35 Burst results for "Briggs"

The Left Is So Upset With Elon Musk

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:48 min | 1 d ago

The Left Is So Upset With Elon Musk

"The left is really upset with Elon Musk. Why are they upset with Elon Musk? Because he won't listen. He won't heal. He won't do what they need him to do. You know, when I have Briggs and I want to bring him right up to me, there's a German command called foos, which means get beside me and cut it out. You know, any dog owner Victor marks, you see with a dog. Get over here. Cut it out. It's actually another German word phooey. He's knock it off. It's very direct. That's how the left treats their own. And they've been saying to Elon Musk the last couple of weeks, foos, foos, get beside me, come to heal, and Elon's like, no. I'm not going to. Now the latest tabulations of where his net worth is, they kind of re tabulated every single day. It's about $221 billion today. He certainly has the net worth still to be able to purchase Twitter. We don't even know how valuable SpaceX is. SpaceX is probably way more valuable than anything they publicly disclose. Elon's going to be just fine. For those of you that are like, wow, Tesla stock is really down. I don't think he's going to have to take out a second mortgage anytime soon. However, it does dampen his potential purchasing power. But the left hates Elon because he will not be totally and completely blindly obedient to everything they tell him to do. You see, the way it's supposed to work. And by the way, Jeff Bezos is getting a little Elon Musk energy recently. I'm not a fan of Bezos, but Bezos is like angrily tweeting towards Biden too. He's like, hey, we as elites, we could think towards ourselves like, okay, Jeff Bezos, we'll see how long that lasts. We'll see if you keep on getting your Pentagon contracts. And Jeff Bezos will heal. Trust me. You want to talk about a guy who is all bark and no bite, that's Bezos. Elon Musk, he just might be wild and eccentric enough actually to challenge the regime. I think he

Foos Elon Musk Elon Victor Marks Spacex Briggs Jeff Bezos Tesla Twitter Bezos Biden Pentagon
Joshua Perry and "Yoda" Describe Baden K-9

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:59 min | Last month

Joshua Perry and "Yoda" Describe Baden K-9

"With me today are two amazing guys. Josh, from Baden, or Baden, canine. I got that right. And then we'll just call the friend of my left Yoda from the navy seal museum and also the canine project. I wanted this conversation for a while, Josh, I'll start with you. My new dog came from your farm, came from what you guys do, and I've just been so blown away and impressed and our audience knows all about mister Briggs now. And I just want to first just kind of for you to introduce yourself and tell our audience, what are you guys doing bad in? Hey, thanks, Charlie for having us. So my name is Joshua Perry. I come from Ben and canine. It's a Canadian facility that was founded by my family back in the 70s. Early 70s and we breed raising train Dutch uppers, German shepherds and Belgian malinois. Like Briggs, the Dutch shepherds are a unique dog and a good-looking dog. So that's who I am. How long have you been doing it? The company now was founded in 72. I've been doing it for 24 years. That's awesome. And so Yoda, you run the canine project, or you help run it, and also this museum tells about both. Okay, great. So the museum, the museum itself, the mission is to capture preserve and present the history of naval special warfare to the public. And then within that they have a charitable 501c3 organization known as trident host charities. And within trident host charities, they got four pillars on it, but one pillar is the K9 project. And that's an entity that really focuses on marrying up the right dogs with the right veterans who require the veteran who are required the dog and that also translates right into the veterans family. So really it's affecting both just both the veteran and the family itself. And that's it in a

Baden Mister Briggs Josh Joshua Perry Navy Briggs Charlie
"briggs" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

03:34 min | 2 months ago

"briggs" Discussed on Backlisted

"And <Speech_Male> for little more than the <Speech_Male> price of two pots of <Speech_Male> green slime <Speech_Male> at the king or GS, <Speech_Male> lot listeners <Speech_Male> get two extra <Speech_Male> lot listed a month, <Speech_Male> our own public <Speech_Male> liberality, where we <Speech_Male> three give vent to <Speech_Music_Male> our libidinous natures <Speech_Music_Male> and <SpeakerChange> discuss the <Speech_Music_Male> gross we heard watched <Speech_Male> in red in the previous <Speech_Male> fortnight. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> A <Speech_Male> lot less there's also get <Speech_Male> to hear their names read out <Speech_Male> on the shows and mark of <Speech_Male> our thanks and appreciation. <Speech_Male> This <Speech_Male> week's batch roll <Speech_Male> call is yasmin <Speech_Male> awed <Speech_Male> Stuart Galloway walker <Speech_Male> and Charlotte <Speech_Male> Gita. Thank you <Speech_Male> all for your generosity, <Speech_Male> all our <Speech_Male> thank you to heartfelt <Speech_Male> thanks. <Speech_Male> Enabling us to <Silence> continue what <SpeakerChange> we do and <Speech_Male> love and enjoy. <Speech_Male> Largest <Speech_Male> Shireen <Speech_Male> is there anything <Speech_Male> you would like to add <Speech_Male> about Raymond <Speech_Male> Briggs that we have yet <Speech_Male> to say <Speech_Male> any <SpeakerChange> last message <Speech_Music_Female> for our listeners? <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> Well, do <Speech_Female> you know a nice thing that happened <Speech_Female> is I had this huge <Speech_Music_Female> pile of Raymond bridge <Speech_Music_Female> books in <Speech_Music_Female> my living room <Speech_Female> and my <Speech_Female> 8 year old actually <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> 9 year old <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> wandered <SpeakerChange> past and <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> went Raymond Briggs <Speech_Male> blooming <Speech_Music_Male> Christmas. <Laughter> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> Brilliant. So I <Speech_Female> was really heartened <Speech_Female> by that. I thought <Speech_Female> it continues. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> The power <Speech_Male> continues. Very <Silence> good. Wonderful <Speech_Male> Andrew. <Speech_Male> If and <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> really, only <Speech_Male> our longest <Speech_Male> term listeners will <Speech_Male> understand why I'm asking you <Speech_Male> this. <Speech_Male> But if <Speech_Male> fungus the bogeyman <Speech_Male> were a Jean Kelly <Speech_Male> film, <Speech_Male> which <SpeakerChange> Gene Kelly <Speech_Male> film would it be? <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> You <Speech_Male> won't be surprised to hear <Speech_Male> that I had to dig <Speech_Male> quite deep for this one. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> But in 1962, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Gene Kelly directed <Speech_Male> a film called <Speech_Male> xizhou. <Speech_Male> In which <Speech_Male> Jackie Gleason <Speech_Male> plays a giant <Speech_Male> unwashed <Speech_Male> sentimental <Speech_Male> mute <Speech_Male> who travels the foul <Speech_Male> smelling back streets <Speech_Male> of Paris. <Speech_Male> And tries to <Speech_Male> express and tries to explain <Speech_Male> concepts like death, <Speech_Male> religion <Speech_Male> and war <Speech_Male> to a small <SpeakerChange> questioning <Speech_Male> child. <Speech_Male> Brilliant <Speech_Male> brilliant. <Speech_Male> Nikki, can we <Speech_Male> drop in the end of the 1812 <Speech_Male> overture <Speech_Male> to salute? <Speech_Male> Andrew's <Speech_Male> achievement there. <Speech_Male> Magnificent <Speech_Male> Andrew magnificent. <Speech_Male> Thank you. <Speech_Male> Thanks very much, <Speech_Male> everybody. We're going to leave <Speech_Male> you with <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> tribute that I <Speech_Male> think Raymond <SpeakerChange> would <Speech_Male> hate, <Speech_Male> which has <Speech_Male> been <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> recorded by <Speech_Male> our dear <Speech_Male> friend, <Speech_Male> verity McCormack, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> a who is 8 years <Speech_Male> old and <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> you'll recognize the <Speech_Male> poem. So thanks <Speech_Male> very much. <Silence> Andrew, <Speech_Male> this has been <Speech_Male> brilliant. <Speech_Male> Wonderful. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Thank you <Speech_Male> so much for giving <Speech_Male> us this <Speech_Male> opportunity. It you guys. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Looking around <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> this house, what will <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> they say <SpeakerChange> in the future <Music> <Advertisement> guys? <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> There must have been some barnyard <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> blood care. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Artsy fartsy <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> type. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> The pictures were kiddy <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> books or some such <Music> <Advertisement> tripe. <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> You <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> should have seen the stuff <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> he stuck up in that <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> tactic. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Tons and tons <SpeakerChange> and <Music> <Advertisement> tons of tats. <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Can I skip it, <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> tuck them in a <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> whopping <SpeakerChange> bonfire <Music> <Advertisement> out the back. <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> Bye. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> God, it's gone. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> And he's gone too. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> He must have been <Speech_Music_Male> a real latter. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> Do you <Speech_Music_Male> like children? <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Well, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> not <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> our mass. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I mean, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> occasionally you come across <Speech_Music_Male> kids who are <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> nice and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you get on with them as <Speech_Music_Male> individuals, <Speech_Music_Male> as a species, I <Speech_Music_Male> suppose I <SpeakerChange> don't <Music> really.

Stuart Galloway Gene Kelly Raymond Briggs Jean Kelly Andrew magnificent Andrew Jackie Gleason Raymond Charlotte Paris
"briggs" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

05:33 min | 2 months ago

"briggs" Discussed on Backlisted

"Where it's about love, you know, she's loving him through his existential kind of doubt. It's beautiful. Could we talk a little bit before we go about his most recent and what will probably be his final book. This was published in 2019 by Jonathan cape, it's called time for lights out. I didn't really know about this book, and I read it for that listed, and I think everyone else did, didn't they? I think we all kind of did. As much as like a bear, I was absolutely blown away by this. This seems to me to be an fantastic example of a forgotten book published in 2019. And weirdly what we're here for to draw people's attention to. I mean, you probably know fungus the bogeyman listeners and you probably don't know time for lights out. But it's the product of 20 years work. It's the book Briggs said he was writing for years about old age. And it is, I can't find the vocabulary. I've never read a book like it. There you go. I've never read a book like Tom for lights out. What did everybody else think of it? I thought it was incredible. And the thing that struck me immediately is how similar to fungus the bogeyman is, it is. And a lot of his books but finally he is writing about himself. He is, you know, he is finally the character at the center of the book. It's no longer he's no longer using father Christmas or fungus the bogeyman. It is about Raymond Briggs, but it's following the same path. It addresses all those things like a quest for meaning. You see parallels in the way that he is someone who kind of thinks about poetry and prose and is incredibly learned. But he's constantly confronting the questions that other people don't..

Jonathan cape Briggs Raymond Briggs Tom
"briggs" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

05:48 min | 2 months ago

"briggs" Discussed on Backlisted

"Anything for a quiet life in solitary. Anyway, it's just a lovely, lovely collection. But he was a total joy to deal with. Everybody fell in love with him and it's still in print stills obviously sells really, really well. Yeah, just one of the great publishing experiences. So I hadn't appreciated until we were researching for this that in fact. Basically all the books we think of as Raymond Briggs. From father Christmas onwards from the early 1970s. Our in reaction to his personal situation in the early 70s where he lost both parents and his wife in the space of a year. And I think when you know that and also the fact that he was in his late 30s to early 40s, all this huge success that came to him was almost not irrelevant it clearly made things more comfortable, but but secondary to the exploration artistically of what those losses meant to him. And so before we talk about that and we talk about his what will probably be his final book. I think we should hear him talk about his wife Jean. She has schizophrenia, which is not something that wish on anybody. Absolutely nightmare. But that governed our whole lives gotten her life, of course, and governed mine for many years. She was constantly in and out of mental hospitals. But you've also said that she was an inspiration as well. In her meanderings as it were sometimes. Yes, well, I'm very inspiring people because they have wild flights of imagination. And tremendous enthusiasm and excitement. And very stimulating to live with, if exhausting. But you have all the bad side of it, the acrophobia, claustrophobia, and physical attacks rather than epilepsy to cope with. Lying on the bed and shuddering and screaming. It's all rather alarming, really. The burden was for her more than for me, mine was just helping to look after and to deal with it. What did she die of in the end?.

Raymond Briggs schizophrenia Jean
"briggs" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

04:52 min | 2 months ago

"briggs" Discussed on Backlisted

"So far, Christmas gets cheesed off getting dirty and coming down the chimney and dreadful job. I mean, we know he's old. We know it's fat. Who'd like to climb down one shouldn't he let alone hundreds? Covered in soot, freezing cold on your own. Dreadful dreadful job. He's bound to be fed up with it. Are you telling me you're a grumpy old man? No, no, no, I'm very cheerful and lighthearted. So lovely. I think it's interesting what he says that he is truthful. He doesn't shy away from the truth. I mean, you know, even with fundus the bogeyman, you know, bodies and all the other unpleasantness. That's very true. That's a true part of being human. And he knows that children haven't yet really learned to or I think he does. I don't think he's that concerned with his audience, actually, but I think he recognizes that children also just look at the truth. Oh, we die at the end. Okay. And I think that I think in children's books, I mean, I've put death in some of my children's books. And it's adults who get upset. It's adults who write and reviews on Amazon about me or who will send an annual email. It's not children. Adults are closer to death. And we're scared of it. Yeah. Yeah. But it's funny because the book he wrote the man, which feels very much like a kind of reaction to the snowman, but also a reaction to I think also like a reaction to books like the Tiger came to tea because it's basically about this kind of horrible little homunculus. It comes to live with this boy and he's an absolute nightmare. And he's miserable and he just messes everything up and just kind of is a burden to the young boy and then leaves. You know and it's kind of like you think is he writing about young people looking after their old parents. You know, is he kind of is it another reference to Briggs's own life. But it's a brilliant way of doing it. It's basically says, you know, these people might come into your life and unlike the snowman, which is a magical event that ends and it melting. The arrival into your life could be an absolute sod. They spend the whole book bickering and at the end. He misses him terribly. Yeah, yeah. It's just incredible. Yes. Yeah, he just kind of creates some fantastic. John what book have you brought to us? I brought this. It's called notes from the sofa, and it's a collection. And this is the book you published, right? We published this. I'm buying published it. He apparently heard Dan, my partner, business partner on the radio, and he.

Amazon Briggs John Dan
"briggs" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

04:40 min | 2 months ago

"briggs" Discussed on Backlisted

"Fantastic. I mean, I'm sorry about the quality, but that's the best I could get it. Oh, that was brilliant. But totally exactly what we've all been saying. You know, the depth of work that goes into creating the world. Now, we asked everybody to bring in addition to fungus the bogeyman, their favorite Raymond Briggs book. At nausea, which book did you choose? Well, I've chosen Ethel and Ernest, which is a long form comic strip, some people would say graphic novel to make it sound respectable. Whatever you want to call it, graphic novel, long form comic. And it's about his parents. Ethel and Ernest, it spans their relationship from their early courtship, at the moment they first meet all the way up to their deaths. It's so, so beautiful. And I think for me, it kind of distills the things that I love the most about his work. And I respond, I don't know why, but I just respond to his illustration style in this book a lot more than I actually do, we fund this the bogeyman, for example, all the snowman, there's something about how he observes that it's something about how he observes kind of the fabric of everyday life, the light switches and lampshades, the bricks of the house that he grows up in. Steve bell the garden cartoonist says one of the great things about Raymond Briggs work is his ability to draw bricks, tiles, and slates. Yes. It is, because he draws, but he draws every I am useless at this. I think that's one of the reasons I'm so in awe of him. I consider myself just this, I am a terrified amateur, but when it comes to buildings, he draws every brick sort of has soul and he draws every line and every tile is imbued with feeling and you can feel it and smell it. And so aside from the story, the kind of narrative and the dialog, which is fantastic, aside from all of that, I'm just in awe of the drawings, they're just so beautifully perfectly observed..

Raymond Briggs Ethel Ernest nausea Steve bell
"briggs" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

03:58 min | 2 months ago

"briggs" Discussed on Backlisted

"Are, you know, the surface of it is the rather the love of language in the the jokes, but beneath it, there's deep currents of learning and gloom, I suppose I would characterize it. It seemed to me so much. Absolutely. So green and boggy for what's nominally a children's book. One of the lovely things about it is in the same way that he presents bogey facts like there are pages from encyclopedias and it's a question of sort of learning that that's kind of how it's presented to you. That you are in a process of learning and you're deep within knowledge. And it kind of mentioning when we say earlier that he quotes from people like kind of Carlyle and Milton and everything, but not only does he quote from them he borrows the structures of a lot of their books, you know, so you can compare it to berks, philosophical inquiry into the sublime or you can compare it to Carlisle's Sato Rosario. Obviously, I didn't pick up on that when I was 11. But you know, you go back to it now and you can see kind of the air edition and the knowledge. And even that was by the time I got it was 12, first time I tried it. But you know, that lovely passage about the national bogey gallery, which you kind of realize is about, it's kind of Briggs writing about Victorian art, you know, and a lot of the time you feel that he's kind of, he's writing a kind of history book about almost like a past stage. There's a nostalgia in there and there's a kind of sentimentality. In the sense that he's kind of writing about, yes, he's writing about bogie dome, but he's also writing about this kind of, he's writing with a sense of nostalgia for it of something that's gone. Which is incredibly moving, incredibly beautiful. Why don't we hear? So the audio quality on this isn't very good, but it is totally fascinating. This is Raymond Briggs talking in 1980 about fungus the bogeyman and the background noise you can hear in the second half is him referring to a filing cabinet. You can find this on YouTube, stuffed with the research for fungus the bogeyman. When he opens the drawer, it's broken up with dividers saying things like culture and slime and so the reading that has gone into the book is clearly.

Sato Rosario national bogey gallery Carlyle Milton Carlisle Briggs Raymond Briggs cabinet YouTube
"briggs" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

05:04 min | 2 months ago

"briggs" Discussed on Backlisted

"I spent two years doing fungus all immersed in this snot and slime and Mark and everything. I was a bit fed up with it. Also with the wordiness of it, and I wanted to do something that was quieter and simpler with no words and relatively quick to do. And I turned to the snowman as light relief from the bogeyman, really. Yeah, Andrew. But he did just that. But we'll talk about this in a minute, but Nadia, where all the interviews that Briggs gives. He's that persona is brilliant because what he always says when he's asked, why did you write your own pitch books? He says, well, I realized that it was, you know, I was being asked to illustrate text that were terrible. And I thought, oh, wait a minute. It's much easier to be a writer than an illustrator. I might as well just write my own stuff, which I think is I mean, I've got to be a fascinating bit of I mean more in terms of Raymond Briggs himself. It's a really interesting persona. He puts forth that you'll hear all the way through this. That is a brilliant example of someone pretending to be somebody for the purposes of going out and talking about their work. Don't you think? I absolutely agree. I wonder, I mean, I wonder how much of this I'm sure he was quite grumpy individual in many ways. But I wonder how much of that was a kind of camouflage for shyness, social awkwardness, and also when he taught himself down as a writer. I wonder if that's a defense mechanism. He is a writer. There's no doubt when you're reading his books, you know, the way he uses language, his ear for dialog. It will talk later on about Ethel and Ernest, which is speech bubbles. It's all dialog, but you don't just toss that off. He's not just plonked in words in. But it's interesting. Maybe he felt more confident being regarded because he went through art school. I think he went to Slade, maybe he felt more confident being regarded as an artist, and he didn't want to be judged as a writer..

Raymond Briggs Nadia Briggs Andrew Ethel Ernest Slade
"briggs" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

05:25 min | 2 months ago

"briggs" Discussed on Backlisted

"Oh, I think I'd look forward to it, really. It fed up with all the things we have to deal with every day like paperwork and telephones and form filling. How important is music in your life? Not very much, I am not a great musician, and I've always found it rather complicated and technical and rather intimidating. Do you have any skill you play any instrument? No, nothing at all never have. No, I listen to radio form more than anything. I play music in the evenings between about 6 and 8, I think. It made me cheer up in sort of music, such as I've chosen. That's the time when you feel you want a bit you had up at the end of the day rather than the beginning. Despite the fact you've done a good day's work. Yes. Relief of the gloom that descends at that time when the day is all gone badly. I love him. I love him. And that's the start of the chef they haven't even played a record yet. Brilliant. You want to say Raymond, you do know what this show is about. But the thing is, this is classic Roman Briggs. On that one, on the 1983 one, he plays 8 red hot jazz records in a row. Wonderful, wonderful jazz music. He loved her. And then when he when he comes back in 2005, he chooses a whole different palette of types of music. Totally totally fascinating. So we talked a bit about how fungus the bogeyman doesn't have a plot and nor do you said you don't think you read it as a child. Can you remember what's the earliest Raymond Briggs book you can remember or the presence of Raymond bricks? I remember, well, I came out a year after fundus the bode man. So.

Roman Briggs Raymond Raymond Briggs Raymond bricks
"briggs" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

02:52 min | 2 months ago

"briggs" Discussed on Backlisted

"Of the show, Andrew mail. Andrew is making his 9th appearance on back lasted. As well as all 6 of our Halloween episodes, Andrew has previously joined us to talk about Norwood's Raymond chantler. And Salisbury's William Golding. He's a celebrated arts journalist and books nut, the senior associate editor at mojo magazine and writes regularly on music, books, film, art, TV, architecture, clothes, especially hats. For Sunday to make it up now helps lesson. He's the big issues hat correspondents. Had no idea had no idea. I'm still waiting for my first column. I haven't got back to me. They promised. Yeah, and he does all those things for Sunday times culture and The Guardian. And we are really, I so nice to see you here in a non ghoulish capacity. It's not to say that there aren't ghoulish elements to fungus the bones again. We already know what this year's Halloween choice is going to be. And when we get to it, I'll tell you what though you'll see how the choice was between the book we're doing today and the book we're doing in October. It's quite quite a dramatic difference. Unlikely to be found on the same shelf. Okay, the book we are here to discuss if you haven't already guessed is fungus the bogeyman by Raymond Briggs, first published by Hamish Hamilton in 1977. The illustrated story of a working class bogeyman undergoing an existential crisis about exactly what his night job of scaring dry cleaners, that's us humans, is for, became a huge international bestseller, as well as spawning merchandise of all shapes and sizes of which more later, the book has been adapted for stage and twice for television, including a memorable BBC version in 2004, written by the novelist Mark haddon, and most recently in a sky three parter starring Timothy spall, Joe scanlon, and Victoria wood in her last television role. But before we sink, knee deep into the mulch and mold of boge dum, Andy, what have you been reading this week? Thank you very much. I've been reading a book called laugh defiance by Mary Richardson, which is a memoir that was published in 1953. It's not in print. I had to get it out of the library in order to read it. And the reason I wanted to read it was that it's mentioned by artist and writer called Tom de freston in a new book called rec, which is published by grant this month in March. It's about the painting the raft of the Medusa by gericault and various things that come off that painting. And I'm going to talk about it on a future episode about listed..

Andrew Raymond chantler William Golding mojo magazine Raymond Briggs Norwood Salisbury Hamish Hamilton The Guardian Joe scanlon Mark haddon Timothy spall Victoria wood Mary Richardson BBC Tom de freston Andy
"briggs" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

05:09 min | 2 months ago

"briggs" Discussed on Backlisted

"I am told from Brighton by the seaside. Yeah. Oh my goodness. Yeah, why? Why am I goodness? I was a student in Brighton. Many years ago and now and now a close family member is a student in Brighton. Right. I took him out for drinks at the basket makers. Right, I'm still getting to know it. By look out of my window and really squint. I can just about see the sea. And that's a really nice thing to do. So I sit here days at sea and missile my book deadlines. The best of all possible I've been doing that for years. Yes, great. John, you're not calling from your usual Oxfordshire, are you? No, I'm stillington in north Yorkshire. I'm looking out while I'm not actually, I've got my back to the hills. Which are it's very beautiful. It's very near castle Howard. Castle Howard, please. Sorry, sorry. We've just done south riding. I'm more or less in south riding. If south riding was a real place, this is more or less where it would be. Our magnificent Yorkshire access just won't quit listeners. Still. Oh, was that meant to be your show? Was that yours? I'm very much afraid it was, yes. Okay. Okay. A lot of people write letters in. A Raymond Briggs lives near Brighton, doesn't he? My understanding is he lives in a village called Westminster, which is probably about a 15 minute drive from where I am. So after this, I'm going to go around with some capes. Are you? That's very nice of you. Go and tell him we all think he's great. He'll love that. I will. I will. I probably won't get very close to the front door, but you know. He was certainly living there in 2015. When we filmed the film that we made for notes, notes from the sofa, in his amazing ramshackle house, his most incredible house full of full of stuff is. And at full of stuff that you recognize from the books as well, which is particularly exciting..

Brighton Castle Howard Raymond Briggs Oxfordshire north Yorkshire Howard Yorkshire John Westminster
"briggs" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

Breakfast Leadership

05:58 min | 6 months ago

"briggs" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

"To to look at as an option as well. Yeah you know these things are just nice to have or kind of you know. Sometimes we'll talk about some of the the what i'll call the quote unquote softer things at work. And because of that they can get labeled as maybe feel good things but the research each opposite of come out of the pandemic have been so powerful also. esta did some research there. Escort employee owned companies. Eastbound owned companies. And in my own experience. I'm on a a corporate director for an engineering firm here in colorado. That was a that. Isn't he's up. And what we did see is they were able to pivot into business models faster but i think it is the integration so for example this engineering company that i worked for they pivoted pretty quickly into industrial hygiene and talk about like somewhere where you really need to be when our air systems are in how how buildings are engineered is part of keeping us safe as we need these. Eric changes to happen. But rather than having this very kind of that that metaphor of the ship the these big ships turning super slow this firm really did act more like a school of fish or or a flock of birds as just being able to shift. But why was it. I hope that it's the employee ownership. That was a big part of that. Glue that i also think the bigger part again was this participation in distributive leadership where people were able to move much faster they were already connected before the pandemic so it just made that that shift so much easier so these things all the things that you talk about your speakers. Talk about on this podcast. They're not feel good soft things. There are hard things that lead to corporate performance and These companies outperformed a lot of other non employee owned companies according to the research because of that that special kind of sequence of ingredients employee ownership carrying about our long term future a lot of them have more distributed leadership in a lot of people. Just have this common unity. The community of people that allowed for a lot more model shifting and there's restaurants in that hospital service that are in that as well too so when you feel like. I'm not just a wait staff. I'm actually a member of this business that it's easy to say but it creates such a different model of how i think about what i do and it's so borton so a lot of us do believe all this will create a more durable vibrant economy long-term That our economy has it is now is just not sustainable But you know and it also helps keep the businesses a little bit more local You know to make sure that the dollars are recycling in communities. And i know when i buy something i am. It's a it's become unfortunate habit for me right now but i'm always buying something thinking. Where did the prophet of this purchase. Go like who's getting this money from this product that i bought. Who's who is it you know and when you buy from whether it's cooper ease stop You know when you like in ohio. There's two great E- sought breweries a great lakes brewing. And right rain guys when you buy from them. Where does the money go Part of it is being reinvested back into the business and that that helps from consumer relationship. I think So you know again. We're building an economic system using these different tools of employee ownership but it still takes a lot of leadership so all this stuff It matters it matters in terms of how the business performs nuts in. At least i hope that more organizations take a long hard look at this because i agree with you the way that the economy is is not sustainable for a lot of reasons interest rates inflation. We could go into five thousand directions that we we'll get we'll you know we'll see if chairman powell's available for phone call. Probably not him. I might be able to get paul. I might be able to get paul though that through a connection but But he's busy too so i love this conversation. Where can people find out more about you in this incredible work. You're doing so. I existed a few different planes so i have a. My website is a life in mosaic. Dot com my business. Urs called mosaic. Craciun a work directly for the university of california at san diego with bicester institute Dan you can find me on twitter So you know if anyone ever need help And wants to talk about this more or wants to ease up feasibility. Study might seem at bicester. The bicester institute loved to do that for you and we would love to work with you and help make that transition. But just general sense feel free to reach out I love the Actually as much as sometimes. I don't like twitter. The employee ownership community just some of the hashtags employee ownership or has hashtag east stop. It's a very healthy non truly community on twitter so just follow those hashtags a join us and kind of be a part of the Conversation here was going on because it's fun. There's great people out there and You know. I'm excited michael. That you're gonna you're gonna come into our community too so this is a it's it's a. It's a fun it's been diagram of amazing people. Don't thank you for that. And yes. I'll have all that information the show so jennifer. Thank you again for the work. You're doing It's going to make the world much better From employees work every aspect of life. So thank you so much for your time today. Thank you. Thanks for listening to the leadership. Part of the breakfast leadership network visit breakfast leadership dot com for tips on empowering your business and your life..

borton bicester institute chairman powell colorado Eric Craciun paul twitter ohio Urs university of california san diego michael jennifer
"briggs" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

Breakfast Leadership

06:38 min | 6 months ago

"briggs" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

"The tools. Will i the tool set but the skills to use those tools on. How do you work. Shift work Well and you know in our current news cycle. We hear a lot about people at tech. We hear a lot of people doing virtual work. And sometimes i worry like those things are getting forgotten in the design of them but that's just a real example of how this applies And and we forget about the people the mechanics of designing the business which is just. It doesn't even make sense at all but it happens every day. is given organizations that opportunity to hear a lot of times people call this the great reset and is an opportunity for companies to take a look at things and go all right if we had an opportunity to reinvent the wheel. We've always heard. Don't reinvent the wheel you know. What sometimes the wheel needs to get. Reinvented because that will Is a little warped and it's not a smooth ride so take the time to look at things all right how do we. How do we do things. You look at the challenge areas and this is where again having you know everybody feeling comfortable to share their insights and viewpoints Especially on the models that you work with it. It creates a lot of opportunity to bring things to light. And when the clarity is there that's when you see opportunities. I always go back to in recently. The scientist at the who was part of the team at three am the created the glue that ended up being on posted notes. You know it took years for them to figure out what they were going to do with that glue and then they stumbled upon it will stick it to little pieces of paper and stuff and next thing you know the the billion product Just because of creativity and an opportunity to organizations don't nurture creativity. It's okay. we got to get this done. Get this done. Get the stunk. At the time you know and and it's unfortunate because set creativity that comes up with more unique to do things or new opportunities for business growth or business ideas and it's a lost opportunity to many organizations face. Well they're such so in fairness. I've never been to three. Am but i've read a lot about. And i think they're fantastic. Example of a good incentive structure but also the corporate structure that. I've read about so much with them as they you know. If you've read about dunbar's number that we get to a certain size in it's really hard for us to hold the group in a way that's really healthy and my understanding a lot of times. They design their groups to be kinda human-sized so that people could interact and so that there was a it was a little bit of a lot probably a lot of social system design that went into. How do we look at groups is how do we look at impact. How we look at working together. And i love what you said. I'd be curious to know what you're hearing around out there. But i'm hearing more and more business. Leaders are just kind of wanting to forget about what happened with the pandemic move forward because we have so much fatigue from that you know. It was a very it was a hard time for people and so they just have this. Komo's nostalgia this desire. Just just get back to normal. And i have that to in fairness without taking the things like you said of learning from. How do we need to redesign it. But i'm concerned that they're not enough companies. That are taking that pause and saying fundamentally we have to think what we're doing And for those business owners to You know who are wanting to exit the business you know. Should i sell to pece just for my business. Oh what about what. Maybe i should sell it to the employees and not even knowing that that's an option and that goes down again back to the most fundamental of houses business owned and starting right there. One of the things. I'm seeing is a lot of in. We're seeing in different sectors. You know retail's one where And it was a mention. I think the wall street journal they call it the great resignation. You know where know a lot of people are leaving. That's why you're seeing a lot of problems and restaurants and that's why you're seeing the help wanted signs and a variety of different businesses because people aren't going back to those roles and there's a variety of reasons why i anticipate as more and more of the office type work Starts returning those organizations that are saying we want to get back to the way things were I think There's gonna be a lot of employees that are gonna say i'm not interested in that some gonna go look for a role that will allow me to work In an environment where. I can work remotely sometime in. Go into the office as well. I think hybrid if i had to pick a model Hybrid would be the one that i would probably lean towards you. I tend to work remote quite a bit so Easy for me to say that. But i think there's something to be said about face to face human interaction I think a lot of us of loss that and then i get why a lot of leaders are saying we just want to get back because it has been a very very tragic and challenging period of time in the grand scheme of things in our lives. It's not as long as it feels but oh boy does it. Feel like it's been going on forever. And i think organizations are really missing opportunity. And i'm not. I'm not saying organizations. Data completely revamped everything down to the logo. But i think there are opportunities to go. Okay what would we change if we could. You know what are some challenges that we were dealing with because we all had them beforehand. What can we do differently. And i love your example just gave about you know the the owner of the company is like you know what i'm i don't wanna go back. I want to sell now. I want to retire. Or i wanna do something different. And you know who's going to buy. How much business worth and you've got a bunch of employees but you know ideally the employees. Maybe have been there a long time. And they're like. Oh no you gonna sell to private equity firm. They're gonna just liquidate and do whatever and in all all these people are are no longer part of it or if if they believe in the cause whatever they were is you know that employee ownership component of it is an amazing opportunity because then the work continues on and beyond and Know it's it's a.

dunbar Komo the wall street journal
"briggs" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

Breakfast Leadership

07:25 min | 6 months ago

"briggs" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

"Working on this jenas. Working on this gym is working on. This nathan is working on this in and you understand you have a more you know again. It really depends on the individual. Some people don't care but some people are more of the hour on a look at this from like ten thousand foot view. What is the organizational. What's all the moving parts. How do they all work together. What are some things we can do again. Getting rid of the silos on a work there and a lot of that again comes from the leadership and designing an environment. Where that is not only nurtured. But you know it's definitely taking care of annex locust and making sure that that's what what happens when i it makes me think so. I just got back from some travels to accompany. That's transitioning to an e saw. They're gonna do it slowly over time. And i worked in an east hop new belgium brewing for you know more than a decade in the thing that both of those businesses and actually a lot of employee owned businesses. Have in common is. They're they're afraid of their culture becoming to corporate Have been thinking a lot about this. What does that really mean and a lot of the things that we're talking about could be corporate so alignment who go k. r. scoreboards aligning people's. Were very common in any business inc so to me. It's a question of how do you use them. That makes it corporate or not corporate when you focus on the community of people doing the work when you don't talk about executing it in a linear fashion but together collectively were not only aligned but you're were unified we want to activate that work we wanna put energy into it. We want to bring life to it and to me. It's not the tools of strategic alignment. But it's how leaders used them how they regard people and you know. I love that word community because the context i use it as a common unity one. We all wanna make some money and we wanna help. Everybody grows some wealth and we just care about the long term health of this business. Which means we're going to put our decisions. Do a different. I'm gonna see more rigor. But i don't mean we're going to go through analysis paralysis and we're gonna talk a lot more conceptually about what what are the effects of our decision And is this not only the right thing for finance but is also the right thing for hr is it. The right thing for For working hospitality How is gonna show to our guests. How are they going to experience it. And so they're just more holistic decisions from that context but You know it doesn't mean that these businesses are taking the lessons report perations. I think they're actually taking the lessons of utility. But they're taking the lessons of how they use the poorly and kind of flipping down on the heads ing. Wow we're just going to do this a lot better And they usually wanna be effective business first and then they figure out how to get efficient and we've seen a lot of corporations in the traditional or modern context i guess worry about efficiency before getting effective And that's the short termism. That's a fundamental difference. I think between short-termism in 'long-termism long-termism wants ineffective business short-termism wants inefficient business. And we have to be both. It's just a matter of order. I still work with a physician. I used to work in healthcare and zahn a lot of government panels with the physician and everybody was talking about it. Needs to be this set up this way. It's got flow through this and this and you know he came in and kinda looked at like. It's good enough. Let's go and he had like no patience for in a i mean i'm not saying he was systems designs or anything like that he. He wasn't obviously he. Was you know. He led groups and it was head of the college of physicians For a period of time so he knows what he's doing but he's like why are we wasting time on this. How do we get everything to work. you know together and we'll figure out why we're working together because if we sit here. We tried design everything. But we're not. Actually you know in using lean technology. We're not we're not in jambo. We're not worthy work is. we're not. we're just back here looking 'solas let's get in figure figured out and understand that. Yeah it might be a little bumpy. And i know you know many companies that you've helped you initially it's like okay. This is a little. We're feeling like you know toddlers learning how to walk again but it's okay it's it's actually good because when you take a step back and you can look in everyone. Seeing things in can contribute in a way where that environment nurtures that. That's when you start having breakthroughs and say yeah the corporate has it all this way. That's great we can use some of these tools around make sure that we have the human component to it not to pick on corporations. But we're gonna add little more human element to this. Yes hope people actually enjoy the work that we're doing and to put it like in a real tangible example So i was working with this company. It was a really fun experience and experiment to do. They were concerned about diversity. In their workforce as are a lot of companies. And it's a concern for us collectively as a society And they were wondering why they weren't getting more diversity of applicants individuals particular manufacturing jobs. They were tough jobs. And when i went in and looked at it all their ships were designed for twelve hour shifts and Twelve hour shifts. If you've ever done they're really hard. You're on your feet a lot Especially if they're rotating in this company did have rotating shifts so it can contract cure brain along with your sleep patterns and there really is a pretty narrow group of people who want to do it but who can do it. So many people have daycare options. It excludes certain people just like if your student in what your energy to go to your learning adult or otherwise. Or you know. If there's things in life that you need to take care of it really disrupts that But again the business designed about being efficient so the twelve hour shifts mechanically or the most efficient so if they would have added some more Like frac fractional ships done a few four hour shifts in had a different rotation it definitely added complexity to this shift scheduling system for the people that are doing the scheduling but it allowed more people to work in the work environment. It created space for more people who may be had things in life that they needed to do So you know when we look at the financial system as they were the efficiency of the money the efficiency of how the labor was spent versus a social system. And how are we going to invite people into this work environment. They just weren't. They weren't considering the very narrow set of people that they were. That would even be able to do those jobs. And so that's a real thing and then to make it even worse. This particular company wasn't doing things. A lot of your other speakers have talked on of. How do we manage our our human energy in this system. That's incredibly draining They weren't giving people the skills and.

new belgium college of physicians nathan paralysis zahn ing
"briggs" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

Breakfast Leadership

07:59 min | 6 months ago

"briggs" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

"Those shares are held in a trust and the employee share in the value that they help create. And i think that's the line a lot of issues people share the value they helped create. And that's a really important thing. So what do i do I spend a lot of time with bicester institute at the university of california san diego. I'm also a commissioner on the colorado commission for employee ownership in colorado And i'm also the. I'm working on a project for reinventing work and how does that go in honestly. Sometimes i struggle with because i think fundamentally. I'm not sure that we can truly reinvent work until we can reinvent how businesses are owned. And that's just one of the things that continues to go around as intel people have access to not only labor income but also the capital income that so many kind of wealth as built on wheel knee labor income. We all need our income that we get you know. Just 'cause buy groceries. We pay rent with pair of mortgage but we also need for those other of our lives in you know in some cases for our children that wealth income that will sustain us after work and You know. I think the statistics on for kesar pretty sad and so in my world East stop is kind of the solution to that. But he stops wanna aren't the only version of employee ownership there's employees in cooperatives. There's a lot of great companies that do that. So there's there's a spectrum of one employee ownership can look like my expertise just happens to be any sauce amazing and let's dive into subsequent. Bet you know why. An organization would benefit from doing that. And i know we. We used a dirty word During our pre show called engagement. And you had the lightning thing about it which is is definitely Educated me and brought to my attention some additional things. I agree with your assessment on that word so ensure a little bit more about. He's upset and stuff that the that really really beneficial. Well i kinda tackle bag gauge moment like it's such a tired word. It's become a euphemism kinda not that different from culture. Everyone's culture volta color but we know there's very bad cultures. Every company has a culture. But it's just like how bad it is and so we don't talk about those ideas with enough precision and so With employee ownership are or each obser- any kind of an employee ownership vehicle It really isn't there. Are some jobs that we all have to do. that are tedious of mundane. Are just aren't good. Jobs are things that we have to do in produce it. Frankly that's fine but that's just a part of our existence in the business in so when you can marry these ideas of just getting your tasks done in a day plus being a citizen of your business and being able to contribute Wearing this other hat of. I'm not only completing tasks by helping to grow the value of the company and i'm looking at the customers and i'm concerned about their joy when the interact with my product concerned about the customer engagement that combination of employees care it really creates a powerful To make a higher performing business in like a lot of other speakers. I do believe that we have healthier humans that contributes to help your business results. I think for employee owned companies. The addition there is they actually care about that because they're gonna share in in some of that wealth it's created they're gonna share beyond just you know token bonus or or what i'm getting my paycheck and also it gives value in knowing that you're working on something that is part of you. As far as you are a partial owner or an owner use the word partial. I'm an owner of this organization. So therefore i need to make sure that i'm doing my part to make sure that everything we do is successful because that will make me successful in get more sort. Wanna look at it definitely not going to use engaged. I think you're more invested in where you actually Yes the mundane works. The tedious work. We've all had to do it. And some of us thrive at it and some of us would rather have root canals all day. Long to deal with the kind of accounting's one of those things for some people you know. I used to be an accountant. And now anytime i have to do any of it because i did too. I did too much of it. Ideas my career for awhile so as i want but at the end of the day you know get this is an important component to the greater scheme of everything that we do and also i think gives the permission and again depending on how organizations are set up but it gives people the permission where they can speak up in bring awareness to situations instead of if i say something to the management. I'm gonna get yelled at in then they're not gonna do anything with it. Where it cuts out those silos that we see in pretty much every organization. Some of those silos are are downright bunkers. You know that are wartime proof. And you're like okay. This is not gonna penetrate anything and it's frustrating when you wanna systems guy like me is like okay. Let's do this and this waiter where you're gonna have to get approvals from how many people wonder nothing gets done when i think there's a lot of good like packed into what you just said so simply plugging in an isa. So ease up is a vehicle of corporate financed. It allows business owners to transfer ownership to their employees through trust and the laws that were put in place back in the nineteen seventies about this allow certain tax benefits in a really kind of our whether they're not they are in a retirement plan and so simply plugging in any stop into a company or selling to the employees in the streets actually doesn't create that meaning So it really still requires really strong powerful leadership. it's just. Those leaders have an extra tool in their tool kit to be able to work with people. And when we look at our incentive structures which all the stuff you said. I think fundamentally kind of goes around these incentive structures You know a lot of businesses. They'll do you know incentives. Which i like them. They're good. They enable people to get more money. But they tend to be focused on individualism in my own ambition. And what can i drive. Or what my unit drive and so when you look at broad based gain sharing cash options that everyone in the company has opportunity to get Or in this case broad-based stock that everybody will get through. It helps check the horizons of like. I'm looking long term. I'm looking three five even longer. In what is a health this business in the case of short-term cash gain during plans people do care about how their work integrates with other people's work because it's not only about is my or my function being successful or i being successful in driving. Xyz it it it creates stat Coordination and collaboration effect where people do want or need their work. They do care about the upstream and downstream effects of what they do. And but it's it doesn't happen just automatically. It's it's really this tool kit that we give leaders in the c. suite in business to make sure that they.

bicester institute colorado commission for employ university of california intel san diego colorado
"briggs" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

05:13 min | 8 months ago

"briggs" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"Apply today we're excited to share one of the first episodes of on new podcast. My unsung hero. There are several other episodes that you can also here right now in the feed for that show so please head on over to listen and subscribe ign shankar survey danton and from hidden brain media. This is my unsung hero. Hey i wanted to share my story about an unsung hero shankar. I would like to talk about my hero on heroes. The men in the panama hat on the flight to boston is the plane. Unsung hero would definitely have to be my fifth grade teacher. Mrs abrahams she was to. I don't know who they were. I can't even remember their face. But i do remember what they did for me. I can't even express to you how much you've changed my life. Thank you thanks. Thank you for making me feel heard today. Story comes from. Jackie breaks and is she gently touched my arm. She said really. Don't wait moment. That changed jacky. Bricks is life came on a saturday afternoon in august. Two thousand six. I was attending what was billed. As a women's health conference turned out it was really a pitch for cosmetic surgery. Which really irritated me. But anyway at that point in my life. I was fifty two years old and for several years. I'd been working sixty hour workweeks in this high pressure. It job i had very little time for myself. So i really wanted to go and here this one particular speaker as a few hundred women milled. Around different booths picking brochures and eating crew to taes offered by the black painted. White shirted waitstaff. This lovely dark-haired woman came up to me and she said. Excuse me. But i can't help but notice your arm. I had what my boss later described as what he thought was a rose tattoo. It was on my upper right vice. And i was uncharacteristically wearing a sleeveless dress that day. Well this woman who. I have come to refer to as angela although i really don't know if that's how she introduced herself or affects the name. I have since given her but she asked me. If i'd seen a dermatologist. About this smallish. Irregular almost birthmark looking spot and i assured her i had she pressed me and said when and i had to stop to think i counted back. The munson no years. It had been over three years. I was supposed to follow up a year after But i was so caught up in my job. I never did. The dermatologist's office never reached out to me. Either so blah blah blah times on so. This woman urged me to call my doctor monday morning. First thing please don't wait. She said she explained. She was a nurse for plastic surgeon. Initi- gently touched my arm. She said really. Don't wait and thanks to her. I didn't wait in the following. Weeks of doctors appointments biopsies in the surgery or all a bit of a blurb but because everything very fast but my melanoma was removed and my six inch ragged scar. That travels almost from the top of my shoulders down. My arm is my everyday reminder of her angela. My guardian angel. She saved my life. Melanoma is a cancer. That metastasized is faster than any other except pancreatic. And if i hadn't listened to her. I probably wouldn't be here so to my hero nurse angela. Thank you for my life. Jackie briggs of portland oregon. She tells us that about two years after that conference and her melanoma surgery. She quit that sixty hours a week. I teach she also took up mountain climbing and summited twelve peaks when we spoke with her. She was happily retired going kayaking hiking and motorcycle riding whenever possible. We have an unsung hero of our own to share. Today laura chorale who is our lead producer on this project. Over the past few months laura has taken on my unsung hero with great skill and conscientiousness. This.

Mrs abrahams danton shankar jacky panama angela Jackie boston melanoma munson Jackie briggs cancer portland oregon laura chorale laura
"briggs" Discussed on Higher Journeys with Alexis Brooks

Higher Journeys with Alexis Brooks

05:14 min | 8 months ago

"briggs" Discussed on Higher Journeys with Alexis Brooks

"The you are. I know you're okay. Journey is we have a little bit of a dicey connection because kevin mentioned that. He's kind of out outside of the I think words really wired. Your connection may not be as strong as some others so bear with us but we just wanna make sure we can get your message across so anyway as i was saying we're talking. Lifelong experience are nearly sixty years at this point right. I want to talk about several key. key epiphanies. I think you had On this journey of your encounters. I wanna start with when you were eight years old and i think the best place to start is the beginning. And you're telling our audience what happened eight years old. You're in your bathroom doing whatever you're doing and what happened okay. Yes any old other. Child is always sensitive to the frequencies that founders. While i was taking the the i felt a change in the vibrational frequency within the buffalo i looked to my right into beings appeared. They were slightly elevated off the flaw at both both long blonde shoulder-length web So tight fall deep. Blue eyes us had very attractive and they were talking to one another. At which i could understand i was terrified as you can imagine being an eight year old to beings materializing your vaso another side that we're speaking telepathically to speaking about me not to me and i remember the female head amy's day I know them very well of the sixty s an off the mail. day Question of and said is the by an ac l. Said yes this is why. And then she said i usually says about and he said yes. This is about shaw. Alleging again question. Look at him. As he's frightened by presents they small. He's on educated and a said yes. I will guide him. I will take him. There was some other conversation in there. an internet asked announced of this house frightened to death. I get out of the boss the to cold it was chevron came into see why was still in the mouth the close gold unexplained beings and she said it was just my immagination And it wasn't a now instilling contact with him to this day..

kevin buffalo amy shaw chevron
How to Develop Your Leadership With the Enneagram

The $100 MBA Show

02:01 min | 11 months ago

How to Develop Your Leadership With the Enneagram

"Ever wonder why certain people can just get under your skin at work. Or maybe you feel like you aren't having the right conversations in your team meetings more than likely your team is composed of people with many different. Any ram tights. The any graham is a powerful model to help you understand your own leadership style and the style of those you work with in this session. I'll i explain what the any graham is and how it applies to leadership and business then give insights on how the graham can help you. Better understand yourself and the motivations and working styles of your colleagues then. i'll share. Why tool is far more powerful than traditional tools. Such as disk or myers briggs readership growth. And how it's particularly impactful in unlocking team performance. Finally i'll share the best assessment tools and a resource site for you to learn how to find the graham to things like how to give effective feedback to those of different types. Some do's and don'ts kind of delegate to different types or how to resolve conflict even how to be more influential and persuasive based on your tight so my firm taj leadership has been at the forefront of applying the model of the any graham to help executives. Get clarity on these types of questions that i started with and help them shift to a higher level performance. My team and i created a resource site filled with tools to help you. Apply the wisdom of the graham in your working relationships. But let's start with. What is the any of graham so the word any graham derives from the greek words. Any ah which means nine and graham which means something written or drawn and it refers to a nine pointed figure inscribed in a circle there are nine different primary types nine different leadership styles.

Graham Myers Briggs
S6 E9 - How to identify what you are passionate about

Courage to Fight Again

26:16 min | 1 year ago

S6 E9 - How to identify what you are passionate about

"This is the we served now. What podcast and if you're anything like me you've had a ton of questions after leaving the military and the lack of answers has left you frustrated and probably a little confused. This show is here to help you make sense of the craziness that is post military life so you can turn your post military life into your best life. Money was aaron perkins a. Us army combat veteran husband to a beautiful wife. Daddy to amazing kiddos and on this episode of the show. I want to talk to you about identifying your passion in life and how you do that. That's a big question. I think we all have even if we haven't put into so many words like how do identify my passion in life. It's like well aaron. Who are you to talk about identifying passion. Well number one. I've identified my own number two. I developed a process to do just that net processes called the nine line framework which i put into the book called resolve. That is just a step by step guide for you. The veteran to help you to rediscover purpose meaning and you guessed it. Passion in your post military life before i dive into the episode today. I want to take a few minutes until you a little story. I myself love stories. I love hearing them. And i love telling them and this story is really near and dear to my heart because it's about my son. His name is christopher and you may have heard me talk about him on the show before But this story. I've never actually shared on the show because actually just happened about a week or two ago and my son christopher almost twelve years old. he's a normal kid. Not a huge fan of school. Really good in school gets really good grades Does everything well is i. I don't know if i would say popular. But you know people like him he. He's just a normal kid. And he. And i we have this unique Father son relationship. I mean we joke around a lot. We have a very very similar Sense of humor. So we have memes that will share back and forth and that's actually across our entire family that we can laugh at together and everything but this story about his passion for video games. Now you might be thinking well yeah. He's eleven year old boy. eleven year. Old kid boy girl the one but he's eleven year old kid and he loves video games. Yeah what kid doesn't we're here's the thing. He is not just passionate about video games. He is passionate about tech in school and his technical classes studying python programming language. He studying java script and his his his little techy and he loves the technical aspect of it. Well there's this that he has for one of his platforms. And it's called beets saber. You may have heard of it. It's on playstation four for vr. And it's on oculus quest to In fact every year. we're pretty much every year. We get a family gift at christmas and this past year. The family gift that we all could use was the oculus quest to and that is a a virtual reality gaming system. That's fully wireless but the headset on. Hold the controllers and you could just play play games fun and while he has been absolutely just going nuts over this thing having so much fun with it. Well again. this game beats saber. You can create your own levels if you modify the game and there is no right or wrong i should. There is a right or wrong way to do it but there is no manual that you can look at and say okay. This is how you modify find the game. So he gets on discord. he's he finds Some experts who know about modifying the game he chats with him for hours. Some of some of them are as friends he's he's played games with everything and he's talking to them. Like how do i modify this game. What do i need to do. He figures out the programs. He needs to us figures out how to roll the game back to a previous edition. Now he knows how to launch the game with these modifications so he can play his own levels on the game. Keep in mind. This had nothing to do with school this nothing to do with any requirement. This was just something that he wanted to do something that he is naturally gifted at and naturally naturally passionate about and that is that's what that's one of the things i wanna point out here. Today is your passion in life is most likely going to be something that you are naturally geared toward you are naturally good at and maybe even it may even be something that you have spent a lot of time practicing and preparing at and you've spent a lot of time working on developing that skill. It could be anything from woodworking to the medical field to an to. I'm the the passion ideas for your life are virtually endless. But you heard me referenced. The nine line framework earlier. And as i look at this nine line framework. You know again. It's it's this step by step guide. It is the process that helps you rediscover passion in your life after the military. And i look at these these lines in here. These chapters and the storage is told about my son. I can see him in these chapters. I can see how his passion is coming out just in the things that he is naturally doing now in the last episode i mentioned and talked about quite a bit actually line four. Which is what is my personality type. you know. why does it matter. And it's not even so much. Why does it matter. But how does that. Impact me and my passion and my purpose for life. And so i'm going to touch on line for a little bit today but i want to give you some examples from line five later in the show about discovering that passion in your life but line four again i used sixteen personalities dot com. You can go there right now. You can take this free assessment to figure out to learn what your personality type is and again that is not the only tool you can use you. Can use myers briggs. You can use the disk assessment. There are so many tools you can use to figure out your personality because in the military unless you are you had a way different experience than i did. They really ask you. What your what your passion was or even more specifically. They didn't ask what your personality was. Just said hey here the jobs you can pick from pick a job do your job and then you go your military career and you get out and now you're here listening to this show and saying man. How do identify my passion in life. What is it that i am passionate about. How do i find that. Well you'll hear me say this more than once. Pick up a copy of the resolve book. That is really your first step to figuring out your passion and your purpose and your meaning in your life after the military but again light for just goes over. What is your personality type. It walks you through that process of discovering who you are and who you're meant to be and line five asks another question it says what do i have to offer. And that's very specific to you. What do you have to offer the world. Because i believe that. A life focused on making a difference in the world as a life worth living. I think that's really what we're all after is that we want to make a difference. Maybe it's just in our own personal lives. Maybe it's in the lives of our friends or family or our church or our school whatever it may be or or if your teacher may be your students you want to make that positive impact and so line five walks you through that process of figuring out what it is that you have to offer so coming up after the break. That's what i'm going to talk about. I'm gonna share some examples and walk you through blind five and sharing this for free and you can pick up a copy of the book on amazon or on kerr's to fight again dot com but i'm gonna share the the line five here with you and some examples that can help you figure out what it is you are passionate about in your life. That's after the break. Stay with us. Many americans today. Don't realize the stress and anxiety they feel is most likely because of their finances according to bankrate.com more than six out of ten people couldn't cover a one thousand dollar emergency seven out of ten. Don't budget regularly. An eight out of ten are living paycheck to paycheck to these describe you. Are you ready to live like others. Can't too many make the mistake of budgeting their lifestyle instead of budgeting their basic needs. I my friend. Marco over at mc business lab has a simple process to automate the basic things. You need to live and then never looking at one of those bills again. Head over to live like others can't dot com to get on the wait list for his own line course to learn this automation skill. That will significantly reduce your stress and anxiety. And if you think one on one attention could be the way for you. You can also schedule your free consultation with marco once again that's live like others can't dot com get on the path to your dream life today all right so as we go into these examples. I want you to have an open. Mind here right some of these examples. You may not even thought of. But i i want you to keep in mind that some of these may not apply to you. Some of the may apply to you perfectly but before we get into those examples and went to review. Read you this quote from a retired general martin. Dempsey actually had him on the show. A few seasons ago A great conversation. You can go check that out. He talks about you know continuing to provide leadership in your post military life again. If you don't know years he is the former or the lissi would number was of eighteenth chairman of the joint chiefs of staff and so again great guy. We had a great conversation. Should go check that out. But i want to read you a quote. He said sometimes we wait for thunderclaps drum rolls and clearly on calls to alert us to what's important when actually it's most often the subtle and persistent signals around us. That make the most difference. I want you to think about that for a minute when you think about your passion and life and what. You are naturally geared toward what are those subtle and persistent signals. So in in the book. I talk about the subtle and persistent signal. I got even as a child as a teenager. Really that writing is something i am. Naturally gifted at is something. I'm naturally good at in fact My mother found a poem that i had written She was cleaning. My room was teenagers. Don't ask me why she was cleaning my room and she didn't make me do it but i'm very grateful for her but she was cleaning my room and she comes into the room and she sees this poem that i wrote and when i get home from school she asked me about it. She says hair. Where did you copy this phone for. Almost didn't copy it. I wrote it. And i'm all of a sudden proud of myself because see my mother had always been this voracious reader with a strong command of the english language so hearing her say something like that. Which implied the poem was of this incredibly high quality right. It has stuck with me to this day. That aaron you you're naturally gifted at that and that the poetry. It wasn't anything i had to do. It was something i had in my head and maybe even my heart and just wrote it down. It was something. I felt naturally wrong to do. Just like my son was naturally drawn to develop this modification for this game and figure out all the additional software he needed and how to modify it and how to play the game afterward. I was actually drawn to writing so in that case even though my son and i we get along great and we have great father son relationship were way different as far as our passions. Go and that's okay. It's the thing is my. My writing skills are they. Were constantly improving through my life and the funny thing is even as i wrote the book wonder like am i the most qualified person to to write this book. Maybe maybe i am gifted at writing right. Maybe i am good at this. But am i the most qualified person and so why do i tell you this right. I tell you this. Because i want you to realize something that i'm still learning myself. The skills you have are probably around eighty percents better than you actually think. I want to say that again. The skills that you have are probably around eighty percent better than you actually think. Now what are get the eighty percent number. You know statistically they say what is seventy. Six percent of statistics are made up on the spot. I will say this. Evidence is more inaccessible and nature. But the things you are passionate about. You are geared toward learning more about it it just this natural thing. It's not something that you can really force. Can you learn things and learn more about Passions in your life. of course. you can't can you learn how to take care of the zales in your garden or in your new hangar. The year rose garden right. Is rose garden on. That makes sense but i looked at my window and saw zulia so i i mentioned it so it. Can you learn about that. Scher will you be passionate about it. Maybe you can develop a passion for it but passionate in your life is is this area of your life. That's built in. Its this natural part view. And so where do you go from here right. What are those examples that promised you a before we get into those examples. I want to share with you just a few questions that you can write down to ask yourself and you can kind of fill these out like to help you figure out where you go from here and figure out what it is you have to offer the world so the first question goes right along the lines of my story. I just told about not only about my son but about myself. I have always been good at blank. Fill in the blank there. What is it that you have always been good at something. That seems easy for you for me. It was english and grammar and for my son. Tech is easy for him. Technologies easy for him super easy a he is are basically our systems administrator at the house. he knows so much about For my daughter the things she is naturally good at and she finds easy music. She finds that incredibly easy from wife. She finds the medical field incredibly easy to pick up on. And it's not because it's not challenging to learn it's because we have a passion for those particular things in our lives. Here's a second question you can ask yourself. I don't know why. But i really just enjoy doing the following things and then list those things what things that you do really bring you joy for me. It's writing it's crafting something from nothing. It's looking at this blank page and putting words on it and impacting the world with a those words. And let's see what's the next one number three this. This is kind of long ones. All probably read it a couple of times. I never thought about what. I'm naturally good at and what i enjoy until what so for this question. Think of a time your life in which our knowledge or skills or ability was needed. Think of a time when you were able to use it and you suddenly realized that brought you joy so i to read that one again and explain that a little more. I never thought about what. I'm naturally good at and what i enjoy until this particular event in my life. I never thought about me being really good at writing until my mother when i was fourteen. Fifteen years old picked up that poland in my room and said hey this is really good. Where did you copy this from. I never thought about that. My son may not have ever thought about how good he is attack. Until i pointed it out and said dude that is amazing that you figure that out on your own you contact the experts in and you did everything needs to do on your own and so when you think we think of that like okay. I never thought about what i'm naturally good at. And what i enjoy until a particular event in your life and you think about when your knowledge or your skills or abilities were needed and and then you say okay. I was able to use it at that point in my life and then you suddenly realize man that made me feel really good. That brought me joy. That was dare. I say it fun and a lot of times. We as adults we. We tend to tend to think like well. You know i'm an adult. I don't need to have funding more. I shouldn't be having fun anymore. I'm more focused on business and and making money taking care of my family. Those are all great things but at the end of the day passion following that passion pursuing that passion your life a lot of times what it feels like is fun just a lot of fun number four thing. You can ask yourself. I was able to make a difference in a person's life by using one or more of my unique abilities which not only made a difference but it brought me joy as well and the question is list those skills or abilities that you use to impact someone's life or to make a difference in the world for me. They'll be writing for my son that might be tech my daughter that might be music for my wife that might be the medical field. So there's so many things that again virtually unlimited number of things where you can find passion in your life and it's those things that you are naturally geared toward they. Here's a few examples. I'm going to review these for you just to give you a sense of where you can find passion in your life and don't get caught up on the stories themselves. I want you to imagine yourself. What is it that you personally find your passionate about. Here's example number one. I was a cormon in the navy. And i learned a lot about helping others in times of medical crisis. I found so much joy. In this. I knew my job well and i knew i was making a difference. Pretty simple right pretty direct and so this person says hey. I knew what i was doing was making a difference. And i found joy in it. Here's another really good one along the video games. A video games idea. I love playing video games call of duty fortnight minecraft you name it. I get a sense of joy out of playing them and truth be told. I'm pretty good at it. My unique personality which i found in line for which i now understand. It equips me well as a teacher and so a combined those elements to start a video game players club in my community. We get together. We eat snacks. Play video games. Hold tournaments and get to know each other better. It's such a great time. And i love it. So being a woman in the navy versus playing video games way different right but still these people can find passion in these things see. Here's a here's another one very a very hands on example. I've never really enjoyed school or sitting in the classroom. But one thing i do enjoy working with my hands getting my hands dirty now that i know my unique personality type again that he learned in line for i understand more about wild like this type of work and why i tend to dislike sitting in the classroom. I love solving problems. I distinctly remember one time when my elderly neighbors toilet was leaking. She asked me. If i knew someone who could help and gladly volunteered myself. I checked out the situation figured out what. The problem was unseated. The toilet installed a new wax ring and reseeded the toilet. She was so grateful. And i had fixed a problem for her. I felt really good about myself. That's huge The the the What do you call it. The joy the inner joy that comes from making a positive difference in someone else's life is absolutely huge. Now here's here's the last example share with you because we're running up on time but this one. I really liked this one. Because i have a dog. I love my dog and a lot of you probably have pets as well but this one says. I am a pet whisper. Yes it may sound silly to some. But i have an incredible heart for dogs cats birds and just about any other animal who is suffering or quote unquote down on their luck. In fact i have adopted two dogs and two cats. I've them better lives. This has been so rewarding to me and it is a passion. I continue to pursue. See the thing is there is not one specific passion that we are all going to find fulfilling the passion in your life is going to be your own. Here's the last thing. I want to share with you how we are built as humans. We're designed to live our best life in the context of relationships with other people. I to say that again as humans. We're are designed to live our best lives in the context of relationships with other people. You know chances are we're not all going to be billionaires or a world famous politicians. Are you know billboard topping musicians but we can all make a difference when we find that passion in our lives. We all have a lot of questions but the most important question you can ask yourself is this have. I accepted the forgiveness of sins. That only comes through faith in jesus christ. I hope you enjoyed this episode. Hope it's been helpful for you and that you've learned at least a little bit about identifying that passion in your life again you can pick up a copy of the resolve book at courage to fight again dot com or on amazon and i will share those links in the show notes as i typically do. Leave us a review. I tunes at definitely helps so much. Of course follow social media kurds. Finding in dot com is our website. Thank you so much for listening. We will see you next time.

Aaron Perkins Christopher Aaron Us Army Myers Briggs Zulia Bankrate.Com Joint Chiefs Of Staff Kerr Dempsey Marco Scher Amazon Martin Tech
An Amateur Detective in a Quest for Truth

MANslaughter

02:05 min | 1 year ago

An Amateur Detective in a Quest for Truth

"Sarah palin. I'm a criminal behaviorist and homicide investigator for six episodes. We've told you a story about the nineteen. Seventy shooting of former policeman verne's stored off to share a little about the story behind the story with me. Today are some of the creators and participants of the show including dorothy marsk. Vern stocks niece. She explored his death for her book with one shot. Welcome dorothy hi. Sarah how are you doing. I'm doing great dorothy. You spent years thinking about what happened in this house early. On the morning of march first nineteen seventy. Tell us about your journey. Well i'd always thought along with my family that there had been some miscarriage of justice and there were rumors floating around that. Suzanne didn't actually pull the trigger that night and we always wondered why she only spent eleven months in a hospital after confessing to murder and so shannon. I talked a lot about this. And i would say for ten years. We kept trying to figure out what happened. Suzanne and her family. We looked everywhere and this was before the internet. I traveled a lot. Every city be doing consulting workshop. Been i'd find a phone book and look for david. Briggs suzanne starbuck donna briggs to try to find any of them not realizing that most of them have changed their names until the internet came and shannon found on find a grave the grave of daniel store doc suzanne youngest son the one that my had adopted and from there she was able to piece together where they were in what their names were. So i went to tennessee against the protests of shannon. Who said you know somebody in that house murdered my father and my friend who said you can't go to tennessee. It's dangerous but i had to go. I wanted to know the truth. I wanted to know really in the beginning. Just who murdered my uncle

Dorothy Marsk Dorothy Hi Verne Suzanne Sarah Palin Vern Shannon Briggs Suzanne Starbuck Donna Briggs Dorothy Sarah Doc Suzanne David Daniel Tennessee
S6 E8 - Life: TBD

Courage to Fight Again

22:08 min | 1 year ago

S6 E8 - Life: TBD

"This is the we served now. What podcast and if you're anything like me you've had a ton of questions. After leaving the military in the lack of answers has left you frustrated in probably more than a little confused. This show is here to help you make sense of what can sometimes be craziness that is your life after the military. See you can turn your post military life into your best life. Now when i was working on this show. I thought you know. I don't even know what this next. Show season six episode. Eight is going to be about so in the show. Topic is making my notes. I just put to be determined. Dvd to be determined. And i thought you know what that is a perfect title or or maybe more appropriately. I think it's a good topic especially right now as it feels like we are nearing the end of this year. Long over a year now global pandemic that is covid nineteen and the truth is it's it feels like our lives have been in a to be determined status for that entire time right so you can't go anywhere you can't really get out of the house much. Could there's not a lot to do now if you like the outdoors. Maybe this was the perfect time for you to do that. but you wanna go shopping. You want to go out to dinner somewhere. We'll sorry you can't because everything is closed so our lives of felt like we're in a to be determined status but you know pandemic aside. Maybe you're wondering some more practical things you know. Maybe you're wondering if you ever be happy or if you ever get married or if you'll ever have kids or maybe you're wondering if the tonight is in your ears. Whatever shut up. I know i wonder sometimes. Or if you're ptsd symptoms will ever subside. I'm willing to bet that you felt an and maybe you're feeling right now that your life is on hold it. It's all in this kind of this murky to be determined status so my question to you is this. How will you know when your life is no longer on. Hold in this episode. I'm gonna share six elements of forward progress with you and buckle up. Because they're not easy. But i can assure you they are worth it. So by way of introduction mining aaron perkins. I'm a us army combat veteran also hosted. This podcast. I've been focusing on the veteran community. You basically ever. Since i got out you know i should be more honest with that right for a very long time after i got out on myself and focused on figuring out what my next steps were what my forward progress looked like once. I finally kind of got a handle on what my own life was looking like or what. It should look like what i wanted it to look like. I thought you know what. I can't keep this to myself. This is not something that i can say. Okay well i figured it out. All my other veteran brothers and sisters can just figure it out for themselves. So i wrote a book called resolve. That is a step by step guide. That takes you through the process of rediscovering purpose after the military but that aside today i want to talk about something really specific and and and a lot of the elements of the book. Come into to today's show. But i want to talk about those six elements afford progress with you. So look no matter where you're at you can live your best life. No matter what phase your life is in your best days are ahead of you and that and that's a key element and it leads right into this first piece. I want to talk about. Get your mind right. And i know you've heard so much about it. No doubt about mindset and how important your mindset is and how much it matters this. Honestly the most important aspect. Because if you don't get your mind right you are setting yourself up for failure if you are going into any challenge. Excuse me any challenge in your life. And you haven't i said okay. Let me you visualize what i'm going to do. Maybe let me rehearse it so to speak. Let me planet out now. Let me go tackle it. If you don't do those things then you are really like. I said setting yourself up to fail but more important than all those all. Those things i just mentioned is what comes before that and that is believing that you're going to be successful. So here's the thing when it comes to mind set right. It is not just a one time event. It's not just this decision. You make to say okay. Well i'm going to be Positive in this particular in this particular regard or I am going to say okay. I'm gonna change my mindset for this one time only. I know i normally have a negative outlook and i think that nothing is going to go my way and i it seems like life is crashing in on me but this one time. I'm going to believe it's going to get better. It's going to be better. Look your mindset. it's a regular event. It's not just a one time event. Maybe it's daily. It might be several times a day. Mindset is absolutely huge and a big part of the mindset is asking the why behind your desire to move forward or more specifically than. This is where i told you some elements of the book will come in. Maybe even the why try and so in the resolve book So i put together for the book. What is called the nine line framework. It is a guide a plan for you. The veteran to step through one step at a time for rediscovering your purpose after the military and line one in this nine line framework is why. Try you know we've already had purpose. We've already done so many things for our country and for allies for families. Why try and that. And that's one of the questions you have to answer in the book. I share more about how to get to that point right but element too so i wanna get your mind right get that mindset all clicking in the right direction element to is discover your purpose and you've heard me talk about a few times you've heard me say that discovery purpose rediscover your purpose even on this show on this episode and again talk a lot about this in the book and i wrote it with the belief that you do not have to suffer through life after the military. I'm going to say that again. You do not have to just suffer through life after the military because there is life after your military service you know. Maybe it's a whole new career or a whole new hobby or new opportunities. You simply couldn't take advantage of you. Were in the military purpose. Looks different for all of us. When i'm friends he was a medic In my unit that we deployed with and he is. He's big into fishing like that's his thing now. I'm not talking like you know. He just goes allen out on the lake every now and then this guy is a competitive fishermen really really great at his skill set and he has found a renewed sense of purpose just in fishing. And you know what is he doing. They're right what is he who what does he really getting at when you look at it like well okay. Cool like he's into fishing. But what does that mean as far as you know his life moving forward or discovering his purpose. Look here's what. Here's what i can guarantee you. In his life in his his new fishing fishing centric life right. He's got a family and everything that he's taking care of but this this is one of the best things for him because he has a passion for it and in that passion he gets to live out what he is really loving about his life and so in his day to day life where he gets to talk about fishing and and go fishing and all this. He's building these relationships with people around him and he's doing so much that it is. It's so cool to see when a veteran really really discover is in uncovers who they're meant to be after the military and again purpose different for all of us. So where i find my purpose are where my old dock mimetic buddy found purpose and fishing. Yours is probably going to be the same and don't expect it to. You shouldn't expect it to look the same as anyone else's that's why again that i created the framework that you can use to discover your own sense of purpose and the next element that leads me right into this. One is forgive. Look forgiveness is one of the least talked about aspects of transitioning from the military and it is arguably the hardest i say arguably because some people never even come close to really dialing into what it is. They need to forgive. They need to forgive themselves. Do they need to forgive. You know an old battle buddy Unit commander you know those who've been victims of trauma or If they have. Ptsd from their from their combat service. You know what are the elements of their lives that they need to forgive and again you know i feel like i'm talking about the book a lot and i'll be honest i am because there's so much more in the book and this is line three it walks you right through the process of forgiveness and forgiveness is not saying you know what it doesn't hurt it's not saying it wasn't a big deal. Forgiveness is choosing your own freedom. And i think i said this on the last episode of but holding onto unforgiveness or or bitterness even is like setting yourself on fire and expecting the person you were bitter at or angry at or holding a grudge against expecting them to die from smoke inhalation so all forgiveness is as tough as it may be all it is all it breaks down to is that you are choosing your own freedom so get your mind right. Discover your purpose and forgive what you need to forgive. Forgive who you need to forgive. Maybe that's you. Maybe that's someone else helmet four. Uncover you in other words. Understand how you tick. What types of choices do you make in specific situations and one of the best tools for this is a personality assessment and yes. That's part of the book as well. That's part of the nine line. Framework is discovering your personality. Because let's be honest in the military you know. Personality is fine when you're hanging out with your friends or your battle buddies or whatever you want to call them right but when it comes to getting the mission done your personality kind of takes a backseat. It seems to knocking out the mission to getting to mission success getting to mission completion and so a big part of your post military life like who am i to figuring out what it is that you are not only passionate about. But what are you naturally geared toward and in the book. I use a tool called sixteen personalities. And you can check out at sixteen personalities dot com that's one six personalities dot com. There's also a myers briggs assessment. There's the disk assessment. Which kind of is how you function in a work environment and so uncovering who you are and the key elements of your personality are really critical to your moving forward in life that brings me to the fifth element. Make a plan. The fifth element of moving forward in your life is to make a plan. Don't just imagine a plan get one now. Look i want to say something about plans here. Right it's a whole lot easier to turn to the left or to the right if you're already moving. Have you ever set in a vehicle. You're sitting in the driver's seat and you turn the wheel all the way to the left. It's kinda hard to do or maybe you need to turn it all the way to the right. It's kind of hard to do because the tires just kind of moving on the on the on the surface there and you're like this is. This is really really difficult. But if you're moving you can turn the wheel just slightly to the left or to the right in. It's a whole lot easier. So when i talk about making a plan you don't have to have every single thing figured out before you start moving. Make general plan now. Look there are a lot of great plans out there. The resolve book has just one of those. Which i've mentioned is the nine line framework. Now let me be honest with you here. Scrawling down your plan on the back of a cocktail. Napkin is about one hundred miles ahead of someone who never writes down their plan at all. There is a fundamental shift in our brains in imagining a plan and then writing out that plan so make a plan element six get accountability. Accountability is like magic. If there is some magic element to rediscovering your purpose and to moving forward in your life. Accountability is really kind of that magic. And you really get to kind of see behind the curtain so to speak and it's kind of the inner workings of how that m- all that magic happens and accountability can compel you to do things. You would not ordinarily do so take for example of a group of friends right so every saturday you go for run with those friends and you know you have to get up at five thirty. Am and it's saturday and you really have to work today. But you're getting up at five five thirty because you're going to go for a run with these friends and it's not just about the run. It's about the fact that if you don't show up there to give you a hard time about dude where were you like. Why were you not here. This is this is ridiculous right. And they're gonna they're gonna mess with you about it and and if you're a guy that they're gonna call out your man card and be like. Hey you know like we showed up. Why didn't you and so the there's this element of like men getting up at five. Am to go run now. If you're like a big into running and you do it anyway. Maybe this story doesn't resonate with you but for most of us. It probably does so. We're supposed to be showing up to this run right and we're like okay. Well here we go. Let's go tackle this thing but Man tired. I don't know if i want to do at this morning at saturday. I've gotten up early every single day this week. I have a hard all man. I just remembered these guys are going to be there. And i had better show up. Or they're going to give me a hard time and the thing is sometimes. It's fun accountability. It's it's light hearted but sometimes it's someone pointing their finger at you and saying. Hey why aren't you doing what you need to do or challenging you to say. Hey here's the next step for you. Here is what you need to be doing in your life. Go do it so element. Six is get account ability. So let me quickly go over these one more time number one. Get your mind right. Your mindset is critical and big critical part of that is asking the uae. Or the why tri- why should i even bother element to discover your purpose. How do you do that. Well one way you can do. That is pick up a copy of the resolve book. I go through that whole process. There and that process is called the nine line framework part of that nine line. Framework is forgiveness. One of the least talked about aspects of transitioning from the military. But i think one of the most critical element for uncover. You check out a personality assessment. Again you can look in the show. Notes shared a couple of links in there and you can use sixteen personalities. Dot com myers briggs disc assessment of variety. Once you can use but uncover how you naturally tick element five. Make a plan. don't just imagine it. Don't just think it write it down if you write it on the back of a cocktail napkin. That's fine at least write it down and remember. You don't have to have everything figured out before you actually start moving. It's a whole lot easier to make adjustments if you're already moving file element here elements six. Get accountability and accountability. Is that magic simultaneously that magic and it is the secret behind everything else that happens in your life. Can you do things without accountability. Sure is it a whole lot harder absolutely because again accountability. Is this thing in our minds. Says hey someone else's relying on you to do this to be that saturday morning. Run to show up at work to be at that volunteer opportunity. You promised you would be at an an again accountability. I cannot stress enough. i wish i could. I guess technically i could shout and scream and throw things and you know you know bangel desk and things like that but really accountability is so huge and it takes a certain level of maturity. It takes a certain level of maturity for to do that. Now look we all have a lot of questions but the most important question you can ask yourself is this have. I accepted the forgiveness of sins. That only comes through faith. In jesus christ while i hope these elements have helped you. I hope they hope you think about not only whether you should move forward in life but what your next steps. Are you're practical next steps. Four moving forward in life. And i'm going to ask you specifically right now to go. Pick up a copy of resolve at courage to fight again dot com. Maybe you're not ready to pick up a copy of the book and if not just go follow us on social media where facebook courage to fight again. instagram same thing Twitter at courage again a. We're the most active on facebook. Though post a lot of things there you can join our post nine. Eleven of veterans families facebook group on. That's also great way to get connected. But one other thing i would love free to do is leave us a review on itunes because it helps so much. Thank you so much for tuning into this episode. Be sure to check out our others episodes as well. I mean this is season six. So if you're just joining us secret a lot of content you can catch up on. Thank you again so much for tuning in today. I'll see you right back here. In two weeks we served now. What is the production of courage to fight again.

Aaron Perkins Us Army Myers Briggs Allen Trauma UAE Facebook Instagram Twitter
How To Make A Name For Yourself As A Junior Product Manager

All The Responsibility Podcast

02:20 min | 1 year ago

How To Make A Name For Yourself As A Junior Product Manager

"Even if you're a new product manager the chances are great that you have something amazing going on to be hired as a product manager in the first place that means. You're some kind of unicorn your interesting and accomplished with lots of skills and a resume that has compelling experiences an impressive educational background most likely and diverse interests and skills. But i'm going to talk about something different. We're all unicorns as product managers unusual and rare compared with other roles in the company even in life. But we're all still different from one another obviously so. What color is your unicorn. And what i'm talking about is what are your particular talents. Aptitudes and strengths that differentiate from other people even other product managers now. We often use the concepts of strength. Talents aptitudes special sauce superpower to mean roughly the same thing and that is the way that you see the world were act within it. Think and so on that are kind of unique and unusual to you and special and often. These comes so easily to you that it's hard to believe there's anything special about them. I always think about people who can draw and people can draw and think that it's pretty easy to teach other people to draw because they just show them how they learn to draw but the fact is. If you're somebody like me. Who really has challenges. Withdrawing doesn't matter how easy it was for someone else to learn it. They can't teach me how to draw. I just can't learn. This is something that i know about myself. I've tried multiple times. The fact is that usually you're aren't actually the best judge of your special talents. Because they seem so normal so obvious to you like the drawing talent for somebody who can draw now. Often were very aware of our weaknesses. Like i'm very aware by weakness as being able to draw very well. When i say strengths in this context though i'm actually using that as a technical term meaning the clifton strengths finder assessment. It seems to be a meaningful assessment of a person's strengths. It's definitely more meaningful than something. Like the myers briggs type indicator for example. And so. i'm going to talk in this episode about how to find out what your strengths are in this context of the clifton strengths and then how to make use of your knowledge of your strengths. Which you probably don't have if you haven't done this assessment yet to figure out how to make a name for yourself.

Myers Briggs
Taking Children: A History of American Terror with Dr. Laura Briggs

The Electorette Podcast

04:12 min | 1 year ago

Taking Children: A History of American Terror with Dr. Laura Briggs

"So let's jump into this Laura briggs welcome. I'm glad to be here. Thanks for having me on. I'm so excited about your new book by the way You know because the media has all but forgotten about the children who've been separated from their families know the detention camps and the cages. You know we were all outraged when it first started to happen but you know really. No one talks about this. And what's happened is that things have just worsened for everyone else right and so we just took our focus off of it but i mean i think that's the problem which i think is kind of underlying message of your book that history keeps repeating itself. I think that's right. That's right and like one of the things you notice. Was that a lot of leftists. And a lot of people on the left in progressives and democrats kept saying you know all this is unamerican. Americans don't do this but you know that's pretty much. All we've done is separated children from their families. Well that's really why i wrote. The book is because i want people to see that. This is a form of violence like policing imprisonment. That taking children disrupting the inside. So people's families particularly people have colored families is a form of sadism and cruelty that has been part of the american political system since before there was a country here. Yeah and i think one of the things that i learned in the opening of your book is that by not calling out this fallacy of american exceptionalism that we can keep the harm going right. You know this. We support the harm by not saying you know what we're not exceptional especially in this way. That's right and i think that the problem the we also face especially as we're coming up on an election is if we think that donald trump has so i president who has separated the kits of refugees from their parents. If we think that this is the first time in. Us history that people have lost children to the foster care system to health and human services to powerful forces of the state then we will just elect another president. Who will do it again for me. The moment of truth actually came when obama was first elected in two thousand eight and lived near the border. And so i knew there In arizona knew very well what was happening at the border and a friend of mine who was undocumented was picked up by the police and for a tail light or something tinting on her winds and they investigated her status and couldn't get they couldn't quite figure it out because immigration status as always confusing shared a border crossing card so they called ice And they took the two year old child who was in the back seat and they separated them and they told her that they would put this child in foster care unless she explained her immigration status to them and how long exactly she'd been in the country. Had she overstate of these and would she named the people who helped her any people who employed her and the thing was so shocking to me was a- bama had just become president when just lived through george w bush and torture in usa's detention camps all over the world and we had lived with immigration raids. And i knew about the separation of immigrant and refugee children from their parents under george w bush and i was so sure that everything was going to be better because obama was president and the first thing i learned was that this friend of mine head immediately been separated from her toddler daughter and threatened with losing her and the reason i wrote the book is that i won't be able to very clearly that they're selling rotten at the core of the us political system that enables us over and over again to terrorize people of color in particular by taking their children.

Laura Briggs Donald Trump George W Bush Barack Obama Arizona United States Bama
Biden formally announces Buttigieg as nominee for transportation secretary

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

Biden formally announces Buttigieg as nominee for transportation secretary

"The president-elect highlights would could be another precedent setting cabinet pick. President elect joe biden formally introducing former south bend indiana mayor buddha judge as his nominee for transportation secretary piece got a great perspective of a mayor that solves problems and briggs people together. He's got a vision of the next generation leader. The role of transportation secretary is expected to play a central part in joe. Biden's push for a bipartisan infrastructure. Package if confirmed buddha jets will be the first. Lgbtq cabinet secretary of proof by the senate. Fox's john in

President Elect Joe Biden South Bend Cabinet Indiana Briggs Biden Lgbtq Cabinet JOE Senate FOX John
The 6 Types of Working Genius with Patrick Lencioni

The EntreLeadership Podcast

05:35 min | 1 year ago

The 6 Types of Working Genius with Patrick Lencioni

"With have different talents than you. Sometimes that can be frustrating. But it's actually a good thing because we all have different strengths and different weaknesses. we have different personality styles. You guys know this. It takes a village but what we do to try to figure out the space and understand our people better. If you're like me you start taking. These assessments disc myers briggs in your graham. All good things. But here's what a lot of those things. Don't tell us. Can this person actually do their job from the ramsey network. This is the entreleadership podcast where we help business. Leaders grow themselves teams and the prophets. i'm your host tardy and my guest. today is paddling. Joni pats the founder and president of the table group where he spends his time speaking and writing about leadership teamwork organizational health. But here's the thing is. He's not just another consultant. We have worked with him. At ramsey solutions and andre leadership for years. We've given every one of his books to oliver team members and would give him out at our entreleadership events because his stuff is so legit. When it comes to team culture values you've got to be reading pellet joni now this is exciting. He and his team have developed a model that helps leaders identify their teams areas of working genius areas of life draining weaknesses. That if they're doing those activities too long they're going to burn out and quit. You don't want that so this is going to be a lot of fun but before we get into the model we have to first start with understanding the foundation of a great team. Well it all starts with trust which is humility based and vulnerability based if people can't come to sit down with their team and say i don't know the answer i need help. I'm sorry i was a jerk yesterday. Or i don't know what to do here somebody else or you. You're smarter than i am at this. I wanna be like you if people can't come work and be emotionally buck naked if you will it then you're done because if people can't come and be raw open honest they're not going to be able to engage in conflict because they're not going to be telling the truth and they're gonna feel like that's too risky. They're not gonna commit to decisions because they never really weighed in. They're not gonna hold each other accountable and say hey. You're my friend but you gotta do better than that on this one which is a great thing on a team. But if you can't be vulnerable you're not going to do that and they're not gonna actually do. What's in the best interest of the team. They're going to look at themselves. So that's the basic way that teams function from trust to results. But in order to do that you really need to be humble hungry. Smart person which is i. I don't think too much myself. I think others are more important than i am. Honor them. I work really hard. I'm hungry and inter personally smart. I know how to deal with human beings and if you can find humble hungry and smart people and put them in an environment where they build trust have good conflict hold each other accountable and do all those things. It's going to work. It's not complicated. I know i just went through that very quick. And i talked about eight different things but it's very simple. Are there blockers to trust aside from not having those people who are hungry humble smart well i would say there's blockers if the league doesn't have that and it's counter cultural by the way i should say that to people don't grow up thinking about being vulnerable they teach you to grow up and you know reveal just the parts of yourself that you think people like and this is. This is a problem. So that's why human beings have a hard time being vulnerable is because we think we're supposed to come into the world and protect ourselves but that's not what makes a team great so i think that if you have people that are humble hungry and smart and the leader gets that and nurtures that i. I don't know that there's other blockers. I'm trying to think what might that be. I mean there's environmental factors. Maybe working a company. That doesn't mike that doesn't reward that but if if the person at the top thinks it's important and crates environment from the top and i will tell you daniel that you know one of the reasons that i work with ceos and their teams because it needs to be modeled from the very top and it's not that they're more fun to party with like. Oh i want to be important. I just think if you can get the people at the very top organization to do that. You have a fighting chance in the rest of it. And when i go into an organization and i start at the at the bottom someplace. They're constantly looking up and going. Do you think they're ever going to get this so it just makes more sense to come. Which is why love talking entrepreneurs could is like you can turn your. You can turn your company into a trustworthy us. Good team quickly if you make that so with you and your leader well it sounds like what you're saying in some ways similar to our friend john maxwell he's has everything rises and falls on leadership absolutely. And if you're not working with the leader you're not working with the highest leveraged point of culture. Yeah that's their job. Yes and when they don't realize that when they think their job is just figuring out the technical parts of the of the operations then it's really difficult. So yeah john. And i would be incomplete alignment around that and that's why the leader is so important but that leader can't believe that they're inherently more important than the people lead their actions and behaviors are just more important. Yeah i think the is that they're more important but not more significant. Yeah you know. It's it's the it's the it's the challenge of humility article years ago called the trouble with humility and that is that as a leader. I have to believe i am just like anybody else here. I'm just a child of god a person. That's i'm no. I don't have more significance as you say. And so i have to believe that. But my words and actions are going to have a disproportionate impact on everything else around here. The problem is when people realize that their words and actions are disproportionately important. Sometimes they start to personalize it and say man. I'm pretty important here similarly people that say. Hey i'm not that important. So they forget

Ramsey Solutions Joni Andre Graham Oliver John Maxwell Daniel Mike John
The Truth to Shining Brightly & Letting the World See You by Shirley of Daring Living

Optimal Living Daily

05:28 min | 1 year ago

The Truth to Shining Brightly & Letting the World See You by Shirley of Daring Living

"The truth to shining brightly and letting the world see you by shirley of daring living dot com. Today i wanna share one truth shining brightly and presenting yourself in this world how it all started and some background into my past. Last weekend i attended a series of events held by mpg. Tgi where house honor to connect with a group of exchange university students from taiwan is a program that was involved in during my graduate years so group that holds very dear to my heart was again at the event. I saw my old self. Who as if. I was back there in the organizing team with them just a few years ago struggling and carrying along with me the overwhelming burden of school. The pressure of meeting up to appearance appearances. Society's expectations the constant struggle to finding my passions and most importantly the desperation to reaching that never ending benchmark of set forward for myself. I was never good enough this time. However i was the bystander with much more communist and openness than before i felt the exchange tunes hopes dreams aspirations for the future also saw their personal struggles of finding themselves searching for a place to belong in this world this experience stirred up a gentle reminder. I think we all deserve to hear about presenting ourselves to this world while also staying true to who we are. You do not have to be in the spotlight to shine in this society and organizations today that a certain type of people that everyone looks up to in order to be successful even during my years in business school in every class we were encouraged. Step onto the stage and take the spotlight own. The room with confidence communicate inspire people with our ideas see. We were taught to be leaders. Not just any type of leader. The extroverted charismatic leaders that were highly valued. Sometimes the idea you need to communicate is so important they have to take the stage to express them to the right people but being the center of the attention is not where everyone thrives for me. It is not where i thrive is not where i can be myself. You do not have to be in the spotlight to shine. If you not feel comfortable leading group or being in the center of attention it is okay was important is you must understand yourself and find the best method and environment that suits you where you can effectively and truthfully express yourself and what you have to offer. I used a model these attention loving sociable charismatic extroverts and thought i had to be them in order to be successful in life but the truth is everyone of our personalities is so different. According to the myers briggs personality test we generally group are personality traits in this world into sixteen different types out of these sixteen half of them are extroverts. Matt of the eight only two of them are considered to have the natural charismatic trait mehan. Tj and ian fj. So what does that mean for. Those of us who do not belong as an emt j. or espn fj. While it means that you simply cannot pretend to be someone you are not and he should not have to be even if you are one of the two leadership type personalities. How much do you understand yourself. Be aware of your strengths weaknesses. Any environment that you are most comfortable in but of course these personality tests are just a start because they are just categories and still don't fully define you dive into your past experiences if think about what you enjoy doing try different hobbies follow your curiosities engage and take part in different groups and communities find out the best way for you to express yourself to the world. Perhaps it is through art through inventions through the internet to writing or through verbal communication. What kind of environment. You thrive in his through one on one conversations or in small groups or in a big stadium with hundreds of people to work better by yourself or a team. We are all different. Don't ever compare yourself in your situation with someone else's focus on yourself work on yourself. That's the only way for you to grow what the world needs while we really need are all types of people portraying different strengths in this world. Q. imagine what it would be like if the world is filled only with allowed charismatic extroverts and actually be pretty scary place to be and nothing would ever get done. We do need charismatic. People in this world to inspiring gather people together a will. We need also are quieter introverted. People and leaders who prefer to stay behind the scenes and are not afraid to let others take the spotlight. Moee need our brave people who choose to believe and follow crazy leaders with visions. What we need are committed people who follow through with what they say and can put words into actions when we need are open minded people who can really lean in and listen first before speaking while we need are kind people who have compassion and can show empathy in this cruel world. What we really need are people who have strong self awareness who are honest and truthful to themselves so that men return they can be their best selves to better serve this world quote. Ask yourself when makes you come alive and go do that. Because what the world needs is people who have come alive

Shirley Taiwan Myers Briggs Espn Matt Moee
Dallas Dog Owners Get High Rankings

The Savage Nation

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

Dallas Dog Owners Get High Rankings

"Dog owners get high marks The top dog owner. Personality Traits in Dallas. Report from rover dot com says Dallas owners of the third most active in the country and ranked fourth and most indulgent and most sociable 47% are likely to do yoga alongside their pump, and they ranked second in using high tech devices like a dog activity tracker. 5000 dog owners in 10. Different cities were looked at to put the data together. The link to the full report can be found at calif. Dot com. Mickey Briggs, Calif. News News

Dallas Calif Mickey Briggs
Coronavirus in Melbourne: Victoria's case number rollercoaster

Coronacast

04:45 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus in Melbourne: Victoria's case number rollercoaster

"I'm going to start by talking about numbers in. Victoria again. But before you run away because we talk about this, every day I just want to talk about how much of a roller coaster it as we went from the three hundreds to the seven hundreds in die again, how do we make sense of the kind of fluctuations it was saying out of Eke? Well, there's one explanation for part of them, which is that you might get a run of a batch of tests that come through in one hit. which were a backlog served? Let's say it takes up to three days to get the results. You may just have a backlog. But it's hard to imagine that you've gone to a backlog of something four hundred or so from yesterday, it's. Thirty, it's more like seven hundred, absolutely new cases you. have been reclassified. So you can get a surge like that. But this is you know it's almost double. In fact, it's more than double what it was yesterday. So it's hard to explain by suddenly several batches of tests coming through, but that's always possible. What you should look at the rolling average. So each day you update the rolling average for seven or fourteen days, and when you look at the graph of that, it's going up. So it's not. It's not stabilized yet. It's still going up. At, least according to the evidence that we've got and I think one of the problems Victoria is that it looks transparent, but it's not. The issue here is, do they really know what's going on and I'm not? I'm not alleging incompetence here is working incredibly hard not getting a lot of sleep. People are doing their best. You'll critcism doesn't help, but the issue is that there according to Casey Briggs who is the font of knowledge when you? Analyzing numbers. Are over three thousand, least yesterday, the war's over three thousand. Cases still under investigation. So how do you say with any degree of confidence? What's happening when three thousand cases are under investigation and again according to Casey, some of those of been over a fortnight long and remember what you see today is what happened five or ten days ago in Victoria, it's not what happened yesterday in Victoria. It's these people have been infected and found because of stuff that happened some time ago, and there's this constant delay in the system. System. And what you hope was that the lockdown that occurred the isolation of the suburbs, the lockdown occurred masks would start to see a significant bend of the curve. It hasn't happened, yet it will. It will happen. But when will it happen and if you're in Victoria it becomes very dispiriting as you're just hanging out and hoping that the lockdown only last six weeks, and here we are three weeks passed on Wednesday Friday and the numbers keep on going up. And again, if you look at the numbers, the majority are not this time in aged care according to what I understand from the figures. Yesterday, we can only say that one hundred of seven, hundred km from each care, six, hundred didn't. So what's going on here and you've got all the investigation presumably, you don't know where they came from. The at risk of losing its handle on the outbreak, well, you're not seeing seven thousand, but you are seeing seven hundred. And you are seeing this roller coaster where it goes down then goes up, but the rolling average keeps on going up, and if it keeps on going played this, they haven't got a a strong handle on. They've got a bit of a handle on it because it's not exponential growth, which is what it would be. If you had no hand. Lona at all, but it is slow and steady growth, it's not. In the say, well, Luke Kuechly effective reproduction numbers coming down to one or below one. Is it. Do they really know that if they've got so many under investigation, it's hard to know how they're generating their numbers because it's not absolutely transparent. We have to trust that they're doing that. And I. Think there's a bit of what I call viral volume going on, which is don't you worry about it? We're. We're. We've got this under control comes from the Komo through age care. Well, how do you have so many age care homes affected if there isn't a fundamental problem with each care and how it's run at least in the private sector in Australia? No matter where you are in Australia listening to Corona cast, you've got the same problem with. With private care in your state, this is not a Victorian problem. This is a national problem, the responsibility of the Commonwealth government, not you're not the individual state government. We've got an H. K. Royal Commission going on at the moment for other problems, each care, this is a sector that's under stress and we haven't proactively parachuted into age care. The sorts of support that they need to prevent an outbreak in each care, you go problem inside the moment for. Complete nightmare and guarantee it.

Victoria Casey Briggs Australia Commonwealth Government Luke Kuechly H. K. Royal Commission Komo Lona Corona
July 2020 Book News

Books and Boba

05:56 min | 1 year ago

July 2020 Book News

"Back to books and Boba Club in pocket, which impose Asian and Asian American Authors Marinas Marina. And I'm re-re. You and we are here today our mid month episode toward the month of. July July. Twenty twenty. How're you doing? Good I can't believe that we're ready like halfway into July. Honestly if each like just started no right. Also, I realized that because Marvin and I used to record in studio. I used to see Marvin by twice a month in person, but we haven't. We haven't seen each other in like. Ever since March I don't think we've seen each other. It's been. It's been a while I think the last time we saw each other was when we were recording. What was our? Was? Our February book even. Was! It not south no map assault stars. was after I. Think it was May. who was such a long time, we? Can just look it up right now. I'm looking at right now. Because the Internet exists, I don't WanNa be one of those people who don't know how Gorka. Let's see now that there's like this website where you put in a Google Inc and then you send you send it to someone who asks you a question right like they could totally yes. Let let me Google there for you. Yeah, yeah, I back. When I was in Grad School, I was send to. My classmates would ask me dumb questions. They can just google themselves. sat quite a lot. In College as well our February Book Club pick was the kiss quotient. God so the one recorded with your friend Kaitlyn. That was our last the last time we saw each other. That's wow. Yeah. I feel like These past few months has reinforced idea that. I'm. Pretty Okay with staying at home all the time, which is something I didn't really know about myself or didn't remember about myself. What's your? What's your Myer Briggs by the way? I know it's I. I know it's complete bullshit, but. It does give me a good handle on whether someone is a really extroverted or introverted, and so my with the Myers Briggs is like so if I take the test I usually test at an NF, which is like the Uber. But because of the people I work with I'm often forced to take the set characteristics. So people are often surprised that I am at NFP because I was surprised, too. Because you know like your co host used to be Mindy. The. She does now she now does first of all which is. which is one of the PODCASTS Einar podcast collective and Like she's she's definitely like more extroverted. She's an actress, so yeah I was pretty surprised once I started co hosting with you. I thought it was just going to be to interest talking about books. That totally was not the case. The thing with like introvert extrovert is it's not really. Outgoing. This isn't the it's a trait of extroverts, but it's not. It's more of a symptom than like a core thing, right extroverts just means I. IF I'm out with people are like I can stay up all night. socializing gives me energy instead of expending energy I. Mean I think that's the core difference so? but but what I found is I do gain energy from socializing even online with people so I don't need face to face to be energized and the complete opposite for for. I mean like my Myers Briggs is on twitter, so a lot of people probably know already, but I am I've tested as I N T J. and. socializing is definitely not my strong point. Every time I do go out to Asian American like shindigs. People are always surprised that I'm there. 'cause tonight, because I, really I. Really don't go out. I'm pretty much a unicorn if you see me out in about. So I definitely adapted to the whole self isolation thing. Better than others I mean it helps. There's a lot of media to enjoy at home so I've been seeing a lot Final fantasy like the past. The past three weeks. Grace I recently I talked about this on some of the other pockets that I'm on I binged content this past week, so I washed the old guard, and that I watched all three seasons of dark, I watched the first season of umbrella academy I watched both current seasons of food wars, the the horny food anime, and then I went online and read the rest of the Manga series, so it's been Dan Marvin. I have unhealthy binge habits, which is why I try not to binge as much as possible because. Once I start something I will finish it. It's like it's not even it's not even a of a question. And then I'll spend the next ten hours reading pieces and analysis, so which is why like when you were watching killing eve as it was airing. It definitely curbed that addiction. I know but I've phone behind killing eve so now I have a whole season to binge later, so it's so good Marin about that So good. Yeah, I mean. It's the same with books to write I typically read books in like s few sittings as possible because. A because I have zero self-control, and if you give me the chance to just stay up all night and read something and free or something. I will take that chance

Dan Marvin Kaitlyn Google Inc Twenty Twenty Mindy Myers Briggs Myer Briggs Boba Club Authors Marinas Marina Grad School Assault Gorka Marin Twitter
Los Angeles County Fire Crew Battling Soledad Fire, Which Officials Says Has Potential To Spread To 1,500 Acres

Mo'Kelly

00:41 sec | 2 years ago

Los Angeles County Fire Crew Battling Soledad Fire, Which Officials Says Has Potential To Spread To 1,500 Acres

"Burning burning between between Santa Santa Clarita Clarita and Palmdale has scorched at least 400 acres Ko Phi Steve Gregory has let us live from the scene. And Michael the L. A County fire officials say it has the potential to explode the 1500 acres the only county Sheriff department says a mandatory evacuation is in place for residents from Agua Dulce de Rig Canyon Road to Briggs and Soledad Canyon Road to 14 Freeway. Red Cross is set up in evacuation center. The victory outreach parking lot in Palmdale. The North bound fourteen's closed at Soledad Canyon Road in the South bound fourteen's closed in Agua Dulce de Road and Cruz and bulldozers are cutting in containment line with water dropping helicopters attacking from the air Live in Santa Clarita, Steve Gregory King If I news,

Santa Santa Clarita Clarita Soledad Canyon Road Agua Dulce De Rig Canyon Agua Dulce De Road Palmdale Steve Gregory Steve Gregory King County Sheriff Department Red Cross Briggs Michael Cruz
Djokovic Has Coronavirus

The Tennis Podcast

05:14 min | 2 years ago

Djokovic Has Coronavirus

"We'll fake. He said we might be back with an emergency podcast just amid twenty four hours after according to last one and back, we are because there have been developments in. The covid nineteen crisis that's been developing on the Adra tool. For probably over the course of the past two weeks, but is only presented itself to us over the past few days. We've obviously been following an extremely closely. We're expecting a statement from the world number one and one of the organizers of the Adra Tool. Novak Djokovic today and we have had the statement. In fact, we've had to statements from the world number one. Read you the first one just now. It starts off by confirming that Djokovic has indeed tested positive for Covid nineteen immediately upon his arrival in Belgrade he was tested along with members of his family and his team He wasn't showing any symptoms, and he says that his result is positive as his wife Yelena. Both tested negative. He goes onto. Say Everything we did. In the past month we did with a pure heart and sincere intentions. All Tournament meant to unite and share message of solidarity and compassion throughout the region. The tool has been designed to help both established and up and coming tennis players from Southeastern Europe to gain access to some competitive tennis while the various tools are on hold due to the covid nineteen situation. It was all born with philanthropic idea to direct all raised funds towards people in need, and it warmed my heart to see how everybody strongly responded to this. We organized the tournament at the moment. The crisis has weakened believing that the conditions for hosting the tool had been met. Unfortunately, this virus is still present, and it is a new reality that we are still learning to cope and live with i. am hoping things will ease with time, so we can resume lives the way they were. I am extremely sorry for each individual case of infection. I hope that it will not complicate anyone's health situation, and that everyone will be fine. I will remain in self-isolation for the next fourteen days and repeat the test. In five days now, already going to be a busy day today for we'll certainly for the British tennis media because it was the first day of. If Jamie Murray event the battle of the Brits. But obviously with this huge kind of. Story transcending the sport developing It's an even busier day. So what does I'm? Briggs want to nine PM. He wants a message David Law, saying Don't close your laptop to seen Simon. Join a common. The tennis podcast Hello Simon. We, can he Simon? As a slightly weary voice, but we're. We're very glad to have the house he day been. Well, actually I. Play tennis this morning Mitch was. Day because in. About, one o'clock PM. statement dropped in just actually almost as the first big hit in. What you might describe elite tennis in the UK in Twenty twenty. Almost simultaneously as Jamie Murray went on colts. Who Doubles match? The statement jobs and the news course navy tested positive. I. Mean The I think if you're talking about the address. It wasn't as big a deal today. The positive tests were concerning But the how many do we hereby stay ahead? Five hadn't made by the end of the end of the day and I will on Sunday night. so today it felt like a continuation rather than being quite the bombshell yesterday when. Magi my busiest every day on twitter. What were your initial reactions were? It's joke Richard subsequently released a second statement on instagram tonight, which we will come onto. But what were your reactions when that first statement came out and how? Much, did it. Differ or not from from what you were expecting from him, not in terms of necessarily the results of the test, but As somebody responsible for that tour in that tournament, his sort of degree if the responsibility is prepared to take etc.. Yeah well I mean. There was a sort of Was a source of slight cheesed-off tone to it wasn't at the. He was sort of disappointed that we hadn't seen his pure intentions. For what they were a? and. Almost implication that that should have been enough to satisfy. On, lookers than indeed know the mysterious workings of the virus, and it was a bit of a mystery that has not recognized his pure intentions for the. Positives that they were. So, he kind of sounded a little bit. Petulant in the first statement, and then by the time the second one came out, he was a lot more. Apologetic fellow somebody might have had it worse.

Adra Tool Covid Tennis Jamie Murray Novak Djokovic Simon Twenty Twenty Briggs Twitter Belgrade Self-Isolation Southeastern Europe Mitch UK Yelena Navy Richard Colts David Law
Kids Know How To Occupy Themselves. We Need To Let Them Do It

Parenting: Difficult Conversations

06:46 min | 2 years ago

Kids Know How To Occupy Themselves. We Need To Let Them Do It

"One of our own NPR colleagues Mike Lean decline. was actually feeling this stress big time she's been working quarantined with her husband and her daughter Rosie. WHO has four? She is like a firecracker, right? She is strong willed. Through life with this intensity, which is fantastic, she learns really fast, and she's fearless, but you know it's like when she wants something. There is like no giving in, and it was these constant demand demands to draw neurology. Video, Mama, make a Sandwich Mama set up. My Zoom Circle Time Mama you know all those little interruptions that completely obliterate your concentration I would lock the door. I slid down the back of it and I just cried I. was like what am I going to do like I have this book deadline in July and it was just really like this is. This is not going to be good for any of us. Like things are going to deteriorate really quickly in this House Mike Lee and actually wrote about this moment in a new. York Times. OP, ed recently, and it's related to the. The book that she's working on, so it's called. Hunt gathered parent, and it's coming out in March twenty twenty one, and it's all about what American parents can learn from other cultures including traditional cultures, because the pressure to keep kids constantly entertained well. Mike, Ian says that's really specific to American parents and culture. There is huge amount of pressure like I have been fighting it and I still feel it. You know I still wake up in the morning I'm like. What are we GONNA do today. What are we going to do this morning, right? You're like per child entertainer part event planner. I mean it is like we're planners. If you think about it, right, it is late. They are little tech CEO's that have like a day planned for them, and we are there to usher them in, and not only just usher them, but make sure they enjoy it or something out of it or like. There's feedback afterwards, right? There's a cruise director like there's hustler service aspect to it. It's having a good time. Did you find your except my kids are those trolls on Yelp that always give the two stars, the One star now, not good enough, not good enough. Maybe they're trying to tell you something so in this episode of Life Kit. It's all about turning kids from customers. You have to please into good coworkers Mike. Leeann is gonNA share what she's learned from her reporting on other cultures to help our kids learn to entertain themselves. Michelina Club says that she got this idea from her reporting that she could sort of retrain her daughter. Yes, she was thinking about a scene. She had read about in an anthropology book by Jean Briggs who studied the inuit in the Arctic in the sixties, the anyway still lived in pneumatic lifestyle, and in the winter they build Igloos to stay warm, and the mother had two young children I think that the time they were about three and six. Six, so this is a part of the world. That's one of the coldest parts of the world in so there were many days where like the little girls couldn't go outside there. They had nothing to do right. There were no videos legos, no children's books and there's these scenes in the book where the children literally spend like an hour or two in the morning under a blanket playing without bothering anyone yet. That sounds like a real dream culture. I cannot wait to get to that point and so looking at these cultures to do this. You see striking similarity, and that is that they do not feel the need to constantly entertain, educate or stimulate. However, you want to think about it children. It's a very different approach to the way they treat a child's time. And I. Think because they don't demand the child's attention. You do this now now. You're doing this now. You're doing this I. Think in return. The child stops demanding the parents attention, and so that's what I really wanted to test out to walk us through. What did you do? I stopped trying to demand Rosie's attention. Right I stopped trying to say now. It's nine o'clock. You're going to watch this video or we're gonNA. Read a book right? I stopped being the event manager for her. And I started doing the things. I needed to do and expect her to come along with me. And welcomed her right so another thing that like these other cultures do that? We tend not to do is welcomed the children into our worlds right? There's a very separate world child world. And I think in order for this to work. You have to welcome them into your world, so hey, we're cooking now. Come over here and you know probably stir these eggs or now we're cleaning. Help back you. It's not forced. It's not like you have to do it, but I'm not gonNA. Draw you a Narwhal right now. I'm cleaning and they do this with all of their work. It's not just cleaning and domestic chores, but also you know their businesses. The children are there. The children are welcome into the world of and so so I started doing that, too. I said well. You know what I need to write. I need to write like four hours a day. And Yeah me. Sitting on a computer writing is not very interesting, but neither is like sewing and an Igloo and so I said okay. I'm going to write I. Need Quiet. And you are welcome to sit here with me the first time we did it, I started small like thirty minutes, and if she really was upset at the beginning, I would stop I'm not trying to like force anything and make a lot of chaos in their house. It's really the opposite like if she was really like in the beginning, if she was really escalating with you and getting really upset, you would would give her some time. Yeah like I. I would really try to ignore her. Because I was really teaching her like this is quiet time and it's not time for me to give you attention. But? But if it got really bad and then I'd be like okay. Let's go outside. Let's take a break you know. But you guys the first time I did it. She was kind of stunned. She actually said to me. I can do anything I want as like. Yeah, you can do anything you want as long as you don't damage the house. Like you know she just couldn't believe it, so started sma- and after about a week we had worked up to lake. Hour hour and a half chunks in by like two weeks. She wants to do it even she'll be like. Are you going to write a? Show. Ask Me and so you built up to it and her main thing that she does. Being is what she will sit here in color with me for an hour or so, and then she kind of runs around the house in desert. Thing she can go outside she cooks quote unquote, which means like mixing different things in the kitchen and she makes them S. There's no doubt there's a message. To be honest, she latched onto it quicker and better than I thought it was going to be I mean. It is one child in one house, but it's backed up by all these other families right that I that we've seen in these cultures

Rosie Mike Mike Lean Mike Lee NPR Michelina Club York Times Yelp Leeann Hunt CEO Jean Briggs Director Arctic IAN
French Fries: American as Apple Pie?

Doughboys

01:47 min | 2 years ago

French Fries: American as Apple Pie?

"As the nineteen seventeen. Us Entry into World War One whip citizens into a nationalistic fuhrer rebranded. Sauerkraut as liberty cabbage. An attempt to mute the culinary influence of the now hated Germans. This distinctly American act of combining performance jingoism with the absolute least amount of effort would repeat in their early outs as Francis. Opposition to the Iraq. War led the. Us's loudest wrong as citizens to rebrand French fries as freedom fries. But despite these temporary attempts at Euro erasure the continents influence on American cuisine is indelible and vice versa with French fries. Among the most notable examples in the sixteenth century Spanish Explorers Return from the Americas with a new ingredient the potato at first relegated as hogtied by Europeans but in time recognizes the first style kitchen staple French fries among the new dishes. That would come to exist as a result of the transcontinental tuber track though their disputed origin is credited by different sources to France Belgium or Spain brought back to the states in the seventeen. Hundreds French fries exploded in Popularity State side in the twentieth century alongside their common accompaniment. The hamburger and soon home cooks would desire way to approximate addition their kitchens without the Messi sputters of deep that frying in Nineteen Fifty. Two brothers formerly corn. Growers opened a company offering frozen French fried potatoes intended for oven. Reheating with facility. Straddling the border between Oregon and Idaho giving their company. Its name from abbreviating both states day. Sixty years later. The Briggs Brothers Brainchild is the dominant frozen fries brand in the US and the company also credits itself with the creation of variant beloved and cafeterias and Gastro pubs alike. The tater tot only time will tell which future war of opportunity will lead to originally specific foodstuff getting clumsy rename. But whatever you call them. French fries are now as American as Apple Pie. Which itself is European origin.

United States Briggs Brothers Brainchild Nineteen Fifty Iraq Apple Americas Messi Francis France Oregon Spain Idaho Belgium
"briggs" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

12:58 min | 3 years ago

"briggs" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Briggs who is an ethnomusicologist and he is a spectacular guest we talked about Chas how it came to be what it was before it was called jazz and how it interface then at the center of relationship between African American culture and jazz and how jazz exploded in the twenties we also talked about hip hop which we started out being known as rap I did not ask him if it pop is simply wrap by another name or if it's significantly different well you can't remember everything he is he's just so good ice I saw him on TV I immediately made a note in my my process is I keep my eyes open all the time see a guess anybody I think would be good to have on I make a note in my phone I send myself an email because that's what if it turns into and then I called the producer Karen resent me and she gets on the case or send it to her email and she actually I'm so fortunate I can just say I seek I guess he somebody on TV and say Hey it would be great if we get this person she is on it is magnificent right now if he co I like I'm I'm making a definite attempt to be upbeat these days this is so much negativity and and really negativity and anxiety so share with me if you well what do you good decisions certainly did in the course your life it say well that was a good decision have you quit a job maybe you he decided to take a job got married I got divorced took a trip or did not take a trip bought a car or you didn't back by car good decision like not backing up on the highway is a good decision my father did that once no not again that was not cool that was so stupid he will leave a note that as youngsters it's true this is a time there's a fraction of the traffic there is now but still I was so lame is that your kids don't ever do this man we were going to a red Sox game and we're gonna meet our friends his his going to meet his friend and Bedford mass Mr BGO this could blow smoke rings Bob BGO anyway miss the exit backed up like a fool sorry dad I got a call out on our own I was bad news does a bad decision good decisions in my life include let me say no well they all stem from knowing myself and that I was never wanted to be stuck in a job that I hate it because I needed money so I have a minimal financial footprint hi I want to be able to leave a job if if it's horrible and not have to worry that some children will have to act and rotten teeth because I had quit you know I don't want to quit I I don't have to work at a job this so I don't feel guilty about supporting someone is it selfish now even if your comments on IT service I say so what I mean this is selfish and self care this knowing yourself and not put yourself in the process of the situation it took about quitting couple jobs as a great and other people's decisions at our I know I had a condo hi so that for a loss because I hated own anaconda it was in I bought it a long time ago in the eighties it was cheap relatively cheap but immediately I'm talking the day after the market tanked I was under water so you know what it was in a bad neighborhood I was trying to turn it over and over just was never gonna happen neighborhood still bad I sold it and you know what that was it was a bad decision find it and a good decision Sellin it even across my money as I was not I was not happy there at all you're going to tell you the story why I moved out okay and maybe on a wind for this but in a really bad neighborhood bad like I went I went to the store to get their names people chased me to get the beer hi bad like I came out of my house and some kid had a machete hidden in the sleeve bad like across the street a woman ran out of the house screaming for being chased by a dude with a knife who proceeded to stab her bad neighborhood and so there was one event that and I was always nervous I really was I built my own shutters made out of pine just kind of basically closed out the window so that we can get in then there was one incident and it what is wasn't too late at night I think it was late afternoon I am in the home and I hear on the intercom I say is the Boston police let us in I hesitated really I'm it really the Boston police I didn't say that I was just thinking what to do and then next thing I know the door blasted open we wanted to do was blasted by one of those big old door knocker downers that the police is he's a big Southend doors big noise yeah before that I heard through the floor the police intercom someone else upstairs they also did not answer the phone and then they broke down the door they came pounding up the stairs running up the stairs pound pound pound pound pound as fast as they could go and I am the door to the apartment below me was up opened up and is a screaming the floor let me see it's gonna well it turns out that there was a vacant apartment below me in some squatter had somehow gotten a ketone was living in there selling drugs I should have had a hand when there was a and are inch extension cord into the the common area and I didn't realize that's because the electricity been shut off there and they were get electricity from the common area and they were dealing drugs right in my house who is a file as a condo with four units that's pretty dangerous right who knows what kind of star more coming up and down my stairs it's a bummer but having the please last overhead door component of the stairs and blast over the door it was if it was the full on full movie thing after awhile and have to take the guy away and they left a shambles I suppose what you gonna do that's a shambles yeah that was done right then yeah no I'm just not good at fix and stuff like I had to find somebody that the door was busted big expensive south and that's going to be five hundred Bucks you know how to deal with that stuff it's not me man stop me I'm a person just because the landlord fix it so what I did was I moved out they got a tenant I moved to revere first ten it was okay second that it was not okay it was one of those people who are professional non rent payers so each month I am eating the mortgage and get zip in addition I'd be a good guy it installed why should drive for these narrator wells and they messed around with it in because water damage to the unit below some on the hook for that too yes I had insurance but I'm just not down with that sorry I'm not down maybe now would be different but that I was not I was down as I was hemorrhaging money so so that for a loss you know what good decision people say you should do it it'll be worth so much now whatever I would have been living in a I'm very unhappy place for years and years and years and I I lived in places that friends stay there I would not have been able to experience like you know what which street I live the forty three winter street in a giant industrial loft I'm finished you know is a dream come true with two people that I like very much it was a very wonderful life you know the elevator opened right on to the place two beautiful talented smart women for women folk the kind of roommates they enhance your life instead of drainage I wouldn't have that experience and I wouldn't live that plum island for three years either so even though it's kind of counter intuitive I know properties worth a lot you know what so what it was a good decision to change and that I think long and hard now before owning property again sometimes I get this fantasy and I think nope Airbnb baby I don't need to own this place I'll find my dream place in their Hampshire and I don't need to buy it it'll be an Airbnb house there that Airbnb person Hey what if I pre pay X. amount of nights we you give me a twenty percent or something like that there you go Hey it's Harold in Hanover will get the house right after this on WBZ that's one what do you say with Bradley J. WBZ news radio ten thirty this is the sound of someone gyrating on your undercooked chicken and it looks like mom might be taking it out the little don't let someone else get sick on average one in six Americans will get.

Briggs Chas twenty percent three years