at around the same time and and I told him while they're gonNA make off wrong spot he said No. No no and sure enough. You guys made an offer unders left left and recently that he'll draw sorry recently he recently joined the sorry and you are now now focused on stable coins pretty much exclusively. So the the intersection there. over the course of the last six years of course there's there's been some uh some work in between between Baltimore with DC G. and some of the were yet while I was coined us It's been fascinating to watch circles evolution over time and data and I think the you're in a very good position right now on the US DC front triggered talk a bit about as it is emerging as as you know one of the leading contenders unders for what's going to be the dominant stable especially in the US dollar pegged a stable income to cover a lot of territory right now Or of course the next hour fled Germany. For for starters loved to get the quick background on you. I think some people industry no a little bit about your background Previous to to digital currency. But but let's talk about that just to to start and then the evolution of circle in your own is And then I'll maybe jumping with with a little bit of my thesis as as to where certainly goes from here and then we can talk about that around you can. You can tell me off. I am very often. It sounds fun but number you were you. Were a a a a very sharp early speculator about what we were going to be doing doing good when we were stealth back in twenty thirteen and early twenty fourteen. Yeah that's yeah yeah and You no I I think you even knew some of the internal code names. We had for different things which sort of talked aspirational about where we saw digital currency going and Yeah and we'll get to all that conversation insurance so kind of where things are today but yeah my yeah my background just for for people who aren't aware I've been working being in Internet platforms for a long time since the early nineteen nineties and I I had a background in kind of studying political economy global political economy And that's what actually drew me into the Internet in nineteen ninety and became kind of very very obsessed about what you could what you do with it and worked on multiple companies over the next. You know fifteen twenty years I think what animated those companies was excitement about the promise of open open platforms open networks permission lists access to open protocols what you could do with that information. Communication software software delivery media all these kinds of things. which were you know? I think critical kind of infrastructures built up on on the layers to the Internet from the early nineties through obviously still today And so I you know first. Business was really enabling programmers grammars to build software applications for web browsers which was quite novel in Nineteen Ninety Four nineteen ninety five Really empowering a new generation of developers to create software for new kind of model and to build kind of content applications as. We'd like to call them back Ben and that grew Into a public company and then eventually we merged with macro media one of the dominant Internet designing tools companies. And I was chief technology officer there and worked on FLASH PLATFORM BACK IN. This would have been in. You know. two thousand one two thousand two thousand three and at that time. Flash was the most ubiquitous piece of software on the Internet. Ninety eight percent computers had it. And you we could actually upgrade the runtime of the Internet in twelve of months because we could basically launch a new version of the player it was like a new almost like an operating system had a virtual machine. We were dancing programming language to do a lot more stuff than we had a set of ideas. He is that when you have broadband and Wi fi kind of lighting up which were just sort of happening end kind of user experience. The Internet could could be a lot more rich and we put underlying primitives into that platform for video and And that sort of sparked my my next like major ager passionate in which was in early two thousand and two sort of interested in you know how could you disrupt what is the television and and media distribution the newspapers coming online or magazines coming online but actually television on the Internet and started another company. Let's left macro media. Started another company called Bright Cove which is listed public company. Now J. Took public. I'm a little bit before starting circle and that was again a platform company so basically providing UH platforms for companies in developers. That wanted to you know use video do video distribution not just browsers mobile devices. TV sets all stuff. I'm and bypass the legacy system for media distribution kind of going over the top Which is the phrase that we used with a software in media communications and in a in those generations the Internet? Now you know I sort of think about things like stable coins is like we're doing an over the top Financial System by building it all on open open permission list network so it networks Protocols Deli platforms developers can build on And really trying to create a user experience money. That's really different different. But I'm the sort of a little bit of the thread that runs through it and I think in two thousand and twelve Had just taken breakoff public And like a lot of people around two thousand twelve became interested in and obsessed with cryptocurrency Not Not just you know bitcoin specifically but the broader kind of our that we could see back in early two thousand thirteen. Sean and I were batting around starting circle and Many many of the ideas that sort of animated the founding of the company on things that we imagined becoming possible are actually just just now becoming possible and so it's super exciting time in the industry. It's a super exciting time. I think also circle but it's a very exciting time for the industry where Yup many of the things that got us to found the company and belief systems about what could happen with the global financial system where you can actually start to awesome. That's emerging so that's a little background in a little bit on how I got to circle so we we glossed over Quite a bit of meet in the Middle Right in terms of Aware Circle started in where you've been last few years and when people see the focus today on Uscca the encircle pay is still integral to the wrecked it. Now so circle pay we We ended service on circle pay last year as a standalone service. So and I can talk to you the kind of which which which one of my thinking so so the the the the the current product suite includes USCC and Yes so right now we have the USD service which is available to individuals and institutions and businesses and then we have a whole new set of products that that were gearing up to launch guy. Soon

Jeremy Allaire United States Co Founder Baltimore Bright Cove CEO WI Chief Technology Officer Uscca Germany BEN Uscc Dc G. USD
"bright cove" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:35 min | 2 years ago

"bright cove" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"This is a coarser looked at founder chairman and CEO of circle Jeremy AllAire, he saw the possibilities of the internet while still in school and founded his first company with his brother called AllAire and early pioneer in the web platform market that he eventually to public. He then created bright cove and online video platform used by media organizations worldwide that he also took public in two thousand twelve the following year. He saw the future of money and founded circle consumer internet company who stated mission is to make possible for anyone anywhere to help change the global economy. He joins me now for a closer. Look german. You've said that you're ridge no interest in the internet was sm- around nineteen ninety when he saw a decentralized network. Could guess injure mediate governments and media companies? You don't have a degree in engineering or business, but political science, so how did you wind up in technology? Yeah. Thanks. You know, I started tinkering with technology when I was young. I was sort of one of these, you know, kids I was lucky that we had an apple two in our house in the nineteen eighties. But it really was in in in nineteen ninety when I was in college. That I also lucky that I got access to an inter high speed internet connection in my dorm room and transformative experience to connect to open decentralized network and information communications could move freely. It was obviously not the internet. We know today, but the fundamental the fundamental model of this open. Global permission list network would there, and it was very self evident to me into that inspired me to learn as much as I can about the technology, which which I did in the doing years in two thousand and thirteen you co-founded circle which started I as a consumer finance company using the blockchain technology. What exactly is circle pay? An how's it changed since it detonated in two thousand thirteen when we started. The company in in two thousand and thirteen we had been very excited about inspired by cryptocurrency. And by what it suggested to us about what the future of the global financial system would look like and having watched the prior twenty years where decentralized open networks transformed how the information industries where account information broadly could be exchanged and utilized globally. We thought very similar happening in the world of finance and money. We wanted to build a new kind financial institution, but build it all on top of the cryptocurrency infrastructure, and and really continue are continuing to pursue that. When we started building, the first pieces of our platform in two thousand and thirteen in two thousand fourteen the technology was pretty limited. Then you really just had bitcoin and a lot of things that we wanted to do eventually. Alike. Represent more elaborate forms of financial assets create contracts around those assets, those were things that were conceptually possible. But no one had really implemented technology for them. So when we started we really started with how could we create an experience for people to be able to pay anyone anywhere and exchange value with anyone anywhere in the same way that we can exchange content instantly globally fiction, Leslie and without cost. And we we did that initially by building on top of the bitcoin network. And we did that with dollars euros and pounds at the starting currencies. And that's obviously that the product still allows people to make those kind of fiction lists instant payments between people, but the technology instead of bitcoin, we've been moving our own architecture to what are called stable coins or taking traditional government issued money the money and token, izing it and allowing dollars and other currencies to actually be crypto currencies and work with the same benefits and cryptocurrency as well. How does the company differ from pay pal or van mo- circle different? Let's say there a lot of different pieces to what we do as a company and actually one of the most important things to understand it that kind of payment as utility. We actually don't think there's a business model and payments. We think that payments will go to zero in the same way that, you know, sharing information, it's just a service on the internet or communicating with video is a face service on the internet publishing your opinion globally to anyone is a free service on the internet..

Jeremy AllAire chairman and CEO apple founder Leslie twenty years
"bright cove" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:29 min | 2 years ago

"bright cove" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Chairman and CEO of circle Jeremy AllAire, he saw the possibilities of the internet while still in school and founded his first company with his brother called AllAire and early pioneer in the web platform that he eventually to public. He then created bright cove and online video platform used by media organizations worldwide that he also took public in two thousand twelve the following year. He saw the future of money and founded circle consumer internet company who stated mission is to make possible for anyone anywhere to help change the global economy, he joins me now for a closer, look German. You said that you're ridge no interest in the internet. Was from around nineteen ninety when he saw a decentralized network could guess intermediate governments and media companies. You don't have a degree in engineering business, but political science so how did you wind up in technolog-? Yeah. Thanks. You know, I started tinkering with technology when I was young. I was sort of one of these kids. I was lucky that we had an apple two in our house and nineteen eighties. But it really was in in in nineteen ninety when I was in college that I also lucky in that I got access to a high speed internet connection in my dorm room. And it was just a transformative experience to connect to open decentralized, network and information and communications could move freely. It was obviously not. The internet. We know today, but the fundamental the fundamental model of this open. Global permission list network was there, and it was very self evident to me into that inspired me to learn as much as I can about the technology, which which I did in the doing years in two thousand and thirteen co-founded circle which started I as a consumer finance company using the blockchain technology. What exactly is circle pay? An how's it changed since it w did in two thousand and thirteen when we started the company in in two thousand and thirteen we had been very excited about inspired by cryptocurrency. And by what it suggested to us about what the future of global financial system would look like and having watched the prior twenty years where decentralized open networks transformed how. The information industries. Workout information broadly could be exchanged and utilize globally. We thought that the very similar happening in the world of finance and money. We wanted to build a new kind of global financial institution, but build it all on top of the cryptocurrency infrastructure, and and really continue are continuing to pursue that. When we started building, the first pieces of our platform in two thousand and thirteen in two thousand fourteen the technology was pretty limited. Then you really just had bitcoin and. A lot of the things that we wanted to do eventually alike. Represent more elaborate forms of financial assets create contracts around those assets, those were things that were conceptually possible. But no one had really implemented the technology for them. So when we started we really started with how could we create an experience her people to be able to pay anyone anywhere and exchange value with anyone anywhere in the same way that we can exchange content instantly globally fiction, Leslie and without cost. And we we did that initially by building on top of the bitcoin network. And we did that with dollars euros and pounds at the starting currencies. And that's obviously evolved that the product still allows people to make those kind of fiction lists in payments between people, but the technology instead of bitcoin, we've been moving our own architecture to what are called stable coins or taking traditional government issued money be money and token icing it and allowing dollars and other currencies to actually be crypto currencies and work with the same benefits of cryptocurrency as well. How does the company differ from pay pal or van MO house circle different say there, there's a lot of different pieces to what we do as a company and actually one of the most important things to understand that kind of payment as the we actually don't think there's a business model and payments? We think that payments will go to zero in the same way that, you know, sharing information, it's just a pre service on the internet or communicating with video is a feature on the internet publishing..

Jeremy AllAire Chairman and CEO apple technolog Leslie twenty years
"bright cove" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"bright cove" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Jarrett. Thank you so much eight mixed day, certainly here in the US equity markets. But let's see where the action is and small caps. We bring in Bloomberg stocks editor Dave Wilson with the latest. Well, there's definitely action Paul no question and a clear direction for smaller company shares and it's down the Russell two thousand index lower by one percent while the s&p hundreds only off by a tenth of a percent. The Russell's steepest drop belongs to consolidate a communications, whose ticker is C N S L. The phone company has tumbled twenty six percent after scrapping its dividend. Now, this path had been maintains his company went public back in two thousand five marine. Max ticker, h zero has dropped fifteen percent first-quarter earnings at the seller of recreational boats trail average estimate and Bloomberg survey. Marine Max's annual profit. Forecasts also came up short of projections and exploration companies that focus on California are lower after the introduction of a Bill in the state assembly. That would potentially curtail drilling. You've got berry petroleum ticker B, R Y down about eleven and a half percent in California resources, ticker CRC, down fourteen percent now one of the Russel's. Biggest gains belongs to bright cove, ticker. It's up thirteen and a half percent. The video software maker had a narrower loss last quarter than analysts predicted as sales beat estimates and oil states international ticket. Oh, I ask is up almost twelve percent. Similar story at the oilfield services company. First quarter results where they narrow loss and higher revenue than analysts expected. Bloomberg stuck Senator Dave Wilson. Thank you so much for that. This is Bloomberg.

Bloomberg California Senator Dave Wilson Dave Wilson US Jarrett. Paul editor Russel twenty six percent fourteen percent fifteen percent twelve percent one percent
"bright cove" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

03:41 min | 2 years ago

"bright cove" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"It's it's it's awesome. Then eventually go back and move everybody out and bring in new people. I'll let you do the Kremlinology of apple in there. That's. But all all big businesses. Have that issue organizations that issue house virtue? I house box media doing. Great. How do you feel about Facebook Facebook on my phone anymore? So you you you are someone who who has spent a lot of time creating content specifically for other platforms for a long time, YouTube, Facebook, etc. When did you realize, hey, that's not gonna work for or maybe is it still working for in retrospect, I would have bet harder on YouTube faster. And there was an when those conversations every media company, really hard. Do you? Do you pay bright cove and run the thing on your on site, or do you just like take less money in fraud in video player, the most well, some of, you know, about, but yeah, I if you clicked on a verge video for long time, it was a bright go. Yeah. One of them's tiresome arguments in the history of this company was like he is bright cover super dumb. No, one cares. I wish we had made the audience faster. And I think you know, we didn't because it's gonna find there. But that's where the audience is. That's where the ecosystem is. That's where the watching of our kind. Videos happening that just happened organically. Yeah. We because he's the biggest video services the world's biggest. That's where they are. We should go there should figure out a business there that works for us. One thing that we're challenged by is that we won't do direct sponsorships like we're journalistic organization, so like other YouTubers and of money because they will hold up the phone case. Here's a Samsung, whatever. Yeah. Yeah. Like this Samsung phone, I'm doing is in someone else's case, you can buy we we just want to do it. So we have some more challenges. But like, I totally respect factor. Do that make money the Facebook that we made a circuit breaker, we made it. Do I wish we hadn't put any effort in the Facebook ever in our lives? Of course, it do. We made a tiny bet the people there would want catch. It's we like shaved off part of our brand to put it there medium worked circuit breakers, still exists. It's it as a label on our side. It's a permission slip for people to write silly things like assets, I think it's important piece of what we do. Do. I think that we have all seen Facebook coming that. It would never figure this out. I re I do. Yeah. Like, I just think Google is a company wants stuff like they want content. They have a lot of problems there an information ingestion organization, whereas Facebook is an advertising organization two more questions where you you're. You're you guys started off as a gadget blog rent the roots of this company airing in gadget gadget blog is that still the core of what you guys do sort of extra core. We there's a new whatever we wanna tell you about whatever. Or is that now sort of a vessel part of your content? No, it's the heart of it. I think there are less. Things that are vast interest. Right. That's one ought to get to if we're no longer excited about the new iphone, right? And we just fundamentally aren't where does that leave someone like the company? Well, so people are still really excited often just really excited about the new galaxy Esten isn't the audience for like when you guys do a rollout thing like steadily decreasing. No, it's it's it's very high. But flat. Okay. Right. So it's like, I think we've maxed out. So when there's a new iphone whatever event, there's still a lot people tuning in to learn about it. But that number is not growing anymore. Yeah. Our joke from this last event was people care about with Apple's new hardware. And so the credit card was the most popular because. Piece of hardware titania. So whenever apple has the armored massive audience, right? Whenever Samsung Google has new products massive audience. I think our mission with the gadget coverage in particular is to say, hey, they're still innovation this world..

Facebook Samsung apple YouTube fraud
"bright cove" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"bright cove" Discussed on The Vergecast

"It's it's it's awesome than eventually go back and move everybody out and bring in new people. I'll let you do the criminology of apple in who works there. But all all big businesses. Have that issue organizations that issue house virtually on first-degree house box media doing great? How do you feel about Facebook Facebook on my phone anymore? So you you you are someone who who has spent a lot of time creating content specifically for other platforms for a long time, YouTube, Facebook, etc. When did you realize, hey, that's not gonna work for us. Or maybe is it still working for it in retrospect, I would have bet harder on YouTube faster. And there was I think when those conversations every media company will really hard. Do you? Do you pay bright cove and run the thing on your on site, or do you just like take less money in your frightens? And he does a video player that most. We'll somebody you know about, but yeah. But if you clicked on a verge video for longtime. It was a bright go play one of them is tiresome arguments in the history of this company was like bright cover like super dumb. No, one cares. I wish we had made the audience YouTube faster. And I think we didn't because it's gone fine there. But that's where the audience is. That's where the ecosystem is that's where the watching of our kind of videos happening that just happened organically. Yeah. We because it's the biggest video service, the world's Vegas. It's like that's where they are. We should go there should figure out a business there that works for us. One thing that we're challenged by is that we won't do direct sponsorships like we're journalistic organization, so like other YouTubers money because they will hold up the phone case. Here's a Samsung, whatever. Yeah. Yeah. Like, this Samsung phone number viewing isn't someone else's case. You can buy what we we just want to do it..

YouTube Facebook Samsung apple Vegas
"bright cove" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"bright cove" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"The threes. One eighty weight loss brings us the four day WBZ AccuWeather forecast. Dave Samuel is. Here. We had the stormy weather yesterday. We got a little bit coming in tomorrow. We're kind of stuck in the middle here with a bit of sunshine. Nice day today high pressure overhead, but it's a little breezy and cold out. There. Temperatures are still in the twenties, and we have wind gusts over twenty miles per hour. We'll go up a few more degrees, but it will be cold right through the afternoon with a gusty wind. The high thirty two out there in downtown Boston night tonight under a clear sky. Everybody will be back down into the teens. That's mar we'll be seeing some increase in cloud, cover and other cold one upper twenties and lower thirties. And then we'll have some snow moving in tomorrow night. That'll change to rain downtown Boston near the coast after one to three inches, but we could see an extended period of freezing rain for a few places inland, but everybody will warm up by Thursday morning effect temperatures that soar through. The forties. We'll approach fifty downtown Boston Thursday afternoon stays mild Friday and this weekend, which is in the forties. I'm AccuWeather meteorologist Dave Samuel WBZ. Boston's NewsRadio Fitchburg twenty two degrees. Bedford twenty four degrees. Gloucester twenty-five, and it is twenty eight degrees in Boston. It's finally February. Have you lost the weight you set out to lose this new year? This Dan Rae. If not don't give up it is possible. You just need the right program. One that's customized for you and has worked for me, and thousands of others awaken. One eighty weight loss dot com. Twelve twenty five it is time to check New England business here's Jeff after nearly two hundred years in business. There's got to be a lot of stuff coming out of the cobwebs of Durgin park restaurants, more than two hundred items are on the auction block this week owner. Arc restaurants closing the iconic facility in Quincy market last month, central mass auctions taking bids online through tomorrow, the robots are coming and they want your job city group says artificial. Intelligence is about to take over tens of thousands of positions at its US, call centers, we should have seen this coming. The company spends eight billion a year on technology. Bloomberg's Peggy Collins says this is a good idea for city group. But it does come with a cost technology is going to help us cut costs and enable us to do to to continue to grow. But that also involves getting technology to work really quickly. The financial times reports the move to robots will get this improve the customer service experience a once upon a time they duked it out in court. Now, the one time legal foes are about to work together. Boston digital software company. Bright cove, buying out west coast online video company Yala, the price tag is fifteen million the California based company helps clients figure out ways to monetize online video it wants sued. It's streaming rival for stealing trade secrets. That's New England business. Jeff Brown WBZ. Boston's NewsRadio twelve twenty seven straight ahead on W..

Boston Jeff Brown WBZ US Dave Samuel WBZ Dave Samuel New England Dan Rae Durgin park California Gloucester Bloomberg Quincy Peggy Collins twenty eight degrees twenty four degrees twenty two degrees two hundred years three inches
"bright cove" Discussed on Mixergy

Mixergy

03:09 min | 2 years ago

"bright cove" Discussed on Mixergy

"If I'm gonna do something in this space next. And so he build lose it as a way to do that, you know in. So he was really satisfied when he built the first earth news like this great. I understand I development. I understand this platform. Again, lose it off the ground really successful. So like mission accomplished. Know, we both were working on the same problem. He was just doing it a lot smarter than that's why. That's why he's always bailing and his brothers. Also is his brother Jeremy dealer, the founder of circle the digital currency company. He's on the board of bright cove. Is that right? Yes. Jeremy's another on very prominent here in Boston. He found a bright cove, which is a publicly traded company. He was one of the founders of layer corporations. Well, we traded company. A now he's on circle. So he's he's on he's on a Rana's. Well, okay. All right. I get it. And so he didn't wanna do this. Did he just wanna handed to you? Or was he looking for someone who'd be a partner, I think he was really looking at it off. And so he was I was looking for an opportunity we work together for so long that I think he was thinking I've got some other ideas for companies that I'm gonna be working on. So I just wanted to I want someone I could trust ache over this and of shepherd along enhanced or sell it to you. Handed to split it with me. You wanted to apartment ship exotic done so much work that that needed to be needed accounted for what was the partnership. How much would you get how much would he get? What else? That's probably where I probably would not talk. Fifty fifty point. Are we? No, I think was very equitable. Okay. And was it the type of thing that you would have to spend time on and build up your ownership stake? No. He was pretty good actually about outlining a young trying to make sure that I had enough interest in the company that I was going to be very invested in making a successful guy. And so he got that right away. My ownership did best. So I had a typical scheduled just like anyone would if it was just time. It was time. And we both have very similar. I think goals and objectives for how been about this company. We really saw the stuff. So I don't think there was much concern that I was gonna do anything to to out of control a lot of people created apps couldn't get downloads many people who got download couldn't figure out revenue took you awhile to figure out both in one of the first things you did was help get users. And then I wanna think about that. Now. Someone ask you about how you got a revenue, but let me take a moment. Talk about my first spa. Answer. It's a company called top towel. Charles juno. Towel. Yeah. Absolutely top rates. How do you know Cal will, you know, cause we're always trying to find Bella pers-? And so so we're, you know, we're constantly trying to figure out where we're gonna find the next. Great developer ends. Okay. Everything that can help us with that. So you've checked out top cow. Let me ask you this. Instead of doing the commercial top Cal. What's one like thing that have smart developer helped you with that in ordinary developer even a team of ordinary developers? Could I want to highlight the the the way that you've worked with with good developers? What a good developers brought to you and your projects in the past..

Jeremy founder developer Boston Charles juno Cal Bella pers partner
"bright cove" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"bright cove" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Luca Messa lira, you are the chief architect design and yen Choi, you are principal engineer at design. You've also been on the show several times to talk about various service efforts and companies you've worked at guys. Welcome software and Jane daily, thank Jeff 'cause you can just yes good to talk to you as well. Those shows we've done in the past have been really popular. And I'm looking forward to exploring technical issues with you once again, so does own where you guys both work is a live streaming platform for fight fans, so boxing, for example, is something that is live streamed on dissolve on. Why is live streaming a hard technical problem? That's a good question. The first of all we need to explain it to be better. Will we will? These our aim in zone. Dust will understand the wise that difficult so zoom was greeted Frears ago and Kodak. We have only seven markets. If we are not just the streaming a fighting matches days start law firm, so will be the best from which country. We are. We're streaming Buffoni societally, we have Syria on rights. We have is the main who will rise that you can have in Italy. I mean, Germany primarily we have Champions League county. We have NFL zal, let's say our blasphemies vita better reach on that side, but for each single country, we have different rights of able in the case of US. We have a low actually rides on around fighting cloth and demanding when you winning work on these kinds of things he's going to be the shoes. Definitely. There are quite a few challenges in order to have Euler content from stadium from the beach of soccer beach, who did the vice that the user these watching the content because as you can imagine that transformation a lot of changes that are happening in individual liberty pipeline, and therefore the cups that in at any given point and also. Phone citizens, put a view as well the conscious. Hey, sorting guy. So down his company hopping out open the Faisali finished. So we have to put it on f making sure that our platform is up especially during those really crucial half may two hours in disposing. You've any such happening live streaming has become a popular way of consuming content. You could imagine live streaming platforms for lots of different verticals, not just fights not even just sports. But also for well, you see this on twitch. Of course, people are live streaming all kinds of stuff. Why hasn't this been commoditised? Why is there not some off the shelf live streaming technology? I think he's very complex area that one and everyone is trying to find a Super Bowl at obviously is very difficult because I think is very different. Also, the source of tweets, for instance, or when you will try to have live streaming from another computer that is showing the game. Whatever in our case, you have to be my the our company started with the broadcast of background. And therefore, we have a lot of broadcaster awkward that in certain ways of sedating Goss. But at the same time that wear some decisions that didn't allow us to scale as quickly as possible on all the brand new comedy. So there is also on our side. A lot of foolish move at a lot of things on the cloud from on Prem solutions, and that will speed up the possibility for us to make our VW, right? By blinds Luther we'd or monitoring place and having the Optima bathroom what use us. There are some AWS services that help with video. There's also services like bright cove, there's mocks is solving for video delivery the same as solving for live streaming video. I the big difference on delivering VOD content. So mad and. And the live content because as as suggested we need to doing the live event, we need to be modestly always bailable and provide the best experience possible..

chief architect design US Luca Messa lira yen Choi Frears soccer Jane Kodak Syria Luther principal Jeff Italy Champions League county Prem solutions NFL Goss Germany
"bright cove" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"bright cove" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"To you in this mba report with us is the owner of compass rose video jeannie part a lot of companies are recognising that it's really important to have a presence where are sharing a story and reaching their customers in attracting new customers by having short storytelling videos on social media and on their websites for the business person but is seen videos would have been implemented into their business plan how important is it video is extremely important today anybody who's fans anytime on social media will see that there's just a ton of video now what used to just be some tax maybe some images like to share some statistics about why video is so important enjoyment of video ads increase purchase intent by ninety seven percent so customers intending to buy your products by ninety seven percent and brand association by 100 and thirty nine percent in that's by an organization called unruly by 20 18 seventy nine percent of all content online we'll be video and that's by real seo social video video you see on social media gets shared twelve 100 percent more than links to websites and text combined and that's by bright cove i got one more for your 96 percent of beat ob organizations used video in some capacity of which seventy three percent report positive results to their roy choose the over of couple's rules video ginny what is the best way pupil dream reach you take a look at our website at www u dot com rose video dot com if you want to reach out directly we can email me at genie that j e a and as a nancy why at compass like the navigational instrument compass rose video dot com this has been another kbnp business report to find out more about portland's lead business organization we have virtually call them at 503 two to three six nine seven the paris climate accord and our president's decision to bail out it it has a lot to do with the environment of course it has a lot to do with gardening that don't wanna make anybody mad climate change is real is it manmade climate change probably it is i'm not one of these people who were stupid enough to.

social media roy portland president climate change paris ninety seven percent 20 18 seventy nine percent seventy three percent thirty nine percent twelve 100 percent 96 percent
"bright cove" Discussed on Calls with Chris Smith

Calls with Chris Smith

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"bright cove" Discussed on Calls with Chris Smith

"Rana report from the last twelve months and you look at the percentage of each page you know we do this for companies all the time you only have like 5 to 10 money pages and then the 5 to 10 percent of your articles blow up so i think it's smart i think the future is doing less content its way better and to get a lease and to get a client you need time onsite unique page views per visitor so i would much rather have five thousand people visit and spend five minutes than five million people visited spend five seconds so one of the biggest thing i saw was actually a company called bright cove and fading landing page is just like ask but their main goal is to video so right when you click on a landing page it's actually a video sites plane and on right on the side of that it has the opportunity for you to sign up videos as a lead magnet were great is it a background wallpaper kind of a video and has the ability to like at the very bottom strip there's even more like related videos that they could click on lead pages was here unbalances here brajkovic i've never heard of we do landing page is a curator so landing pages are huge 48 percent of marketers use a new landing page with every campaign hubs spa put out great data the companies that have forty or more landing pages generate 10 times more leads in companies with one to five landing pages i think that that is probably the trend there for me with the conversion and traveling in teaching you know i say landing pages or the new black people kind of me this occurs on brand new and business i got nothing going on what should i do what do i really need to at least some deals and i don't even say a website you need a facebook ads with the landing page in a phone i was scary attracted to bringing brown's speech about authenticity and the idea that if you're authentic you sort of belong everywhere on the end you know i just think has the company as a whole team members.

brown Rana video sites facebook twelve months five minutes five seconds 10 percent 48 percent
"bright cove" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:32 min | 4 years ago

"bright cove" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Three the euro one nine eighty nine the found one twenty nine sixty one all to the us dollar quickly europe the foot seas up sixtenths of a percent the backs in germany's of four tenths of a percent in the captain paris is up nine tenths of one percent that's a bloomberg business flash police and pen with bloomberg markets continues thanks very much greg jarrett it's time now to turn to dave wilson bloomberg stocks columnist and blogger at em live go on the bloomberg and remember to send dave an email at dwilson bloombergnet sign up for his daily free email newsletter it will help make you a smarter investor and also showcase some of the work that is going on professional analysts and securities experts when it comes to the stock market dave wilson tell us about the russell two thousand the russell two thousand we're looking at small and mid cap sight see that it's down about well point seven six points which is basically unchanged were you want to start gainers her losers the way i'm look at the russell it's actually out the tad early now i it's showing in between gains and losses today we we can say that for sure what do bright covert you going to go where you're going to go with the the rest well you are talking about bright cove absolutely it's the stock that has the steepest drop in the russell today down thirty three and a half percent bright codes of video software maker the tickers b c o v company had a wider first quarter losses analysts expected based on bloomberg survey they have national sent a media they provide live of events and other programming movie theaters ticker nc am i it's down twenty four percent they had a wider loss.

us paris greg jarrett bloomberg stock market software maker germany dave wilson dwilson bloombergnet bloomberg twenty four percent one percent