35 Burst results for "Briar"

 Bingo, Lite-Brite, Nerf among Toy Hall of Fame finalists

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 5 months ago

Bingo, Lite-Brite, Nerf among Toy Hall of Fame finalists

"Voting is now open on which toy should go into the national toy Hall of Fame this year The class of 2022 toy finalists were announced and they are bingo briar horses catan light bright nerf toys masters of the universe pinata phase ten pound puppies racco spirograph and the top The public can vote online through September 21st the three toys that receive the most public votes will make up a single player's choice ballot that ballot will be counted alongside those turned in by a national selection committee The winners will be announced in November last year's honorees were American girl dolls risk and sand to vote go online to museum of play dot

National Toy Hall Of Fame
Unpacking 'The Supreme Leak' and the End of Roe

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:28 min | 9 months ago

Unpacking 'The Supreme Leak' and the End of Roe

"Reported that the Supreme Court was poised to decide that roe versus wade was going to be overturned. Now this is an unprecedented development because Politico received a leak. Now we're used to leaks in Washington, D.C., leaks happen all the time in leakers are rarely ever held accountable unless the leakers of course are leaking on Barack Obama or Hillary Clinton. And so what appears to be a Supreme Court Justice clerk will get into that later in this program of who we think it is. They leaked a draft of the decision composed and written by Samuel Alito by justice Alito. Now the significance of this is, is that the decision is not done yet, is that the justices meet right after they hear oral arguments, they start to draft opinions, and the final decision, the final vote will be done based on how the opinion is written. And so based on the draft that looks like Amy Coney Barrett, clarence Thomas, justice Gorsuch, justice Alito, and justice Kavanaugh, 5 of them are going to vote against the four would be briar Sotomayor Kagan and Roberts saying that roe versus wade will be overturned. Now mind you. We'll get into the technical aspect of this. Does not mean that abortion will be outlawed as much as I'd like to see that happen. That just, it's simply means that states will be able to determine their own abortion laws. It will

Washington, D.C. Samuel Alito Supreme Court Wade Politico Amy Coney Barrett Hillary Clinton Justice Gorsuch Barack Obama Justice Kavanaugh Sotomayor Kagan Clarence Thomas Alito ROE Roberts
How Liberal Has Justice Stephen Breyer Been?

Mark Levin

00:41 sec | 10 months ago

How Liberal Has Justice Stephen Breyer Been?

"How liberal has justice Stephen Breyer Ben you know one of the biggest oversimplifications we do is a we have liberal justices and conservative justices We know they're all different right By the way Brian mud in for the great one Mark Levin and it was none other than justice Breyer himself who said this last year with the whole court packing debate He said what goes around comes around and if the Democrats can do it the Republicans can do it And that was what he said to oppose court packing Obviously not a radical We know that K BJ would not even travel down that path That alone tells you even on that specific issue yes you know she's going to be to the left A briar

Stephen Breyer Ben Brian Mud Mark Levin Breyer
Sen. Rand Paul: KBJ Is the First Justice Who Can't Define 'Woman'

The Dan Bongino Show

00:56 sec | 10 months ago

Sen. Rand Paul: KBJ Is the First Justice Who Can't Define 'Woman'

"Course so your first thoughts it appears can Taji Brown Jackson the judge has the votes now to be confirmed She'll be seated when a seat presents itself briar obviously hasn't left yet You know my problem with this senator listening to her was you know where we have some ideological diversity A lot of it on the conservative side they don't always vote in lockstep obviously You don't see a lot of that on the left side and her answers were really horrible I mean doesn't understand the definition of a woman or can't provide one and you want to sit on the Supreme Court Sounds kind of ridiculous You know I think this is historic in many ways though Dan it's historic because this will be the first Supreme Court Justice who can't come up with a definition for a woman who doesn't believe that there's individual rights I mean this really is probably the first time we've had justice who doesn't believe that rights are individualized and come from a creator So there's a lot of firsts here but I don't think any of them necessarily are good

Taji Brown Jackson Supreme Court DAN
Senate confirms Jackson as Supreme Court's first black woman

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | 10 months ago

Senate confirms Jackson as Supreme Court's first black woman

"The the the the Senate Senate Senate Senate has has has has confirmed confirmed confirmed confirmed Catan Catan Catan Catan G. G. G. G. brown brown brown brown Jackson Jackson Jackson Jackson to to to to the the the the Supreme Supreme Supreme Supreme Court Court Court Court in in in in a a a a historic historic historic historic first first first first this this this this is is is is one one one one of of of of the the the the great great great great moments moments moments moments of of of of American American American American history history history history Senate Senate Senate Senate democratic democratic democratic democratic chief chief chief chief Chuck Chuck Chuck Chuck Schumer Schumer Schumer Schumer pumped pumped pumped pumped his his his his fist fist fist fist moments moments moments moments before before before before the the the the vote vote vote vote confirming confirming confirming confirming Jackson Jackson Jackson Jackson as as as as the the the the court's court's court's court's first first first first black black black black female female female female justice justice justice justice the the the the fifty fifty fifty fifty one one one one year year year year old old old old federal federal federal federal judge judge judge judge will will will will join join join join the the the the bench bench bench bench this this this this summer summer summer summer one one one one Steven Steven Steven Steven Briar Briar Briar Briar steps steps steps steps down down down down meaning meaning meaning meaning the the the the court court court court six six six six three three three three conservative conservative conservative conservative tilt tilt tilt tilt to to to to will will will will not not not not change change change change Democrats Democrats Democrats Democrats are are are are healing healing healing healing Jackson's Jackson's Jackson's Jackson's confirmation confirmation confirmation confirmation as as as as a a a a long long long long overdue overdue overdue overdue step step step step toward toward toward toward equality equality equality equality the the the the GOP's GOP's GOP's GOP's Ted Ted Ted Ted Cruz Cruz Cruz Cruz says says says says Jackson Jackson Jackson Jackson will will will will make make make make history history history history for for for for the the the the wrong wrong wrong wrong reason reason reason reason I I I I believe believe believe believe she she she she will will will will prove prove prove prove to to to to be be be be the the the the furthest furthest furthest furthest left left left left of of of any any any justice justice justice to to to have have have ever ever ever served served served on on on the the the Supreme Supreme Supreme Court Court Court some some some Republicans Republicans Republicans argue argue argue Jackson's Jackson's Jackson's been been been soft soft soft on on on crime crime crime as as as a a a judge judge judge though though though two two two of of of the the the nation's nation's nation's biggest biggest biggest law law law enforcement enforcement enforcement groups groups groups backed backed backed her her her Sager Sager Sager made made made Donnie Donnie Donnie Washington Washington Washington

Senate Senate Schumer Schumer Senate Jackson Jackson Jackson Jackso Catan Catan Catan Catan G. G. Brown Brown Brown Jackson Jackson Jackson Jackson Supreme Supreme Supreme Suprem Chuck Chuck Chuck Chuck Jackson GOP Steven Steven Steven Steven Court Court Court Court Ted Ted Ted Ted Cruz Cruz Cruz Supreme Supreme Supreme Court Sager Sager Sager Donnie Donnie Donnie Washingto Washington
For Black women judges like Jackson, blazing a trail has meant opportunity, scrutiny

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

For Black women judges like Jackson, blazing a trail has meant opportunity, scrutiny

"President Biden is set to make a historic Supreme Court nomination two years to the day after pledging to name the court's first black female justice the president said to introduce cantante brown Jackson if she is confirmed it would be the first time for women would serve together on the High Court Jackson would also be its first ever former public defender for confirmation though would not change the court six three conservative tilt since she'd replace retiring liberal Steven Briar for whom she once clerked Jackson's a

President Biden Brown Jackson Supreme Court High Court Jackson Steven Briar
"briar" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"briar" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Washington D.C. now and to do that We are talking to Nancy lions for check the latest world in national news Hey there Nancy Thanks Tim U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen breyer is stepping down from the bench briar is expected to serve out the remainder of his term and will formally retire once his successor is confirmed President Biden says he has not made a decision yet on who he'll nominate for the vacancy but he did make one commitment A person I will nominate It will be some of the extraordinary qualifications character experience and integrity And that person will be the first black woman ever nominated to the United States Supreme Court Biden says he'll announce his choice by the end of February leading candidates include U.S. circuit judge katon G Brown Jackson U.S. district judge Michelle childs and California Supreme Court Justice leandra Kruger The world needs to move faster on climate change That's the warning from White House climate envoy John Kerry He says the world is not serious enough about reducing admissions And the result is that the planet is going to continue to evolve in reaction to what we human beings are doing to it Mostly through fossil fuels Climates are John Kerry spoke with Bloomberg's David Rubenstein on peer to peer conversations The full interview will air next month on Bloomberg television Kerry has been meeting today with environment ministers from about two dozen countries A new study indicates gas stoves are contributing more to global warming than previously thought Researchers tested emissions around stoves and homes and found even when not being used the stoves leaked methane into the air About the same amount of greenhouse gases come from stows that come from 500,000 cars Global news 24 hours a.

Washington D.C. Nancy lions Nancy Thanks Tim Justice Stephen breyer President Biden U.S. Supreme Court katon G Brown Jackson judge Michelle childs Justice leandra Kruger briar John Kerry U.S. California Supreme Court David Rubenstein Biden Bloomberg White House Kerry
Why Did Justice Breyer Decide to Step Down?

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:29 min | 1 year ago

Why Did Justice Breyer Decide to Step Down?

"We're here to talk about justice breyer stepping down. Well, I don't know if that was a surprise, but didn't prior say earlier that he was not going to step down. Exactly. He had said that he didn't want to make the court political. So that was his reason for not stepping down, but evidently he's now chosen to step down. Now, ideologically, it seems to me this is no big change because it preserves the 6th three majority, presumably a liberal or leftist is going to be replaced by another leftist. Breyer did vote occasionally with the conservatives, but not in any big issue. And he was for the vaccine mandate. On roe V wade, you don't expect him to be going oh no. To keep it. Right. So what do you think his reasoning is for the shift of approach? I think that there has been a lot of talk from the left about packing the court. And I think that's something briar really felt like with harm the integrity of the court. And so I think in some ways he might have stepped down in order to prevent the left from pushing that continually instead maybe focusing on filling this seat as opposed to trying to pack the court, although I don't think packing the court would have worked anyways because Manchin and cinema wouldn't have voted for it, but I think maybe brier felt like he needed to give something to the

Justice Breyer Roe V Wade Breyer Manchin Brier
"briar" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:13 min | 1 year ago

"briar" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's morning edition from NPR news I'm Steve inskeep And I'm Rachel Martin Good morning Today President Biden is expected to meet with Supreme Court Justice Stephen breyer In that meeting briar is expected to formally announce that he is retiring from the nation's high court after serving nearly three decades President Biden will now get his first chance to appoint a new justice Christopher king is with the advocacy group demand justice He has served in The White House as deputy counsel to then president Obama overseeing the vetting and selection of more than 200 judicial nominees So he's got a pretty good sense of what this process is going to look like And he joins me now Christopher thanks for being here Morning thanks so much for having me I want to talk about process in a minute but let's talk about people first President Biden has said that if given the chance which he now has that he would nominate the first black woman to the court who is likely to get this job So I think that there are a few contenders in the job The leading contender is judge katangi Brown Jackson of the District of Columbia circuit court so it's often considered the second most important court in the country And not only does she bring almost a decade of experience as a federal judge but she also really embodies President Biden's commitment to professional diversity Her career includes time as a federal public defender representing people who couldn't afford a lawyer who have been accused of committing crimes as well as being a sentencing commissioner so she's a lot of great experience and criminal side which has been lacking The Supreme Court has not had a lawyer who's represented defendants in criminal cases since thurgood since thurgood Marshall retired almost three decades ago Another name at the top of the list leandra Kruger ray Yes she is a Supreme Court Justice in California She also served in the Obama administration She's also one of the leading contenders because they're very few black women who have risen to the level that she has in our nation's courts I do want to draw out an interesting detail about katangi Brown Jackson I read in The New York Times attributing to them that she is related to by marriage to former GOP Speaker of the House Paul Ryan She is I think it's like her brother's her husband's brother is married to somebody in Paul Ryan's family I think it was very exciting when Kathy Brown Jackson was nominated to the district court in the District of Columbia The Paul Ryan actually came and introduced her and spoke glowing lever I think it really speaks to the bipartisan supports you would have if you were nominated I mean that's going to be the rub right I mean it's a 50 50 in the Senate It's a heavily partisan moment How does that affect the nomination process going forward here Well right now Democrats could confirm a Supreme Court Justice with just 50 votes in the Senate plus vice president Harris breaking the tie But I think that we just saw judge Jackson was confirmed by this same Senate less than a year ago to our current position with three Republican votes And I think that anybody who the president is looking at a highly qualified historic nominee is going to bring that kind of bipartisan support so it won't be just a 50 50 vote at the end of the day NPR is reporting along with other media outlets that the Senate majority leader Chuck Schumer wants to move fast on this He is citing the quick turnaround for justice Amy Coney Barrett's confirmation that took roughly a month from when she was nominated How likely is that kind of speed in this moment I think it should be the expectation right Republicans set this precedent of confirming a Supreme Court nomination 30 days after the president put the name forward And I think that that would be the expectation this time around as well I wonder if you could reflect for a moment on justice Steven breyer What strikes you about his legacy What does the court lose with his departure Well he has a great legacy in particular he's written these powerful decisions with respect to with respect to protecting the access to abortion And I think especially this term when this Republican supermajority on the Supreme Court seems poised to overturn the landmark decision of roe versus wade protecting that right to abortion it really crystallizes the importance of justice breyer's voice in what he's brought to the court He served on it for almost three decades He's seen a lot of change He's been on the right side of history of so many important cases But I also think that his decision to step aside now and ensure that President Biden can nominate a successor while Democrats control the Senate is an important decision as well As you look towards a confirmation hearing what are the issues that you can imagine flaring up Well I think one of regret one of the things that any nominee that the president puts forward being the first black woman is going to face a lot of bad faith attacks I think we've seen it in particular with other nominees of color and women of color whom the president has nominated to judgeships and other positions And I think that's just something that we're going to have to be ready for The actual stakes here are a little bit lower than they have been in the past because Republicans again will maintain this super majority hold on the court It'll still be 6 justices out of 9 appointed by a Republican president So I think a lot of the attacks will be regrettably bad faith What does that mean Candidate Well I think that we've seen women of color in particular be subjected to more aggressive line of hearing a double standard of questions and expectations of knowledge of the law that they don't ask of other candidates And I think that we just have to be ready for that sort of hostility to come from the other side Christopher king of demand justice we appreciate your perspective on this this morning Thank you so much for being here Sure thanks for having me Stephen breyers expected departure is just one of the big retirements we're following today He's going to be joined in retirement by two chimpanzees The chimps have arrived at chimp haven in Louisiana where a retirement home for research chimps from the national Institutes of health is the largest in the country 300 chimps live there And Piero's Neel Greenfield.

President Biden Supreme Court Steven breyer Paul Ryan Christopher king NPR news Steve inskeep Rachel Martin Senate judge katangi Brown Jackson District of Columbia circuit c leandra Kruger Obama administration Brown Jackson Kathy Brown Jackson president Harris judge Jackson briar justice Amy Coney Barrett thurgood Marshall
Biden has long been preparing for a Supreme Court pick

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

Biden has long been preparing for a Supreme Court pick

"Sources sources sources sources say say say say Supreme Supreme Supreme Supreme Court Court Court Court justice justice justice justice Stephen Stephen Stephen Stephen Bryer Bryer Bryer Bryer plans plans plans plans to to to to retire retire retire retire which which which which would would would would give give give give president president president president Biden Biden Biden Biden his his his his first first first first shot shot shot shot at at at at filling filling filling filling a a a a High High High High Court Court Court Court seat seat seat seat as as as as a a a a candidate candidate candidate candidate he he he he pledged pledged pledged pledged to to to to pick pick pick pick the the the the first first first first black black black black female female female female justice justice justice justice and and and and certainly certainly certainly certainly stands stands stands stands by by by by that that that that that's that's that's that's as as as as far far far far as as as as spokeswoman spokeswoman spokeswoman spokeswoman Jen Jen Jen Jen Psaki Psaki Psaki Psaki will will will will go go go go doting doting doting doting Briar Briar Briar Briar has has has has not not not not actually actually actually actually announced announced announced announced his his his his retirement retirement retirement retirement I'm I'm I'm I'm not not not not going going going going to to to to speak speak speak speak to to to to any any any any considerations considerations considerations considerations preparations preparations preparations preparations lists lists lists lists naming naming naming naming another another another another liberal liberal liberal liberal to to to to replace replace replace replace Briar Briar Briar Briar would would would would not not not not shift shift shift shift the the the the court court court court six six six six three three three three conservative conservative conservative conservative majority majority majority majority but but but but picking picking picking picking up up up up a a a a black black black black woman woman woman woman would would would would make make make make high high high high court court court court history history history history it it it it would would would would be be be be the the the the first first first first time time time time for for for for female female female female justices justices justices justices sat sat sat sat together together together together and and and and the the the the first first first first time time time time two two two two of of of of the the the the nine nine nine nine justices justices justices justices would would would would be be be be black black black black Sagarin Sagarin Sagarin Sagarin agony agony agony agony Washington Washington Washington Washington

Supreme Supreme Supreme Suprem Justice Justice Justice Stephe President President President High High High High Court Cour Jen Jen Jen Jen Psaki Psaki Ps Briar Briar Briar Briar Briar Briar Court Court Court Court Sagarin Sagarin Sagarin Sagari Washington
"briar" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"briar" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"Again, it's unity project online dot com. If you're a mom, you're a dad, you're a parent and you're concerned and you're like, what can I do about these vaccine mandates? Well, they have resources right here from scientific papers to data analysis to ethical legal and social issues, they have a toolbox, which is really great. I'm just slipping the website right now. And all about supporting science, the conversation, quick links, online petition, to downloadable letter to schools to the parent non consent form to the downloadable flyer. A lot of stuff you guys put a lot of work into this. Congratulations on that. All right. Thank you. So you are the general counsel of this effort. So parents will say, all right, I'm all on board, but then I think I have my mind changed because the argument they always use is, well, you gave your kids the measles mumps rubella vaccine, didn't you? Which is rather an insult to anyone's intelligence. Every vaccine that's currently mandated, for instance, in the state of California. And it's the same kind of throughout the nation. Has had a minimum of a decade of study. Most of them have had at least 15 years before they were mandated. And those vaccines actually eradicated the underlying viruses, like polio, like measles, like mom's rubella, which we can not say about the COVID-19 vaccine, can we? We all know that it will not prevent infection or transmission. To even call it a vaccine by that virtue is nearly a joke. In addition to that, those underlying viruses with the other vaccines had actual significant risks for the entire population, especially the pediatric population, for instance, I think there was a 30% mortality rate with measles. 10% with chickenpox. I can go on. But what's very important is the fact that those other vaccines didn't pose the severe risk that we are finding are not in fact rare. That this particular vaccine is causing in children. We are not seeing the death that we saw. In fact, there's a report from who that shows that all of the vaccines combined throughout history throughout the world. Over the last I think it's from 1968, 53 years have had a million less deaths than just this past year from the COVID-19 vaccine. That should be astounding in a scientific world where if you have 50 deaths from any particular medical treatment, that product is

Supreme Court Charlie Kirk Andrew colville Briar Sotomayor Thomas alita Gorsuch Barrett Trump Kavanaugh Kagan California Department of Healt HHS Sotomayor Charlie California army Nelly Roberts Charlie cubs San Diego Laura
"briar" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"briar" Discussed on WTOP

"Com slash choice today One 48 Traffic and weather on the 8th to rob stallworth in the traffic center New problem in dear wood shady grove wrote at briar Dale road all lanes are blocked for the crash We have a truck that was T bone there You're following police direction in order to get around No way you can get around to 70 right now northbound delays off and on between Germantown and Frederick westbound I 70 the lays going up the hill through south mountain as you head toward Hagerstown traveling I 95 and the Baltimore Washington Parkway below speed northbound as you leave the capitol beltway headed toward the Baltimore beltway on the outer loop through prince George's county crashed after route 5 branch avenue was along the right side of the roadway We believe that is now clear eastbound 50 delays leaving four 50 in parole across the 7 river bridge in delays approaching the Chesapeake Bay bridge with two way operations in place we did have one broken down on the bay bridge blocking the right lane of two and now both lanes are open eastbound as a matter of fact they have three lanes east and tu lanes open in the westbound direction Virginia westbound 66 leaving the beltway headed toward nightly street The emergency work is blocking the right lane causing you delays back to the beltway northbound in southland I 95 often on the birks and separate stretches in either direction between the Springfield interchange and Fredericksburg with travel lanes open It's Ashley home store's greatest Black Friday ever starting at 7 a.m. on Friday beat the clock and see big at Ashley home store this Friday Rob stallworth wtp traffic Storm team forest Lauren ricketts not a bad day light wings temperatures in the midtown for 40s doesn't get better than this with lots of sunshine Clear skies overnight and it's going to be a gold startled Thanksgiving 20 and.

rob stallworth Baltimore Washington Parkway south mountain Germantown Hagerstown Ashley home store prince George Chesapeake Bay Baltimore southland Rob stallworth Virginia Fredericksburg Lauren ricketts Springfield
"briar" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

The Erick Erickson Show

05:47 min | 1 year ago

"briar" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

"The house give the combination of their narrow majority redistricting historic bitter patterns that fatalism can be seen in their effort to jam as much government spending as possible to buy first year in office dissipated. This may be their last chance to do so. Democrats have been oblivious however to the true political cost of pushing through the three point five trillion dollar legislation championed by progressives lacking the imagination to anticipate the downside of pushing well beyond their political mandate. It's not just the house. It's the senate. The supreme court of the caliber of elected officials at stake. The difference between an average midterm setback at a republican wave means control of the senate and the ability to replace steven briar. The difference between.

supreme court of the caliber o senate steven briar
"briar" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

Slate's Political Gabfest

05:49 min | 1 year ago

"briar" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

"People's court and that will really matter. I mean the other thing that strikes me about the timing of these remarks you know one from the liberal moderate side of the court and briar and the other side from the conservative from amy coney barrett is they are worried the courts institutional legitimacy which they have the hugest steak right so justice briar called the supreme court and national treasure. He wants desperately to believe that that is the case. He's been devoting his life to it. Since nineteen ninety-three rate these people are institutionalists at their core. Because that is the best thing for them. They are used to an atmosphere. That is combative and sycophantic. They argue with their colleagues who they disagree with and then they're clerks and their chambers are set up to be very coddling lovely places in which they're treated as like geniuses basically that's what it's like to clerk for a judge and i think you that dynamic is a really powerful psychological one and that's or seeing and then when you play it out on the national stage and the rest of us like regular people watch it. It doesn't make a whole lot of sense to us. So one thing i found irritating was brier was complaining about how reporters when they cover. The cord covered judicial appointments mention whether the president who appointed you as a republican or a democrat will yeah we mentioned that because it is highly relevant to understanding. Unfortunately what you are likely to do. And that has become more salient. There is less heterodox of the kind. David was talking about earlier. And that's not because like the reporters have created it. it's because it exists. We are reflecting a reality. So many things were irritating but that prior thing but the the one that was so funny in in the way it was urinating with the him saying he intended not to die on the court. And it's like you can just hear god laughing. You can just hear the arrogance the arrogance of a man of that age man who well past the retirement age. Who's well past the prime of of mental cognition. Well past prime of productivity. Being confident in himself is infuriating and exactly a year ago justice. Ginsburg did die on the court and that was certainly not her intention either. No-one intends to. Of course you don't intend to. You is a tarnish on what's been a very distinguished career of his and he should he. He's really he's really blown at man for me he's really blown it. Wow let me just say. I'm not going to die on the court. Which of the three of us do you think is gonna die on the court. Emily's most likely die on the gas. Fest that will be really no lower taping taping. I think i'm definitely most likely to die. While taping other could be john. I could see john like tripping on something he's always got like. He's still rounded by stuff listeners. The reason dave is a has what i'm surrounded by in his brain is that i'm recording from our new apartment for the first time and it is quite as set up. I've got here. So that's what. He's worried for. My emily emily going to live to be one hundred and fifty. Anyway so you'll you might die on the gatt vespas with rosen plots and dickerson children. You'll be taping with them. That sounds pretty good. I like all your. Yeah actually let. Let's close with this question. Emily about the popular the demissie and is it. True that the court depends on popular legitimacy. Are they at risk of losing. It does it does popular legitimacy matter as much in a world where minority -tarian rule seems to be now to just the fundamental practice of the right or the. It's an accepted accepted world. View of the right. Yeah i mean this is a fascinating and like hugely important looming question for us. Historically the supreme court has had to really dial it back when it gets far away from the american populace. So you know most famously. During the new deal the court conservative justices struck down major planks of fdr congress's legislation and then fdr threatened court packing and the court effectively saved itself. A conservative justice switched is and then they just started retiring and that kind of preserve the institution. We've seen that happen. In other eras of american history to i think it's important also not to over valorize the court. The court is often not on the side of history in terms of you know even the most basic fundamental aspects of protecting civil rights. Accord has really failed a number of times. So if it wants to have this huge amount of power right this real judicial supremacy which in a lot of ways. It's been more muscular about of late. There has to be some kind of intangible reckoning with the public and what it wants. And i think this huge question over the next few years is going to be how far out of sync this conservative majority will get with the public and how restive people will become and whether it will start to have real questions about the composition of the court which obviously progressives have already started to ask and also about this whole concept of judicial review. Does it make sense to put so much power over the constitutional in particular in the hands of judges or do we want to set some kinds of limits so that the democratically elected branches have a greater say. This.

amy coney barrett justice briar national treasure supreme court brier emily emily Emily Ginsburg john dickerson David rosen dave congress
"briar" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"briar" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"T. You start changing all these things around and Uh, It is no big deal something There are many considerations. Many, many considerations. Rob President make the party, darling. Oh Briar strikes me as a tea party kind of guy. He doesn't. He doesn't want it. I guess he just doesn't like the things changing around on him there. Oh, my gosh. Wow. I'm sure Teeny tiny is like Who else could I invite? Um, Justice? Um Clarence Thomas wouldn't have said much all right. It is a game of whack a mole when it comes to the city and graffiti. Nothing says we don't care like seeing a whole bunch of buildings and bridges and overpasses spray painted with a bunch of garbage order. I don't think that graffiti is going on. You were. I think that they're probably come up with some sort of this is a graffiti graffiti person. Says that there is nothing you can do to stop it. Fancier parts of town or whatever, the more you look, the part some more European buildings will, uh, probably have so Coding. You know, they'll just be able to buy far you know, I think we kind of have some sort of degree of that now, but I feel like it will probably what is often waters, you know, like it won't even do anything. But I feel your video always exists. No matter No matter what they do you know you you're gonna be able to scribes are going to be able to freeways thoughts. You know you're gonna Just be able to do like straight vandalism. You know, there's always gonna be trucks. You know who's always interview police bullets. You know, it's always gonna be there. Okay. This is a vandal that spray paints, public spaces and basically saying, you know if you can put up the film, but we'll We'll still go out there and crap all over your city time. Yeah. Great stress reliever..

Clarence Thomas Rob Briar Justice tiny European President
"briar" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

The Daily Zeitgeist

05:52 min | 1 year ago

"briar" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

"I most americans do have empathy. Most americans like your neighbors. You're like damn don't fucking cool by day. I didn't really talk to them. But are something happened in like we got together and we we started something out that was great community as you see it and you saw it in texas. When the power ran out a lot of texans are having to lean on each other to get through it because fucking sure. Utility companies aren't going to help and make things you know quick and expedient for their recovery so on that level like we know those pieces are there. But it's like it's like embracing this idea to that. There are ways that we can collectively take care of each other and protect each other in a way that is beneficial to everyone. We're not waiting on the decisions of bureaucracy. That's being run by people that are grandparents age who we look at our own damn grammars like oh shit. Yeah but they're run but these same district classmates are running the country basically for and we're like wondering like owner. Nothing's working because we have it's an e because that that mentality that like a everything's okay. Nothing drunk that may have worked when there were greater tax revenues to help people born in a different era now and that kind of thinking so regressive and its violent. So it's like it's like getting people really motivated enough to see like yeah you can. You can see this place for what it is not totally black billed but then pivotal. What's the solution is. Solution is finding like having policies that are more humane like an on some level. The f- the first thing should be like it's a pandemic. Well no once you go hungry and no one should be kicked out on the street because it's a pandemic but here arguing courts like well. The cdc doesn't have the lord legal authority. What the fuck are we talking about. We're talking about people on the street yet. But we're not. We're not having a conversation like in those terms and that's the kind that's where we need to agree center a lot of things. But that's the process of i think of waiting for these kind of generational shifts and political culture. Yeah i mean the supreme court dual power needs to be the answer because the supreme court has like purely an ideological tool. And it's going to be doing things in the background for generations to come that hurt americans and you know keep it out of step with the will of the people assuming nothing changes and they don't fucking kill the filibuster and pakhtakor like they absolutely should but one very frustrating development that steven briar one of the older members of the court..

texas cdc supreme court steven briar
"briar" Discussed on Amicus with Dahlia Lithwick

Amicus with Dahlia Lithwick

07:29 min | 1 year ago

"briar" Discussed on Amicus with Dahlia Lithwick

"And now let's return to the conversation with ellie misspell justice correspondent for the nation. And adam jensen former. Deputy chief of staff. To senator harry reid and the author of kill switch the rise of the modern senate. So i want to get to a couple of the audience questions because there's a bunch and the first one actually is for you. Ellie and it's Just in the bucket of structural court reforms that are being floated to just straight up term limits for supreme court. Justices does that get us part of the way there. I loved term limits. I think they're a great idea. Unfortunately thrown constitutional saying that. That's probably i from my read. Eight differing court justices saying that. I do not think that you can pass term limits legislation and get this supreme court already stacked as it is sixty three with conservatives to agree that the whatever hokey plan you do for term limits passes muster under article three of the constitution. I wish they thought differently. But i think that's how they think in fact. I honestly think that only steven briar of all people is the one that has been out forward in favor of you know being interested in term limits. The rest of them think that's constitutional. It probably isn't so if you want term limits and again. I want her women's i think they're a good idea. I'd like many of the plans. I've seen there if you want term limits. I'll tell you how to get them. Expand the port add ten justices who think term limits our constitutional and then pass your legislation. And then let those ten justices overrule the nine justices who maybe don't think their constitutional boom. We've got term limits. The i'll just put the thing about cort expansion that people kinda blows people's mind it's the easiest thing to do. It's actually the constitutional solution to the problem of a supreme court. That is out of step with its people. it's actually the constitutionally perferred solution so that's kind of why we i. It's it's kind of why we have to do it. It's really tool that. The constitution gives the legislative bodies to to handle the courts adam. I have a question that i feel like could be a question about everything we've talked about tonight and everything we could talk about for the next six hours. Which is just the tit for tat question so somebody is essentially saying right so we ditched the filibuster and then what happens when the republicans win back control of congress and the presidency and by the way we could have that conversation about court reform. We could have it about Almost any sort of democracy reform. We've talked about what's your. What's your kind of back of the envelope. Answer for tit for tat or spiral to the bottom well. They're sort of a brass tacks political argument and then there's a. There's a broader argument that the brass tacks argument is that if you don't get rid of it now and pass the stuff that we pass. Republicans will just get rid of it when they're in power and ask the stuff they want to pass anyway. I think that's a pretty solid bet that they'll do that Look from sort of strategic analysis by leaving it in place right now. We are guaranteeing that we will not pass. Things like voting rights. Hr one gun control a whole raft of immediate urgent authorities. So you're incurring a huge cost up front to yourself and to our democracy you're probably also making it easier for republicans to get back in power faster by not passing a voting rights and democracy reform. So you're accelerating the the you know the doomsday scenario where they are in power and so you're incurring that cost and you're doing it in order to maintain this defensive tactic that you hope will come in handy for us. When the other sides in power so what happens though when you incur that massive cost to yourself up front then. The other side gets power and with the flick of his wrist. Mitch mcconnell just gets rid of that defensive tactic that you incurred that cost in order to keep so you know i think it's a bad idea to incur. That cost up front and sort of cross your fingers and hoped that mitch mcconnell doesn't yank that away from you what he wants to because i think the overwhelming odds are that he will so. That's that's the sort of the brass tacks answer. Is we have powered now. Democrats do so they should. They should do as much as they can with it. Because republicans will probably just just you know do all the bad stuff. Anyway when they're back in power plants are just it actually over unbalanced. The filibuster is a tool that benefits the conservative side ideological spectrum far more than the progressive side so on net. It is something that it overwhelmingly benefits progresses to get rid of. It is a tool that makes it harder to pass things. Progresses are the party that wants to pass big change conservatives. Are the party that wanted to stand with history yelling. Stop in william buckley's famous phrase. You look historically progressive benefits and expansions of rights have proven extremely hard to undo legislatively. They're easy to do through the courts rollback but legislatively. They're extremely difficult undo. You look at obamacare which after pass was extremely unpopular with the public republicans campaign for seven years on repealing it as soon as they got back in power. They tried to repeal it through. That process called reconciliation. Which means they only needed a majority to repeal it. So the filibuster was no help to democrats in stopping the effort to repeal the affordable care act but republicans couldn't muster a majority to repeal it. Because what happened. It got popular when they tried to take away when you try to take progressive benefits away from people. It becomes very hard because people realize they like it. So i think when you when you take the brass tacks analysis and you take sort of larger strategic analysis together the only conclusion you can really come to is that this is something that while it does post them risk and getting rid of it. Overwhelmingly benefits republicans. More than democrats. Democrats should get rid of it past the things. They wanna pass because that is the on balance the best by far the best thing for them to do. I just want to add that the same argument. Same argument basically works. When you talk about court expansion so you put four justices on the court. And then the republicans get in and they put eight justices on the court wall. Where does it end. Why is that dead who cares again since step one. If you put for justices on the court that are going to protect the fifteenth amendment that it makes it much more unlikely to the republicans ever take back all of government again. Which is what they would need to repack. The court a. b. How is it worse. If they repack the court were already down if something happens a now in six or eight years. The republicans are back on top. That's no worse than it is right now. And then see as i said there are great reasons to have more justices on the court that go beyond artisan politics and so if you're talking about a court that has fifty people eighty people like that's actually still better than what we have now. People forget our supreme court is unique kind of in the western industrialized world in that. It is ace. oh small but be so powerful. No other western industrialized supreme court can just declare an act of the popularly-elected legislator unconstitutional. Because five do say so. Are you kidding me. That's not a power in other places have as a power that we have so changing the bar to five. Dudes think it's unconstitutional. So i don't know forty five. How was that bad. So as adams sing with with with with the filibuster reform yes there are doomsday scenarios where republicans grab all the power and use it.

supreme court ellie misspell adam jensen senator harry reid steven briar mitch mcconnell Ellie cort senate adam william buckley congress adams
"briar" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"briar" Discussed on 600 WREC

"To the Saints as an instrument of discipleship, Confession and unity. In a nutshell, it summarizes in three concise sentences. What the Christian believes Harry has developed an in depth 20 part series on the Apostles, creed that every believer ought to have is a part of their personal study. No, the Apostles creed and you will always be able to share what you believe You can obtain the entire series by going to briar wood dot org. Forward slash Apostles Creed CD again That's Breyer would dot org Forward slash Apostles, Creed CD. We hope that in perspective is encouraging you in your walk with Christ, we would love to hear back from you right, Harry. Add in perspective. 2200 Briar Wood Way. Birmingham, Alabama 35 to 43 or email in perspective at briar wood dot org. This is an outreach of the briar wood pulp it a congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Birmingham, Alabama. Join us again next time as Harry Reeder takes us back into the scriptures so that we might learn to put life In biblical perspective. The proceeding has been a paid program. The opinions expressed are those.

Harry Reeder Harry America 20 part 2200 Briar Wood Way Birmingham, Alabama Christian Christ briar wood dot org three concise sentences Presbyterian Church 35 43 dot org wood briar Apostles Creed
Biden assigns study on delicate issue of Supreme Court

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | 1 year ago

Biden assigns study on delicate issue of Supreme Court

"President Biden has ordered a panel to study some politically delicate issues including how many justices should serve on the Supreme Court and for how long he's fulfilling a campaign promise made amid democratic pressure to re align the High Court that tilted sharply right under Donald Trump who added three justices the president has said the judicial nomination system is getting out of whack but has not said whether he backs expanding the cord from nine seats or imposing term limits liberal justice Stephen Bryer has warned against big changes like adding seats at eighty three Briar is the oldest justice and some progressive groups want him to retire while Democrats controlled the confirmation process White House spokeswoman Jen Psaki says that's not the president's call he believes that the decision justice Bryer roommate when it decides it's time to no longer serve on the Supreme Court Sager mag ani Washington

President Biden Stephen Bryer Donald Trump Supreme Court High Court Jen Psaki Bryer White House Ani Washington
Breyer says big Supreme Court changes could diminish trust

AP News Radio

01:00 min | 1 year ago

Breyer says big Supreme Court changes could diminish trust

"Supreme Court justice Stephen Bryer is urging caution for those who propose changing the makeup of the court such as expanding the number of justices justice Stephen Bryer says liberal advocates of big changes including adding more justices to the Supreme Court should think long and hard about what they're proposing he says politically driven change could diminish the trust that Americans place in the court Breyer's comments are from the text of a speech he gave remotely to the Harvard Law School of which he is an alumnus prior noted that despite a conservative majority he and his colleagues stayed out of the twenty twenty election battle supported Louisiana abortion clinics and rejected efforts to end legal protections for immigrants who entered the U. S. as children Briar at eighty two is the oldest justice and is facing some pressure to retire now while Democrats hold the White House and have a slim edge in the Senate Jackie Quinn Washington

Justice Stephen Bryer Stephen Bryer Supreme Court Breyer Harvard Law School Louisiana White House Jackie Quinn Washington Senate
This Is How the World Ended up with a Shortage of Semiconductors

Odd Lots

04:32 min | 2 years ago

This Is How the World Ended up with a Shortage of Semiconductors

"Show tracy long time ago now feels like we had the joke about. Should we just turn this into a semiconductor podcast. Yes and you've you've really run with that joke okay. The thing is is he can't escape it like we keep things like know we liked. I started talking about is like this is like an interesting topic for us but it turns out little. Did we know when we first started covering this story on the podcast which i was last october last november that actually it would blow up into this huge issue. Semi conductor manufacturing became like essentially. Nash topic of national news. Far outside the sort of like the niche audience right. Semiconductors secretly rule. All our lives. And i'm i'm joking. Obviously but nowadays everything is so high tech that there are a lot of appliances that you wouldn't necessarily think of that have chips in them So smartphones computers things like that obviously but also lots of cars And i saw one headline float by. I haven't had a chance to read it yet but something about aluminum producer's warning of downturn So chips are everywhere. And i think were really starting to realize how important they are and also how important chipmakers are of course as we've been discussing there's a limited number of Right so anyone who sort of listened to our series. We started talking about the decline of intel. We talked about why. Us manufacturing in general is sort of Gone away and we talked of course about the dominant role of taiwan semi. And it's like almost like again. It was not intentional. But now there's like this huge thing and everyone is waking up to how dependent we all are on taiwan semiconductor and a few other major Fabs and it's a it's become a legit. Us national security question. We know the biden administration is looking at it and you know looking at different ways to reduce us dependent so we really can't get away from the story and obviously we're going to be talking about it again today and i bet it won't even be the last time we talk about it. Thank you might be right on that one. So i'm really excited because actually we're going to be Going back to our very first guest to Gave us sort of great overview. Some of the best Clear english descriptions of the challenges of chip manufacturing and it was the first one everyone should go back. And listen to that one. Then talking about the decline of intel. But we're going to zoom out a little bit and look at the acute that the world is facing right now. Why are so many companies struggling with their ability to source chips and then the longer term issue of this is scarce capacity is scarce and even if we get through this current phase there is going to be still this sort of perhaps a dangerous over reliance on a few manufacturers that our capacity limited so a very excited. We're going to be speaking again. Second time on the show. Stacey raskin his managing director senior analyst. Use semiconductors at bruce dean research Stacey thank you so much for coming back on lot at stake. Tastic be back. Thank you for having again. What's it like you know. You're like a star now. Because one point semiconductors were just like this thing that maybe investors mostly cared about but it really does feel like an you know. Correct me if i'm wrong but it really does feel like in the last few months. Everybody is now obsessed with this story. I think i may have mentioned this last time. I was on but i. There's one reason. I love this space. It's literally ground zero for everything that's been going on. And it's it's you know it's not just the last few months the trade and that briar s and then the the the burgeoning geopolitics and now obviously the shortages. And everything else like. It's and you remember. I mean like the global electronic like enterprise. I mean it's like a four or five trillion dollar industry worldwide. If you add up all the pc's and and and and all of the consumer electronics and then all the services and software and everything that goes with it trillions and trillions of dollars in it all rests on semiconductors semi's or the fundament of all of that like we don't have any of that without semiconductors and so i think it's a phenomenal place to to spend time and it's job security for me so that's yeah that's that's the most important

Biden Administration Taiwan Intel Tracy Nash Stacey Raskin Bruce Dean Research Stacey United States
"briar" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:25 min | 2 years ago

"briar" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Much. So Colin Briar started working at Amazon just four years after it was founded Back in 1990 eight's been 12 years at the company, part of the senior leadership team there. And this is the company grew from a domestic seller of books to a global multi dimensional powerhouse. Over two of his years at Amazon. Colin was chief of staff to Jeff Bezos, essentially Jeff Shadow, during which he spent each day attending meetings traveling within talking about business life. So much with Jeff Bezos hey, is co founder of Working Backwards. It's a company where he coaches, executives. Colin's new book, He co authored it with Bill Car off also a longtime Amazonian. This book just out today. It's called Working Backwards Inside stories in secrets from Inside Amazon. Colin joining us on the phone from Seattle. Welcome to Bloomberg. So nice to have you here and congratulations on the book. Oh, thank you so much. And thanks for having me on the show, Carol. It's so timely. There isn't a day column that doesn't go by that. We don't really talk about Amazon to be quite honest, and we've talked about it a lot, especially with the news that Jeff was stepping down a CEO. Um, let me start there. How did you take that knows? How did how did you see it? How should we see it? Well, you know it. I was a little surprised that the timing but he had to come sometime. And how I viewed it is, you know, Jeff has been really preparing for this type of transition for a long time. Even, uh, Since the early days of Amazon, he put a whole bunch of effort focused on how can I put in processes inside Amazon s O other as Amazon grows and skills can x 100 X But they can still make the same type of high quality decisions quickly. When just isn't in the room and you know, so he's what he's coined. That term is called the Invention machine. You know how Amazon hires how they organized people, Teens how they write narratives instead of power point and how they develop new products and measure businesses, and he's been working and holding that in been broken record on that invention machine internally and Amazon for for so long. But I think that this transition but Andy just be taking over the helm, the CEO, you know we're not going to see a ton of changing and certainly in the near term, and I know a lot of this is in the book and I want to get to involvement. Do you know Andy, though, and I'm just curious if he was there when you were there. I do, and he started a few months before I did. He started in 1997. And I worked with Andy. Right, actually, right. When I started in 1998. I started in software team. He was in the marketing group and we worked together on a couple different projects and then Andy was also just first technical advisor or shadow. He did that for about 18 months. So I was just second one. So I would like an Andy. A lot is when I moved on into this new role working with just to get some good advice on how to be successful in that role. Well calling. How important do you think Is it to kind of understand what makes Jeff tick? You know, this is a remarkable company on so many measures, whether you like it or not. It's just hard to be ignored. And I just wonder how important is it that anybody who is in that CEO spot understand? Kind of the way Jeff approaches things and especially for you know you spent a lot of time with him. Yeah, I think it is very important and it's you know, not just out just thinks he located that throughout Amazon, and so he really fostered a culture that was customer obsessed, not competitors obsessed. Long term thinking thinks beyond the next month or quarter quarterly results, You know, spirit of invention, and you also have to figure out with invention. You have to expect and know how to handle failures inside the company and then just being had taken pride in the operational excellence. What That means. Is that the details matter and a lot of the details. Little details that you work on art. You are most people aren't going to see them. But they're incredibly important to making the you know the company checking meeting customer promises. So, Andy, you know he understands that as well as anyone at Amazon. And so clearly incredibly important to fight to write the CEO job description. It would be, you know, understanding how Amazon works being able to work in large teams in small teams, and by the way bonus points if you had built a new business from scratch from 0 to $10 billion faster than Amazon did, And and he did all three of those, by the way, Amazon Web Services got from 0 to $10 billion faster. And amazon dot com. The retailer. Yeah, it's pretty remarkable. If you think about in terms of the growth we've got about 40 seconds that we take a break and come back if you had to say one reason that you think this company has been so successful, What would it be? Is it Is it really just understanding that culture? I think it is. What makes it take you? So it's the leadership principles. It's the customer obsession. And when you do that customers are always a little bit restless. They're gonna push you to do more and innovate your fee off the two day shipping. They're gonna want one day ship in pretty soon. So you know, Amazon always operates and develop innovates new ideas because they listen to customers. Yeah, I wanted, you know, before I've even thought of it. That's how we're getting. Hey, Colin, sit tight, because I wanted to go but more into your book because you really do get into what made this company successful. You've been talking about it, but I want to dig a little deeper. We're gonna come back to Colin Briar, his book out working backwards inside stories and secrets from insights. Amazon will get back to him in just a moment. Right now, though, I got to do live in a world of national news every day. Nancy Lions.

Amazon Colin Briar CEO Andy Jeff Jeff Bezos Jeff Shadow Bloomberg Seattle Bill Car co founder chief of staff Carol Nancy Lions advisor
"briar" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"briar" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"To you by the husband, Wife Law team of Briar Law protecting the rights of the seriously injured in Arizona. Since 1996 it's February 5th. And on this day in 2000 and eight there was a tornado outbreak. It almost seems like weather can be contagious sometimes because 13 years ago, the southern United States and parts of the lower Ohio Valley experienced 87 tornadoes in just 15 hours. The storm created several destructive twisters in Biggs. Cities such as Memphis, Jackson and Nashville. But it wasn't just any normal day. This happened on Super Tuesday, while 24 states were holding the primary elections to select the presidential candidates in total 57 people were killed across four states and 18 counties, plus hundreds of others were injured. It was the deadliest outbreak of tornadoes in the modern era of radar, but there have been others. 123 people died in the 1971 Mississippi Valley outbreak. 76 people died in the 1985 United States Canada outbreak and, most recently, the 2011 super outbreak killed 324 people, But the 2008 storm was devastating in its own right, and it happened on this day in 2000 and eight And this is so weird. I'm an Arizona native. We don't have a lot of tornadoes here yet. The first nightmare I ever remember having was about a tornado, and I still remember it vividly. I must feel like four years old, but I think it might have been influenced by the Wizard of Oz. I couldn't see that was a pretty wicked. When did you see what happened to the witch in that? I know And she was like a bunch of the West, which isn't good. Detour. Dan is live in the Valley. Chevy dealers traffics that air any improvement out there. There is one improvement. Some of the East side freeways that were already recovered.

United States Ohio Valley Arizona Briar Law Mississippi Valley Chevy Biggs Memphis Nashville Dan Jackson Canada
"briar" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"briar" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Low testosterone symptoms without the help of Summit. Male medical go to summit. Male medical dot com. I'm Larry Lewis Key to our news player tonight with a low of 57 Tomorrow Partly cloudy with a high of 77 right now in Phoenix. Partly cloudy skies 80 degrees Weathers. To you by Howard there whether replace a repair call Howard Air. I'm Jeff Mon on Arizona's news station. K T A R news. Enjoy. Thanks. He ordered breakfast at the McDonald's drive through Tell yourself you'll wait to eat it at work, but it's most way too good. So you eat it right there in the McDonald's parking lot, Neal There's a meal for every morning at McDonald's right now get any size ice coffee for 99. Cents, until 11 a.m. and parent with your favorite breakfast sandwich or one of our tasty bakery treats. Pricing participation may very bad up, Baba. McDonald's I'm lovin it. Hey, Chad Benson. I've three really good reasons why you need to get rid of that old bathtub. Replace it with a new shower from Pacific Bath one that bathtub is useless. How often do you take a bath? I mean, what are we 12 to that bathtub is ugly. It's a pain to clean and probably as shampoo bottles lined all around it and three that bathtub is dangerous. If you were born before 1970 stepping over that tub is getting harder and more dangerous. Pacific Bath Company will replace your That up with the practical, beautiful and safe. Kohler shower, you will get to customize every aspect of your new shower and Pacific Bath on. Lee uses Kohler certified installers and plumbers who will finish your project in less than two days. 18 months, no payment. No interest finance plans are available to qualified buyers Replace that bathtub with the beautiful new shower. Call Pacific back to set up a free consultation and quote for Rado 5814003 or go to their website Pacific back. Dot com Arizona license number 3274 days I'm Mark Briar and I'm Alexis Briar, where the husband wife law team, healthy community is, of course, top priority for us, but we're.

McDonald Pacific Bath Pacific Bath Company Jeff Mon Arizona testosterone Howard Air Howard Larry Lewis Chad Benson Mark Briar Rado Alexis Briar Phoenix Kohler Baba Neal Lee
"briar" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"briar" Discussed on KCRW

"And I said, Let's talk about it and let's see if we can do this together. And so I started Briar Cliff Entertainment and Fahrenheit 11 9 was our first release. And yet, it said, I'm in the business of getting people to see movies and unfortunately too often brilliant. Yet for some controversial films have difficulty being allowed to find their audience. And so, on the one hand, I've certainly worked on a lot of big, broad commercial movies that I'm very proud of a few that I'm less proud of. But being able to work with people like Brian on films like The Dissident is really the reason that I'm in this business. The reason that I got into film and the reason that I made film a career Was because of movies like this, So I'm pretty thrilled to be in this position right now. When did you become aware of the dissident? That's fate would have it. This was the first Sundance in almost 25 years that I didn't attend. I was recovering from some minor surgery. I had a couple of colleagues there, who called me from the theater after the movie played and said, just saw an extraordinary movie. You got to chase this one down, and so I started pursuing it. Brian was kind enough to screen the film for me a beauty, eh? A couple of weeks after Sundance loved it. We started to get to know each other and start working on a plan to jointly released the film independently, And here we are, and I couldn't be more proud of the film of Brian and my association with it. Coming up after a short break. Focal tells us why he thinks Amazon didn't make an offer for the dissident. Even though Jeff Basis owns.

Brian Sundance Jeff Basis Amazon
"briar" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"briar" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"And Trump gone. Here's NBC's Alex Bechet. House Democrats will vote today, formally requesting that Vice President Mike Pence invoked the 25th amendment to remove Trump from office. In a letter to colleagues, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi writing If Pence doesn't respond within 24 hours, we will proceed with bringing impeachment legislation to the floor more than 200. Members of Congress now support the article of impeachment, and at least two Republican senators are calling for Trump to resign. DC Mayor Muriel Bowser has asked for more security around vice president My ass. Chilly around President elect Joe Biden for the inauguration. ABC is Josh Margolin, for sure they're reinforcing the National Guard presence there. Talking about whether or not the guardsmen who were going to be brought in are going to be able to be armed during the inaugural events to make sure that they're able to repel any type of violence that might come in Ueno. They're going to bring in more police presence. And what is President Trump doing? The White House is planning to go ahead this week as if it's business as usual, officials Ls that this week he's gonna be out in about. He's traveling to Texas to tour the southern border and talk about security there and the border wall. And he's going to do a serious of events that they say is aimed at highlighting his record what they think or his accomplishments and she's Karen Travers today. President elect Biden will meet with his transition team and receive a second covert vaccine. Other states also ramping up distribution of the shots. ABC is Meghan to present beginning today. First responders in Massachusetts get the vaccine in Michigan first. Responders, teachers and people. 65 older will now qualify in Texas officials in San Antonio opening a clinic where 9000 available slots were booked in just six minutes. Maybe sees making to Rezian in Washington. You're listening to ABC News. Hi. I'm Mark Pryor and I'm Alexis Briar, where the husband and wife law team..

President Trump Vice President ABC Joe Biden Mike Pence ABC News Karen Travers Mayor Muriel Bowser House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Texas Alex Bechet NBC White House Mark Pryor Ueno Congress Josh Margolin Massachusetts Alexis Briar DC
"briar" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"briar" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Well, we've been telling you this morning about Arizona leading the country in the world and the rate of new cases this week. How is that possible? What does it mean? About an hour ago we heard from the highly respected data guru and Katya is Jeremy Foster joins us live with what he had to say. Derrick Archer with our TV partners at ABC, 15 took a look at a site using numbers from Johns Hopkins University and he told us attracts all 50 states all of the countries as well reporting covert 19 cases and over the past week, Archer says. Arizona second to none 12 on average new cases per 100,000 for the past seven days. That is higher than California, which is the second at 96. He says the 17,000 cases reported here two days ago. Put us over the top, but Check out how drastic the jumping cases over the past couple of weeks has been 29th to the fourth. Yesterday, we reported 57,119 cases on the same seven day period the week prior. We reported 43,000 cases, so that's a 32% in jump in reported cases in one week, Archer says he'll be keeping a really close eye Jamie on the numbers in the coming days and weeks to see It will see another big holiday spike. Or if these numbers are the new normal for the time being right, because with the holiday travel and gatherings and everything we may not see it actually a spike for another week or two right that dry did that's what he told us. All right. Thanks a lot. KTs. Jeremy Foster. Time for the key to our timeline. Now, with Steve's ends, My Stern is brought to you by the husband and wife Law team of Briar Law protecting the rights of the seriously injured in Arizona since 1996 It's January 5th and today is the birthday of FM radio..

Derrick Archer Arizona Jeremy Foster Johns Hopkins University Briar Law Katya ABC California Steve Jamie
"briar" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

MYfm 104.3

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"briar" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

"I'm Tony Jordan with Valentine in the morning on What a 43 My FM Tony. Thank you very much. It is 6 37. It's one of 43 month. Habits of balance and the morning were playing name that tune in a couple seconds one of my favorite games. As a kid listening to radio Woz when Johnny Londoner stew Briar one of these guys back in the day in my hometown with play name that tune on the air, loved it. Now it's a game show on Fox. So you can watch it their way to play it. Second on the air, whether a few morning clouds Sonny this afternoon temps and sixties low seventies 43 Arcadia 51. Bulletin. Jill's Got the Hollywood headlines coming up. After three seasons TV show star is leaving and producers are now gearing up for a regeneration. I'll tell you the show coming up with 6 50. Debbie. Good morning. How are you doing today? Good morning balance during Great. How about yourself? Good, Fantastic. I'm here. Jill's at her house. Kevin said his house Brian's Behind a large piece of plexiglass to my left hand side. Morning, Debbie. Good morning, everyone How you doing today? Doing Well, Thank you. Are you ready to play that tune? I'm ready. Here's how we're gonna do. We're gonna let you take a pro. Okay, because this is what we do for a living. Obviously, I play a lot of music so you can pick one of the pro is kind of like a pro dancer for something like that. You can pick Jill or Kevin. To be your partner in this game. Who would you like to pick? I'm going with my girl, Jill. All right? Yes. All right, Debbie. Jill's gonna play for you, Jill. You heard the hint before the break Correct. Did. Would you like it again? One more time, please. This song was released is part of the soundtrack to a 2016 movie, And it's a music video that has over one billion views. Okay, okay. Can you mean that soon? I have a song in mind, but I think I can name that tune. And five notes. Five notes. Okay. She didn't mean that to five. No said Here's deal If she doesn't get it, Kevin wins the money. Hey,.

Jill Debbie Kevin Tony Jordan Johnny Londoner stew Briar Sonny Valentine Hollywood partner Brian
Amy Coney Barrett & The State of SCOTUS

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

04:44 min | 2 years ago

Amy Coney Barrett & The State of SCOTUS

"So the topic I want to go to now is on the question timing the fact that this nomination is coming rather late in the fourth year of a president's term has made it controversial in fact, timing of just. Nominees to nominations to the supreme. Court has been controversial now for four or five years for a variety of reasons. So that's the first question. I would like each of you to tell me your position on on the question. Should the Senate be voting on a nomination to the Supreme Court right now sire you yes or no on that? I. Mean Yes. John All right cy you are yes. On the same question Irwin should the Senate be voting on a Justice of the supreme? Court now yes or no no amy honeybear bear should not be confirmed at this time. All right. Thank you I. Want to go first use for your reasons. Why are you a? Yes on the on the question of the timing of the nomination right now well, on the question of timing I think the Senate has the authority to consent the president is nominated someone. I don't see any reason why the Senate Caq Senate is doing other things it's it's considering thrown a virus relief. Of course, it can legislate until the members leave. and. So nothing nothing prevents the president from nominating someone nothing prevents Senate from acting upon that nomination and I think there three positions John. I think one position is you must vote on the nomination I. think that was Erwin's position for years ago. A second position is you can vote on the nomination, but you shouldn't that might ear ones position today and I the the middle position, which is you can vote on the nomination and you should. Thank your ticket back to you. So what I hear size saying is the Senate has every legal and constitutional right to be doing this now. They, certainly have the legal and constitutional right to do it, but they shouldn't do it. This is stunning hypocrisy by the Republicans for years ago Senator Mitch McConnell said, the American people should have a voice in the selection and the next Supreme Court justice. Therefore, this vacancies should not be filled into we have a new president. Antonin Scalia died in February two, thousand sixteen. President Obama named Mira Garland for that seat in March of two thousand sixteen. There was eight months before the election was to be held in the Republicans wouldn't hold hearings or wouldn't hold about Ruth Bader Ginsburg died on September eighteenth of twenty twenty, and already the Republicans are looking to fill that seat. There is historical precedent. On October twelfth eighteen sixty four chief justice Roger Tawny died the president Abraham Lincoln didn't try to fill the vacancy in the month before the election or nineteen fifty-six Justice Sherman Minton resigned from the court but President Eisenhower didn't try to pick the successor instead an October fifteenth. He made a recess appointment of a Democrat William Brennan. So whoever won the election would pick the successor? Alright let. Let me jump in because I I WANNA give cya chance to respond to some of what you're saying. So so I think we heard from Irwin saying that. eight months. was enough of a lead time and they were talking about the case of Merrick Garland back in two thousand sixteen. But that one month one and a half months is too short and he sites precedent of other examples where presidents had more of that timeframe. So what's your response to that? I think are ones making a slightly different point I think if. They. Can See had risen eight months ago I think are only making the same exact point, which is what's good for the goose is good for the Gander. So it's not really a question of timing. There's plenty of time as Irwin and other people now there there's GonNa be a vote in the Senate. The point is about equity I. Think the point is about precedent in Irwin has some precedents would, of course, you can go back to previous administrations in sight other presidents. John Marshall was appointed days before John Adams left the Presidency Steven Briar was nominated and appointed to the circuit court after Jimmy Carter lost. So there, there are precedents obviously for acting after the election. Let alone before I understand there's some raw feelings about what happened four years ago and I understand that people have flipped Irwin. Himself is flipped a apparently senator McConnell may have slipped as well. I think. It's unfortunate. This game of delaying nominations has gone on for quite a long. I have a colleague who waited two years before she withdrew for circuit court position because it wouldn't allow vote. That's just sort of power politics on both

Senate Caq Senate President Trump Supreme Court Irwin Senator Mitch Mcconnell President Eisenhower Merrick Garland Ruth Bader Ginsburg John All Justice Sherman Minton Antonin Scalia Senator Mcconnell Twenty Twenty Erwin William Brennan John Abraham Lincoln Barack Obama John Marshall
US Supreme Court: The possible nominees to fill vacancy

Useful Idiots with Matt Taibbi and Katie Halper

04:56 min | 2 years ago

US Supreme Court: The possible nominees to fill vacancy

"Of you paid attention to who the possible nominees are. People are talking about Amy Kuney Barrett and Barbara Lago do you know but these judges and can you tell us anything about them? Sure I mean there. It's almost certain to be Amy Coney Barrett. Just because trump has generally deferred to actually others throughout his four years especially when it comes to the higher court, the Circuit Court of Appeals and the Supreme Court, and there's really a pretty big consensus around amy. Barrett, there some talk that like trump would be helped in Florida if he went the other way. But I'll be I'll be very shocked if it's not her now she is you know a a more or less. Predictable right wing jurist. I think her her confirmation. We'll have enormous effects just because I think it's clear. She's a reliable vote to overturn Roe v Wade where. Probably, in her absence, they would just continue cutting the meaning of that precedent down. You know because even as of today it's it's been made so hard to get an abortion in the south that weather would wanNA speak of. A meaningful federal right to abortion is already open to question in in many other areas. She'll just confirm that drift to the supreme, court in this liberal direction, which actually some of the Democrats on on the panel have have kind of colluded and in taking it toward in recent decades. So the addition of one person is rarely like catalytic or transformative. Maybe on this one issue of abortion, it would actually lead five of the justices without chief justice, Roberts to overturn Roe v Wade, which might not happen otherwise and I'm not suggesting that's not a big deal. It is, but probably in most other areas of law, it would just be like the same more of the same except more. So so so what are the different ways that you see this playing out Let's say this happened than Biden is elected He then gets to replace I assume the next soon to retire Justice Briar I believe, right? I mean. We. Assume that Clarence Thomas would try to outlast Joe Biden in the same way that Ruth Ginsburg tried to outlast Donald. Anything could happen right and you happen and of course, we should probably talk about interesting relationship between Biden and Clarence Thomas. How much of a? Let's go there. How much did Biden in neighb- ball Clarence Thomas is Supreme Court. Or empower him as a sitting Supreme Court justice while he was instrumental as as the chairman of the Judiciary Committee, I mean you know we can get personal. But in we've all seen, you know whatever the you know the Netflix's reenactment of this level. But you know the truth is that Biden you know maybe like all of us only more so again has been a prisoner of his time all the way along and at that moment The He he responded you know as part of the like con, the comedy of the Senate required. You know he hung out with these other white men and they decided that this wasn't a big enough deal and there was deference even in a democratically controlled Senate to the you know right of the president to nominate a supreme. Court justice when a seat is vacant we've totally given up those those norm sense really as a country, but you know within the Senate to. You know I definitely think he sh- his treatment of Anita Hill is part of the record that we ought to think seriously about it's mainly testament to changing norms in the country about gender and about sexual violence and so I but I. so but I would kind of broaden out to less about his own limitations which may be substantial and more about you know. Where we've come why really starting with Robert bork before through the Clarence Thomas Nomination, and through our time we've we've really converted national politics into like these psycho dramas around filling supreme court seats, and again, the reason is not having to do with any of these individuals Biden Thomas. it's more with what's at stake, which is policy making authority over all Americans and it it is. It's. It's hard to argue that this particular institution auto habit

Joe Biden Supreme Court Clarence Thomas Amy Kuney Barrett Circuit Court Of Appeals Senate ROE Wade Anita Hill Justice Briar Netflix Robert Bork Barbara Lago Ruth Ginsburg Florida Judiciary Committee President Trump Chairman Roberts
Supreme Court Says States Cannot Discriminate Against Religious Schools

The BreakPoint Podcast

04:40 min | 2 years ago

Supreme Court Says States Cannot Discriminate Against Religious Schools

"The past two weeks of Supreme Court rulings have not been encouraging after a disastrous ruling last week. And Bostock, arbitrarily expanded of rights protections to include sexual orientation and gender identity this week, according June medical all but handcuffed meaningful state efforts to restrict abortion finally yesterday, some good news, the Supreme Court by a five four vote held its ground on discrimination against religious education in espionage versus Department of Revenue The court ruled that a state tax credit which discriminates against religious schools in the families whose children attend or hope to attend them violates the First Amendment Free Exercise Clause. This case dates back to two thousand fifteen when the state of Montana created a dollar for dollar tax. Tax Credit for individuals who donate to organizations that provide scholarships to private school students after creating the program, the Montana Department of revenue ruled that such a tax credit. If used to scholarship, students for religious private schools would violate the state's version of the Blaine Amendment, which prohibits state funding of religious education well. Kendra Espinosa, a single mom, who works extra jobs, so her kids can attend a Christian school challenge the Department of Revenue's ruling in court in late, two, thousand, eighteen, the Montana Supreme Court acknowledged that the department's ruling probably ran afoul of the US constitutions free exercise clause, however instead of overturning the ruling. It just invalidated the entire program well. Thankfully, that didn't work in. In his opinion. Chief Justice John Roberts said that went. Otherwise eligible recipients are disqualified from public benefit solely because of their religious character. We must apply strict scrutiny that statements a reference to the Trinity Lutheran Decision, which was a case successfully argued by the alliance defending freedom back in two thousand seventeen strict scrutiny means that the action can only be justified by a compelling governmental interest. Montana lacked a compelling governmental interest. Instead the state argued that the law serve Montana's interest in separating church and state more fiercely than the federal constitution while Montana's interest replied Justice Roberts is actually limited by the Constitution, specifically the free exercise clause in other words, the establishment clause and the free exercise. Exercise clause cannot be pitted against each other. The separation of church and state can't be done by discriminating against the church. And religion is not some secondary part of the First Amendment even more. Roberts continued Montana's attempt to sweep the free exercise problem and had under the rug by just invalidating the whole program doesn't change what he called Montana's error, a federal law after all because of the Trinity. Lutheran decision the Montana Court already knew the department's ruling was unconstitutional, but instead of applying the decision as it should have hit, just invalidated the whole program to make absolutely sure that religious schools received no aid ban action. Itself violated the free exercise clause according to Roberts a state. Need not subsidize private education, but once a state decides to do so. It cannot disqualify some private schools solely because they are religious. Liberty opinion is a resounding repudiation of dozens of Blaine amendments and other states as well originally targeted to limit Catholic education. These amendments provide legal cover for treating religious institutions and the people who depend on them. Ask second-class Citizens Roberts made it as clear as possible that day, and we are not Roberts also rejected a suggestion by Justice Briar, which he called a quote, flexible context Pacific approach that may well vary from case to case religious. And citizens he said should not be at the mercy of courts waxing philosophical about the purposes of the religion clauses, and then applying them on some ad hoc basis, not dimension. It's hard to imagine how briars flexible content specific approach could be applied to any other right such as abortion, and perhaps the best part of this ruling. It offers a roadmap for Christians who hope to help people like Kendra Espinosa Afford Christian education. The Montana program can serve as A. A model for other states could even open the door for other solutions such as vouchers. Educational Innovation has long been among the best gift. Christians have to give to the wider world. This is an open door for us to become even more creative today. That's why this decision is such good news after the earthquakes from the court in the past couple of weeks, it's certainly nice to have some solid ground on which to stand

Chief Justice John Roberts Montana Supreme Court Montana Supreme Court Montana Department Of Revenue Montana Court Kendra Espinosa Department Of Revenue Bostock Justice Briar Educational Innovation United States Blaine Christian School
Fire breaks out at SW Atlanta apartment complex

Von Haessler Doctrine

00:28 sec | 3 years ago

Fire breaks out at SW Atlanta apartment complex

"Here to let in southwest Atlanta this morning where I live the smoke in my closet frantic residents running to safety after fire breaks out an apartment complex every far showing on from the breeze way on the second level of two story apartment says sergeant Cortez Stafford with that line of fire he says the blaze for several families from their homes this morning into the cold it started in the laundry room area of the green Briar apartments on Connell Kali parkway nobody was

Atlanta Sergeant Cortez Stafford Green Briar Connell Kali
Bill Hader and Rachel Bilson Are Apparently Dating

Celeb News Ride Home

01:56 min | 3 years ago

Bill Hader and Rachel Bilson Are Apparently Dating

"Where were you when you found out bill? Hader and Rachel bill sin. We're in a serious relationship. Personally I was home in my kitchen pouring myself a cup of coffee checking twitter then. The mug crashed to the floor. Coffee sprayed everywhere chunks of ceramic landed around my feet. But I didn't care because Rachel Belsen was spotted getting coffee with bill hater in his hometown of Tulsa Oklahoma. And that's all that mattered. It's all that matters. The a couple got coffee at starbucks. Like I said they held hands. They were photographed. Bill Haters family. was there TMZ reported it. I mean Rachel. Bilton went went home with Bill Hater for the holidays. I love this. I would watch a hallmark channel Christmas movie about this happening. I just in fact it is. It's the movie to me. This piece of news is a movie. And it's my favorite movie L. Dot Com covered. This outing and gave some background on Rachel and bills history together. They wrote quote rumors about the couple date back to early November when hater was photographed on a date with bill sin according to US weekly the pair. In fact have history. Together they appeared in two thousand thirteen's the to do list which was directed by haters Mao. Ex Wife Maggie Carey and had a sexy together. Both Bilton and hater are two years out from. I'm divorce. She separated from husband. Hayden Christianson in September twenty seventeen and the two share a five year old daughter. Briar Rose Hater and Kerry split let in July two thousand seventeen and have three daughters together and quote. Listen the holidays. They're a stressful time. Everyone's a mess right now. We really needed needed. This good news. Why is it good news? I don't I don't know it just feels good you know. This is a piece of celebrity news. That's it's safe. It's warm it's wholesome. It's the holidays are all about Rachel. Bilton and Bill Hader invented Christmas to me. That's just my personal religious beliefs.

Bill Hater Bilton Bill Hader Rachel Rachel Bill Bill Haters Rachel Belsen Starbucks Hayden Christianson Maggie Carey Tulsa Oklahoma United States Kerry
Europe Is Burning U.S. Wood As Climate-Friendly Fuel, But Green Groups Protest

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:34 min | 3 years ago

Europe Is Burning U.S. Wood As Climate-Friendly Fuel, But Green Groups Protest

"World leaders are gathering at a U. N. climate summit in Madrid this week to talk about how to reduce greenhouse emissions in the search for alternatives to fossil fuel. Some some countries have now turned to one of the oldest energy sources around would some are importing from the United States calling it clean and renewable but some environmentalists. Say this makes no oh sense. NPR's Dan Charles has the story on a soggy field in eastern North Carolina. Jason Too and his crew loggers cutting trees threes and sorting the logs into piles depending on their size. And what kind of would they are poplar. Sweet Gum Elm right there. Some piles will go into plywood. Some will become puffy absorbent fiber in baby diapers and then there's the least valuable pile the small limbs tops of hardwood trees. It's basically a trash. Should we would've normally hauled that back out in the woods and just left it. But now there's a new market for that Wood Pellet Mills they've expanded across the southeast over the past decade. They'll take this would crush it and pressed into little pellets. Ready for burning fuel the landowners. Getting some by we're getting some production is just an all around good deal do most of these pellets. Millions of tons each year. We'll get shipped to Europe where burned in power plants because some European governments are offering financial subsidies cities to burn these pellets. Instead of say coal it's supposed to help fight climate change. Here's Seth Ginther. Executive Director of the industry group that represents Wood Pellett companies. The carbon benefits are tremendous burning. Would also biomass does release lots of carbon dioxide the greenhouse gas. But the idea behind had the subsidies is you can let farce grow back. And as they do they'll recapture the carbon dioxide from the air and stored in their branches and roots again so it's considered renewable lable just like wind or solar the European Union literally just pass something known as the Renewable Energy Directive to and biomass sustainable biomass ass was unequivocally included as part of what can meet renewable energy goals but environmental groups are challenging that decision in court. They say the idea that large scale. wood-burning is carbon neutral is based on bad math and to explain exactly why Adam collect from the environmental group Dogwood Alliance takes me to another patch of land North Carolina near the town of Williamson. I know it doesn't look like much but we're gonNA take a walk. It's covered with bushes and little trees as maybe ten feet tall. In the south. We call it a briar patch but yet on paper this is a forest for years ago really was a forest with big trees rees then it was locked some of it went to make wood pellets. So let's count the carbon emissions accurately. Colette says when the big trees were cut they stopped opt capturing carbon dioxide from the air that benefit was lost at least temporarily and some of the carbon they'd previously stored was released into the air when the wood pellets were burned and as tree roots decomposed. But you won't see any of that in the official calculations of greenhouse emissions. He says none of it's ever been counted in any of our like emissions counting in the US or in Europe that's because the forest eventually will grow back and recapture that lost carbon but it could take a century for that to happen now. Seth Ginther from the US Industrial Pellet Association says his industry should not be blamed for those carbon emissions because wood pellets are not the reason forests wrists are cleared. These are lands that are being harvested for Sawed Timber for housing for paper and for other things what we're taking is is the the byproduct of that in facto independent forestry experts. Say That's not completely true. Their data shows that the wood pellet industry is competing for some of the same. Would that might go for making paper or diapers and it's pushing up prices for that. Would Adam Collette from Dogwood. Alliance thinks it's persuading some small landowners to harvest their trees. You have have more knocks on those doors. More telephone calls saying hey I'll give you X.. Number of dollars for your trees. What Colette wants is for officials to knock on those doors with a different different message encouraging landowners to maintain forests expand them? Our forests are young. They're degraded and what that means. Is that the potential Henschel to suck carbon out of the atmosphere of force in the U._S.. South is enormous. Those forests are some of the best climate solutions. We have he says if they keep growing Dan. Charles N._p._R.

Seth Ginther Colette North Carolina Adam Collette Europe Wood Pellet Mills United States NPR Dan Charles Wood Pellett Jason Madrid Us Industrial Pellet Associati Charles N._P._R
Rebooting AI: What's Missing and What's Next With Gary Marcus

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

10:11 min | 3 years ago

Rebooting AI: What's Missing and What's Next With Gary Marcus

"I am on the line with Gary. Marcus Gary is the CEO and founder at robust dot ai I also the a CEO and founder of the machine learning startup geometric intelligence which was acquired by Uber in two thousand sixteen. Gary is the author of five books including putting his latest rebooting ai which will be available on the day. This podcast is published Gary. Welcome to this week she learning and at thanks for having me I'm really excited to jump in and chat with you about this book. I had a chance to dig into it and awesome awesome booklets. Let's just jump in before we really dive into talking about the book. I'd love to explore a little bit about your background. You spent quite a bit of your career at and why you as a professor of psychology and neuroscience you tell us a little bit about your background and the perspective that this creates for you so I'm trained primarily as a cognitive scientists my research for many years and my PhD with St Thinker was all about how children learn language and and how children's start to understand the world so developmental cognitive scientist by training and at the same time I've been interested in is since I was about eight years old when I learned about programming computers and in the last seven years or so I've focused almost exclusively on answering the question what can cognitive science bring to. Ai I so a is currently dominated by certain statistical approaches that from my perspective as a cognitive scientist someone who studies how humans work seem a little weird to me so I don't think of children as giant data machines but the way that they I is kind of rolling right now. It's all about big data and I've been trying to see what I can contribute the two from the perspective of cognitive science so when you were when you create a geometric intelligence. Was that a company that really commercialized live cognitive science based approach or was there a statistical approach involved in your work their geometric intelligence which was my first company was inspired in some ways by cognitive science. It wasn't slavish to it. So there's always this tension of you know if you building airplanes you don't want to fly exactly like birds it 'cause that wouldn't make any sense who wants to flap their wings so many times a minute but you also want to understand something about the dynamics of flight in in my last company and also in this company were trying to take some lessons from biology in particular from how humans think and apply those to a problem so we're not in last company was not trying to be narrow scientifically perfectly accurate. We're not trying to be faithful to the brain. We're trying to take inspiration from the brain. The last company the broad problem that it was trying to address how do you learn from small amounts of data and that question itself in some ways comes from cognitive science. I think machine learning earning is catching up to it now in the last couple of years but it's always been clear from cognitive science especially from the field of language acquisition that learning from small data's the name of the game children can generalize from tiny amounts of examples. My dissertation was about how children learn the addy rule for forming the past tense which take sometimes use incorrectly they'll say goad or went to things like that. They learned that from a small amount of data sometimes they make mistakes over apply it but they don't have the gigabytes of data the way to save the GP tee system does now to the last company was really focused on one particular way a of solving this small data problem at our. I think most impressive results were we were beating deep learning in terms of data efficiency so we could learn things things with half as much data without having specific briars about the nature of the things. We're learning so we take 'em nist which is a benchmark. Probably a lot of your audience knows recognizing characters we could do amnesty have as much data without having to build in anything about the nature of letters or anything like that so we were working towards a general way of doing supervised learning. Maybe some other things using less data and we were inspired there by humans. We weren't necessarily doing it exactly the way humans do but I think the core intellectual property is something that is being Garan I developed and I sort of set a direction that was based on some things that made sense to me from a cognitive science perspective and Tuban been brilliant mathematician figured out how to apply it and so I think a lot of our listeners when they hear the idea of creating a unlimited data. We'll think about things like one shot. Learning zero shot learning but sounds like your approach was very different from these or was it. I mean there's some into relations and I can't say too much because Uber owns the IP and there's NDA's okay kind of stuff but I would say it. Zero shot learning in one shot learning first of all our names of problems. They're not names of techniques and people use different kinds of techniques to do them. They're often I think narrowly construed so there are lots of problems in the world where you have some data. It's not the zero data but you just don't have that much. It's something I often like to talk about is what my daughter did when she climbed through a chair so we were sitting in a whole foods about a year ago she was about four and a half years old or four years old at the time we sat in a chair that had a back in the gap between the back and the base of the chair if you can kind of visualize that and and she'd never seen the TV program the dukes of Hazzard with climb through the windows so she didn't have any data from like a model of doing wacky things sticking their bodies through an aperture inside of there so this was not a big data problem or at least there wasn't a lot of directly relevant big data. She had data about how her body worked the size of her body and she probably explored other apertures before she did what a lot of people might call at abstractly unsupervised supervised learning but he didn't use any of the techniques that we would call unsupervised learning so it was unsupervised in the sense that she didn't have training example saying this is the right you know. Torque to apply to your torso in order to spin through chair right in the way a reinforcement learning robot might try it a million sometimes and get reinforcement stuck this way it didn't get stuck that way and so forth she just did it in the space of like a minute and then the second time that she did. I I asked her to reenact it and I took pictures the second time I wish I had taken pictures the first time or taken video the second but anyway you look you look at this sequence of pictures that I took and she actually got stuck doc at one point and then she figured out how to get unstuck and so there was problem solving process there and it was also kind of leveraging modest amounts of data. She had no direct data on this problem except what she got from trying herself in that moment and then she had a bunch of background data from other kinds of problems that she had solved and she knew enough committee not consciously but unconsciously about physics and our body moved and so forth that you can integrate all of that so that doesn't fall into the paradigm of zero shot learning although you could sort sort of call it a zero shot problem but it's not like the things that people do in literature and it doesn't fall into the one shot learning and it doesn't really fit with how people think about unsupervised learning where they take take clusters of things or predict the next frames in the video. It's not really like any of those problems and yet it's kind of what little kids like. My children do all the time. They say here's some challenge that I have never confronted before. I'm going to figure it out. That's like eighty percent probably exaggerated but it's a large fraction of what my kids do is. They set new challenges right now. My son's a little older he's six and a half my daughter's five now. They like play Games all day long and they don't all play existing games. They play games that they invent until like well. Let's pretend you can't fly anymore because you broke your wing or whatever they're constantly making up assumptions and then doing problem salving relative to those reference points and that's just completely far away from what people are doing and they. I now part of the reason the Ernie Davis and I wrote this book rebooting. I I like reorient. The feel and reboot is like start over so we're doing great on all the supervised learning stuff where we have a ton of data ton of labeled data but but the reality is that's not really what the real world is like and it's certainly not like what children do as they come to understand the world and there's a gap right now between I I think memorizing doing something a little bit better than memorization and understanding so deep learning is like a better way of doing memorization you can Tripoli between examples. You've seen gene before but it's not really about comprehension. It's not really about building a model of chairs apertures and bodies and understanding how those interrelate into what earning an is trying to do is to get the field to look in different direction. That's more about comprehension and understanding and so forth did my going back to your question for second me did my last company. We do all of that. No I mean we were small startup. We were when we thought we were fifteen. People we at one very specific way of solving a supervised learning problem with less data. There's a lot that goes into human approach to less data another thing that goes into it that we didn't work on last compete at all is in eight nece so Chomsky's arguments which I think are correct is that we start with something that constrains how we learn language we don't. We're not open to any possible. I was reborn knowing certain things about language. I differ from him a little bit about what those things are but I would say we're probably born knowing that you can see candy. Symbols in order to express things is going in the right word or is it something you know as about the same conscious but I'll tell you about an experiment that I did which is probably not my best known result in psychology literature. I one of the two I taught seven kids in artificial language and I didn't tell them the rules as for the language it is give them examples two minutes and that

Marcus Gary CEO Scientist Founder Professor Of Psychology Goad Tuban Chomsky Hazzard Ernie Davis Tripoli Eighty Percent Eight Years Seven Years Two Minutes Four Years