18 Burst results for "Brigham Women's Hospital"

"brigham women hospital" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

03:07 min | 2 months ago

"brigham women hospital" Discussed on Cardionerds

"Thought we could start by discussing some of your major contributions to the management of atrial fibrillation even since my medical school days. It seems like the emphasis. On lifestyle management for diseases such as atrial fibrillation has increased exponentially as we learn more about arrhythmia mechanisms and now we specifically screen patients for sleep apnea diet alcohol use et cetera. So from all of the landmark clinical research that you've conducted over your career. That's far could you. Maybe summarize for us. What you feel are the biggest takeaways whether in eighth hundred prevention or in any of your other areas that sudden cardiac death. Thank you when i started doing. Research on the epidemiology of heart rhythm disorders really wasn't an emphasis as you say on. Risk factors for h. fibrillation or sudden cardiac death. And then you know a group of us not just myself but amelia benjamin in the premium study and patrick eleanor. We all started to get interested in looking at atrial fibrillation as you would cardiovascular disease and some of the major findings are really related to lifestyle and how it can impact each relation including body mass index. And wait and wait reduction. We've done several studies. One who first authors tetreault who's also electro physiologist at brigham women's hospital and she published a very important study in jack. Where we showed in bunks women. Even being slightly overweight had elevated to risk of fibrillation. And then if you lost weight you lower that risk. And in addition some of the other research we did was around. Exercise and showing that exercise is beneficial to atrial fibrillation. But as we all know too much. Exercise can actually have an adverse effect and this again was a study that was done by tony acer who was also an electro physiologist and his now at nyu worked with me for a while. So both of those manuscripts were very important. With regards management of atrial fibrillation. In addition we also published one of the first studies looking at alcohol intake and h fibrillation. Now there have been multiple multiple studies showing that alcohol is related to atrial fibrillation. And as you know a randomized trial now that shows that if you abstained from alcohol you lower your risk of atrial fibrillation so all of these studies are not just by myself but multiple. Investigators have really changed the practice where we as clinicians think about lowering. Risk factors as electra physiologists event and approach sanders. Work in australia really took it to another level by actually doing clinical trial in showing that reduction of weight and modifying risk factors lowers incidence of atrial fibrillation. So now it's really one of our pillars of treatment and it is rewarding to see something go from observational research to clinical trials in actually to

hundreds of millions san antonio texas dr. Helen taussig At harvard university iran ut health ask
Managing Atrial Fibrillation With Lifestyle Changes Dr. Christine Albert

Cardionerds

03:07 min | 2 months ago

Managing Atrial Fibrillation With Lifestyle Changes Dr. Christine Albert

"Thought we could start by discussing some of your major contributions to the management of atrial fibrillation even since my medical school days. It seems like the emphasis. On lifestyle management for diseases such as atrial fibrillation has increased exponentially as we learn more about arrhythmia mechanisms and now we specifically screen patients for sleep apnea diet alcohol use et cetera. So from all of the landmark clinical research that you've conducted over your career. That's far could you. Maybe summarize for us. What you feel are the biggest takeaways whether in eighth hundred prevention or in any of your other areas that sudden cardiac death. Thank you when i started doing. Research on the epidemiology of heart rhythm disorders really wasn't an emphasis as you say on. Risk factors for h. fibrillation or sudden cardiac death. And then you know a group of us not just myself but amelia benjamin in the premium study and patrick eleanor. We all started to get interested in looking at atrial fibrillation as you would cardiovascular disease and some of the major findings are really related to lifestyle and how it can impact each relation including body mass index. And wait and wait reduction. We've done several studies. One who first authors tetreault who's also electro physiologist at brigham women's hospital and she published a very important study in jack. Where we showed in bunks women. Even being slightly overweight had elevated to risk of fibrillation. And then if you lost weight you lower that risk. And in addition some of the other research we did was around. Exercise and showing that exercise is beneficial to atrial fibrillation. But as we all know too much. Exercise can actually have an adverse effect and this again was a study that was done by tony acer who was also an electro physiologist and his now at nyu worked with me for a while. So both of those manuscripts were very important. With regards management of atrial fibrillation. In addition we also published one of the first studies looking at alcohol intake and h fibrillation. Now there have been multiple multiple studies showing that alcohol is related to atrial fibrillation. And as you know a randomized trial now that shows that if you abstained from alcohol you lower your risk of atrial fibrillation so all of these studies are not just by myself but multiple. Investigators have really changed the practice where we as clinicians think about lowering. Risk factors as electra physiologists event and approach sanders. Work in australia really took it to another level by actually doing clinical trial in showing that reduction of weight and modifying risk factors lowers incidence of atrial fibrillation. So now it's really one of our pillars of treatment and it is rewarding to see something go from observational research to clinical trials in actually to

Atrial Fibrillation Cardiac Death Amelia Benjamin Patrick Eleanor Tetreault Brigham Women's Hospital Apnea Tony Acer Cardiovascular Disease NYU Sanders Australia
"brigham women hospital" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

02:27 min | 5 months ago

"brigham women hospital" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

"Make people lose track of like why we even bother testing which is a bad idea but But we're already seeing that we have this amazing capacity to To bolt do damage when we don't intend to do damage And and then also to pull up when we need to pull up you know. Stop complete catastrophe and so I it's and we are an interesting species in that way. that's for sure. So there's a lot of young folks undergrads grads They're also young crowd. Listen to this. Oh is there. If you've talked about a lot of fascinating stuff that's like there's ways that things are done and there's actual solutions in. They're not always like intersecting. Do you have a device for a undergraduate students or graduate students or even people in high school now about A life about career. How they might be able to solve real big problems in the world how they should live their life in order to have a chance to solve big problems in the world. it's hard. I struggled a little bit sometimes to give advice because the advice that i give from my own personal experiences necessarily distinct from the advice that would make other people successful. I have Unending ambitions to make things better. I suppose and i don't see i don't see barricades were people's sometimes barricades Now even just little things like when this virus started on the medical director at brigham women's hospital so i oversee or helped oversee molecular virology diagnostics So in this virus started wearing my epidemiology hat wearing my sort of viral outbreak hat. I recognize that this is going to be big virus. That was important at a global level. Even if the cdc in who weren't ready to admit that it was a pandemic was obvious and january that it was a pandemic so i started trying to get a test built at at the brigham which is one of harvard's hospitals. I you know the first Encounters i had with the upper administration of the hospital. Where pretty much know. Why would we do that. That's silly who are you. You know and i said well okay. I don't believe me sure But i kept pushing on it and then Eventually i got them to agree. It was really only a couple of weeks before the biogen conference happened. We sort of building the test I think they are looking abroad. And saying okay..

brigham women's hospital harvard's hospitals upper administration of the ho cdc brigham biogen
"brigham women hospital" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"brigham women hospital" Discussed on WTOP

"Five ninety five each pretty quiet as far south as Fredericksburg and no delays to report in either direction on sixty six popular WTOP traffic you're strong team for four day forecast we check in with Matt returning Dimitri I'd say about two thirds of his right now are finished with the study room light rain that we had for most of the day and really is just a couple of very light showers and some drizzle left over it's gonna be chilly overnight tonight dampen Robert temperatures are gonna fall all that much we're gonna kinda hold in the forties would be surprised if we start getting some fog forming after midnight to that's something we'll have to keep an eye on at any rate a few more showers we moving through in the morning not quite covering as many areas as today's rain did about us regardless the showers will be ending by tomorrow afternoon we're not gonna clear out to leave pretty cloudy week will stay over cast tomorrow it will be milder than today high school in up in the mid fifties for most of us near sixty degrees in parts of the southern listening area closer to I. sixty four then for Wednesday cloudy back to the cooler temperatures on northerly winds and some steady rain like we had today will rise in late in the day with highs in the mid upper forties that rail continue Wednesday night the taper off Thursday morning Thursday breezy miles impartial clearing that'll help get us into the low to mid sixties but then a strong arctic cold front will move through Thursday night Friday partly sunny blustery much colder and much drier highs will be in the upper thirties to low forties forty three right now in Leesburg forty eight letter town also forty eight Washington Reagan national forty six degrees here in friendship heights brought to buy new look home his sign get fifty percent off all roofing materials new look home design dot com take twenty your health sponsored by the DC department of health and annual vaccination is the best defense against the flu one quarter of kids who get antibiotics in U. S. children's hospitals are given the drugs inappropriately which increases the risk of antibiotic resistance that research comes from Washington university in Saint Louis in a separate piece of research published in health affairs journal scientists look at how antibiotics are prescribed to Medicaid patients between two thousand four and twenty thirteen and they found a lot of these drugs are prescribed without the patient being examined we talk about this with doctor Michael Fisher of Harvard Medical School and Brigham women's hospital about what he and his team learned such a large fraction older one quarter of all of the antibiotics prescribed to this national population over several years happened without the patient coming in and having a visit with the doctor and we felt that that was an area that.

Fredericksburg
"brigham women hospital" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"brigham women hospital" Discussed on Science Friday

"That says science Friday high my replay to- inactive ingredients you've seen them on the back of that bottle of aspirin. You have at home or box of allergy medication. You're purchasing here is zoom right by them. Right. As you're looking for the dosage or list of side effects. You don't give them a second thought. Because what they're called inactive ingredients. That means. They don't do anything. Right. Well, a lot look a little bit closely at those inactive ingredients and you'll find they include things like peanut oil lactose and gluten and in fact as a new study out this week shows over ninety percent of medications have. Active ingredients that a really active that can cause allergic reactions in certain patients here to tell us what to make of all of this is one of the authors of that study, Dr Giovanni Traverso assistant professor at Brigham women's hospital hovered mid school and the department of mechanical engineering and MIT Dr traverse a welcome back to science Friday. No, thanks so much for having me. So what else is my blood pressure? Medication? Not that. Doing for me. Besides the medicine it self what what compounds kind compounds you find in these inactive ingredients. I mean, I think it's really fascinating. I mean, what what will you find that? This was sort of is something that, you know, I came across a few years ago, and you know, one of the things that we set out to do in. The study is really analyze exactly what else is in there. And you know, an average we find that about seventy five percent of tablets and capsules are actually occupied by these inactive ingredients. And I'm, you know, typically on average they're about eight other, you know, ingredients in in in that capsule and sometimes up to thirty five, and you mentioned earlier, you know, their ingredients like lactose, sometimes starch, which can be wheat derived. So hence, the potential for gluten in some instances also even peanut oil, but you know, many other, you know, they're over a thousand chemicals that can won't continues from you know, to really help make that that that capsule. So why did the pharmaceutical companies if they know this kind of stuff? I mean, they know that people are allergic to lactose, and we peanuts. Why did they do? They put them inside the pills. I, you know, I think one thing that really emphasize here is that the these inactive ingredients are actually really important. So I think by no means always adjusting that they'd be removed, and they play a critical role with respect to this ability of that tablet, or capsule, you know, the appearance potentially, you know, modulating taste or even enhancing absorption, or even, you know, preventing tamper proofing, and you know, likely the reason that we have some of these ingredients is, you know, for his talk historical reasons, where we've seen some of these work to actually facilitate the the, you know, those parameters in in in in the pills. But certainly as awareness increases, you know, it's something that I think we're all starting to appreciate hopefully, more and more. And I, you know, I think hopefully, we're getting more focus around what should be included. And can we find alternatives in some situations? And you think that there are alternatives that could be -absolutely, you know. And if you take drugs, you know, dr- drugs that are now, John. Eric, for example, members all which is used for the treatment of reflux or also treatments. You know? There are many different formulations of map result. So for example, you know, the physician like I will prescribe let's say members all twenty milligrams once a day or twice a day. But that the at that does, you know there there can be over thirty or forty different formulations of of a map result twenty milligrams and my formulation. I mean, you know, the composition of the inactive ingredients. So you one might find ones that have lower amounts of lactose or no lack those and others that may have lactose. And so, you know, certainly there are alternatives, and and, you know, for some drugs there are many alternatives for others are few, you know, sometimes when I go to the drugstore, and I have a medication limb..

Brigham women aspirin Dr Giovanni Traverso assistant professor Eric John seventy five percent ninety percent
"brigham women hospital" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:32 min | 2 years ago

"brigham women hospital" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Here is zoom right by them. Right. As you're looking for the dosage or list of side effects. You don't give them a second thought. Because what they're called inactive ingredients. That means. They don't do anything. Right. Well and lot look a little bit closely at those inactive ingredients and you'll find they include things like peanut oil lactose, and gluten and in fact has a new study out this week shows over ninety percent of medications have inactive ingredients that a really active they can cause allergic reactions in certain patients here to tell us what to make of all of this is one of the authors of that study, Dr Giovanni Traverso assistant professor at Brigham women's hospital Harvard med school and the department of mechanical engineer. Airing and MIT, Dr Taveras Ariza, welcome back to science Friday. Now. Thanks so much for having me. So what else is my blood pressure medication? Doing for me. Besides the medicine itself. What what compounds kind of compounds you finding in these inactive ingredients. I I mean, I think it's really fascinating. I mean, what what we find. And this is sort of is something that I came across a few years ago. And you know, one of the things that we we set out to do in. The study is really analyze exactly what else is in there. And you know, an average we find out about seventy five percent of tablets and capsules are actually occupied by these inactive ingredients. And, you know, typically on on average there are about eight other ingredients in the in that capital and sometimes up to thirty five, and as you mentioned earlier there ingredients like lactose sometimes starch, which can be derived. And so had, you know, the potential for gluten and some instances also even peanut oil, but many other, you know, they're over a thousand chemicals that can can choose from you know, to really help make that that capsule. So why did the pharmaceutical companies if they know this kind? Stuff. I mean, they know that people are allergic to lactose sweetened peanuts. Why did they did? They put them inside the pills. Yeah. I think one thing that really emphasized here is that the active ingredients, actually, really important. So I think by no means are we suggesting that they be removed, and they play a critical role with respect to this stability of that tablet or capsule, you know, the appearance, but actually modulating taste or even enhancing absorption or even providing tamper-proofing, and you know, likely the reason that we have some of these ingredients is know for his talk historical regions, where we've seen some of these work to actually facilitate though, the, you know, those parameters in in in the pills. But certainly the weirdness increases, you know. It's something that I think we're all starting to appreciate hopefully, more and more. And I, you know, I think hopefully, we're getting mellow more focused around what should be included. And can we find alternatives in some situations? And you think that there are alternatives that could be absolutely, you know, and if you take drugs drugs that are now. Generic, for example, which is used for the treatment of reflux or also treatments. You know? There are many different formulations of America's also, for example, you know, the physician like I will prescribe let's say members all twenty milligrams once a day or twice a day. But that the at that does there there can be over thirty or forty different formulations of of America's all twenty milligrams and my formulation. I mean, you know, the composition of the inactive ingredients. So you one might find ones that have lower amounts of lactose or no lactose and others that may have lactose. And so, you know, certainly there are alternatives, and and you know, for some drugs there are many alternatives for others are a few. You know, sometimes when I go to the drugstore, and I have a medication lamb getting in the drug has, you know, I have a different manufacturer is making that same drug, and we're using that now that could have other ingredients in it that I'm not used to from the first drugstore from the first pharmaceutical company. That. That's exactly right. You know? And I think, you know, I mean, myself included and colleagues, you know, we've we've seen situations where you know, similar experiences. Have you know, that that our patients have have had where exactly as you mentioned, you know, the manufacturer changes, and and actually manifesting and actually new symptoms potentially. And and I think that's hopefully by raising awareness that you know, there are inactive ingredients in these and capsules that they may be the culprit behind him. Speaking speaking of your colleagues when you found out the ninety percent of the medications had these ingredients in them. What was your reactions from your prescribing colleagues to this news? Yeah, I think you know, just to take that back on the ninety percent piece are one of the things that we recognize of these inactive ingredients is that they can cause adverse effects, and generally we group them into two groups one is allergic reaction to that sort of Frank allergy as we recognize them today. Whether it be in the extreme like, an NFL lactic reaction Iraq. And then on the other side is sort of intolerances like giant says on the allergy side what we had identified in. This study from the literature is that there are at thirty eight ingredients have been associated with allergies. And if one ask the question, you know, what percentage of capsules contain at least one the answer is indeed, you know, over ninety percent. But I think one thing to emphasize is that those events are rare. But nevertheless. You know, they they are out there, but they are rare. So, you know, I think people still recognize that these events are rare. But you know, I I think just again, I think it's all about raising awareness both at the patient level, and at the healthcare provider level, and I think, you know, I it's it's changing I think how we think about the prescription process and access to the information. So let's say I'm concerned consumer is there any place online that I can check out what you know, what I should be worried about is there a resource. Absolutely. So I think you mentioned at the beginning certainly in the drug insert. So you could check through the tax than you will find some of that information. There's also a database out there called pillbox that has some of that information, you know, but for both know there are a few steps to go through at least arrive at that. And it's one of the things that we see as potentially helping both patients and healthcare providers is developing tools to just make it easier to. To really help identify those ingredients very quickly any even to help quantify the total amount of an ingredient to go back to lactose. If someone is taking let's say ten tablets to at least quickly, you know, figure out how much does that person is consuming from their their their medications alone. And so that's one of the next things were starting to look at. That's you said developing tools, but what do you mean like an app or something like that? Exactly. I think it's absolutely also systems to interface with the 'electronic medical record systems, you know, to really start to help quantify, you know, the the inactive ingredient components interesting. Thank thank you for taking time to be with us today. Dr barroso. Well, thank you for having me on the show. Welcome have a good weekend. Likewise, thank Giovanni Giovinazzo. So is a gastroenterologist at Brigham and women's hospital assistant professor in the department of mechanical engineering and MIT he works both MIT and Harvard at the sancta. My next guest.

MIT Brigham and women assistant professor America Dr Giovanni Traverso Dr Taveras Ariza Giovanni Giovinazzo Dr barroso Brigham women Harvard med school NFL Frank Harvard ninety percent
"brigham women hospital" Discussed on Antidotes, Stories in Medicine

Antidotes, Stories in Medicine

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"brigham women hospital" Discussed on Antidotes, Stories in Medicine

"In the NFC. I think this happened kind of in the middle of the night. But it might have been the middle of the day. Like, I remember being dark room. So I don't know the curtains were drawn or if it was actually nighttime but just chaos, but they put it back in and obviously I calmed down. I think they had it for other maybe day and a half or two days when they took it out the second time, I think it was a little more prepared for it. So I didn't lose my mind to the same degree. But that was because Fisk out the took out the breeding too, but I still had the N G tube announce kind of a fight to get them to take that out. His you know, I was eating a whole ton because I I was traumatized. Yeah. But it's like it's hard to eat with the N D to feels ever got like a piece of spaghetti stuck in your throat. It's at same exact sensation on you can't swallow in you can't cough up ill. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. You just have spaghetti in your all day all night. Yeah. Yeah. So and that was because eating with the N T too flaky you really get that sensation of on choking on something. Because you kind of are like it's in there. Right. Yeah. Bitch about enough that one of my nurses like wanted out. Let's take it out and just pinched it in like yanked it out, right then and there. She's like starting. Yeah. For feisty, nurses. I know like what you wish. And then. Yeah, just. I messed us you a little while ago about something that happened that I think I've is still still intimated. So it was my my surgeon came in kinda check up on me in likes to see how things going zip boats Taylor. And after it lands. I remember the nurse for sure as Dana was her name in Dana at the Brigham. Yeah. Yeah. Six flower. I don't know if she's still think they kind of come and go, but there's Dana that's an RN on the sixth floor Brigham women's hospital in two thousand fifteen minutes hundred thirteen to thirteen. Okay, mid-march dozen farce when I thought it was this July. Oh absurd. I liked doesn't thirteen. All right. So we can find Dana July August, so the surgeon cousins check on me. And I kinda like start like making is at Dana. Hey, hit refining refund. I reach over pretending to pitch the surgeons ask like smack in like, she starts laughing. I like letting his best as he can with a tube down your throat and the surgeon is like he's really straight laced like bowtie type, you know, dislike older man turns around from my giant like three by five stack of I've e- pumps..

Dana Fisk Brigham Taylor two thousand fifteen minutes five stack two days
"brigham women hospital" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

09:07 min | 2 years ago

"brigham women hospital" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"To follow us on Twitter and on Facebook the doctor deli shell. So for those of you who are diabetic, it really sucks being diabetic, really, really sucks. Your body doesn't produce enough. Insulin therapy does the insulin may not be working as well. And then you have to rely on medications, very very strict diet. Check your sugars frequently by poking your skin bleeding onto a little strip and check it out multiple times a day, and for some of you need, insulin injections, and since the dawn of time people have been asking when can there be a pill for insulin? Well, we've had trouble making a pill for insulin. Insulin will completely degrade in the stomach acid, and we need to make sure that you get exact consistent amounts. We need to have the predictability of the amount. You're going to get and we have been unable to figure out how to get insulin to you by the gut route until now. According to AP news. Scientists have figured out how to hide it inside. A piece is pill creating a swallow lable gadget kind of inspired by a tortoiseshell that kind of jets medicines from inside the stomach not only could this work for insulin. But it could also work with other medications. They say patients usually prefer oral treatment comply with a better. But many times he's pills can't survive. The harsh trip going down the digestive system. So this new adventure was reported Thursday by Massachusetts, isn't it of technology. MIT led research team. And it's been tested only an animal so far. But if it works in humans, wow. They say it's like a miniaturized rocket launcher for insulin. Scientists have spent decades trying to develop oral insulin replacing these daily shots. And and I know many of you have actually had to have pumps implanted in you where so you don't have to keep injecting yourself. It just you know. Is already. Fitted already embedded in your skin or it could do the subcutaneous shots for you on its own. But again, that's very it's it's the fact that you still have to have something, you know, put inside your body. I it's it's it's frustrating and foreign. So they've been spending decades trying to develop Orleans Lynn and replace at least some of the daily shots that many people diabetes require. So how do you protect the insulin? From the digestive breakdown. How do you protect it from the acid, you protected from the enzymes so this ingest -able injection could work and it'll allow insulin to absorb through the wall of the stomach. That's according to Dr Giovanni Traverso gastroenterologist at Boston Brigham women's hospital. They say the way this works as a travels down, these SAFA guess in seconds is the stomach within a few minutes when you get the drug. So basically it has to land in the right spot. Even if you're moving around, so they said a tortoise the leopard tortoise from Africa. Can run if it gets flipped onto its back. Flip over, you know, people always wonder. Okay. Well, you know, if tortoises flip over like if they're having sex or whatever not that. That's how. Sex stores other other back how do they get back on their feet? So apparently, they studied the leopard tortoise in Africa. And they said it could right itself if it's flipped onto its back because it's got a special steep curve to a shell. So researchers crafted a miniature capsule with a similar shape and a weighted volume. So that once it reaches the stomach, it will automatically roll into the right direction to latch on. So. So do you get that it has one area on it that will administer the medicine? I mean, you would think something all completely round would work, but I guess it doesn't necessarily. But so it needs the part that has the injectable unit to be able to face the tissue. So they had to engineer it such that, it could roll and whatever. Then the team designed a micro injector like a needle only made of dried insulin compressor to sharper point. So this micro injection to be super small so to power what they did is they bound a tiny spring to a hardened sugar disks. So basically there's sugar holding it back once that sugar dissolves in the stomach or from fluid or whatever it releases the spring and the Jing the stomach gets injected with the insulin. It's fascinating. I mean, the engineering of this. It blows my mind. It's fascinating stomach acid is also sugar. The spring pops is get shot, and they say in pigs the injectable injection lowered blood sugar blood sugar to levels comparable to standard shots. Once the son was absorbed. The capsule made of stainless steel and a biodegradable material folded floated free and was excreted. So it's clever. It works. Here's a problem. It works on an empty stomach. You have to make sure you're taken on an empty stomach. Nothing could get into the way because you don't want it to land on your piece of hot dog commercials said that means it might one day replace morning insulin shots, but here's the problem. Many of you need insulin right after your meal. So. That won't work. So it might work for your morning insulin. But for some people they're like one by myself, a shy why have two separate things. Now the beyond insulin. This could work pretty nicely. There's other medicines. You know, that you might need to what if we have to treat gastric cancer or treat. Colon cancer intestinal cancer pancreatic cancer, getting into the stomach could be really really advantageous. So. The other thing I like is this direct idea of getting medicines directly to something. You know, what about like ulcers? You know, we take a medication for the also it's really interesting how we do this. We take medications they start to dissolve. We hope that the majority of it will decrease the acid production in the stomach before it starts to move usually stuff stays in the stomach for a couple of hours. Right. You swallow something you dissolving starts. Well. Your your digestion actually starts with your fork and knife, then it's your teeth. Then it's your saliva. Then you swallow. It goes down your softness. The Asakusa has smooth muscle that moves things down. And then it lands in stomach the stomach it sits there for a couple of hours. Then it goes to the intestines with the intestines. It could be there for a day or two because there's a lot of small intestine the large intestine it could be there for a day or two. And then you put it out for some of us with faster transit. Times we may go through a day or two for others. It may be longer. And so a lot of us have ulcers and gastritis and things like that. Sometimes these point directed these medications that could just land and do what they need to locally might be more effective way to go. You know same thing with infection. You know, we take so many Orlando -biotics what what about something like like strep. I, and you know, we have a lot of penicillin resistance while of strep is affecting the throat. Why don't we make a gargle that allows the anti microbial to stick after you gargle it onto the tonsil? And in that area and then exude a certain. I don't wanna use the word chemical, but a certain substance that makes the habitat for bacteria, grow Sua. And I wonder if we could treat a lot of strep throat that way now true, sometimes bacteria can evade and spread etc. Which is why would you the antibiotic? We wanna knock it out and prevent fever. But I think the idea of it doesn't always have to be a pill. You could do some direct contact type treatment might be a way to go, especially when we have to deal with these super bugs, and these resistant medications, so just a thought. When we come back mosquitoes..

Africa Twitter AP Massachusetts intestinal cancer Orlando MIT Dr Giovanni Traverso Facebook penicillin SAFA Orleans Lynn gastritis engineer Boston Brigham one day
"brigham women hospital" Discussed on Around the Rim

Around the Rim

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"brigham women hospital" Discussed on Around the Rim

"I've seen on your way to save my name to recod- try to. Hey, how she acts. Anyway, you know, what high fans? That is the voice of my fabulous fantastic producer, even though. She just tried to cut me off to Rica faster, foster Bradsby. I am here. Hopefully, China Robinson. We have a lot to get to in this podcast. So I'm not going to talk your brain off right now in the intro. Yes. I do have a lot on my mind. But I'm gonna talk about it with Rebecca Lobo. That's right. The hall of Famer Rebecca Lobo is our guest today. And we talk about lots of stuff. I mean Rebecca's everybody knows. She's funny. She's witty. She's just she's Rebecca she's a model for kids. And she looks amazing. What is my excuse to Rica? I couldn't even. Do. I don't know how she finds all the con-. She like she. She's a fantastic A-List. She's a she's a wife, she her and her husband had a podcast. We talk about that. She has four kids like she works out. I can't even do two out of five of those things. I'm barely making it with two out of the five of those things. I'm barely at analyst. Okay. Much to start with. Anyway, Rebecca's on the show, and we will recap big Monday between South Carolina, Missouri. We're going to preview Notre Dame Tennessee and just hop around a little bit. We get Rebecca spots on Yukon. And just what she feels like is happening in the landscape, a women's college basketball because it's crazy right now. Absolutely crazy. So sit back, relax, wait a minute. I should have did the escape version kick off your shoes. And relax feet, y'all have one little in Atlanta. And now everything is Atlanta's wait a minute. We're is the Super Bowl of from by the way, just really quickly. And I and I said this on Twitter for those that don't know. I'm originally from Boston Massachusetts. Okay. I was born there at Brigham women's hospital, and I'm one of sixteen children. Right. So there's a lot going on in my family. But the bottom line is that my family is huge Pat fans on both sides because my mom and dad both spent a majority of their adult lives in Boston. My mom actually was born and raised there. So. It's just you know with the Super Bowl being in Atlanta. I was praying that she's would win. I soon as Tom Brady put the boat on that thing. My phone starts ringing. You know in my family. Listen, we're not some Boston proper. We're from Roxbury. We're from Japan from bore Chester. Okay. My phone's ringing. Everybody wants to stay at my house. It's not happening. Okay. I don't even like the patriots. Thank you God. Like the patriots cheated. And I don't care how long it was ago. They so I've never forgotten. I'm not a big NFL person. You guys know, I don't love football. I love basketball, but three Rica's football. And I just was upset that that game went to overtime in that Kansas City. Never even got a chance to score. What kind of overtime is that? You already know my feelings on the patriots. And if I want the fans to still continue to like me, I should probably keep my opinions to myself. Oh my goodness. Well, all I know is that I don't see how you have in overtime. You flip a coin to see who gets the football. And then if that team scores, that's it. Time left on the clock cares. Something like that. It's that's terrible horrible come up with some new rules. Anyway, that's enough for football time to get to the basketball. We hope you enjoy our conversation with Rebecca Lobo. And no, you cannot stay at my house or the Super Bowl. I was the belt to. No. All right basketball fans will one thing I promised you was that I was not going to rely on my limited knowledge of what's happening in college women's basketball to keep you guys updated because we have so many people that know much much more about what's happening than I than I do. So I'm excited to have one of my good friends. She's a hall of Famer she is one of the best people that you really will ever meet. She's a mom. She got a podcast with her husband. Please join me in welcoming to the show ESPN women's basketball analyst, Rebecca Lobo, welcome. Rebecca, thank you. Or should I call you re as calls you? This show..

Rebecca Lobo basketball Rica patriots Boston Atlanta football analyst Rebecca China Robinson producer Twitter Tom Brady ESPN Brigham women Notre Dame Tennessee Japan NFL Kansas City
"brigham women hospital" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

WDTK The Patriot

05:33 min | 2 years ago

"brigham women hospital" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

"In newborn care is giving infants a better start in life and could improve Americans health far into the future at the same time. Researchers getting new insights into genetic and environmental influences on the fetus, such as mother's obesity or exposure to toxic substances and a growing movement to provide better postpartum care aims to help. All new mothers better care for themselves. And thus their babies Wall Street Journal freelance contributor, Laura Landreau says all of which may not only improve health during pregnancy and infancy, but for years to come Laura explain well, one of the things, you know, the March of dimes, but you've probably all heard of it's been around forever. They're funding these six prematurely research centers, including one at Stanford University. And so they're they're trying to identify the causes of premature birth and one of the things they're finding is that you can go back to a blood test. Simple blood test. And that blood test will help you determine whether this particular mother is at risk of delivering a baby too early. And that baby, you know, obviously, if it's boring early is going to be at higher risk. So what they're trying to do is figure out if we notice women at risk. Let's figure out what we can do to prevent it to slow it down. You know, they actually have certain drugs that can prevent women from delivering too early. However, those drugs they don't always know who to give them to. And by the time the woman starts to deliver. It's too late to give them a drug because the navy's coming out. So that's one of the issues that that is very much in the forefront. Another thing that happens is that babies are born prematurely and their their little brains can be injured they might not have enough oxygen. They have lots of reasons that their lungs aren't fully working or their brains are a little more vulnerable. So even if you're a full term baby, for example, decision just premature baby. As even fulltime babies can be deprived of oxygen in blood for just a few minutes. You know, they can up with seizures. They can go on to develop cerebral palsy and other developmental problems. And then there's that risk of long term problems. From brain injury learning disabilities. There's a lot of evidence of this. So they're looking at ways to more carefully monitor those babies as their as the weather's getting closer to earth. And as everyone speaking with Wall Street Journal freelance contributor, Laura Landreau. Her piece is called the new improved world of infant care. She's got a look at the technology that is helping babies these days. In the story to you mentioned genetics and epigenetics right genetics. We all know the full genome people are getting it's getting a lot easier and less expensive to sequence the entire genome of of every person, and if you're a baby born now, you'll get a little blood test. It's the he'll stick and they screen for about thirty conditions. You know, things that are immediately of a risk, you know, problems with digesting milk or something like that. But what they're talking about doing now at places like Harvard, affiliated hospitals the national institutes of health. It's funding this, and they are looking at how you could sequence the entire genome it's called baby seek like baby SEAQ, and they're exploring whether is this the right thing to do. First of all is this the right thing to do to parents want to know what Rick star baby might be might be or might not be at risk for down the down the road in the future. So they've got about three hundred and twenty five families, and basically they're random ising them into just getting regular. Tests or getting the genome sequencing, and they're going to try to follow the kids 'til they're eighteen and the idea is we're going to predict conditions decide what medications we can use in the future. If we know you're at risk for heart disease. Maybe we're going to go much more carefully into checking you every year, you know, there's so many childhood onset diseases that can be caused by a single, gene. So if you are aware of that, it doesn't mean that child's gonna get it. But you know, to watch for things, you know, the pediatrician knows let's keep an eye on this baby. And you know, epigenetics is sort of it's kind of one of those complicated scientific things. It's where something that influences. The genes DNA from the outside and switches these chains on and off it could tell you something about whether you're gonna inherited trait like obesity. Wow. So if they're awake control genes could they switch those genes from obese to lean with changes that you could make drugs or supplementing the diet or other other therapies, if you know, the gene are kind of gonna predisposes you through. Something is there a way to fix that to to tinker a little bit with the jeans, and obviously this is all in the future. But this is what researchers are looking at now. You seen the pictures associated with your online story, but there's a picture of the this embrace system. Yeah. Brigham women's hospital in Boston. Yeah. Oh, it's it's looks like a voice perfectly molded to Holden infant. A little silo to what scan the brain. And completely wrapped in swaddled. It looks totally immobile and probably sleeping. Yes. Well, that's the thing. You know, what they've found is that studies have shown that MRI images can really help. Look at baby's brains to see first of all has there been a brain injury. Something you could never see outside and the child might not have any outward signs of a brain injury. However, if you put them in an MRI, you can you can see that miss Lawrence, Wall Street Journal freelance contributor, Laura Landreau, twenty two minutes now after the hour on this weekend..

Laura Landreau Wall Street Journal Stanford University obesity Harvard navy Rick Brigham women Lawrence Boston twenty two minutes milk
"brigham women hospital" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"brigham women hospital" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"Sleep in the link regardless of the factors such as Obesity or how long the, men slept but they're reductions in the deepest age asleep, is specifically so shaded with an increased, risk of developing the high blood pressure Dr Susan Redline who's a professor of sleep medicine at Brigham Women's hospital in Beth Israel Deaconess medical center. And also Harvard Medical School there, was a study published on August twenty ninth edition of, the journal of hypertension and reinforced other research that has linked to, sleep problems, in raise risk of obesity and, cardiovascular issues as well but they found after doing this the researchers dividing all the mid up in different groups and they found that they, took it account the race as body mass But other factors, along with, us, in, the study found, overall that the sleep deprivation led, to a higher risk of blood pressure in the deeper stage. Of sleep that a person goes into in these men the less chance they have. Of high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease so it's interesting, when it comes down to that sleep is really important he noticed that in medicine typically in healthcare no matter. What somebody has no matter of his diabetes heart disease depression. Anxiety whatever it, is if a person's not sleeping, well the physician typically will always go after getting them to sleep I because. So much restore restoration can happen when someone gets proper sleep at night if they can get into the deep stages of sleep the body can regenerate can restore can repair for the next day. And everything from hormones all the, way around it's so important so critical for us to, get proper sleep so great study especially in indication of blood pressure triple Late two eight three seventy two seventy two that's. Triple eight two eight three seventy two seventy two let's go. Now to Patricia, Patricia welcomed garland how can I, help Well.

Obesity journal of hypertension Beth Israel Deaconess medical Brigham Women Harvard Medical School Dr Susan Redline Patricia professor
"brigham women hospital" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

05:25 min | 3 years ago

"brigham women hospital" Discussed on WGTK

"For the left you it is the opposite of progressive it is regressive we are going backwards to tribal ethnic identity as opposed to identifying with excellence a medical student who sees a white male doctor on the wall should ask what did he do now what is this color or or his or his sex it's unbelievable the the attack on excellence she has read their faces foolish woman mabel said no one on staff has objected to taking down portrait's of past department heads that's the most depressing about a sentence in the in the piece because most people are cowards that's why sorry human race is not impressive some humans are impressive the human racist cowards if she's right no one has objected not one person watching all of the thirty portraits being taken down may include dr harvey cushing the father of neurosurgery now why would he be put up there right the father of neurosurgery who studied at harvard and yale and became surgeon in chief at peter bent brigham hospital in nineteen thirteen i wouldn't want to put him up for white male same like the new york times with music they were they were tired of putting up all these germans and austrians is the greatest composers so they they brought in other groups too the portrait's of cushing councilman doctor henry christian brigham first chief of medicine will be moved to the entrance of the hale building for transformative medicine the hale building is named after robert hale junior a white male and ceo of greenwich telam communications who along with his wife donated one hundred million dollars to brigham the largest donation to the hospital has ever received now should they shouldn't they changed that to the white male that they're named after the hale building it should be remained dr naval said no staff at brigham women's hospital is quote openly unquote objected to the removal of the portrait's of course they wouldn't be ostracized god i be depressed going to that hospital this is this is happening do you understand to it's an attack on humanity here humanity doesn't matter and attack on excellence achievement doesn't matter race does pure racist stuff through our work we have learned that inclusion about feeling respected that's why by the way the one of the divides between conservatism and leftism is a is it metaphorically a masculine feminine divide with the left representing more more of the feminine and the right more of the masculine the masculine is rules oriented and the feminine is feelings oriented those are generalizations obviously there are exceptions many exceptions but that's what is meant when we speak about a feminine masculine divide in perceiving life inclusion is about feeling respected and valued for who you are i don't wanna be valued for who i am i'm nothing i wanna be valued for what i do what does it mean valued for who i am i don't even know what does that mean do you understand what that means what it means you're valued for who you are racially what the classic racists of the past with totally agree with you liberalism teachers that revalued for your achievement your character not your race this is the hospitals diversity and inclusion program which made this statement the goal is to find ways to honor and celebrate each individual now i have no desire to be honored and celebrated i have a desire for my achievements to be honored and celebrated the nursing department according to the nursing department which strives to offer inclusive care what.

one hundred million dollars
"brigham women hospital" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

05:01 min | 3 years ago

"brigham women hospital" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Now what is this color or or his or his sex it's it's unbelievable the the attack on excellence she has read their faces foolish woman naval said no one on staff objected to taking them portraits of past department heads that's the most depressing sentence in the in the piece because most people are cowards that's why sorry human race is not impressive some humans are impressive the human racist cowards if she's right no one has objected not one person watching all of the thirty portraits being taken down include dr harvey cushing the father of neurosurgery now why would he be put up there right the father of neurosurgery who studied at harvard and yale and became surgeon in chief at peter bent brigham hospital in nineteen thirteen i wouldn't want to put him up white male they were they were tired of putting up all these germans and austrians is the greatest composers so they they brought in other groups too the portrait's of cushing councilman and dr henry christian brigham first chief of medicine will be moved to the entrance of the hale building for transformative medicine the hale building is named after robert hale junior a white male and ceo of greenwich telam communications who along with his wife donated one hundred million dollars to brigham the largest donation the hospital has ever received now should they shouldn't they change that to the white male the that the named after the hale building it should be remained dr naval said no staff at brigham women's hospital is quote openly unquote objected to the removal of the portraits of course they wouldn't they'd be ostracized god i be depressed going to that hospital what is happening do you understand the tha it's an attack on humanity you hear humanity doesn't matter and it's just attack on excellence achievement doesn't matter race does pure racist stuff through our work we have learned that inclusion about feeling respected that's why by the way the one of the divides between conservatism and leftism is a sore is metaphorically a masculine feminine divide with the left representing more more of the feminine and the right more of the masculine the masculine is rules oriented and the feminine is feelings oriented those generalizations obviously there are exceptions many exceptions but that's what is meant when we speak about a feminine masculine divide in perceiving life inclusion is about feeling respected and valued for who you are i don't wanna be valued for who i am i'm nothing i wanna be valued for what i do what does it mean valued for who i am i don't even know what does that mean do you understand what that means what me your valued for who you are racially what a sick notion the classic racist of the past with totally agree with you liberalism teaches that you're valued for your achievement your character not your race this is the hospitals diversity and inclusion program which made the statement the goal is to find ways to honor and celebrate each individual now i have no desire to be honored and celebrated i have a desire for my achievements to be honored and celebrated the nursing department according to the nursing department which strives to offer inclusive care no.

one hundred million dollars
"brigham women hospital" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"brigham women hospital" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Building trades he didn't have healthcare um he had healthcare yet the buy into what he had medicare when he retired so i get that but the edges unfortunate you can't just say amoko take a company and i don't know what when there are benefits to go i just can't do that upset mighty model tom i got lama gotta again all lines i and on autonomy you're going off the rails only buddy please don't do this you've been very polite so far but i got full lines i think you've made you points with the mayor we're not going to resolve it tonight but certainly does now on his radar screen as a consequence of japan i will look into a trump promised short thanked appreciate very 6172544400 thirty triple eight 929 1030 let's go to we're going to go next spring ron in weymouth utpal me which arrived i hit a wrong button hey ron you're on with boston mayor marty walsh with boston police commissioner bill evans on the ringside central nights i call i got it thank you and it's an honor to speak to uh you both gentleman about this a comment i habitable wrong come on i listen to you every level go ahead i'm is trying to lighten up a little bit go ahead ron um fight that this is primarily for the commissioner i in regards to the uh gangs of up by bikers that job minibike atvs and so on those senitivity of that right up and down the street survive bostonanaheim now onto the expressway out where it goes my boss the kids run those kozaki from the northshore if you look at the addresses and where those names came from the i didn't see anybody listed as a bus and kid and not just for the reckitt okay but in fact back in two thousand fifteen when they were riding up and down blue hill avenue they were body kate knife yeah and uh go ahead i uh i was uh uh at that time transporting uh my wife back and forth to uh brigham women's hospital uh from from the south shore and uh they they would terrorize people driving up and down they go to the lights age we in and out around the around the cars and i call the the boston police department i said what what what are you gonna do abidi's has to be honest with you we can't really do anything because their.

weymouth marty walsh bill evans commissioner brigham women tom i japan boston ron um
"brigham women hospital" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"brigham women hospital" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"This and that led me to several years worth of of research into the current state of our understanding about cannabis i win in you know open to the idea but you know reasonably skeptical as any position slash science it ought to be uh and i came out the other side fairly convinced that this stuff is very helpful and that is enough evidence at this point to be able to make some general state it's about its effectiveness and its risks and that it seemed reasonable to start treating people with this uh under certain circumstances and uh and at that point i went all gene that's kuwait bought who's gonna be doing this and i looked around at the late in the land in at the time it to be a even attic gag order so that we couldn't not only couldn't prescribed this stuff or people recommended which is the current ireland's but um but we couldn't even talk about it which i i don't know how that constitutional but it is um and uh i looked around in many of my colleagues in sort of the various harvard is the tuitions like the brigham women's hospital and g h with israel and i realize his mother goes administrations were going to allow people to do this 'cause they always see federal funding and there's you know that concern in i work at cheese only to do this is it as a private practitioner and so that poly open my costas and i bet you're practices flourishing and especially since november when the valid question that the state of massachusetts is still trying to to change because it was voted to bank canada's legal and those of us that live in the state are getting a big kick out of it but it's not you funny that every minute the legislators are adding more addendums and and changing the laws that we as citizens voted four so it's it's going to be an interesting ride that much we know absolutely going to be unjustly right some of the modifications you know that i campaign very loudly four questioned four uh i think that recreational cannabis should be legal as it is now um but i also think that we should take a reasonable and fought old approach to it more than many of.

ireland harvard brigham women israel costas massachusetts canada cannabis kuwait
"brigham women hospital" Discussed on KELO

KELO

02:51 min | 3 years ago

"brigham women hospital" Discussed on KELO

"Of pediatrics yes nuclear university yeah who was pioneering chord blood to uh repair cerebral palsy patients one of them was repaired in eight months and so they decided to go to joann kurt spur at luke frozen the blood chord blood and tissue and with one in fusion dr kurtz were was able to turn that around just one one now that she was she was scheduled for three but the results at the first which they reported on was pretty outstanding she'll probably still get the other two and i've found or online a year later she's a beautiful little girl i wish they knew the weber said it would have told you you hit the of course we've been talking about stem cells injected into the heart oh and they've done remarkable things in you've been talking to me about that for years a study comes out last week the talks about how the each action factor and hearts have been increased by stem cells into the heart absolutely i mean how far were you ahead of time with you work in research well here's years yeah i'll tell you something else i just two you hear about uh news flash a couple of a just a couple of weeks ago that uh uh the biggest breakthrough in cardiovascular since the discovery of the statin drug was was at that kind of pressure thing they they do people they apply to all no it's different uh they here's the kind of headlines new wonderdrug hail as biggest breakthrough to fight against heart attacks and cancer or another headline read scientists say new heart treatment is biggest worry crew since the advent of staten as well when you hear something like that of course that exciting you want to ask uh it's me in thirty one years since this baton was developed it must be pretty important but then you wanna say or who are the scientists making that claim in this case if you're george to make it a list of the top cardiologists scientists in the world the name call rid kurd rector of preventive cardiology at harvard and brigham women's hospital and harvard university and his cali dr peter livvy chief of cardiac out cardiovascular would have to be among the.

dr kurtz weber stem cells cancer staten george harvard university joann kurt spur brigham dr peter livvy thirty one years eight months
"brigham women hospital" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:44 min | 3 years ago

"brigham women hospital" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"The world the name paul rid kurt director of preventive cardiology at harvard of brigham women's hospital and harvard university and his cali dr peter livvy chief of cardio cardiovascular would have to be among the very top for the record so to coast to coast listers might recall it was dr rick here who developed the highsensitivity c reactive protein blood test we have talked about over and over and how important it is as a marker for inflammation yet and to ask your doctor to give you want it's it's a simple test very simple tests information waved fair this at the root of all chronic disease so the idea what's to target the inflammation with a potent anti inflammatory agent which would provide an extra benefit overstaffing therapy because when you're given staten therapy after a heart attack there is a great percentage a people will have a second heart attack within five years because of the statins well the status don't correct it now i see so in this study they enroll ten thousand patients is a fouryear study each patient have to have had a heart attack but also had to have recorded give for inflammation and all patients received high doses of statins as well as either that new'drug they antiinflammatory drug or a placebo both were administered by injection every three months the heart attack survivors were given nj actions of a antiinflammatory drug and well those receiving the drug had fewer attacks in the future and as an added bonus and this may be more important than the heart cancer deaths were cut 50 percent fifty overfishing and really a great race dude and who knows where it will lead you and i have talked uh at with dr uh agarwal that cancer is an inflammatory disease and now it's known throughout mother send it it is a and and inflammatory disease as our most chronic diseases he oh this is dr paul rid kerr she reactive protein just a matter of fact you sent me his book it's called c reactive protein and cardiovascular is the he's the authority.

director brigham women harvard university dr rick inflammatory disease kerr dr peter livvy staten heart cancer three months 50 percent five years fouryear
"brigham women hospital" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:54 min | 3 years ago

"brigham women hospital" Discussed on KTRH

"The scientists making that claim in this case if you're george to make a list of the top cardiologists scientists in the world the name paul rid curtu rector of preventive cardiology at harvard of brigham women's hospital and harvard university and his cali dr peter livvy chief of cardiac out cardiovascular would have to be among the very top for the record so do coast to coast listers might recall it was dr ripped kerr who developed the highsensitivity c reactive protein blood test we have talked about over an older and how important it is as a marker for inflammation yet and to ask your doctor to give you one a it's as simple test very simple test information we've said this at the root of all chronic disease so the idea what's to target fee information with a potent anti inflammatory agent which would provide an extra benefit over staten therapy because when you were given staten therapy after a heart attack there is a great percentage uh people will have a second heart attack within five years because of the statins well the statins it don't correct it now i see so in this study they unrolled ten thousand patients is a fouryear study each patient had to have had a heart attack but also had to have recorded positive for inflammation and all patients received high doses of statins as well as either the new drug the antiinflammatory drug or a placebo both were administered by injection every three months the heart attack survivors were given injections of a antiinflammatory drug and well those receiving the drug had fewer attacks in the future and as an added bonus and this may be more important and then the heart cancer deaths were cut fifty percent via skills and really a great great news in who knows where it will lead you and i have talked uh and with dr a agarwal that cancer is an inflammatory disease and now it's known throughout medicine to it is a and and inflammatory disease as our most chronic diseases kill this is dr paul rid kerr she reactive protein as a matter of fact he sent me his book it's called c reactive protein and cardiovascular disease he's the authority on it then this.

george brigham women harvard university kerr inflammatory disease dr peter livvy staten heart cancer fifty percent three months five years fouryear