17 Burst results for "Bridge Bio"

"bridge bio" Discussed on First Rounders

First Rounders

03:27 min | 2 months ago

"bridge bio" Discussed on First Rounders

"And <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Telephony_Male> also <Speech_Male> just finding <Speech_Male> the the <Speech_Music_Male> environment or the <Speech_Music_Male> culture that <Speech_Music_Male> i would want to <Speech_Music_Male> work. Yeah <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> it goes back <SpeakerChange> to <Speech_Music_Male> where is <Music> for or working <Silence> <Speech_Male> offer. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Excitement <Speech_Male> is when i feel <Speech_Male> when i come <Silence> to work <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> it's while <Speech_Male> while i think we're just <Speech_Male> getting started. I <Speech_Male> think hopefully <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> members and brench by <Speech_Male> fell to its <Speech_Male> extent. <Silence> <Advertisement> Yeah it's just. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Is that <Silence> <Advertisement> academic excitement. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> It's <Speech_Male> just one <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> final thing you <Speech_Male> said before that when <Speech_Male> you're at third rock <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> you sort of create <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> a company. They go in for <Speech_Male> a while and then they <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> might come back out but <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> this sounds like <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> this is not a one <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> asset company. This is <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> a big company. Now you've <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> got two hundred and fifty employees. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I think are more. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> We have thirty <Speech_Male> two programs and <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> we got <Speech_Male> four hundred <SpeakerChange> employees <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> or so. You <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> could run this company for <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the next twenty years of <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> your your life. If he wanted <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to. Is that <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> kind of the goal. <Speech_Male> Let me <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> away. <Speech_Music_Male> Yeah no. <Silence> I mean <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> i'm having a blast <Speech_Male> and i think that there's <Speech_Male> a lot to do <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> like i said as long as <Speech_Male> objective function remains <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> one <Speech_Male> with leighton opportunity <Speech_Male> meeting meaningful <Speech_Male> medicines aren't <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> being created that we could <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> stop any an elk <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> elke that <Silence> <Advertisement> i'd love to do this <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> until <Speech_Male> seventies or eighties. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Other kids <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> that are are <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> from. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Yeah <Speech_Music_Male> well <Speech_Male> okay. <Speech_Male> Listen <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> i really appreciate. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> This is invigorating. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> talk i <Silence> <Advertisement> I loved it. Thank <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> you <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> thank you very <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> it. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I'm going to hold on to stop. <Speech_Music_Male> This <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> is your first <Speech_Male> rounders. Podcast <Speech_Male> with neil kamar. I <Speech_Male> hope you enjoy that as much <Silence> as i did. <Speech_Male> I would like <Speech_Male> to say. Thanks to kneel <Silence> for making the time to do <Speech_Male> this <Speech_Male> thank you to the midwest. Quiet <Speech_Male> for use of your <Speech_Male> music in this podcast. <Speech_Male> I will take some <Speech_Male> information <Speech_Male> Some <Speech_Male> more information on bridge bio <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> mega fund article <Speech_Male> by angelo <Speech_Male> and the book. <Speech_Male> That neil mentioned. I will <Speech_Male> put all that in our community <Speech_Male> page which can find <Speech_Male> off the homepage of nature <Speech_Male> biotech. <Speech_Male> If you'd like to talk <Speech_Male> about this podcast <Speech_Male> are journal <Speech_Male> or anything that we do you <Speech_Male> can find us on. Twitter <Speech_Male> handle is at <Silence> nature biotech. <Speech_Male> You're <Speech_Male> listening to this or <Speech_Male> I'm releasing <Speech_Male> this on march first <Speech_Male> spring <Speech_Male> in the air. <Speech_Male> Vaccinations <Speech_Male> are happening. <Speech_Male> My father has been vaccinated. <Speech_Male> My stepmother's <Silence> vaccinated. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> My mother-in-law <Silence> husband vaccinated <Speech_Male> my teacher. <Speech_Female> Friends have been vaccinated. <Speech_Male> I've a dentist <Speech_Male> friend. He's been vaccinated <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> it's happening. <Silence> It's happening <Speech_Male> better times <Silence> ahead. <Speech_Male> <Silence> Thank you for listening. <Speech_Male> I will talk <Speech_Male> to you on the next <Speech_Male> one and <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> goodbye <Music>

"bridge bio" Discussed on First Rounders

First Rounders

06:55 min | 2 months ago

"bridge bio" Discussed on First Rounders

"Experienced game where people were literally like retiring into biotech are retiring into the startup world and doubts. Not the vibe here so this this perfectly last question i wanna ask you about this. The reason why biotech exists is venture capitalist had been happy to sink money into companies that made widgets or hance or cars. But but what happened. Is they realize that you could actually put money into an experiment. Which would biotech is a grand experiment. And sometimes it's experiments pay out and that became a model that worked and that is what gave rise to this industry. It's the thing that separates of american biotech industry from the rest of the world. Frankly is all this. Vc capital that's available for it so that was an evolution in financing. And it's equally important to what happened to this industry as all the great science that came out in the first antibody research etc. So my question is when you look at something like bridge bio or santa. We just saw that spun out of medici right so many cheese spun out. This conglomerate called fantastic which is ten biotechs put together and they see that it with two hundred fifty million dollars and the question is is this another evolution of the financing model for biotech mean. You know the people in front about it. But i think the more capital the better in this space. There's so much to do for patients and there's so many good ideas you know the traditional venture capitalists might say ashford this before all too much cap space or you know. There's there's there's the ideas being funded. There are a lot of great ideas still sitting on the shelf. There's tens of thousands of patents grants occurring every year and were founding hundred companies here to companies here so the opportunity is massive and hope as he's new models. I'm bringing you types of investors will continue to broaden the scope in patients and like you know was not. Yeah i mean do people say. What's the fear when when people say there's too much money in the sector right now. I think to be honest. I think the fear is greed because right now when people are worried about the money the money is like is like glomming onto the same companies. So i said like you look at the number of new companies founded every year tomas flat flat line from two thousand seven all the way to maybe slightly higher. But it's not that much more than a couple hundred so all that's happening math valuation and who people are putting that money work there like venture capitalists who have a relatively three to five year horizon. They need to get into the need to get out of the valley so worried for them. Is that by the time. They're getting in. The valuations are so high that You know potentially they're not gonna make as much money as but that's the wrong object. Well dr right. Objective function for the Functional medicine right and the moral in the morning and how many beautiful medicines we're gonna make you only make those profitable right. so so. So what were the valuation that just described whatever it is on point. Let's just call biotech point. Six one point eight trillion dollars market cap or whatever that implies that you probably need something like you know if the revenue off five times you need like forty billion dollars of new products a year to to to me implied valuation and navy. We're at the approvals. Last year or so sales on that is four hundred twenty four billion. We're we're off so someone's gonna lose somewhere. Some of these biotechs that are here is value of going to go down. And some are gonna go up. And that's fine this fair people. Fred about those ever-increasing valuations but how is highly morning into the early stage space because regardless of what valuation free money is at. There are great ideas that can help patients that are sitting on shelves today and should be pushed forward and could make some money in the right context. I mean you just said sixty approvals right. I mean roughly. That's remarkable. it's awesome. Yeah i mean. I always kind of thought. The idea was well. If there's so much money coming into the sector. What's going to happen. Is a bunch of people going to lose their shirts. And then it's all going to pull back and there's not gonna be any money left and that's the fear but i just don't know that that's gonna happen. I in there are certain people that will obviously not live up to the to the ivan and they'll be others that great medicines. But i think my arch were very productive. Time are interesting. The you know what what was call. Evens law as reversed inasmuch is productivity or number of enemies per dollar spanked. His is going for the time in a long time. And that's in part because we're doing better with targets are because we're some fraction adding syndromes into real seizes. That we can go after and think. Yeah the time feels like out to to work productively. So i agree with you. A lot of people friend in about the tech industry whatever. It was ten years ago and certainly there was a bubble warm a secular trend toward value creation. There even though if you like. Dcfs foul industry. I guess like you know a lot of it is like just makes money on advertising. You know the implied advertising like twice the global product market like two dollars for every one dollar product makes no sense but the avant is gonna be other ways to monetize the platforms. And my thought is. There's gonna be a lot of ways to help patients and we're just we're just scratching the tip of it so to bring this back to you so this after having heard about your back on this makes perfect sense to me right that your mother was sort of more into economics and finance. Your dad a researcher. No wonder that you were so interested. In the mega fund idea andrew lows in an economist. And you've taken those sort of economists ideas which is in my opinion sort of like karma so really good at calmly looking at the data right there super go to debt and that makes sense and bridge via looks the way that it does. Do you agree. I think it's a reflection of the way. Maybe you think about maybe the world manning but madly informed by some just wonderful mentors work with you and charles richard franken but yeah no. I think it's i think it's a a startup. I hope is is kind of a reflection of what i find deer an interesting intellectually and.

charles richard franken two dollars Fred two thousand two hundred fifty million doll hundred companies eight trillion dollars twice today five times Last year five year ten years ago bridge bio four hundred twenty four billi tens of thousands of patents forty billion dollars santa first three
"bridge bio" Discussed on First Rounders

First Rounders

08:11 min | 2 months ago

"bridge bio" Discussed on First Rounders

"In nature. Biotech about the concept of financing. Something at scale megaphone. The make fun. Yeah exactly. That was a really interesting filming but those things together quickly build something that could be really pragmatic and as scale bunch of patients in these areas of generic. So that's how it all came together. This is this is fascinated me. I mean when i was looking at bridge bio there's three big areas that i think are really really interesting to talk about and so the the first one is you have on your board charles homsi's on the board right and so's andrew lowe so he must have been brought in. You must have helped set up the business plan with his thinking about at scale and maybe we should talk a little bit about. Just the mega fund idea that he sort of put out there which was kind of you know. Drug development is super expensive. Every everybody knows that cancer is proving incredibly hard to crack and the more we find out about the more difficult it becomes almost in his idea was. We can't throw two hundred million dollars a cancer. Let's throw thirty billion dollars cancer. And you'll have as much money as you'll ever need what you'll spread the risk around all these assets so that the fund won't really be in danger if something fails if something fails and eventually out of it the money will probably be depleted in the end but you will have three or four new cancer drugs. That might be really really life. Changing it was super interesting thing and it has sort of shifted a little bit. I think the thinking around funding possibly a little bit already. Do you agree with that. Totally just starting because there were a lot of companies and we're not the only one that were born on the idea but we never quite like just getting started today. We're finally today starting to get an approach. The scale that we talked about we started the company and to take advantage of some of the concepts that and do it put forth and the whole concept would united is that you're living in jackpot industry and meaning. The expected return is positive. The modal return is negative. And you've got a really wacky way of financing you. Just you've got people who think they can make the right call you know. They're that smart people. I mean i had the privilege of work a lot of marble but the generally going to be more wrong than they are right just because it's an incredibly aren't set of problems. Dissolve so in most industries like that. You finance basket understanding what the historical probability tactical successor successor. Or whatever it is and in doing. So you can basically hive-off default risk so that you can bring a lot more capitalist space and that that's under i'll moment which is there's one hundred trillion dollars. A capital of the world is jillion dollars of capital. So boom people say while biotech is on point six trillion or one point eight trillion remark out. Right now cares too small as you know as phantom out to producing the gdp so did the ability of biotech to help more and more people with more and more find using if they just had the right profile. Which is you're not gonna lose your money and you might make money here. If you can create data profile you could bring down. Investors who account for much larger of the portion of the economy you know equity investor. You don't wanna take risks and in doing so lead the science go you can let the science speak for itself and not and you don't want sexy here like one earned. It is or or anything like that. I thought the brewery what andrew was was and i think you know like our last financing was basically be linked debt and getting close clashes concept of a diversified fairly one product. I can digital shave overboard folio. That's it so i when i was looking at like. What is the proposition for. Bridge bio and let me put forth what i think it is right having looked at it. It's it's the idea that there are companies that are put together around like a really interesting piece of biology. We came we came across this in the lab. We spun out of university. And we think this is great. Or even. here's a disease that we think we can. We can attack. We're gonna go after angelman syndrome or something and that's another way. What what bridge by was put together is and i think i think even maybe the company is put this idea that it's kind of moneyball idea where the company is going to go find what's considered a moneyball for anyone. Listening is the book by michael lewis about the oakland athletics where they would find baseball players who are undervalued but quite quite good and together put together a team that was spent less than anyone else in a good team. So the idea that you're gonna find these assets that are somewhat undervalued the reader languishing in academia. Maybe they're they've been shelled at Pharma because there wasn't resources for it apply value to them and then eventually hopefully get the real value. Which is the thing is approved. And they're for patients so when you look at that as a concept of getting these assets in that are undervalued by using the scale that you mentioned the resources that you have applying value them the company is actually a financial proposition. And not a scientific one am i. Am i correct in that. Will i don't think that moneyball thing although you know it's it's an interesting headline the book. But i'll tell you. I'll tell you where it's analogous not tell you where it's different. I think the purpose of our company is is super simple. It is to create and to maximize the number of new meaningful madison's for patients with genetic disease that unwise would not have been created. Yeah that's normal and almost everything that we worked on early days. Everything you see. Lesnar pipeline is effectively ideas that were sitting on the shelf mechanism of disease ideas often with like an early hook onto how you might see at its source somewhere in academics laboratory and we said highly translate that insight into a medicine that matter so that translation that early work with those journals. All that stuff that is that is part in parcel of my animates us. Because you get to the meaningful impact on asian so that the company is a science company through and through. I mean we are. We are let your science is rigorous science. There's no bullshit science just like moneyball. I don't know that much about money balls or baseball. But they were like it was a love of baseball. It was just like not baseball. it wasn't a. Hey you know this guy went to the you know like it was actually looking at the facts whatever. Those facts were sabermetrics their case for us. It's just forget whether the person is decorated in this way or whether they are disc will whether the or whether the these two signs they came out or this other thing. Let's get down to the bones what we understand about this disease and whether or not we have to make an impact and sometimes it's going to be in small markets which we can make profitable so so that so that'll be sad. I think it's analogous money. All maybe or financial position is that there is no limit. I think a priority to the company could do in charge of innovation that can help patients meeting. I'm not saying that. I'm just s irony company nor am i saying on just right. Angel man's or cns inherited disease saying everything within the span of genetic disease and genetic. Disease really is a moniker. For higher probability technical success. I can draw an engineering blueprint. So maybe it's not just maybe in the future platforms where the protein variants adequately quantitatively describes this into the back. And i say okay. Go after that because i understand that is a target. It's really.

michael lewis three charles homsi two hundred million dollars thirty billion dollars andrew lowe one hundred trillion dollars andrew one point today four new cancer drugs first one asian eight trillion three big areas two signs jillion dollars six trillion Lesnar one product
"bridge bio" Discussed on First Rounders

First Rounders

07:46 min | 2 months ago

"bridge bio" Discussed on First Rounders

"My name is brady. Hogan i'm the host of this show you you probably know that by now if not. Maybe you're a new listener. In which case. Welcome aboard the the guest. Today is neal kumar. He co founder and ceo of bridge bio a company. That was founded in two thousand fifteen. They had a sizable ipo in two thousand nineteen. They raised almost three hundred fifty million dollars and they are set up as a I'm not gonna say new but a sort of tweaked. Business plan which has changed the investment proposition for investors. They've erased some of the issues around drug development and one of the co founders is andrew lo who's an economist and i found it fascinating to think about the way they are trying to run this company and the way they're trying to run this business and that's why when i was thinking about you know we'll would be a good fit for the show. I thought yeah i. I think there's a lot of things about bridge bio that are interesting to think about not only about the company itself but about greater trends in start up formation. And the the way you have a good interview is sometimes someone comes in. And they are guarded and open to talking about anything and through the conversation you get down to some sort of truth about who they are as a person which then informs the way they see the world which informs the way they run their companies that informs away tackle complex biological questions and a little bit of that did happen here with neil but also sometimes what makes a good interview is a robust exchange of thoughts and ideas. And i think that's what happened in the in the later. Half of this interview you. I just got to sit with neil and ask him wise bridge bio built this way. It looks like it's built this way for these reasons. Am i wrong about that. What does this say about the future of venture capital funding. was it. Say about the risks inherent in biotech really. Good conversation i. I came away thinking about things that are different way I learned some stuff. And that's how you know you had to go talk anyway. That's how i knew. I had a good talk. I hope it's also interesting for you and also just on top of it. What a nice guy really enjoyed talking to them. I think that's probably all you need to know so here. It is your first round his podcast. With neal kumar. Listen up yes all right about that. I literally dotted early day too. So i around from to install the audio driver on my computer. Because just goofed up so on your say that you get up you get up at four thirty for your kids. Yeah i usually. I usually get up at four thirty so like my kids when they have practice. I got it okay. You get everything out of the way early and then you've got that time with them. Although in my office. But i get up early. Go down to the basement. I thought for a second. I thought boy. His kids are hardcore if they're getting up four thirty day work ethic eight year old and a five dark phase. But so i. I was thinking about this. I know that you know that bridge byles in california. Of course in that you went to stanford where did you grow up your no. I actually was born in boston. But i don't remember anything of it because we moved to rochester minnesota when i was about three weeks old and i grew up there so minnesota southeast minnesota toward the no clinic is and i spent most of my formative years there. How was that. I mean i. It's not often that. I have some from minnesota on the show certainly from from rochester. Ideally you know. I mean i think it's interesting. Reflect on a little bit. It's it was a small town back then and probably less than sixty seventy thousand people Lots of You know diversity of thought socioeconomic diversity net. No racial diversity. I think we were the racial diversity. Yeah but it was a it was a really i think. Great grow up in middle from stuff to Air and those kind of simple living. How how is it so you just said. No racial diversity. How is it that your family was there in the first place i mean. My father is a physician researcher in the area and apologies so the male clinic was there and i think he's been there for over thirty years. That's the reason why the move from boston. Yeah okay so that so this leads into my next question so your dad is a physician and and a researcher. Yes did that sort of lead you into thinking about a life science or medicine. I think in you're effective about what you grow up around and i grew up around a lot of examples of people working on basic science. Translate basic science into stuff that could be meaningful for people and help people with it so certainly that was l. was an influence on me. I was never all reasonable pressure from to become an adopter gonna get going to go down that route queasy and data from ills a large. I certainly must have been affected by growing up in our community. You are health care since you got big part of everyone's that you could just the idea of translating research into medicine. Was your father. Also was his research also translational in that way or just because he saw patients that he thought that way. I think probably one of the one of the you know differentiating features of doing research at place like the clinic. And there's been any good examples of this act team is that you get to take what you're learning in physician settings you'll see off and start doing research on yes certainly he He connected the two and did a lot of seminal work in boston. Ins and bone mineral density and one twenty five alpha hydroxy vitamin d. Just a bunch of stuff that that also affected much of his practice to. Yeah so you're surrounded by growing up for sure. And what about siblings. Did you have siblings or have a younger sister to younger. Is she. In medicine at all home. She's a smart kettering and down she's bad. And what about your mother. Was she also in the sciences. At all or yeah looks like my mom was trained in economics. Actually and was. I actually stayed at home with us for the most part when we were younger. And then i started working in development so She does a lot with foundation and helping to raise funds for males. It's a big male family sister roster basically male clinic. They used to be an ibm plant there. That was that was of impor- But that's sort of wound down over time. So i've been if you bet if you survey roster now by.

neal kumar boston california brady minnesota andrew lo Hogan Today rochester less than sixty seventy thousa bridge bio over thirty years one two Half rochester minnesota almost three hundred fifty mil four thirty day stanford five
"bridge bio" Discussed on Wall Street Breakfast

Wall Street Breakfast

05:53 min | 5 months ago

"bridge bio" Discussed on Wall Street Breakfast

"Today vaccine rule out inoculation challenges and futures point to another vaccine rally leading today's news less than two days after the fda grant emergency authorization for pfizer and in covid nineteen vaccine nearly three million doses of the shot have been transported across the country. It's part of stork mission to vaccinate more than one hundred million people by the end of march with one hundred and forty five sites in the us poised to receive the vaccine today and nearly five hundred locations. Said to get their first doses. On tuesday and wednesday. Five of the vaccinations will take place at a national ceremonial kickoff event scheduled this afternoon at george washington university hospital. Despite dry runs and contingency planning a lot can go wrong. Everything has to come together. The packaging the dry ice the vials the material itself. It all has to come together to the same place have another bit and exactly the right people there to take said galaxy shifty director of the mit center for transportation and logistics in other news according to official guidelines from the cdc healthcare worker should be the first to get pfizer's vaccine alongside people that live and work in long term care. The group consists of about twenty four million americans which will take up most of the doses that will be produced by the end of the year. The goal is for the rest of the us population to be vaccinated by summer. Twenty twenty one though. Some hurdles remain one. The logistics hurdles mentioned above to roughly four in ten americans. Say they would definitely or probably not get a vaccine. According to a recent survey by pew research to achieve herd immunity experts say about seventy percent of the population needs to be vaccinated or have natural. Antibodies hopes for a continuing economic recovery. Saw cyclicals lead advance for futures overnight as the us gears up for historic back in out. The dow was up point. Eight percent the s. and p. Five hundred up point six percent and nasdaq up point. Four percent vaccine has and will likely continue to provide a tailwind to the market that is allowing investors to look beyond record case levels hospitalizations and deaths said analyst at j.p morgan on the stimulus. Front a bipartisan group of lawmakers is readying a two port proposal with nine hundred and eight billion in pandemic relief though disagreements remain between the parties over liability protections for businesses and funding for state and local governments. The best chance for passing a bill would be attach it to the twelve bill omnibus package. Congress must pass by friday to fund the federal government. It's a big week. The federal reserve will hold its final meeting of twenty twenty on tuesday and wednesday with any guidance on continued asset purchases. Watch closely by wall. Street about of dealmaking began over the weekend. As astrazeneca bulked up rare disease portfolio with the thirty nine billion dollar purchase of alexi and pharmaceuticals marking its biggest acquisition. On record elsewhere in the pharma sector glaxosmithkline was reported to be in the race to by eidos therapeutics by putting an offer of one hundred and twenty dollars per share compared to the one already agreed to from bridge bio pharma other industries also saw increased activity educational software maker. Plural site agreed to a three point. Five billion sale to this equity partners. Huntington bancshares unveiled all stock merger with financial and electronic arts announced. A one point two billion dollar deal for uk video game company code masters trumping and earlier agreement with the rival. Take two interactive looking ahead. The deals we will see. We'll be mainly conducted by the large companies that farewell during the covid crisis and will be larger than normal on average writes essay. Contributor barouch love multiple federal agencies including the us treasury and commerce department have reportedly had some of their networks breached as part of a global cyber espionage. Camping believed to be the work of the russian government staff. Emails were monitored for months. Though the full scope of the hack isn't yet clear sources told reuters that the breaches were related to a broad campaign that also involved. The recently disclosed hack at fireeye while washington post report suggested the agencies were breathe through a network management system called solar winds the. Us government is aware of these reports and we are taking all necessary steps to identify and remedy any possible issues. Related to this situation said national security council spokesman. John eliot solar winds is down. Fourteen point eight percent pre-market in an unsurprising turn of events. Uk prime minister boris johnson and european. Commissioner president ursula bonder laying agreed on sunday to push brexit trade talks beyond their latest deadline sending sterling up one point six percent to a dollar and thirty four cents despite the exhaustion after almost a year of negotiations. Despite the fact that deadlines have been missed over and over. We think it is responsible at this point to go the extra mile the to said in a joint statement after they spoke by phone meanwhile investors continue to w k investments on fears that britain may crash out of its brexit transition period without a trade deal in place. Uk equity funds have bled two point four billion over the past two months. According to data provider epfr our global bringing total outflow since the brexit referendum in june two thousand sixteen to two billion should shareholders vote on a company's plans to tackle climate change unil- ever think so.

covid george washington university h galaxy shifty mit center for transportation pfizer pew research p morgan us pharma sector glaxosmithkline eidos therapeutics Huntington bancshares fda cdc us treasury
"bridge bio" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:35 min | 7 months ago

"bridge bio" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"You so much. Gregg Jarrett. It's time to look at the Russell 2000. Presumably, it is tracking the other indices. And indeed, as they look at us here, the arty why is up 1.9%? So let's bring in Dave Wilson voice and commentary about what particular sectors in the Russell 2000 feeling it today. Not say it's tracking. And then some When you consider that 1.9% game for the Russell compares with a 1.3% advance for the S and P 500, So was smaller companies. Bigger gains. The story of today the Russells sharpest advance bones too mild cardio. Who's ticker? Is M y okay? The developer of hard drugs has serves 58%. After accepting a $13.1 billion takeover offer from Bristol Myers Squibb on Idols. Therapeutic Sticker E I, D X has risen almost 41%, the drug developer accepted a billion dollar offer from majority owner Bridge bio farmer to take full control. And again take a G A. N is up. 15%, the supplier Gaming software, signed a 10 Year agreement to run Wynn Resorts online casino and Sports betting business in Michigan. Nowthe Russell's steepest drop belongs to Cinemark Holdings to Chrissy and K. The movie theater changes down 16.5% after rival Regal Entertainment, said it would suspend operations Thursday. Other theater owners are also lower. AMC Entertainment Ticker AM Sees Down about 11% Marcus took her M C S is down 8.5% and theater advertising company. National CineMedia Ticker N C. M I is down almost 10%. LAMARK stocks editor Dave Wilson. Thank you so much. We appreciate that, while a fascinating story on the Bloomberg Terminal one of the most widely read stories on the turmoil today is a scoop buyer friends it of Bloomberg News, Exxon Mobil. They found some plans from the company where it shows that the company's planning a surge in emissions in the years going forward. This is a time when smother their big rivals like BP and Royal Dutch Shell are moving to curb oil and 20 out a mission. So big store here Kevin Crowley, one of the reporters joins us. He covers big oil for Bloomberg News. Kevin. Thanks so much for joining us here, Talk to us about your story here. What's really jumping out at you? What's the lead? Well and put some numbers on the on the company's growth plans that were announced in 2018. They were they were, they were very rich in targets around cash flow and and earnings, But they never talked about the emissions impact and Story based on them. Internal documents from Exxon shows that the emissions associated with the production growth would've would've been quite large would've been good about it an extra 21 million tons of to enter the atmosphere just from Exxon's own production, but then scaled up to include gas. Emissions from from her from customers in the usage of gasoline use of their products would have been ah, around around 100 million tons of extra emissions. This is Exxon's all pre pre covert plans. But it goes to show you that the company is certainly in a different mentality than the European rivals such as BP and Shell have decided Tio reduced their reliance on that one and gas in the in the years coming forward. Yeah, It's so interesting now. Are there any regulator is keeping an eye on this and telling Exxon, you know, Hey, holders, Or is it just sort of up to Exxon? To decide that itself. I mean, you know, all these countries have signed up to the Paris accord. I mean, some haven't obviously but you know who decides how much Exxon Khun do? Because it's it's really free free free markets on DH, You know, the U. S pulled out of the Paris accords. So, um, in in the U. S, is far less political regulatory pressure on emissions and compared Tio Compared with Europe, so exams plan was to increase production on DH. These numbers show that emissions and would increase alongside alongside that Andi. They would show that there was a Exxon did include a number of mitigation measures. But there are these small in comparison to the horrible increase in in production. It's interesting. We've also heard a lot about SG investing in and how a lot of war investors institutional investors are really looking hard at companies from an environmental, social and governance perspective. What what's been the policy of Exxon Mobil about? Maybe adjusting some of their strategies to appeal more to some of these yesterday influenced investors. Next exit has made some moves. They vote targets around reducing methane leaks on DH, reducing emissions intensity. But, AH, climate activists say that this is really tinkering around the edges, and it doesn't really mean much when you're planning it. Big a big increase in Ah in production. So really, I think the mood music around so the str annexed on is that the company really needs Tio team or if it is Tio, entice some of these Yes reminded investors and of course, we've seen the last of the last year to two years or so is becoming such a huge factor in the jewel markets. I mean, A Tesla, for example. Now it is much bigger than Exxon Mobil. Uh, my market cap and even some of the utilities now starting to take an oil companies on DH. Yes, she's been a big driver of that. What is the strategy? I mean, why is Exxon upping production when there may not be demand is trying to sort of EQ the last little bit out of you know, US oil production. Well, I have to confront this was this is this is that three carry a corona virus plants since the current since the current viral earth, they they kind of go back to the jury What they haven't said what the new plans will be, But yes, eggs almost planning, and so they could take account of cyclical approach, where they would be investing in oil and gas production as others pull. Pull back in preparation for I a unexpected upswing in the in prices. A Z years went on, and especially as other other companies going, pull out. Suddenly you need more opportunities. But I think the real backstory for that is that Eggs on really under invested invested in bad projects with previous decades before before the current CEO Down, which came in in 2018 on DH, So really, it was struggling Tio shoplift production for sometimes so they They were kind of forced to kind of rebuild the upstream portfolio. Really absence of phenomenal stories so well done for breaking in finding the documents and they can get old into. You know, a story that a layman can read and understand. Kevin Crowley have to thank you from our Houston bureau on this internal projections from Exxon. Kevin Crowley there US Pickle, a reporter. Now let's get to DC and Nathan.

Exxon Exxon Mobil DH Nowthe Russell Kevin Crowley Tio Dave Wilson Royal Dutch Shell developer Gregg Jarrett Paris Bristol Myers Squibb Bloomberg reporter Bloomberg News Wynn Resorts BP Michigan Cinemark Holdings
"bridge bio" Discussed on Wall Street Breakfast

Wall Street Breakfast

02:12 min | 8 months ago

"bridge bio" Discussed on Wall Street Breakfast

"Highly on will receive five, hundred, sixty million, which will be used to accelerate product commercialisation. Date on Waste Management's four point six, billion acquisition of advance disposal services is on September thirtieth. alibaba group is hosting a virtual twenty, twenty investor day between September twenty eighth and thirtieth speakers include the CEO, the CFO and other members of senior management team. Last year Shares Valley game during the company's investor. Day when five year targets for gross merchandise volume and active customers were released. The event takes place this year with. A group on the verge of going public with dual IPO splits evenly between Hong Kong and Shanghai and is mulling will could be the world's largest IPO. Seeking raised about thirty, five billion for evaluation of about two, hundred and fifty billion. The World Vaccine Congress runs from September twenty eighth through. October. First with the Novia Pharmaceuticals Novak's and Madonna in the lineup of companies do to present. The conference is likely to cover details on vaccine deployment and data-gathering methods. INSTEAD OF AXIOM trial results bridge bio Pharma is hosting its first are in d day on. September, Twenty twenty-ninth the program focuses on bridge BIOS drug engineering platform. It's targeted oncology portfolio and four highlighted programs with clinical data anticipated in the next twelve to twenty-four months. Also, next week, FDA action dates arrived for and pharmaceuticals. Al Kindi, sprinkle as replacement therapy for pediatric adrenal insufficiency and Missile Blasts Ryan. So be La for accelerated approval in pediatrics steroid, refractory, acute graft, versus host disease. Google holding a launch event on September thirty efforts. Next lineup of products including the Pixel five, a new chrome cast, and a new smart speaker. The Pixel five reportedly features a six inch led ninety hurts display with a cutout in the left corner for an eight megapixel front camera gorilla glass six covers the front of the device with a display offering a color depth of twenty, four bis as well as support for HDR. The first reports wafers way day sales tally could arrive next week to give a charge to the retail sector. The.

"bridge bio" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:52 min | 1 year ago

"bridge bio" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"You're listening to Bloomberg best on Bloomberg radio I'm June Grasso. the healthcare sector has seen a strong year but risks remain as policy announced around the affordable Care Act and debt ceiling concerns continue to be debated on the political stage numbers Jason Kelly spoke to alley set that head of health care strategic growth that KKR they discussed investment opportunities in the healthcare industry and his firm's healthcare portfolio the great thing about healthcare is that growth is still there right it's a three and a half billion dollar market just to put it in context of US healthcare were country be the fifth largest economy in the world and so even if different things are changing at points in time in health care this dynamism I think that favors a patient and long term investor right who can shoe spots and not only focus on a macro health care but also get very deep on a microbe individual opportunities and figure out why that was my prosper while others might not at the same time so when you talk about some of the deals that you've done before we get that let's talk about those investors that you're talking to certainly public investors we watch them every day move in and out of various aspects of the healthcare market your limited partners big institutional investors sovereign wealth funds pensions and whatnot I would imagine though that they've got at least a little bit of skepticism around headline risk policy was all the things that money was talking about a in the intro what did they say to you about this opportunity they they ask is now a good time to be in this space and I think what we would say is it is a great time to be in a space we remain very excited about the space and a lot of the things that are topical perhaps in the news and and a policy standpoint these are not things we haven't seen encountered before and so I think the great thing about healthcare is space is a pretty powerful force and that force keeps a lot of things in play but I think to be successful you got to be very mindful of the potential changes and and really sort of put those two together to to succeed and so we tell our investors is that we think we're very excited we think we can understand some of those challenges and when you think about the potential changes from a regulatory or policy perspective what are the ones that would be for lack of better term sort of catalytic two four eight investment what do you look for that would be. a game changer on the positive side. I think what we look for is fundamentally what is going to deliver better quality or lower cost or both and so if there's a business model that is challenged in one or both of those regards that's probably a tougher business model to invest behind however a lot of this is that we found for example you could take a P. R. A. which makes pharma companies more efficient you could take a bridge by which is finding innovative drugs that help patients those are business models we think sixty really regardless of policy a reimbursement right tell us about P. R. A. because that I mean that's a good bye you know description that we use in the primary where it's a home run night and said multiple multiples of capital return what happened there it was a great investment I think the core of it was it was a space that we have research for years so what they do is on the contract research space essentially making pharma companies more efficient getting drugs to market to patients faster and so we found a team that we have known for over ten years it was calling Shannon in his management team. it was the twentieth contract research business we had looked at but the first one we invested in and I think what we look for is not only what the business was a what it could be we took the U. S. business in close partnership with management largely and and basically tripled the head count we've tripled the revenue in quadrupled earnings all while making it fundamentally a better partner to its ultimate form a client right and I think it's a very good example of when you identify the right space that has the right secular tale wins you identify the right management team and you combine the execution we can help them with that's a really good partnership not to be too courts made a lot of money on that deal we do we did our investors me about six times our capital not deal and I think it was a good example of when you identify the right thing with the right team and have patience capital long side you can do quite well how competitive is it out there for deals right now either both among other private equity firms you're very familiar with the and a number of them you worked a tax I believe a freak and Kay Kay are you know this face very well from the financial sponsor perspective what about from a more strategic buyer perspective how're valuations it's at our. you Asians are not low I would say that the great thing is again we're back to screen out fully dollar healthcare market so not everything in healthcare we think is trading high and so if we can combine the spaces that we really understand and build better business is that either have option Alan young going public selling to some the strategic that are flush with capital and looking to grow their own businesses we think there's a there's a home for that but it is a competitive market and I think that just means we have to be better at finding spaces either we understand we were real angle if we ask ourselves why should we own this business are part of this business we can answer that question we should move on to the next all right and in terms of the sort of the exit side on the other side of the deals there been some existential questions about this current IPO market it is that the preferred route or do you see a lot of sort of bigger strategic that are hungry to buy some of the stuff you out we've seen both if I look at recent exits we've had it was a company which the public console down over time bridge bio was a company that we thought the best home for that company is raising additional capital publicly after we'd funded privately along with other investors but that's a company that again could stay public for ultimately be a strategic target we've had businesses like our Ajax platform where we sold of the underlying graphics asset to my tronic strategic we had our spy rocks business in your nose and throat space that we sold the striker so I think the real answer is option Audi for these investments is there is there is the option to sort of prime full goal and if we can grow good businesses and don't have the right outcomes regardless of what the X. passes that was KKR as head of health care strategic growth alley set that coming up Matthew Lewis Eddie Deutsche Bank chief US economist and Lisa Erickson of U. S..

Bloomberg US Jason Kelly June Grasso. billion dollar ten years
"bridge bio" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"bridge bio" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Is Bloomberg. you're listening to Bloomberg best on Bloomberg radio I'm Jim go also. the healthcare sector has seen a strong year but risks remain as policy announced around the affordable Care Act and debt ceiling concerns continue to be debated on the political stage Bloomberg's chasing Kelly spoke to alley set that head of health care strategic growth that KKR they discussed investment opportunities in the healthcare industry and its firms healthcare portfolio the great thing about healthcare is that growth is still there right it's a three and a half billion dollar market just to put it in context of U. S. health care what country be the fifth largest economy in the world and so even if different things are changing and points in time in health care there's dynamism I think that favors a patient and long term investor right who can shoe spots and not only focus on a macro healthcare but also get very deep on the micro individual opportunities and figure out why that was my Prospero others might not at the same time so when you talk about some of the deals that you've done before we get that let's talk about those investors that you're talking to certainly public investors we watch them every day move in and out of various aspects of the healthcare market your limited partners big institutional investors sovereign wealth funds tensions and whatnot I would imagine though that they've got at least a little bit of skepticism around headline risk policy with all the things that money was talking about a in the intro what did they say to you about this opportunity they may ask is now a good time to be in this space and I think what we would say is it is a great time to be in the space we remain very excited about the space and a lot of the things that are topical perhaps in the news and and a policy standpoint these are not things we haven't seen an encounter before is so I think the great thing about healthcare is space is a pretty powerful force and that force keeps a lot of things in play but I think to be successful you got to be very mindful of the potential changes and and really sort of put those two together to to succeed and so we tell our investors is that we think we're very excited we think we can understand some of those challenges and when you think about the potential changes from a regulatory or policy perspective what are the ones that would be for lack of better term sort of catalytic two four eight investment when you look for that would. a game changer on the positive side. I think what we look for is fundamentally what is going to deliver better quality or lower costs for both in so if there's a business model that is challenged in one or both of those regards that's probably a tougher business model to invest behind however a lot of this is that we've found for example you could take a P. R. A. which makes pharma companies more efficient you could take a bridge by which is finding innovative drugs that help patients those are business models we think succeed really regardless of policy a reimbursement right tell us about P. R. A. because that I mean that's a good bye you know description that we use in the primary where it's a home run night and said multiple multiples of capital return what happened there it was a great investment I think the core of it was it was a space that we have research for years so what they do is on the contract research space essentially making pharma companies more efficient in getting drugs to market to patients faster and so we found a team that we have known for over ten years it was calling Shannon in his management team. it was the twentieth contract research business we had looked up at the first one we invested in and I think what we look for is not only what the business was or what it could be we took the U. S. business in close partnership with management largely and and basically tripled the head count we've tripled the revenue in quadrupled earnings all while making it fundamentally a better partner to its ultimate form a client right and I think it's a very good example of when you identify the right space that has the right secular tail winds you identify the right management team and you combine the execution of we can help them with that's a really good partnership not to be too courts made a lot of money on that deal we do we did our investors me about six times our capital not deal and I think it was a good example of when you identify the right thing with the right team and have patience capital long side you can do quite well how competitive is it out there for deals right now he both among other private equity firms you're very familiar with the and a number of them you worked in a tax I believe a freak and Kay Kay are you know this face very well from the financial sponsor perspective what about from a more strategic buyer perspective how're valuations it's at our. all you Asians are not low I would say that the great thing is again we're back to screen out fully dollar healthcare market so not everything in healthcare we think is trading high and so if we can combine the spaces that we really understand and build better business is the either have optional young going public selling to somebody's for teachers that are flush with capital and looking to grow their own businesses we think there's a there's a home for that but it is a competitive market and I think that just means we have to be better at finding spaces either we understand we are real angle if we ask ourselves why should we own this business are part of this business we can't answer that question we should move on to the next all right and in terms of the sort of the exit side on the other side of the deals there been some existential questions about this current IPO market is that the preferred route or do you see a lot of sort of bigger strategic that are hungry to buy some of the stuff you we've seen both if I look at recent exits we've had it was a company with a public console down over time bridge bio was a company that we thought the best home for that company is raising additional capital publicly after we'd funded privately along with other investors but that's a company that again could stay public or ultimately be a strategic target we've had businesses like our Ajax platform where we sold on the underlying graphics asset to my tronic strategic we had our spy rocks business in your nose and throat space that we sold the striker so I think the real answer is option Audi for these investments is there is there is the option to sort of find full goal in if we can grow good businesses don't have the right outcomes regardless of what the X. passes that was KKR as head of health care strategic growth alley sat back coming up Matthew lose any Deutsche Bank chief US economist and Lisa Erickson of U..

Bloomberg. Bloomberg Kelly billion dollar ten years
"bridge bio" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:01 min | 1 year ago

"bridge bio" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Bloomberg. you're listening to Bloomberg best on Bloomberg radio I'm Jim go also. the healthcare sector has seen a strong year but risks remain as policy announced around the affordable Care Act and debt ceiling concerns continue to be debated on the political stage bloomers chasing Kelly spoke to alley set that head of health care strategic growth that KKR they discussed investment opportunities in the health care industry and its firms healthcare portfolio the great thing about healthcare is that growth is still there right it's a three and a half billion dollar market just to put it in context of US healthcare were country be the fifth largest economy in the world and so even if different things are changing and points in time in health care this dynamism I think that favors a patient and long term investor right who can shoe spots and not only focus on a macro health care but also get very deep on a micro individual opportunities and figure out why that was my Prospero others might not at the same time so when you talk about some of the deals that you've done before we get that let's talk about those investors that you're talking to certainly public investors we watch them every day move in and out of various aspects of the healthcare market your limited partners big institutional investors sovereign wealth funds pensions and whatnot I would imagine though that they've got at least a little bit of skepticism around headline risk policy resolving things that money was talking about a in the intro what did they say to you about this opportunity they they ask is now a good time to be in this space and I think what we would say is it is a great time to be in the space we remain very excited about the space and a lot of the things that are topical perhaps in the news and and a policy standpoint these are not things we haven't seen encountered before and so I think the great thing about healthcare is space is a pretty powerful force and that force keeps a lot of things in play but I think to be successful you got to be very mindful of the potential changes and and really sort of put those two together to to succeed and so we tell our investors is that we think we're very excited we think we can understand some of those challenges and when you think about the potential changes from a regulatory or policy perspective what are the ones that would be for lack of better term sort of catalytic two four eight investment when you look for that would. a game changer on the positive side. I think what we look for is fundamentally what is going to deliver better quality or lower cost or both and so if there's a business model that is challenged in one or both of those regards that's probably a tougher business model to invest behind however a lot of this is that we found for example you could take a P. R. A. which makes pharma companies more efficient you could take a bridge by which is finding innovative drugs that help patients those are business models we think sixty really regardless of policy a reimbursement right tell us about P. R. A. because that I mean that's a good bye you know description that we use in the primary where it's a home run night and said multiple multiples of capital return what happened there it was a great investment I think the core of it was it was a space that we have research for years so what they do is run a contract research space essentially making pharma companies more efficient getting drugs to market to patients faster and so we found a team that we have known for over ten years it was calling Shannon in his management team. it was the twentieth contract research business we have looked at but the first one we invested in and I think what we look for is not only what the business was a what it could be we took the U. S. business in close partnership with management largely and and basically tripled the head count we've tripled the revenue in quadrupled earnings all while making it fundamentally a better partner to its ultimate form a client right and I think it's a very good example of when you identify the right space that has the right secular tail winds you identify the right management team and you combine the execution that we can help them with that's a really good partnership not to be too course made a lot of money on that deal we do we did our investors me about six times our capital not deal and I think it was a good example of when you identify the right thing with the right team and have patience capital long side you can do quite well how competitive is it out there for deals right now either both among other private equity firms you're very familiar with the and and number then you worked a fax I believe a freak into KKR you know this face very well from the financial sponsor perspective what about from a more strategic buyer perspective how're valuations it's at our. all you Asians are not low I would say that the great thing is again we're back to screen out fully dollar healthcare market so not everything in healthcare we think is trading high and so if we can combine the spaces that we really understand and build better business is the either have optional young going public selling to some the strategic that are flush with capital and looking to grow their own businesses we think there's a there's a home for that but it is a competitive market and I think that just means we have to be better at finding space is the year we understand we were real angle if we ask ourselves why should we own this business report with us business we can't answer that question we should move on to the next all right and in terms of the sort of the exit side on the other side of the deals there been some existential questions about this current IPO market is that the preferred route or do you see a lot of sort of bigger strategic that are hungry to buy some of the stuff you we've seen both if I look at recent exits we've had it was a company with a public console down over time bridge bio was a company that we thought the best home for that company is raising additional capital publicly after we'd funded privately along with other investors but that's a company that again could state public or ultimately be a strategic target we've had businesses like our Ajax platform where we sold on the underlying ethics asset to my tronic strategic we had our spy rocks business in your nose and throat space that we sold the striker so I think the real answer is option Audi for these investments is there is there is the option to sort of prime full goal and if we can grow good businesses don't have the right outcomes regardless of what the X. passes that was K. K. R.'s head of health care strategic growth alley set that coming up Matthew lose any Deutsche Bank chief US economist and Lisa Erickson of U. S. bank wealth management this is the number. James the.

Bloomberg. US Kelly James billion dollar ten years
"bridge bio" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

13:28 min | 2 years ago

"bridge bio" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And health care with the emergence of new technologies and break through science today on technician health a new model for going after genetically driven diseases which affect a small number of patients find the scientist wherever they are and build small companies around them then chief correspondent Dr Daniel craft reviews progress in knowing the health status of our hearts it's not unusual for biotech companies to work on a number of diseases all at the same time usually they do that work under a single company and in one or at most two different locations bridge bio has a different model Neal Kumar is its CEO yeah well first of all thanks for having me on and as good players speak with you we have a slightly different model that allows us to go uniquely after some very small diseases and so I guess the whole point of any model is to say okay what signs do we find interesting in this case it's the science behind genetic disease and then how do we actually go after and I can't be by building a normal biotech because in all about tech as twenty twenty five people and labs and a whole bunch of fixed costs that they carry on and that's too expensive to go after patient population of a couple hundred patients let's say a couple thousand patients and so we have a model that effectively very Bly's lot of those fixed costs we have a central platform and then every time we find an interesting project we start a new company but that new company only has a few scientists that really understand that space within it and they can draw from DNA functions are generalized Andi functions from bridge about pharma and then came back when they're done so it had tends to lead to much more capital efficiency which then in turn allows us to go after small things and so we have bridge file that's the sort of the parent company yeah if you well that's right and every time you come up with something new new company that's right a company that bridge file has like okay hoodies pencils probably a little bigger than that we had an event on Sunday but but the science of course is at the core of each of these projects that's why I a diff different set of scientists have to be there give us some examples of that the genetically driven diseases you're working on yeah so I mean what we we think about these diseases and three different categories really the first on the classic inherited diseases like you hear about Tay Sachs or sickle cell we have a number of programs in these sorts of areas TT Armel doses garland syndrome you may not have heard of each one of these diseases there are twenty five million Americans so don't don't those are what we think allies mean daily and disease then there's a series of what are called germ line cancers there's also hair diseases or pediatric cancers which more people have heard of we break them out separately because there's a more of a wariness around pediatric cancer and then they're what we call somatic cancers which developed later in life these can be any sort of cancer a lot of what like Laakso pharmaceuticals and others are going after these are cancers that arise where there's a very clear genetic driver so what what sort of binds all of these programs together is that you can from mutation really precisely understand what's driving the disease so it's not like heart failure diabetes where there are a lot of different things going on there's the genetics there's your diet there's you know all sorts of different exacerbating factors these are very clearly quantitatively driven by the mutation and that's what we focus on I guess one of my questions is do you have them housed in different places them in the everybody has a different color name tag we only have a couple of scientists here in a couple of scientists there yeah so we we think a lot about okay who are the people that really need to be part of the company and it's usually the people that have one of two phenotypes one is that they really deeply understand the biology and typically those people are coming from an academic lab that I've been looking at disease acts for twenty years thirty years sometimes and so we go to where that those people are so we have subsidiaries in Memphis in Montreal in Paris and serves as co of course in Boston it's where the sciences it's where it's where those it's where the science of weather experts are and we try to set up around them and then the second type of person that's a really important to us are people that understand the clinical manifestations of disease and can help with development and so in many cases will locate around them especially if it's a later stage program so yeah well I mean we're basically geographically unconstrained and but but we've done a lot in our backyard Sam Cisco just because you know where they're it is a pretty large bio yeah right now here's another interesting note I expected when I read your bio to find a life scientists alive and science executive all your degrees are in chemical engineering what's up with that will get us to be worth of these appeals what's going on well you're an engineer so you see you know there's another I think that so I I actually entered come because you made a very interesting period of time because the traditional and maybe some of feathers and would kill me for saying this but I've my my perception was to traditional chemical engineering disciplines were dying like oil and gas plastics were all of us use the gal separations things like that there wasn't there's not a ton of research going on there a lot of the really important problems that are even solved so when I entered chemical engineering a lot of new research was going on in the fight by technology industry in fact a lot of the early folks associated with Genzyme engine and tag and you know the whole thing of manufacturing these New Testament allergies there were chemical engineers and a lot of the faculty at Stanford and MIT right trained were actually in biotech and in some of those early days so I did all my research at the corner of biology and chemical engineering and my PhD wasn't cancer signaling cell so it's kind of yeah come on hearings change life science know about that along exactly engineering building in life and I yes you know I mean I think there's a discipline now called a biological engineering that didn't exist when I was in school but it really is yeah it's at the core I mean it's it's at the corner of a lot of engineering disciplines of biology but certainly there some chemical engineering biology intersection there that we we lease so many times we forget that we've got you know okay all this organic matter and we need we look at our brain and then we have all the these electrical signals and we have we have a mystery in there in the site all of these things are working together yeah we have the broken up into separate silos yeah it's kind of interesting you say that because I mean for me engineering is sort of like this this way of simplifying very complex problems and there's no more complex a problem than a biology and then putting some quantitative real rules around it and so you know if you think about a cell for instance you think about it sitting in an extracellular mail milieu it's interrogating all that information then there all the signals going through the cell and then decides to do something like pulling for eight or my great or do something like that and you ask yourself okay so a biologist or reduction or a scientist will look to build up a set of data and understand how all those steps happen that's really hard and so an engineer kinda abstracts and says a little bit like okay you'd like there's a there's a queue there's a signal there's a response this is kind of what you know a lot about it and I tease been talking about and you put that all together and how do I model it and how do I start to get some predictive understanding of how this might change if a drug intervene door you know if I intervene at the at the output level and so that I think engineering is kinda uniquely suited to answer some of these questions not not not all of them but some of them you should work at NASA that's for the scientists and meet the engineers and they're not always I am I think it's really interesting because at the end of the day all of these challenges are going to be solved by humans and they have to be working in all different kinds of ways and have all different kinds of perspectives so that was what I was the first thing that attracted me to say Hey we don't talk to these bridge bio people and see how it they doing it is it working not working have you got to the point where any one of these efforts have been sold off for reach you know got registered or you all you pretty much earlier mid stage and all of them yeah so I think we have a guy to programs now and in or entering phase three clinical trials that we started pre clinically with so that's really exciting now yours yet yeah I you see in daylight yeah exactly so I mean we think about things in terms of you know our ultimate goal is to get products approved I wish that we we don't have any products approved yet but we start quite early and so I'm hopeful that over the course of the next decade will get a few products approved I can make a big difference in patients lives but but what happens if they get approved but have said little company then they beat out I think in the case where we can we would like to commercialize those products so you know this is very different again than some of the broad diseases that big pharma goes after there may only require a fifteen to twenty you know what we call medical science liaison sales force to get out there and commercializes products so yeah we're hopeful that we're creating an integrated by technology company here that can they can distribute the product patients you're going all the way tryin it I usually hear that answer email I'm very very interested here thank you for coming and I hope you come back and we'll see this again thank you so much nicer time Neal Kumar is the CEO of bridge bio more information is available at bridge bio dot com that's bridge B. R. I. D. G. E. bridge bio dot com today chief correspondent Dr Daniel craft talks about the health status of our hearts we're now able to no more than ever before I thought we would start with a start up that I know Daniel is advised in the past it's called Argyris martyrs is an interesting convergence company coming out of Stanford where it was founded by a radiologist and Stanford MBA and a couple other really bright folks too now look at this explosion of MRI data an MRI magnetic resonance imaging doesn't just look at the brain because look at many parts of body including the heart and it's becoming dynamic you don't just look at a slices of the heart and determine its shape we can see it in now in real time and fMRI SMR functional MRI and now the question was could you take that this massive data sets and changes every microsecond and start to understand in some cases the function of the heart and one important element for all of our hearts is what's called ejection fraction how much is our big left ventricle the big biggest chamber heart squeezing how much blood comes out of it with every heartbeat and for most of us who are pretty healthy it's it's a fifty to sixty percent every squeeze now how do we measure that we can do it fMRI actually see the your dynamic heart squeezing additionally to get your injection fraction would require a radiologist or cardiologists to little to go in there and measure with digital calipers today how much distance is changed and from that calculate your ejection fraction that took several minutes they could bill for that type of analysis but have a good business sure but artists was the first to pioneer this approach to do that with a I assistance and late in twenty seventeen there basically the first company that I'm aware of to get FDA clearance for a I assisted imaging system so now that you don't require a radiologist to do that in this case ejection fraction measurement but that can be done almost instantaneously while they're taking it you should know at the end of the picture if you will this is what the answer Haitian resident fMRI in we have not just actually indications about ejection fraction but learning about the valves and other flowing parts of the body could be a what we call an aneurysm they could be in their order or around the kidneys any other part of vasculature cannot be analyzed with fMRI and that with the lens of artificial intelligence assistance how was really quantify that and bring that information diagnostically to the commission almost immediately I would say that you could actually look at how your heart works right I've had my own fMRI the heart done I came out of the machine and ten minutes later I'm looking at my heart on the screen I can look at all of the numbers matches my injection fraction but what percentile I'm I have others my age and sex and height right similarly we seen fMRI be done or MRI in general of the brain I had my brain dead by MRI and the machine learning actually color coded the different components and I can look at the percentile size is my thalamus hypothalamus and might be nice to compare that to others but if I'm in a certain percentile it might mean I'm at risk of dementia and I might want to do something differently about the power of these new a I assisted diagnostic platforms is not to replace the radiologist but to help us green information more quickly and to connect the dots between.

scientist technician chief correspondent Dr Daniel sixty percent thirty years twenty years ten minutes
"bridge bio" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:47 min | 2 years ago

"bridge bio" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Or situations bloomberg world headquarters i'm charlie pellett johnny i've is going to depart from apple and form an independent design company deutchebanks american armed defied predictions and past the federal reserve stress test handing the embattled german lender a rare victory as it struggles to turn around its business every other bank also cleared the annual exam j. p. morgan chase wells fargo citigroup goldman sachs bank of american morgan stanley all announcing share buybacks and a dividend boost after the bell nike posted its first ever ten billion dollar quarter in revenue but weaker than expected profit drag down shares in late trading stocks mixed dow jones industrial average lower today might ten points little change there the s. and p. five hundred index up eleven four tenths of one percent nasdaq up fifty seven up seven tenths i'm charlie come up that's a bloomberg business flash bloomberg best june grasso and ed baxter continues from the bloomberg interactive brokers studio this is bloomberg best it's been a rough you years for the u._s. value investors as the decade long market environment has favored large caps and mega tech's atlantic investment management founder alexander roper says that's all about to change thanks to a great rotation and trillions of private equity dollars looking for opportunity and june bloomberg's vonnie quinn spoke with rovers earlier today white paper recently about this great rotation that you see on the way you want in two thousand sixteen as well and i'm curious as to why you sink now while you're more convinced now that it's coming than you were three years ago two thousand sixteen goes right after the oil price collapsed and strengthened the dollar really call a lot of upheaval in the market in two thousand fifteen in early sixteen we thought that was an inflection point and indeed in value stocks for about a year and a half but with the advent of the tariff wars and brexit in particular not working out very well everybody resorted back to growth large-cap tech and story stocks and as we see early this year we have a lot of i._p._o.'s coming out with companies with great stories quite often money losing situations with and in the meantime if he's off the growth and tech stocks continued expense whereas huge valuation compression has been going on in the mid cap and the value stocks least we follow those time to put things in perspective is timing though isn't it because for example one of the arguments is that the fed has kept interest rates solo for so long that you know everything is distorted in the problem now is it looks like the fed is going to cause again in july so does that could pay little bit to the argument that now is the time to rotate i think the timing is an issue nineteen ninety nine in april by wall street journal reporter highlighting however value amazon ebay and america online were compared to paper stocks force cups in chemical stocks that was about a year early to suggest anybody spot on them just want to highlight the incredibly compelling opportunities created by this equity market dynamic the other part of the argument is that there's what about two and a half trillion dollars according to pre quin of private equity money out there sloshing around looking for homes looking for places to invest his part of your argument that that capital will go to work on some of these mid cap value it's very hard to do a hostile deal i think is rare but there's a lot of private equity dry powder on i think there's a hesitancy on behalf of corporations to do as well as private equity to do large deals going on but the whole holding back pending resolution of voice situation and brexit as well does your argument hold up no matter what the outcome is to the tariff discussions even if you get more tariffs on china even the tar for heats up on also on the brexit side of things if we get you know one or other outcome to break momentarily thing if the uncertainty continues you're going to see investors gravitates to large-cap tech domestic place primarily so it's in favor of what has been driving the market so i think we need some form of resolution on the front where are you active what companies are you active in holding tour an active discussions in a constructive way with management as we always have been for the thirty years we've done this we have been public with our activism on jilin oy this is the largest clash baltimore factor in the world in fact twenty five percent of all the glass bottles in the world made by one seventy seven plants that accompany shooting ultra cheap valuation of less than six times be and less than six hundred to die and we feel it by selling that u._p. division u._p._n. units that could generate about three three and a half billion dollars of cash that it can use to pay debt buy shares and at a reasonable valuation can have a double in the share price when you talk to the management of these companies this mid cap value companies that you say are really being overlooked and can get into what are they telling you are they waiting for the private equity store in this like very busy improving operations approving use of cash growing businesses show no del very hard work to do the best thing for companies and they're very frustrated any cases that to see the valuation so low in fact in last year alone we've seen peas in our universe go from ten to seven on average while the market is going to show does a valuation compassion that really reflects the uncertainty in the generally industrial global economy as a result of the tear fourche the companies that just you hold though for the most part is mechanical chemical huntsman on the tim can cause they're manufacturing economy based companies what about the idea that the u._s. is just migrating away from the manufacturing based base on that particularly if there is more of a trade war with china and so on these companies will find it very difficult to continue on u._s. is migrating away from any factoring manufacturing is is very important to the united states clearly old attention on the tech side we should not forget the technological obsolescence risk is a real big risk factor that should be taken into account when looking at this tech growth stock some of these are that you completely ignoring the technological relationships can hit them to mean companies we are in have been tested over time are very profitable and training very cheaply show people really shoot take a look at it at the end of the day we all fish when you buy a house car dishwasher you comparison shop you wanna make sure you get value i should just to investors do the same thing investment management founder alexander roper and coming up bridge bio pharma c._e._o. neal kumar this is bloomberg this is a bloomberg quick take context and background on issues of interest are focuses on the check protests against the nation's billionaire premier with bloomberg's peter laka the situation relate to policy michigan into the billionaire prime minister the police have recommended criminal charges against the prime minister andrei bubby and say companies illegally obtained about two million dollars of european union subsidies the background Bill and grew inside with each rally. The initial trigger was the naming of the new Justice minister who he's an ally of the prime minister. The argument. Allegations. rivals remains by far the most popular in opinion polls and he supported seems to like higher.

bloomberg prime minister Justice minister apple twenty five percent two million dollars ten billion dollar trillion dollars billion dollars thirty years one percent three years
"bridge bio" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

WAFS Biz 1190

05:26 min | 2 years ago

"bridge bio" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

"They are the cutest little fuzzy. Guys, these little Canadian geese following mom around men. They're beautiful. Well, there's a stock name candidate goose, and they're headquartered in Toronto Ontario. Canada is getting whack a Guth is it's getting goose down twenty four percent this morning. So between Abba Crombie and fifths down twenty four percent Canada goose on twenty four percent. Pretty good day for empty EM t y the that goes against these poor mall based retailers. There's a lot of other Stein mart pretty pretty vulnerable Stein. Mart is almost done. As a last minute dit last ditch effort. They put an Amazon lockers came to pick up your Amazon goods. The Stein mart nother little some news that catches my eye today. Listen to this idea biosciences closes its IPO at ten dollars per share. Dermot Van't sciences is on deck for a small biotech hundred million dollars bridge bio is a Palo Alto based biotech firm. They filed a preliminary prospectus for two hundred twenty five million dollars. And if that's not enough. Don't forget, a trek trek has filed a preliminary perspective for a one hundred million dollar PO Redwood City based bile now, I have nothing against these companies trying to come up with. Solutions to a lot of the problems that ails, but as a mathematician, and probabilities, kinda guy, I've watched probably two or three hundred of these little companies go public this year. And if you say the mortality rate of these companies eventually over the next three to five years, I believe the mortality rate will be extremely high. And of course, there are ways to play this, and, you know, another thing, Paul when the market starts to go when it does go when this bowls over if that high risk area, the highest risk area when risk comes off the table. They don't sell their bond fund. Right. They don't sell their individual bonds, and they don't really sell the consumer Staples until it starts getting really bad. But right up here at the top of the pyramid small technology, stocks small retailers, and especially small biotech, companies that are just nothing more than laboratories burning money. And when people ask me Bill, what do you plan to do when the next bear market? How are you going to make money? Well. I watched the bond market. I watched treasury long US treasuries, go up twenty six percent during the last bear market. I watched small biotechs implode. I watched financial stocks. Obviously implode in two thousand eight two thousand nine I don't know if that will be the eye of the hurricane the eye wall of their hurricane this time around, but something will certainly will be the market's down. So I think there's a lot of ways to possibly profit from the next bear market win. You know, the economy starts to going the tank when GDP starts to grind to a halt. We get those two consecutive quarters. Of course, we should know way before we get the two consecutive quarters that they're coming, but the MO the most important indicator of all is when earnings start to decline for the SNP five hundred stocks, and that's what. Update every single weekend in my newsletter. Well in the final segment of the show. We have a stock that reported earnings last night. And it's actually down a little bit right now down three point four point seven percent. But they beat earnings. It's a powerhouse will feature at right? I want to get a little update on our bond fund. Have you? We we'd pick the good time to roll out a an individual bond fund. We've got some capital appreciation already three point eight seven five okay? Three point eight seven five. And if you add in the yield of four point one, two five, that's a total return if it keeps up for full year about eight percent. And of course, obviously, if you own the bonds to maturity, you're going to get back your principle as long as you know, we chose best stocks now, we didn't pick on troubled companies or you know debt. That's in trouble. We picked on stocks now that are growing rapidly. And that also happened to offer bonds now believe it or not..

Canada Stein Stein mart Amazon Paul Abba Crombie Toronto Guth Palo Alto SNP Ontario Dermot Va US Bill twenty four percent two hundred twenty five millio one hundred million dollar hundred million dollars
"bridge bio" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:51 min | 2 years ago

"bridge bio" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of new technologies and breakthrough science today on technician health a new model for going after genetically driven diseases which affect a small number of patients. Find the scientists wherever they are and build small companies around them, then chief correspondent, Dr Daniel craft reviews progress in knowing the health status of our hearts. It's not unusual for biotech companies to work on a number of diseases all at the same time. The usually they do that work under a single company, and then one or at most two different locations bridge bio has a different model meal. Kumar is it CEO? Yeah. Well, first of all, thanks for having me on and as good pleasure to speak with you. We have a slightly different model that allows us to go uniquely after some very small diseases. And so I guess the whole point of any model is to say, okay. What science did we find interesting in this case, it's science behind genetic disease? And then how do we actually go after? And it can't be by building a normal. Biotech because a normal biotech has twenty to twenty five people and labs and a whole bunch of fixed costs that they carry on. And that's too expensive to go after a patient population of a couple of hundred patients, let's say or a couple thousand patients, and so we have a model that effectively variable is is a lot of those fixed costs we have a central platform. And then every time we find an interesting project. We start a new company, but that new company only has a few scientists that really understand that space within it, and they can draw from GNA functions generalized RND functions from bridge bio pharma, and then give them back when they're done. So it tends to lead to much more capital efficiency, which then in turn allows us to go after small things. And so we have bridge bio, that's the sort of the parent company out if you will to try and every time you come up with something new new company does right a company but bridge bio has like okay who needs pencils lace little bigger than that? NFL today. But but the science, of course, is at the core of each of these projects why a different set aside intas have to be there. Give us some examples of the the genetically driven diseases, you're working on. Yeah. So I mean, we we think about these diseases in three different categories. Really the first are the classic inherited diseases. Like you hear about tastes acts or sickle cell. We have a number of programs in these sorts of areas. TR amyloidosis Groen syndrome. You may not have heard of each one of these diseases. That's about twenty five million Americans. So those are what we think about as mundanely and disease, then there's a series of water called germ line cancers does also hair diseases or pediatric theaters which more people have heard of we break them out separately because there's more awareness around pediatric cancer. And then there what we call somatic cancers which developed later in life. These can be any sort of cancer a lot of like locks so pharmaceuticals and others going after these are cancers that arise where there's a very clear genetic driver. So what what sort of binds all of these programs together is that you can from mutation really precisely understand what's driving the disease. So it's not like heart failure, diabetes where there are a lot of different things going on. There's the genetics. There's your diet, there's all sorts of different exacerbating factors. These are very clearly quantitatively driven by the mutation. And that's what we focus on. I guess one of my questions is do you have them housed in different places? Everybody has a different color name tag. The you have a couple of scientists here in a couple of scientists there. Yes. So we we think a lot about okay. Who are the people that really need to be part of the company, and it's usually the people that have a one of two phenotype one is that they really deeply understand the biology and typically those people are coming from an academic lab that have been looking at disease x for twenty years thirty years sometimes. And so we go to where those people are. So we have subsidiaries in Memphis in Montreal in Paris in San Francisco, of course in Boston. It's where the sciences it's where it's where those it's where the science of where the experts are. And we try to set up around them. And then the second type of person that's really important to us. Our people that understand the clinical manifestations of disease and can help with development. And so in many cases will locate around damn, especially if it's a later stage program, so yeah, I mean, we're basically geographically unconstrained, and, but but we've done a lot in our backyard and San Francisco because you know. Were there, and it's a pretty large bio. Yes, right. Exactly. Now, here's another interesting note, I expected when I read your bio to find a life. Scientists a lifetime science executive all your degrees in chemical engineering. What's up with that? These feels what's going on? Well, you're an engineer. So, you know. So they. I think that so I I actually entered chemical engineering at a very interesting period of time because the traditional and maybe some of my professors would kill me for saying this. But I my perception was the traditional chemical engineering disciplines were dying like oil and gas plastics where all of us used to go separations things like that. There wasn't. There's not a ton of research going on there. A lot of the really important problems that already been solved. So when I entered chemical engineering a lot of new research was going on in the biotechnology industry. In fact, a lot of the early folks associated with Genzyme Genentech, and you know, the whole thing of manufacturing these new types of modalities, they were chemical engineers and a lot of the faculty at Stanford and MIT where I trained were actually in biotech in some of those early days. So I did all my research at the corner of biology and chemical engineering, and my PHD was in cancer, signaling. So so it's kind of chemical engineering has changed life-science know about that. Exactly. Nearing building and the life size. Yeah. So I mean, I think there's a discipline now called a biological engineering that didn't exist when I was in school. But it really is. Yeah. I mean, it's at the corner of a lot of engineering disciplines in biology. But certainly there are some come engineering apology intersection there with so many times we forget that. We've got it. Okay. All this organic matter and relieve we look at our brain. And then we have all these electrical signals, and we have we have chemistry, and they're just like all of these things are working together. We had them broken up into separate silos. Yeah. It's kind of interesting you say that because I mean for me engineering is sort of like this this way of simplifying very complex problems. And there's no more complex problem than a biology, and then putting some quantitative real rules around it. And so, you know, if you think about a cell, for instance, you think about it sitting in an extra cellular milieu? It's interrogating all of that information. Then they're all these signals going through the cell, and then it decides to do something like proliferate or migrate or do something like that. And you ask yourself. Okay. So a biologist or a reduction area. Scientists will look to build up a set of data and understand how all of those steps happen. That's really hard. And so an engineer kind of abstracts and says a little bit like, okay. I'm like, there's a there's a Q. There's a signal there's a response. This is kind of what you know to law from Brooklyn MIT's been talking about and you put it out altogether. And how do I model it, and how do I start to get some predictive understanding of how this might change if a drug intervened, or you know, if I intervened at the output level, and so that I think engineering is kind of uniquely. Suited to answer. Some of these questions not not all of them. But some of them the Asian work at NASA. That's for the scientists meet the engineer..

engineer San Francisco amyloidosis chief correspondent technician Kumar Dr Daniel CEO NASA NFL Genzyme Genentech Memphis Boston Stanford executive Montreal
"bridge bio" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

Radio Cherry Bombe

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"bridge bio" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

"Blue's yes that's going to be the bridge bio it's also my pleasure to be here with sarah be franklin who is a writer a teacher and the editor of the book that we're going to be discussing the the book is edna lewis at the table with an american original and really happy that we can continue the conversation that we started last night we there was a beautiful dinner here is part of the charleston wine and food festival at the alhambra hall and a magnificent meal some of the chefs who cooked were michelle bailey vivian howard chef jj johnson andrea upchurch frankly and it was a stunning meal all cooked under the influence of edna lewis in afterwards we had this great conversation brief conversation about edna lewis in so i wanna ask you i'll start with you sarah where did you first get the idea to create this impala g about edna lewis yeah i'll tell us lately different version than i told last night since we have a smaller group here so is here in charleston almost three years ago now i was sitting in the living room of ms natalie depre and i was called to her house natalie is a really important figure in the new southern what's sort of called the new southern movement i have been here in charleston speaking about to jones who was an lewis's editor also julia child editor many other cookbook authors editors and and i was here in charleston talking about judith jones in lewis in their relationship and natalie caught wind of talking about a meter house i'd never met her and she started cornyn man within a few minutes she said so are you going to do a book and i sort of quake with fear and said i don't think i can i don't know if i think of too young i don't think i'm the right person to do this book and by the end of an hour long conversation we had this idea.

Blue franklin writer editor alhambra hall michelle bailey andrea upchurch edna lewis charleston julia judith jones sarah natalie depre cornyn three years
"bridge bio" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"bridge bio" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Two will ultimately become a block corsican very difficult to predict if i just take one shot on goal and shots on goal could take ten years most likely scenarios that i lose no matter how smart i am what kind of investor uh is receptive to your pitch we've been lucky to work with i think investors across the di asper from barge institutions large private equity in general such funds to biotech specialists kumar at his team regularly audition academics who have new research we're basically talking today about targeting a rare cetera for our disorders call telomere diseases are using insights from human genetics part of a constant efforts to expand bridge bio's portfolio you'll nears meanwhile andy low hopes to scale up his effort to find cures for cancer i now measure of time in terms of the number of patients that are dying each day because they can't get the therapies that we now know how to create we actually have the tools to do it we just don't have the resources and that to me is unacceptable for the pbs newshour this is economics correspondent bowl solomon in boston now how the me to movement is leading to difficult questions and the world of art and among renowned museums around the country there's a long been debate about whether one can or should separate the work of a great artists such as picasso from their personal behaviour william bring them looks at how that question is taking on renewed urgency shook closers largescale portrait's hang and contemporary art museums across the world they've been heralded for their innovative creative approach to this oldest of art forms but does your view of his work change once you know this in december two women told the new york times than close had asked them to model naked for him request that made them feel exploited and uncomfortable one described how once close asked her to take her clothes off he started telling her about sexual acts he performed and asked highly invasive questions about her intimate grooming close apologized for making inappropriate remarks telling the new york times last time i looked discomfort was not a major offence if i am barest any anyone or made them feel uncomfortable i am truly sorry i didn't mean to the fallout came just days later the national gallery of art in washing in dc postponed an exhibition of close its work planned for may seattle university also removed one.

di asper boston the new york times dc andy low seattle ten years
"bridge bio" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"bridge bio" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To die we now have the opportunity to treat disease in many many different ways which is don't have enough money to explore all of the different pathways shouldn't we should we raise the money to be able to do that it clearly it'll benefit everybody and everybody will make plenty of money at the end of the day now all this seems way too good to be true the fact is that low has begun putting his theory into practice as a founding investor in palo altobased bridge biopharm which has a portfolio of treatments for genetic diseases a rare genetic disorder is a mutation in your jeans and so oh the typical kind of therapy for one genetic disorder is going to be almost by definition statistically ankor elated with the success or failure of another kind of rare genetic disorder i see so rare diseases have built into them diversification exactly right you don't need a hundred and fifty of them to get diversification ten or fifteen are enough we've added three new programs all on the genetic disease face lows former student neil kumar is chief executive officer of bridge bio what we're able to do now is to say you have this mutation and you are very likely to have this disease and this is how severe it's going to be in for diseases that are really that easy to describe those are easier in our mind to drug than diseases like diabetes our heart failure will it could be many different causes for the disease is like we got 3s disease huntington's corea that's right so huntington disease is a classic genetic disease sickle cell anemia tastes hacks disease these are the types of diseases that we're talking about rich bio has seventeen drug development project in its diversified portfolio very difficult to convince an investor that this sickle cell or this taste acts or this huntington approach is the right approach what one has to do to attract the vast majority of capital in the world to the early stage based like this is to say look it's true we're going to take mostly losses but the couple of wins are going to pay us out for those losses in the movie industry for instance one would not finance of one or two movies hoping that that specific movie is going to be a blockbuster but rather you're going to finance a multitude of movies hoping that one or.

neil kumar chief executive officer palo altobased bridge corea huntington